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WHISTLER’S PREMIER P U B L I C AT I O N S I N C E 1980

SUMMER/ FALL 2018

M AG A Z I N E FUELLING UP ON FINE CARBS ART FROM A WOMAN’S HEART GROWING UP GOLFING FASHION | HOMES DINING | PEOPLE

WHEELS OF

fortune

How the world’s top ski resort emerged as the world’s top mountain bike resort

COMPLIMENTARY MAGAZINE

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MOUNTAIN GALLERIES PRESENTS EXHIBITION & SALE OF NEW WORK BY TOP CANADIAN ARTISTS

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SUMMER 2018 A N U N F O RG E T TA BL E M U LT I M E D I A N I G H T WA L K

LUMINA COMING TO WHISTLER

TAG W H I S T L E R .C O M / LU M I N A C R E AT E D BY

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2018


WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2018

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contents #whistlerstyle 26

The latest fashion from Whistler retailers BY LOGAN SWAYZE

Wheels of Fortune 36 How the world’s top ski resort emerged as the world’s top mountain bike resort BY ANDREW MITCHELL

Good Bones 50

Transforming a Whistler A-frame into a marvel of urban design BY BRANDON BARRETT

Fuelling Up on Fine Carbs 60

Whistler’s upscale Italian restaurants offer a taste of Europe in the West Coast mountains

JUSTA

BY ERIC THOMPSON

CONTRIBUTORS

BRANDON BARRETT is a reporter and features editor with Pique Newsmagazine. Originally from Ontario, he arrived from Medellin in 2012 where he was reporting South American news for Colombia Reports.

JUSTA JESKOVA

CATHRYN ATKINSON: A former staffer with Pique Newsmagazine and Whistler Magazine, Cathryn left a 30-year career in journalism in 2017 to start her company Arts Adventures Canada and write screenplays.

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2018

DAVID BUZZARD is a commercial, architectural, and food photographer based in Whistler and Vancouver. He has won nine press awards for photojournalism for the Whistler Question and Squamish Chief.

MIKE CRANE is a freelance photographer living the dream in Whistler and beyond, wandering this incredible landscape by hike, bike, paddle, snowboard and skis. Explore, travel, create and repeat.

BRADEN DUPUIS is a transplanted Saskatchewan flatlander lost in the Whistler mountains. He spends his days working as a reporter for Pique Newsmagazine. His mom thinks he is brilliant.

JUSTA JESKOVA is a commercial outdoor lifestyle photographer based in Whistler. She enjoys capturing authentic moments through storytelling while focusing on the natural beauty around us.


Home of The Sasquatch ®

The Ultimate Zipline Experience Ziptrek Ecotours hosts a selection of breathtaking zipline tours. Our wilderness adventure area is located directly above Whistler Village, in the spectacular temperate rainforest valley between Whistler and Blackcomb Mountains.

Discover eco-exhilaration®

ziptrek.com 604.935.0001 WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2018

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contents WHISTLER GOLF: Growing up Golfing 23

DEPARTMENTS

BY GAIL JOHNSON

Editor’s Greeting 10

FACES OF WHISTLER: Setting the Pace 47

Trail Mix 14

BY HALEY RITCHIE

Bits and bites of information about summer in Whistler

ARTS & CULTURE: Art From a Woman’s Heart 57

Events Calendar 20

BY CATHRYN ATKINSON

Unwind Adventure Guide 42

PERFECT PAIRING: World of Bubbles 70 BY SAMANTHA RAHN

Shopping Whistler 82

CASUAL DINING: Sharing Charcuterie 73

Services Directory 89

BY ALISON TAYLOR

COVER PHOTO: Mountain biking up high on the Lord of the Squirrels trail, by Justa Jeskova

VILLAGE VIBE: Spice Up Summer 79 BY BRADEN DUPUIS

SOCIAL PAGE: Scene in Whistler 90

CRANE CONTRIBUTORS

MIKECRANEPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

GAIL JOHNSON is an award-winning journalist who writes regularly for the Globe and Mail, Yahoo Canada and the Georgia Straight and is a food columnist for CBC Radio.

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BRIGITTE MAH is a writer living the dream in Squamish, B.C. When she isn't pecking at her keyboard, she can be found climbing rock somewhere high.

WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2018

ANDREW MITCHELL rides a carbon 29er hardtail with flat pedals, a 32-tooth chainring up front, and a 42-tooth granny gear in the back – and he’ll be happy to tell you why.

HALEY RITCHIE’s work as a freelance writer and photographer has been published across Canada. She has attempted many new sports since moving to B.C. and mountain biking is next!

LOGAN SWAYZE is a Whistler-based photographer born and raised in the Kootenays. When not shooting, Logan is either on his bike or board, or off travelling the world.

ERIC THOMPSON: By the time you read this, Eric will be living as a reporter in Kamloops. He’ll still visit Whistler often, to remember what it’s like paying $7 for a box of Cap’n Crunch.


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editor’s greeting editor’s message

BRAD KASSELMAN, WWW.COASTPHOTO.COM

COAST

LIVING IN SUPERLATIVES

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OUR SLOPES, SERVICES AND WORLD-CLASS ENTERTAINMENT KEEP US NO. 1

OT MANY PEOPLE GET TO SAY this about their hometown: It has the biggest and best bike park in the world; it often, and deservedly so, ranks as the No. 1 ski resort in North America in any ski rankings with clout; it’s home to four championship golf courses; not to mention, there’s a world record-breaking gondola in the heart of the town, an awesome feat of engineering in the Coast Mountains. Spending any amount of time in Whistler, whether a weekend, a year or a lifetime, is like living a life of superlatives — experiencing the best of the best. What a place to call home! And yet, how much has really changed here since the first early settlers arrived and discovered something magical about these mountains? You can still see and breathe what Alex and Myrtle Philip experienced when they set down roots on the shores of Alta Lake with little more to recommend

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2018

ALISON TAYLOR Editor

the place than clean air and breathtaking surroundings (check out the short story in our Trail Mix section). The view from Rainbow Park hasn’t changed all that much in the last century. There are still the same snow-capped peaks, the fresh glacier-fed lakes, the surrounding lifeaffirming rainforest. Over time, Whistler has transformed into a top all-season resort. The Wheels of Fortune story tells how a world-class mountain bike resort came into being, evolving from the dreams of the people who called this place home. There was a vision, of course, for the premier golf courses, but could we have envisioned

that Whistler, town of barely 12,000 people, would be producing golf phenoms not long after the courses were built? You can read about these kids in Growing up Golfing. So we come to understand that there is a thread to life here, a way of doing things — always aiming high, striving to be the best. Perhaps that has something to do with our Olympics roots? Maybe it’s our surroundings that inspire? See for yourself, whether on Whistler’s fairways or savouring some of its award-winning fine dining or relishing in the luxurious quietness of the spa or soaring through the sky on a zipline. As editor of Whistler Magazine, and a long-time Whistler resident, I can say with certainty that those of us who call this place home count ourselves lucky… for there’s no other place quite like Whistler.

Alison


Ride The Sasquatch ®

The longest zipline in Canada & the USA. Ziptrek Ecotours hosts a selection of breathtaking zipline tours. Our wilderness adventure area is located directly above Whistler Village, in the spectacular temperate rainforest valley between Whistler and Blackcomb Mountains.

Discover eco-exhilaration®

ziptrek.com 604.935.0001 WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2018

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SUMMER/FALL 2018

What is your favourite place to bike? GENERAL MANAGER, ADVERTISING/OPERATIONS

Catherine Power-Chartrand EDITOR

Road biking up and down the Callaghan. Beautiful pavement, scenery, bears and very few cars!

I once bought a $100 bike from Canadian Tire and the pedal broke off after a total of two hours on the Valley Trail... but it was an incredible two hours. Kill me Thrill Me starts just an easy 5 minute ride from my front door near Green Lake. It’s a technical cross country mountain bike ride but not too gnarly!

Alison Taylor ART DIRECTOR

Shelley Ackerman CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Cathryn Atkinson Brandon Barrett Braden Dupuis Gail Johnson Brigitte Mah Andrew Mitchell Samantha Rahn Haley Ritchie Eric Thompson

PHOTOGRAPHERS & ILLUSTRATORS

David Buzzard Coast Mountain Photography Mike Crane Justa Jeskova David McColm Claire Ryan Logan Swayze Adam Taber

Danimal. It’s fun and fast and flowy and the perfect start to some more west side trails.

My favourite Whistler trail by far is Comfortably Numb. It was an incredible achievement to build and there’s really nothing else like it. It’s the trail where I learned to ride everything that Whistler has to offer – rocks, roots, steeps and switchbacks.

PRESIDENT, WHISTLER PUBLISHING LP

Sarah Strother ACCOUNTING

Heidi Rode

CIRCULATION/DISTRIBUTION

Denise Conway

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Whistler Magazine (ISSN-0835-5460) is published twice annually by WHISTLER PUBLISHING LIMITED PARTNERSHIP, a division of GLACIER MEDIA GROUP 103-1390 Alpha Lake Road, Whistler, B.C., Canada, V0N 1B1 Phone 604-938-0202 | Fax 604-938-0201 | Toll-Free 1-877-419-8866 Email: cpower@whistlermagazine.com Also publishers of Pique Newsmagazine, weekly on Thursdays, and FAQ, published twice yearly. piquenewsmagazine.com | faqwhistler.com

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2018

One-year (2 issues) subscription: $20 within Canada, $30 to the USA, $45 overseas. Call to charge to VISA, MasterCard or American Express. Copyright © 2018, by Glacier Media Group. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reproduced in any form without prior written permission of the publisher.


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TRAIL MIX

A Look Back —

RAINBOW LODGE JUSTA NATURAL VERSUS MANMADE

NC MORE THAN 100 YEARS AGO, the Rainbow Lodge opened its doors on the shores of Alta Lake, setting in motion Whistler’s ultimate date with destiny. It was founded by Alex and Myrtle Philip, Whistler’s renowned pioneers who ran the lodge from 1914 to 1948. In its heyday, the Rainbow Lodge would become the most popular resort west of the Rocky Mountains, able to serve more than 100 guests. They came for the lakes, the fishing, the mountains and the peace and quiet. The Rainbow Lodge burned down in 1977 but it’s still easy to see why the Philips thought they were on to something all those years ago. The site, now called Rainbow Park, is one of Whistler’s biggest parks with beach volleyball, a floating dock and a sandy beach.

JUSTA JESKOVA

While everyone talks about Whistler’s five valley lakes — Green, Alta, Alpha, Lost and Nita Lakes — there is something to be said about those glacial alpine lakes a little further above. It’s worth the hike to get there. Explore Callaghan Lake or Garibaldi Lake. Ever heard of Iceberg Lake or Joffre Lakes? All worth the hike then taking off your shoes and socks and getting your feet wet!

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COURTESY WHISTLER MUSEUM & ARCHIVES

SWIM UP HIGH

BY ALISON TAYLOR

c B.C. IS HOME to some spectacular natural hot springs — geothermal pools set among the rocks in remote wilderness locales. But if you can’t get to the hot springs, let them come to you. Scandinave Spa in Whistler recreates the magic of the hot springs with so much more: cold plunge pools, steamy saunas, massage rooms. And yet, with its indoor/outdoor setting on the edge of Lost Lake Park, and its no-talking policy, it can feel as though you’re miles away.

THE WRECK IN THE WOODS

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CRANE MIKECRANEPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

MITCH WINTON, WWW.COASTPHOTO.COM

COAST

NE OF THE MOST POPULAR trails/hikes in the Whistler valley is aptly named Train Wreck. It offers: a little bit of Whistler history and mystery, cool graffiti art, the West Coast rainforest, and much more. At the heart of the trail lies the train wreck itself — a handful of box cars strewn throughout the forest floor, the result of a 1956 accident when the train, carrying lumber, came off the the rails. The box cars were moved from the track and left among the trees. In the ensuring 60 years, they have offered a blank canvas for graffiti artists. Mountain bikers also discovered the area in that time, carving out a trail around the wreckage. A few years ago, the Train Wreck trail came under fire after CN discovered explorers were walking or biking along the tracks to get to the site. In 2016, the Resort Municipality of Whistler opened a new suspension bridge over the Cheakamus River to allow safe access to the trail. The bridge connects Train Wreck to the Sea to Sky Trail, part of Canada’s Great Trail which stretches from coast to coast.


LEAVE THE SCREENS BEHIND!

CRANKWORX: 15 YEARS STRONG N

othing sums up Whistler’s festivals and events scene quite like the annual mountain bike festival called CRANKWORX.

Riders from around the world flock to the Mecca of mountain biking for this 10-day event defined by pushing your limits, going bigger and faster, riding hard and generally having

CLAIRE RYAN

CLAIRE R

fun in the mountains. Now in its 15th year, Crankworx is the defining Whistler summer festival in a calendar chock-full of festivals and events celebrating everything

from yoga (Wanderlust) to human endurance (Ironman) to tasty hops (Whistler Village Beer Festival). See the events calendar on page 20.

c WHISTLER IS a place of ancient trees and glacial water and fresh air — a natural Disneyland. There’s oodles of entertainment for kids of all ages — ziptrekking, tree adventures, river rafting, paintballing, mountain biking, swimming — but the true magic of Whistler is the joie de vivre of the natural world. That just never gets old.

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JERI

A TIMELESS CIRCLE

THE VILLAGE INUKSHUK

Jeri, a bronze sculpture, is located on the Cultural Connector route near Fitzsimmons Park. The piece, by artist James Stewart, depicts a man at rest after performing as a Capoeira dancer/fighter in Jericoacoara, Brazil. It is a quiet, thoughtful piece juxtaposed with the rushing waters of the nearby Fitzsimmons Creek.

Renowned artist Susan Pointe created this bronze sculpture, A Timeless Circle, celebrating Whistler’s involvement in the 2010 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games. The sculpture is made up of 86 faces carved in bronze. The piece is located beside the Maury Young Arts Centre along the Cultural Connector route.

Whistler is home to a few Inukshuks since the 2010 Games, a symbol borrowed from the Inuit people in the North. This large basalt Inukshuk sits at the entrance to Whistler Village, representing openness, welcoming and strength. It’s also a popular photo spot, especially at night when the Inukshuk changes colour.

TOURISM WHISTLER/MIKE CRANE

NC

COURTESY JAMES STEWART, TOURISM WHISTLER/MIKE CRANE, TOURISM WHISTLER/CHAD CHOMLACK

ART FOR EVERYONE!


TRAIL MIX

GO GLAMPING CAMPING IN WHISTLER is like everything in Whistler — a little more refined and arguably the epitome of “glamping” or glamourous camping. On the one hand, Head-Line Mountain Holidays can customize any camping experience. You just have to think big — like a helicopter ride to a mountain-high glacier to overnight on the snow, under the stars. Or think a little closer to home with the Riverside Resort in the heart of Whistler where you can stay in a yurt, perched on a platform, tucked among the forest. The yurts come with bedding and electricity — glamping at its finest.

CLAIRE RYAN

CLAIRE R

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The Little WHITE WONDER

MICHAEL ALLEN

NC

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2018

c FOR A BRIEF moment in the summer of 2016, the so-called “little white wonder” took the world by storm. Hard to resist, after all, a cream-coloured black bear frolicking with his brown-haired mom on Blackcomb Mountain. A legendary spirit bear in our midst? No, not quite. Local black bear researcher Michael Allen explains that black bears share similar coat genetics with the domestic Labrador Retriever — that’s why there are black coats, brown coats, and,

ever so rarely, cream-coloured coats. The “little white wonder” was last spotted in June 2017 as a subadult male, though he will likely keep a low profile now and should move on from his mother’s range on Blackcomb Mountain. Still, for that one summer, he captured our hearts and our imaginations. Whistler and Blackcomb mountains are home to roughly 60 resident black bears — the only population in B.C. that has been studied for more than two decades.

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ON’T LET THE NAME fool you! Whistler Blackcomb’s new Umbrella Bar was designed with blue-sky views and sunny ski/summer sightseeing days in mind. Located on the glass-surround patio outside the Roundhouse on Whistler Mountain, the views from this mountain-top bar don’t get any better. This is the perfect spot to rest after walking along the new suspension bridge at the peak of Whistler Mountain, set to open this summer.

THE SKI SEASON ISN’T OVER… YET

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HISTLER BLACKCOMB boasts the longest ski season in North America. And, while most of Whistler is whiling away the summer at parks and beaches, diehard skiers and snowboarders are still sliding on snow. Glacier skiing on Blackcomb Mountain begins June 9 and extends to July 15. Due to construction of the new Blackcomb gondola, uploading will take place on Whistler Mountain and skiers will travel to the glacier via the PEAK 2 PEAK Gondola. Not a bad way to spend a summer’s day although sunscreen is a must.

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TOURISM WHISTLER/MIKE CRANE

HEAD-LINE MOUNTAIN HOLIDAYS / MARC DIONNE

THE VIEW FROM THE TOP


Aurora Borealis — The icy sky at night

ADAM TABER

TABER

W

HAT IS IT ABOUT

the Whistler sky that makes you want to look up in awe? By day or by night, there’s something magical going on up there. Take, for example the oft-blinding “sun dog” — the halo effect around the sun, caused by the refraction of sunlight by ice crystals in the atmosphere. Or, its nighttime partner, the “moon dog,” of similar effect. There’s the alpenglow too, washing the mountain peaks in oranges and pinks and yellows in the late afternoon, caused by the light reflecting off ice crystals as the

sun dips just below the horizon. But few skies can compare to the Aurora Borealis — the Northern Lights. More common in higher latitudes, it’s perhaps its rare appearances that makes this light display in Whistler so special and when it comes, it’s a thing of beauty. The night sky comes alive in greens and purples dancing in magic swirls over the lakes and mountains and trees. Some of the best spots to watch the Northern Lights in Whistler are from Green Lake, Rainbow Park or Lakeside Park. It’s hard to predict the Aurora Borealis so check weather websites.

Follow, like or read us online! W whistlermagazine.com WhistlerMagazine @whistlersmag whistlermag

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TRAIL MIX MOUNTAIN ROOTS BUY LOCAL, BUILD COMMUNITY

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R AW I N G I N S P I R AT I O N F R O M their snow-capped surroundings, local entrepreneurs are keeping busy at Sea to Sky farmers’ markets and in locations throughout Whistler. Here’s a little slice of local work from West Coast art to après beer. — Alison Taylor

COURTESY STACEY BODNARUK

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ARTOGRAPHY27 ARTIST STACEY BODNARUK has a unique take on her West Coast surroundings. She calls it art-ography… and the name says it all. Creating a blend of several photographs, layered on top of each other, Bodnaruk creates a final piece of art that could never be captured from one single photo alone. Chairlifts, bears, mountains and oceans, Bodnaruk’s artwork has a decidedly West-Coast feel. The art is printed on a non-traditional medium: aluminum, primarily, as well as acrylic glass, resin and wood. Check out Stacey Bodnaruk’s work on display around Whistler at Nita Lake Lodge, Scandinave Spa, Mongolie Grill and more. Or go to artography27.com

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CHILLING OUT WITH FROSTBITES c SHAVED ICE HAS NEVER TASTED this good. With flavours like mango passionfruit, raspberry vanilla and hibiscus lemon, frostbites syrup co. continues to tickle taste buds at local farmers’ markets. Husband and wife duo, Martyn Meek and Peggy Speir, kicked off their company in 2010 and haven’t looked back. Four years ago they expanded with their own line of natural bottled syrups, manufactured in Squamish. And the flavours keep on coming! Meyer lemon lavender, key lime mint, pineapple habanero — there’s a taste to tempt everyone. Cool off with frostbites at the Whistler Farmers’ Market on Sundays and Wednesdays. Or take home a bottle of syrup from Purebread or the Blackcomb Liquor Store. You can also liven up your cocktails or carbonated water this summer with a splash from frostbites. Check out frostbitesfun.com 18

WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2018

PERFECTING THE TASTE OF APRÈS NO ONE KNOWS MORE about après than Gibbons Whistler. That’s because the locallyowned family company has been a presence in Whistler for almost four decades, most notably with the infamous Longhorn Saloon at the base of Whistler Mountain. In that time, Gibbons has learned a lot about what makes a Whistler après — the music, the food, and, of course, the beer. It has now bottled the quintessential après lager — Gibbons Après Lager. The beer has been taste tested and perfected in Whistler over the last five years. Try a taste of après at any of the Gibbons establishments in the Village or take some home from the Nesters Liquor Store or the Blackcomb Liquor Store. Check out gibbons whistler.com.

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NC FUSED GLASS NIK NAKS c EVERY PIECE THAT COMES OUT of Trish Nakagawa’s kiln in Whistler is truly one-of-a-kind; such is the nature of fused glass. For the past decade, Nakagawa has been steadily working on her fused-glass jewelry and home accessories like her colourful coasters, soap dishes and bright pendants. She layers different colours of glass together and places it in the kiln at high heat. “There’s so much you can do with glass,” she says, adding that your never know quite how the piece will turn out in the kiln. Part of the charm of the fused-glass pieces, she says, is that they’re colourful and simple, a unique keepsake made right in Whistler. Stop by the gift shop at the Audain Art Museum or check out nik-naks.ca.

COURTESY NIK-NAKS

COURTESY FROSTBITES

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EVENTS CALENDAR FESTIVALS

MARK YOUR CALENDARS! SUMMER IN WHISTLER IS PACKED FULL OF FUN AND ACTION. THESE ARE JUST THE HIGHLIGHTS.

SPORTS & RECREATION

May 18-21

July 13

Whistler’s non-stop summer festival line up starts off with GO Fest — all about embracing the great outdoors as winter ends and summer begins. greatoutdoorsfest.com

Cheer on racers as they cross the finish line at Whistler’s Rainbow Park after a seven-day bike race on the finest West Coast trails. bcbikerace.com

July 6-8

Olympic ski jumps aren’t just for going down. This is the steepest 400 metre running race in the world and it’s all uphill. redbull.com

BC BIKE RACE

GO FEST

July 14

RED BULL 400

With 35 years under its belt, the Whistler Children’s Festival knows how to put on an action-packed weekend just for kids. Workshops. Live performances. Hands-on activities, and more. artswhistler.com

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TOUGH MUDDER

WHISTLER CHILDREN’S FESTIVAL

August 2-5

WANDERLUST

WHISTLER MOUNTAIN BIKE PARK OPENS

May 26

NIMBY FIFTY BIKE RACE

Billed as a technical marathon cross-country bike race, the Nimby Fifty is a 37-km race in Pemberton’s world-class singletrack trails. nimbyfifty.com

This is not just a yoga festival. Top chefs, renowned speakers, international DJs and more all converge in Whistler for the annual Wanderlust Festival. wanderlust.com

May 31-June 3

August 10-19

June 2

CRANKWORX

The world’s biggest mountain biking festival is back again for the 15th year. Check out the best in the world. crankworx.com October 11-14

WHISTLER WRITERS FESTIVAL

Celebrate the written word in this annual festival for readers, writers, storytellers and anybody who enjoys a good yarn. whistlerwritersfest.com

THINKBIKE WHISTLER

A multi-day expo where the world’s best bike and gear manufacturers descend on the world’s best biking playground. thinkbikewhistler.com

June 16-17

TOUGH MUDDER

Designed by the British Special Forces, this is an obstacle course stretching up to 20 km that’s all about adventure and challenge. toughmudder.com June 16-17

TOUGH MUDDER HALF

Half the Tough Mudder course but all the fun. toughmudder.com June 23

TENDERFOOT BOOGIE

Go off-road, mostly, in this ultra trail running race from Squamish to Whistler. Race distances vary. trailwhisperer.ca

July 29

SUBARU IRONMAN CANADA

Swim. Bike. Run. It’s the triathlon of all triathlons. ironman.com September 8

RBC GRANFONDO

Experience one of the world’s most scenic highways on your bike. Vancouver to Whistler — 120 km. rbcgranfondo.com September 22

SEA TO SKY ALL BRITISH RALLY

Participants cruise the scenic 120 km Sea to Sky highway and display their cars at Whistler Olympic Plaza. seatoskyallbritishrally.com October 8

WHISTLER MOUNTAIN BIKE PARK CLOSES

October 13

WHISTLER 50 RELAY & ULTRA

Racers get ready to take on Whistler in this ultra running race. bcathletics.org

WHISTLER HALF MARATHON

Not a bad way to see Whistler! Five different distances to choose from — the half marathon, 30 km, 10 km, 5 km and a 1 km kids run. whistlerhalfmarathon.com June 9

COMFORTABLY NUMB

Take the internationally recognized mountain bike trail on two feet in this 23+ km race, a must-do race for trail runners everywhere. comfortablynumb.ca

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TOURISM WHISTLER/MIKE CRANE

CRANE

MIKECRANEPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

May 18

TOURISM WHISTLER/ANGELUS CHOUINARD

WHISTLER CHILDREN’S FESTIVAL


FOOD & DRINK

ARTS & MUSIC

May-October

June 3

Approximately 90 vendors showcase their fresh fruits and produce, artisans crafts and other services. Located at the base of Blackcomb Mountain every Sunday and Wednesday afternoon. whistlerfarmersmarket.org

Not your typical opera troupe! This is a Vancouver-based company, bringing opera music to the mountains. whistlerchambermusic.ca

OPERA MARIPOSA

WHISTLER FARMERS’ MARKET

June 6-10

WRITERS ADVENTURE CAMP

The 4th annual camp is an immersive experience for emerging writers. Hone your skills in workshops with award-winning writers in an inspiring setting. writersadventurecamp.ca

August 3-5

CANADIAN NATIONAL BBQ CHAMPIONSHIPS

Let your nose lead you to Creekside for the annual BBQ championships. cbbqs.ca

June 8

WHISTLER MULTICULTURAL FESTIVAL

August 19

PEMBERTON SLOW FOOD CYCLE SUNDAY

Soak in Whistler’s culture in this fun and free event. Open to everyone, the festival celebrates Whistler’s diverse food, music, dance and cultural activities. artswhistler.com

Meander by bike through the Pemberton farmlands, taste fresh-from-the-field food, and meet local growers in the Sea to Sky’s signature agritourism event. tourismpembertonbc.com

Explore Whistler 365 days a year

June 30-July 1

VANCOUVER SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

BEER FESTIVAL

September 11-16

WHISTLER VILLAGE BEER FESTIVAL

Celebrate everything about beer in the mountains. Sixty breweries featured during the Main Event (Sept. 15/16) with more than 120 craft beers. gibbonswhistler.com November 8-18 CORNUCOPIA

This food and wine celebration in the mountains is not to be missed. Parties, pairings, dinners and workshops, there’s something for everyone. whistlercornucopia.com

TOURISM WHISTLER/MIKE CRANE

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The VSO performs for free at Whistler Olympic Plaza. Bring your blankets and folding chairs.

Enjoy the Village or venture further. Take transit and experience Whistler your way.

August 11

22ND ANNUAL LEGO BUILDING COMPETITION

The Whistler Museum hosts this sell-out event every year. The competition is open for children ages 3-12. whistlermuseum.org

Leave the driving to us.

August 16-18

NEIL SIMON’S THE ODD COUPLE

The Pemberton Community Theatre Group presents The Odd Couple for three nights in Whistler at the Maury Young Arts Centre. artswhistler.com 8110

For up-to-date event listings and information, visit piquenewsmagazine.com or whistler.com

Transit Info 604·932·4020 www.bctransit.com

@WhistlerTransit

WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2018

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The moment you celebrated 25 years of spectacular mountain golf.

THE VIEWS HERE ARE ENDLESS. AND SO IS THE GOLF. Every round at Fairmont Chateau Whistler Golf Club plays out against an unforgettable wilderness. This is the stage for BC’s most storied mountain golf – the mightiest contests between friends, the best bonding with colleagues, and the most powerful new ideas happen on these greens. With Fairmont Guest Privileges, you can play unlimited golf* all day long. Take one round to dismantle your opponents – and another to enjoy the view. Just one more way Fairmont Chateau Whistler defines your endless Whistler moment.


[STEWART WALKER]

[KAITLYN HILL]

whistler golf

NC SUBMITTED

DIANE HANNA

NC

GROWING UP GOLFING WITH FOUR CHAMPIONSHIP COURSES IN WHISTLER’S BACKYARD, IT’S NO WONDER LOCAL KIDS ARE FINDING THEIR SWING STO RY BY GA I L J O H N S O N

STEWART WALKER: Remember his name. There’s a very good chance the Whistler resident will end up atop the leaderboard one day. says. “When I’m playing golf, I feel peaceful and happy.” Walker is just one of Whistler’s own who represents the future of golf. Another promising player is Kaitlyn Hill, who also calls Nicklaus North her home course and who is on track to reach her own sports goals. “My dream is to receive a golf scholarship to UBC or an American college or university,” Hill says. That both Hill and Stewart train in Whistler is a testament to the town as a premier golf destination. It’s one aspect of life in the mountain town that locals love and that visitors seek out. Just as wine lovers head to the Okanagan to experience the province through its vineyards, golfers come to Whistler to see this part of B.C. via its fairways and tees. >>

NC

JOHANSEN KRAUSE,

For as long as he can remember, Walker has golfed. As a toddler, he spent a summer on Vancouver Island with his family; where most kids would be collecting shells or chasing seagulls, Walker was hitting toy balls. By age eight, he began beating his father and walking 18-hole courses, including Big Sky Golf Club in Pemberton, where his family used to live. Now 13, Walker regularly hits 200-yard drives and beats most adults. He has played some of the most renowned courses in the world (including Scotland’s Carnoustie and Panmure) and has already scored a hole in one (the 182-yard Hole 17 at Nicklaus North Golf Course, his home course). “I love playing as much as possible, on the course and the driving range,” he

[BIG SKY GOLF CLUB]

WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2018

23


GOLF WHISTLER PASSPORT

T

HOSE WHO WANT to experience the best of what the region

has to offer might consider It’s a pass that allows peo-

COAST

ple to play at the region’s four championship courses at a savings of 40 per cent: Nicklaus North (featuring Jack Nicklaus’s signature design); Robert Cupp’s Big

[FAIRMONT CHATEAU WHISTLER]

Sky Golf Club at the base of Mount Currie in Pemberton; Whistler Golf Club (home to Arnold Palmer’s first Canadian design); and Fairmont Chateau Whistler, with Robert Trent Jones Jr.’s mountain design. Other promotions among the local courses include twilight rates, locals’ rates, and, at the Fairmont Chateau

Whistler,

“date

night,” a weeknight outing that includes green fees and a two-course meal for two.

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2018

DESTINATION BRITISH COLUMBIA RECENTLY recognized the province’s golf industry as a “pillar and motivator” among tourists. Nearly 1 million Americans make overnight trips to B.C. every year, while Canadian travellers spend $585 million on golf-related travel. B.C. has 300-plus courses, which are locally owned and operated. Whistler holds its own in that regard. Though the sport has been struggling to attract numbers in recent years, in the Whistler-Pemberton region specifically, the sport is strong: 81,000 people played in 2017, up from 77,000 in 2014. They’re coming, in part, for the premium product. “Golf is a big reason why some people travel to B.C.” says Maya Lange, vice president of global marketing for Destination British Columbia. “It’s one of the passions we’ve identified that we help promote. People come to B.C. for nature and

BRAD KASSELMAN, WWW.COASTPHOTO.COM

the Golf Whistler Passport.

wilderness, and the nature surrounding the golf courses in B.C. is incredible. Scenery motivates people to visit Whistler, and with its mountains and lakes, it offers the epitome of world-class golfing.” And there’s every chance you’ll tee off in Whistler with a black bear somewhere in range, quietly taking its fill on the surrounding skunk cabbage. Hill, who’s 16, plays several times a week during the summer, routinely outscoring and outdriving her golf-loving parents. On a recent winter trip to Palm Springs, she hit two personalrecord low scores (78) back-to-back. She admits, however, that her introduction to the sport wasn’t a positive one. “One of my earliest memories of golf was when I was around six or seven, and I was taking lessons at the Whistler driving range in the Village,” Hill recalls. “I happened to be finished with my lesson,


THIS SUMMER, ENJOY

The Outdoor Lounge NC [NICKLAUS NORTH]

and one of the kids in the class decided to swing back and their club head hit me in the face. This actually made me scared of golf for a little while.” Hill was understandably reluctant to return to the course, but a few years ago, her interest was piqued after she watched the national Drive, Chip and Putt competition on TV. She went on to enter into that event, making it all the way to the semifinals at San Francisco’s Olympic Club. “The competitions looked so interesting and fun, so I decided to sign up,” Hill says. “It never clicked until I saw kids my age compete and play the sport in a way I had never seen before.” She also discovered her perfectionist and competitive sides. What keeps her going back is a desire to improve, whether it’s redeeming a missed putt or driving the ball longer or straighter. The most enjoyable aspect of the game for her, however, is its social side. “It gives me time to spend and connect with my parents out of our daily lives. Parents and their children can’t always relate to each other when talking about their day at school or work, but out on the golf course, it’s like we are all the same. I think I bond most when I am with my parents on the golf course because it gives me time to talk with them and spend quality time with them and we’re all doing something we love to do.” While most other Whistler kids may be found on mountain bike trails on any given summer’s day, both Hill and Walker can often be seen participating comfortably alongside adults during fun-oriented member events at Nicklaus North. “We’re very proud of Kaitlyn and Stewart,” says Jason Lowe, the club’s general manager. “It’s pretty cool to award one of them the ‘Closest to the Pin’ award in front of all the adults that they beat out for the prize.” With courses like this, there’s no doubt that Whistler is no longer just a ski and bike town. W

COURTESY NICKLAUS NORTH

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2018

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fashion

#whistlerstyle WHISTLER ISN’T JUST ABOUT yogawear and puffy coats. Our boutique shops can set you up with the latest trends for dressing up for dinner or dressing down for a day in the Village. Here, we present some inspiration to get you started, with fabulous clothes and accessories from Whistler retailers. And don’t forget to post a shot of your new threads on Instagram! P HOTOS BY LO GA N SWAY Z E

LOGAN

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2018


RACHEL WEARS A JOSEPH RIBKOFF LACE DRESS FROM OPEN COUNTRY AND DIAMOND JEWELRY FROM KEIR FINE JEWELLERY. THE PENDANT IS AN ILLUSION CLUSTER HALO-STYLE PENDANT SUSPENDED ON A FINE CABLE CHAIN CREATED IN 14K WHITE GOLD WITH 38 ROUND BRILLIANT-CUT DIAMONDS EQUALLING 2 CARATS TOTAL WEIGHT. THE BRACELET IS A MULTISHAPE DIAMOND TENNIS BRACELET CREATED IN 18K WHITE GOLD WITH 506 DIAMONDS EQUALLING 6.25 CARATS TOTAL WEIGHT. THE EARRINGS ARE ILLUSION CLUSTER STUDS CREATED IN 14K WHITE GOLD WITH 18 ROUND BRILLIANT-CUT DIAMONDS EQUALLING 1.50 CARATS TOTAL WEIGHT.

WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2018

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fashion

LOGAN GREG SPORTS A BRIXTON CHARTER OXFORD LONG-SLEEVE BUTTON SHIRT IN 100% COTTON OXFORD FABRIC AND FEATURING A SINGLE CHEST POCKET AND STANDARD SHIRTTAIL HEM. HIS PANTS ARE VANS SKINNY JEANS AND HE WEARS A NIXON WATCH. ALL ITEMS ARE AVAILABLE FROM SHOWCASE.

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2018


WHISTLER CANADA

Fashion + Footwear

Open Country

Lobby Level Fairmont Chateau 604.938.9268

OC 2

Mountain Square Whistler Village 604.938.9266

PATAGONIA STORE WHISTLER MARKETPLACE 604.932.2526

MAT TIAS FREDRIKSSON © 2018 Patagonia, Inc.

WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2018

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fashion

LOGAN STEPHANIE WEARS BILLABONG DOWNSTAR PANTS AND A TRÈS BIEN ERROW TOP, FROM THE BEACH. HER SANDALS ARE THE ROCKPORT COBB HILL JANNA SANDAL, AND HER HANDBAG IS THE HOBO LYRIC HANDBAG, BOTH FROM SOLES. THE JUSTINE BROOKS DRAGONFLY NECKLACE HAS A STERLING SILVER CHAIN AND STERLING SILVER PLATED DRAGONFLY. HER PYRRHA “HEARTS” BRACELET IS MADE FROM STERLING SILVER USING 19TH CENTURY WAX SEALS. ALL JEWELRY IS FROM RUBY TUESDAY.

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2018


HIKE

THE MEDICINE TRAIL

604.938.1616

CANADIANWILDERNESS.COM ADVENTURE DESK: Carleton Lodge, 4282 Mountain Square

WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2018

31


fashion

HILLARY WEARS A TRÈS BIEN DOCK-NECK TANK AND ONEXONETEASPOON ROYALE NO.25 JEAN SHORTS FROM THE BEACH. HER NECKLACES AND RINGS ARE BY JUSTINE BROOKS: A LONG ARROW LABRADORITE NECKLACE MADE FROM STERLING SILVER AND LABRADORITE STONE, A SHORT CHEVRON LABRADORITE NECKLACE, A MOON AND STAR RING MADE FROM STERLING SILVER AND MOONSTONE, AND A SAGE RING MADE FROM STERLING SILVER AND LABRADORITE. ALL ARE AVAILABLE AT RUBY TUESDAY. HER BRACELETS ARE BY BAUXO: AN ELITE BRACELET MADE FROM STERLING SILVER AND AQUA STONE, A STERLING SILVER INTENT BRACELET, A FANCY BRACELET MADE FROM STERLING SILVER AND ROUGH DIAMONDS, AND AN EAGLE BRACELET BY NANCY DAWSON MADE FROM HAND-CARVED STERLING SILVER. ALL ARE AVAILABLE AT RUBY TUESDAY.

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2018

LOGAN


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WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2018

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fashion

MARCO WEARS A MAVI FRANK JACKET IN VINTAGE DENIM WITH A BLEACH WASH GIVING IT AN EASYGOING, THROWBACK LOOK. HIS MAVI JOHNNY BRITISH TWILL KHAKI PANTS FEATURE A SLIM, TAPERED LEG . HE ALSO WEARS A PUBLISH MEN'S TEE AND TIMBERLAND LEATHER DESERT BOOTS. ALL ITEMS ARE AVAILABLE AT OC2.

LOGAN

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2018

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35


cover story

WHEELS OF FORTUNE

HOW THE WORLD’S TOP SKI RESORT EMERGED AS THE WORLD’S TOP MOUNTAIN BIKE RESORT

W

HISTLER’S REIGN AS THE N0. 1 ski resort in North America makes a lot of sense — the biggest ski area on the continent, a reliable snowpack that hangs around until the end of May, amazing natural terrain, a mile of vertical (on Blackcomb anyway), and a resort master plan that relentlessly keeps improving everything from lifts to lodges. Whistler’s status as the world’s top mountain bike destination is a little harder to explain. The Whistler Mountain Bike Park — arguably the first, best and biggest of its kind in the world — is definitely part of the reason for Whistler’s international fame as a mountain bike destination. Hosting Crankworx, one of the largest freeride mountain bike events in the world, also doesn’t hurt the resort’s reputation for being on the cutting edge of the sport. >>

STORY BY ANDREW MITCHELL

36

WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2018


WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2018

37

JUSTA JESKOVA

JUSTA


ADAM TABER

TABER

HIT THE TRAILS!

B

EYOND THE BIKE PARK, Whistler boasts hundreds of kilometres of

mountain biking trails. In other words, there’s something for everyone. Here’s a little teaser of what’s waiting in the forest and the alpine above.

JUSTA

LOST LAKE is a great place to learn the ins and outs of mountain biking and to progress as a rider, but it’s not the only low-key beginner area in town. The Interpretive Forest trails are incredibly fun, especially Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds

[CRANKWORX MOUNTAIN BIKING FESTIVAL]

and the surprisingly technical Crater Rim descent. The reality is that you can find green trails anywhere in Whistler, they’re just stuck in the middle of blues and blacks. INTO THE MYSTIC/LORD OF THE SQUIRRELS loop is an epic, all-day ride, and it’s a grunt to even get to the trailhead. While not technical, it definitely requires an advanced fitness level. The feeling of climbing out of the forest into the alpine is one of the all-time best feelings you can get on a bike, and it’s followed by an amazing loop and descent that will have you planning your next ride before you even reach the bottom. COMFORTABLY NUMB is Whistler’s longest and arguably best trail with a lot of variety from start to finish 24km later, including long sections that would be classified as green or blue if they didn’t have black features scattered throughout. There are few rides that test your fitness and bike skills like this one.

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2018

“IN THAT SENSE THIS PARK REALLY WAS BUILT BY THE RIDERS THEMSELVES — THEY MADE IT ALL POSSIBLE.” — Rob McSkimming

BUT THAT’S NOT THE FULL STORY; there’s a whole world of biking beyond the park. According to the Trail Forks app, Whistler has over 170 trails covering some 270 kilometres of rock, roots and dirt. Despite the fact that most trails are rated either black or double black diamond, the latest rider study for the region found that over half a million visitors pedal tires through Whistler’s rainforests and bike park every single year. The bulk of those trails have been carved into the terrain over four decades by a core of volunteer builders. They bring their expertise and care to the trails, tirelessly working for the love of the sport. The truth is that Whistler’s world-class mountain bike scene just sort of happened. There was no master plan, no real budget, and not much in the way of marketing — just a lot of individual efforts that grew into something much, much bigger.

BIKE PARK 2.0

T

he Whistler Mountain Bike Park wasn’t the resort’s first attempt at two-wheel tourism — Blackcomb had previously let people ride down its gravel-covered access trails in the early days — but the “Bike Park 2.0” concept that started operations on Whistler Mountain in 1999 was a bit of a gamble on the part of some very enthusiastic riders that worked for the resort during the winter months.


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[ROB MCSKIMMING]

“In some ways, we were fortunate to be in the right place at the right time,” recalls Rob McSkimming, Whistler Blackcomb’s VP of business development and an early manager of the park. “Freeriding was just starting to take off, and along with that we had some huge developments in bike technology — bigger, heavier, longer-travel bikes. A lot of riders were looking for that bigger gravity experience. “At the time there weren’t a lot of ways to access that type of riding other than pushing your bike up a hill or shuttling up in a truck, but we had gondolas and chairs and we figured we could put them to use. From there we kind of figured out things as we went along. I’m not sure we really understood what we were doing; we just knew that riding preferences were shifting and that we needed to build a different kind of experience for those riders.” The new park started off modestly — a sightseeing ticket on Whistler Mountain was around $22 back then and there was a $3 bike park surcharge to ride a few trails on the lower part of the mountain. That $3 gap funded the trail building in the bike park for its first two-plus years of operations. “We had to prove that this thing we were building made sense,” McSkimming says. “And because of the rapid growth in riders, we managed to continue to add to our budget every year. In that sense this park really was built by the riders themselves — they made it all possible.” >>

DAVID BUZZARD

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39


[JESSE MELAMED] THE NEW TRAILS they created were a key difference as well, using small machines to build features and shift large amounts of dirt. B-Line was an instant hit and the opening of A-Line the following year with its 80-plus jumps, berms, and other features was a “real turning point” says McSkimming. Ridership jumped overnight, and more machine-built trails followed, like Dirt Merchant and Crank It Up. The bike park and its growing fan base have been expanding ever since including the 2016 addition of the Top of the World descent from the peak. A huge expansion to Creekside is now underway, with a significant investment planned for summer 2018.

THE HILLS ARE ALIVE…

40

BIKE PARK 101

THE RISE OF BMX

THE ROAD RAGE

Hire a guide, rent a

Summer of 2017 marked

Whistler is increasingly a destination

bike and hit the park.

another milestone in

for road riders as well, with a well-

Standard downhill

Whistler’s bike scene

defined shoulder in most places,

bikes are available for

with the opening of an

incredible views, and some incredible

rental throughout the

international standard

long rides to enjoy from the

Village as well as high

BMX track in Cheakamus

Callaghan Valley or to Pemberton and

performance bikes.

Crossing. The club hosts

beyond. The Whistler Cycling Club

Consider a group or

regular Tuesday night

(whistlercyclingclub.ca) hosts weekly

private lesson with

races and some weekend

group rides and a few special events

some of the best bike

events as well — like Sea

coaches around. Check

to Sky Series races and

out whistlerblackcomb.

provincial qualifiers.

com for all your bike

For more, visit

park information.

whistlerbmx.com.

WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2018

TW

TOURISM WHISTLER/JUSTA JESKOVA

I

f the Whistler Mountain Bike Park was built with a $3 surcharge on sightseeing passes, most of the 170-plus trails outside the park were made for even less with trail builders volunteering tens,

and maybe hundreds of thousands of hours over the years. The foundation was laid in the 1980s with riders seeking out old logging roads to bomb down, and the work continues today with new trails being added every single year. While Whistler is known for its double black, steep and gnarly descents, there are trails to ease into the sport too. The blue/green “Zappa trails” in Lost Lake Park are a prime example, maintained by the Resort Municipality of Whistler. Most other trails, however, fall in the domain of the Whistler Off-Road Cycling Association (WORCA). WORCA boasts an annual membership of around 1,800, making it one of the largest mountain bike clubs on the planet. Around one in every seven locals is a member. One of those members is Grant Lamont, a WORCA founder as well as a past-president who has been immersed in the local mountain bike scene since the beginning. He now organizes the annual ThinkBike Whistler expo, and is currently a co-owner of Whistler Bike Guides. >>

as well. Whistler is also featured in the Whistler GranFondo ride from Vancouver (rbcgranfondo.com/ whistler) and is the host of the annual Ironman Canada (ironman.ca).

CLINT TRAHAN

NC


JEEP

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2018

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whistler • 604.905.0071 • crosscountryconnection.ca

unwind

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 40 Lamont says a lot of unique things went into LIFESTYLE & creating Whistler’s mountain bike network, ADVENTURE GUIDE starting with the passion of the riders themselves. From day one, however, Lamont credits WORCA for “driving the bus.” The organization was originally founded to lobby for access to Garibaldi Park on the Singing Rentals Pass trail network, and while it has been Skills unsuccessful in that endeavour for almost Tours 30 years, everything else it has touched has turned to gold. WORCA has successfully defended trails and rebuilt trails affected by development — often working with the developers. It has created weekly ride and race events that are extremely well attended. The club runs a youth camp program that has grown every “MY WHOLE in Lost Lake year and sells out quickly. It also helps build PassivHaus LIFE I HAVE and maintain Whistler’s trail network with a professional full-time crew, leveraging whistler • 604.905.0071 • crosscountryconnection.ca BEEN ABLE membership fees, race fees and more. TO JUST HOP “I think what we’ve built here is unique,” ON MY BIKE adds Lamont. “While everyone else was AND SHRED debating whether to even allow bikes, we A MULTITUDE worked together and figured things out.” Just look at the talent coming out of the OF AMAZING town, like pro rider Jesse Melamed, born and TRAILS… bred of the local mountains. EVERYTHING Cross Country Connection Advertisement Files in PDF format, greyscale or CMYK “Whistler is just easy and incredible living, ” Summer 2017 IS CLOSE AND says the 26-year-old racer who took home his Ad # CXC-Summer2017-Ad-2 (two options) confirmation: call Ian at 604.905.0071 TOP NOTCH.” first Enduro World Series win in Whistler last Publication: Whistler Question Rec Guide year. “My whole life I have been able to just hop ad size: 1/6 page (3.5W x 2.75H) technical concerns: Brian Hydesmith on my bike and shred a multitude of amazing — Jesse Date: March 28, 2017 design@hydesmith.com or call 204.487.0 Melamed trails… Everything is close and top notch.” Some of the fastest people, he adds, aren’t the pros. They are people who ride for the love of riding, turning out by the hundreds for the weekly cross-country Twoonie rides organized by WORCA, or the weekly downhill Phat Wednesday races in the park. “Whistler gave me everything I needed to become the athlete I am today, all the while having fun and loving it,” he adds. As for how big the Whistler mountain bike PRESENTED BY scene has become, Lamont says he’s probably the least surprised. “I don’t want to brag, but I called it more than 25 years ago,” he says. Lamont was riding his bike into the Village one day when Ted Nebbeling — Whistler’s mayor, one of the N Westcoaster Slide originators of the Valley Trail network, and N Mario and Friends Mini Golf a future cabinet member with the provincial N And much more! government — joked that “all you mountain Activities are subject to change, bikers think you own the place.” weather permitting “I told him that was true — in 20 years we would own the place,” laughs Lamont. “I was Located at the base of Blackcomb Mountain in the Upper Village being serious.” W

Family Adventure Zone

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2018


To advertise in Whistler Magazine, call Catherine Power-Chartrand at 604-932-1672

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unwind

LIFESTYLE & ADVENTURE GUIDE

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2018


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WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2018

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SETTING THE PACE NOTHING BEATS RIDING BIKES AT HOME WHEN THE HOMETOWN IS WHISTLER

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S A WORLD-CLASS MOUNTAIN BIKING DESTINATION, Whistler attracts famous athletes and mountain biking icons from around the world every season during Crankworx — our 10-day summer mountain bike festival. Every other week of the season, visitors share the trails with local icons — those colourful characters who have had a hand in shaping Whistler’s riding scene over the years. You can find them on any given day, ripping up and down the valley on two wheels… if you can keep up. >>

CRANE

[CANDACE SHADLEY]

STORY BY HALEY RITCHIE P H OTO S BY MIK E CRAN E WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2018

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Shadley grew up splitting her time between Vancouver and Whistler, and it’s also where she learned to ride. Female riders then were few and far between. But now, more and more women are entering the sport, encouraged and supported by things like the Dirt Series camps. Even after travelling around the world and teaching camps throughout North America, the views and terrain of Whistler will always be home. “If you go to the bike park, you ride the chair with people who have saved up forever to come ride in the place where you get to ride all the time,” she says. “I can ride through Lost Lake Park and see the places where I learned to lift my wheel over a log. It just doesn’t get old.” She adds: “You choose every day what your life is, and Whistler is a really good place to be making those choices.”

PHIL CHEW | PARALYMPIAN

CRANE

[PHIL CHEW]

CANDACE SHADLEY | COACH CANDACE SHADLEY EXPLAINS HER LIFE TRAJECTORY LIKE this: “Some people become doctors, and some people become mountain bike coaches.” In 2001 Shadley founded the Trek Dirt Series, three skilldevelopment camps exclusively for women to encourage greater numbers in the sport. The original camps quickly sold out. Seventeen years later and the camps are still selling out. Shadley now leads a family of over 30 coaches, has added in co-ed weekends and organizes 24 camps annually through North America. The program has welcomed 13,000 people in the last 17 years. “Even though it’s big, I want everyone who comes to have a really great experience that is tailored to them,” she says. “The best part is sharing something you really love with someone else, and seeing them get a lot of joy out of it, knowing that when they leave their time with you, they’re going to have so many great experiences.” 48

WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2018

BETTER KNOWN FOR HIS DOWNHILL ALPINE SKIING, THREEtime Paralympian and long-time Whistlerite Phil Chew has been biking for even longer than he’s been skiing. He’s a familiar sight on local trails, but don’t expect to ride up with him in the bike park — Chew, who lost his right leg to bone cancer in 1977, thinks taking the gondola up is taking the easy way out. “I don’t believe in downhill biking, I believe in cross-country because of the fitness that you have to have to bike up the mountain before you climb down,” he says. The summer after taking his first ski lessons with the B.C. Disabled Skiing Association in 1977, the same year he finished chemotherapy, Chew got back into cycling to get in shape for his winter sport. Plus, that’s just what people in Whistler did… and still do. “All the locals, that’s what we were doing — skiing in the winter, biking in the summer,” he says, of one of the reasons he moved to Whistler full-time in 1983. “A lot of my challenges in my life with my disability have been to prove that I can do it better than them or as well as them. I ski as fast, or faster, than the people I ski with, and I do the same thing mountain biking. They just accept that every hill, they’re going to have to race me. I’m like a dog after a bone, everywhere.” The local mountain biking community has also benefited from Chew’s persistence. He’s been organizing Whistler’s longestrunning mountain biking race, the Westside Wheel Up, for the past 16 years. Last year marked his final year at the helm as he now hands over the reigns to the Whistler Off-Road Cycling Association (WORCA). Under his tenure, Chew estimates the iconic Whistler race, which has been a summer-time staple for 25 years on the local event calendar, has raised more than $40,000 for the B.C. Disabled Ski Team. Each year some of the profits are also funnelled to local cycling organizations.

TREVOR HOPKINS | TEAM PLAYER LIKE MANY IN WHISTLER, TREVOR HOPKINS IS A MULTI-SPORT athlete. Also like many in Whistler, he came to the community for a short holiday and never left. More than two decades later, Hopkins is well-known as an accomplished mountain biker, road racer and most recently, a triathlete, competing in both local and


Ex t r aor d i n a ry by n at u r E

CRANE

international races like Ironman and XTERRA. Hopkins is also a community organizer. He manages Team Whistler, a local bike-racing team, and is involved in both the Whistler Triathlon Club and the Whistler Cycling Club. “I do it to challenge myself, to race against myself. Signing up for competitions motivates me to keep training, keep exercising and keep healthy,” he says. On Team Whistler, Hopkins trains and competes alongside a roster of serious local mountain bikers and road riders. Over the years the group has helped organize events, promote local talent and helped mentor young, up-and-coming athletes. In the off-season, Hopkins increasingly spends his time in Maui. While he admits Hawaii’s road riding is a little more pleasant in the winter months, nothing beats the West Coast for mountain biking. “It’s my favourite place to ride, in the world,” he says. Hopkins says his favourite trail right now is Lord of the Squirrels, the recently completed alpine trail in the south side of town (pictured on our cover), ushering in a new style of epic adventure bike riding in Whistler with its long slog to the alpine and fun, flowy intermediate descent. Last summer Hopkins rode it almost every week. “I remember the first time I rode it on October 1st (two years ago) and it was snowing at the top,” he says. “The views up there never get old. It’s nice to have that in our backyard.” W

Photos: Paul Bride & TaraOGradyPhoto.com

[TREVOR HOPKINS]

Located between Vancouver and Whistler, along the Sea to Sky highway, the 10 minute gondola ride provides sweeping views of Howe Sound, the Coast Mountains and pristine forests. Once at the top, enjoy a thrilling suspension bridge, local cuisine in the Summit Eatery and year-round adventures.

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whistler homes

GOOD BONES

TRANSFORMING A WHISTLER A-FRAME INTO A MARVEL OF URBAN DESIGN

STORY BY BRANDON BARRETT PHOTOS BY KRISTA JAHNKE 50

WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2018


LEFT: A MODERN, TWO-STOREY RECTANGULAR BUILDING WAS ERECTED ALONGSIDE THE UPGRADED CABIN, WITH AN AIRY, OPEN-GLASS ATRIUM CONNECTING THE TWO. BELOW: THE 1970’S-ERA A-FRAME CABIN THAT WAS USED AS THE FOUNDATION OF MICHELLE AND MARK FORSTER’S NEW HOME, DESIGNED BY STARK ARCHITECTURE, IN WHISTLER’S ALPINE MEADOWS NEIGHBOURHOOD.

HERE’S NO DENYING THE A-frame cabin is an icon of ski-resort architecture. A staple of mid-century vacation-home design, you couldn’t throw a stone in the earliest years of Whistler’s nascent ski boom without hitting a distinct triangular façade. These purpose-built hideaways, with their snow-sloughing roofs, wallto-wall glass and chameleonic shape effectively blending into the forest canopy, are enjoying something of a renaissance. Outdoor enthusiasts and ski-industry nostalgics alike are increasingly looking to the A-frame as inspiration for their hand-built replicas, while others, like Whistler couple Michelle and Mark Forster (locally known as Mitch and Foz), are rescuing these near-teardowns from going to the landfill. That’s not to say the Forsters didn’t require a bit of convincing when considering using the 1970s-era chalet as the foundation of their new home in Whistler’s Alpine Meadows neighbourhood. >>


THE FORSTERS’ DISTINCT STYLE LEANS TOWARDS THE INDUSTRIAL, WITH EXPOSED SEAM METAL BEAMS AND STREETART FLOURISHES THROUGHOUT THEIR HOME. CONSUMMATE PARTY HOSTS, THE FORSTERS WANTED TO ENSURE THEIR DREAM HOME INCLUDED A LARGE SPACE FOR ENTERTAINING THAT OFFERS VIEWS OF THE PEAKS OF WHISTLER AND BLACKCOMB MOUNTAINS.

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COVERED IN MOSS, WINDOWS BLOWN OUT, and battered after decades of hard-partying renters, the cabin didn’t exactly scream “dream home.” “It’s a very old A-frame cabin that was covered in shingles. It didn’t look very exciting at all,” says Michelle. “Lots of people told us we should tear it down,” adds Mark. “They thought we were crazy.” Despite the space’s dingy, uninviting interior, soon after Stark Architecture’s David Arnott saw the cabin, he knew it had what he called “good bones.” “The clients couldn’t really see how it could be rescued, but when you look at the bones of these houses … the wood back then was naturally grown timbers that have very tight grains, and they’re rock solid. The bones of the house didn’t need any upgrade; it was just aesthetic and a bit of space planning.” With a tight budget and desire to maximize space, the Forsters realized the most efficient approach would be to avoid a costly teardown. They also wanted to steer clear of the rustic chalet style so typical of mountain resorts. Both Mark and Michelle’s style borrows heavily from the sleek, industrial-tinged aesthetic found in more urban locales. “We’ve been travelling for a long time and we’ve always loved warehouses,” Mark explains. “We just wanted a place that was our style. We knew we were only going to do this once, so we wanted to do it for us.” Consummate party hosts, having a large space for entertaining that offered views of the breathtaking peaks of Whistler and Blackcomb mountains was a must for the Forsters. And yet, with two sons, the home also needed to incorporate the practical elements necessary for an active Whistler family. >> WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2018

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THE FORSTERS ESCHEWED THE RUSTIC CHALET AESTHETIC SO COMMON TO SKI RESORTS IN FAVOUR OF A MORE URBAN, GRAPHIC FEEL.

The Insiders’ Guide to Whistler

IMAGE: KRISTA JAHNKE PHOTOGRAPHY

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2018

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A VERY MODERN TWO-STOREY, RECTANGULAR BUILDING NEXT TO THE OLD CABIN, AND COVERED EVERYTHING IN BLACK, STANDINGMICHELLE (ABOVE) AND MARK FORSTER TOOK SOME CONVINCING TO

SEAM METAL

INCORPORATE THE RUNDOWN, WEATHER-BATTERED SKI CHALET AS

TO TIE IT ALL

THE FOUNDATION OF THEIR NEW DREAM HOME.

“THE ENTERTAINING SPACE WAS ONE thing we both really wanted. And just a few extra things: a large mudroom, a big walk-in wardrobe, and an extra TV room,” Michelle says. The project proved somewhat of a challenge for both the designers at Stark Architecture and builders at Balmoral Construction. “The clients’ aesthetic requests were fairly easy for us, because the home is modern and open, but the challenge was tying all the elements together so the building didn’t look like it was lumped onto an existing cabin,” Arnott explains. Using the cabin’s four-decades-old structure as the basis of the upgrade, Arnott and his team added a rectangular extension to the north that is bridged

ATV

TOGETHER.” — David Arnott

together by an airy glass atrium. “We juxtaposed a very modern two-storey, rectangular building next to the old cabin, and covered everything in black, standing-seam metal to tie it all together,” he explains. “And then the space between the two buildings was a double-height, open, glass-on-both-sides atrium entrance with a bridge above that connected the new open kitchen and dining area to the upstairs of the cabin.” Even with its hyper-modern design and street-art flourishes — the Forsters’ pearl-white and exposed brick walls are accented with skateboard decks and boldly coloured graffiti — the building also incorporates some unique elements from the original cabin. Most of the old window openings are preserved, and its sloping cedar walls are integrated into the atrium’s structure. “We loved the shape of the existing building and we wanted to be as true to that as possible,” Arnott says. In a red-hot housing market that is no stranger to the vicious cycle of multimillion-dollar teardowns and rebuilds, the Forsters sleep well knowing that they were able to build their home to the specifications of their finely-honed style and budget, while also preserving an important piece of Whistler’s architectural past. “Actually creating something out of this old A-frame was really satisfying,” Michelle says. “The more time we spent looking at the old cabin through this process, it made us realize there’s so much more to a building than that brand-new, cookie-cutter style.” W

ADVENTURE TOURS

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CANADIANWILDERNESS.COM ADVENTURE DESK: Carleton Lodge, 4282 Mountain Square

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audainartmuseum.com

Experience a world-class art collection in the heart of Whistler Village T. 604.962.0413

4350 Blackcomb Way Whistler, BC James Hart The Dance Screen (The Scream Too), (detail), 2010-13. Photo by Darby Magill.

Masterpiece Moment


arts & culture

NC

ART FROM A WOMAN’S HEART

LE PAYSAGE BY EMILY CARR, AT AUDAIN ART MUSEUM.

HOW FEMALE ARTISTS CONTRIBUTE TO THE VISUAL ARTS AT WHISTLER’S COMMERCIAL GALLERIES AND THE AUDAIN ART MUSEUM

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CKNOWLEDGING THE RIGHTFUL place of female artists at the art world’s very core has been gaining momentum of late. World-class venues such as the Uffizi Gallery in Florence — home to archetypes of womanhood such as Sandro Botticelli’s The Birth of Venus, and Leonardo da Vinci’s Annunciation — are taking their female painters out of storage in order to strive for balance and display their profound talent. Meanwhile, closer to home, Whistler can proudly say that the female eye in art creation is well respected and represented in its commercial galleries and at the Audain Art Museum, one of the resort’s cultural jewels.

AUDAIN ART MUSEUM Whistler’s Audain Art Museum (AAM) has, through its enormous collection of Emily Carr’s works and that of other women artists, been showcasing female talent from the time its doors opened in 2016. It might not be surprising that the latest additions to the AAM’s permanent collection are two pieces by Carr. The first, the landscape Le Paysage, was one of those two key paintings shown at Paris’s Salon d'Automne in 1911, Carr’s first professional showing. The second, European Street Scene, was also painted in France. They were purchased for the AAM, the former for just under $1 million and the latter for $276,000, by the family foundation. They were unveiled in Dec. 2017 and March 2018, respectively and are superb examples of what Carr created while studying the latest in art trends in Paris. Darrin Martens, the AAM’s chief curator, says these pieces are from a pivotal moment in the master painter’s career — just as she was about to leave France and apply what she learned to capturing the B.C. landscape and people. “Emily Carr is simply one of the most important modernist painters of her generation,” he says. “She strove to >>

STORY BY CATHRY N AT K INS O N WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2018

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paint the British Columbia landscape in a bold new way never before seen; her innovative approach acted as a catalyst for a new generation of artists to engage with, explore and represent the landscape in their own way.” The two new pieces join 25 other Carr paintings, augmenting one of the best permanent exhibitions in the world that is dedicated to a single Canadian artist. Carr’s development and growth as a painter will be explored in an exhibition in May 2019 — Emily Carr in France — which will pull together pieces from that important incubating time. Her evolution in 1911 and 1912 through exploring domesticity in a modern, changing world is key to this period, Martens says. The prejudices held against female artists of the time, which influenced how they were perceived and how their work sold or was included in exhibitions, will also be explored.

MOUNTAIN GALLERIES AT THE FAIRMONT CHATEAU WHISTLER Doria Moodie, a Whistler artist represented by Mountain Galleries at the Fairmont Chateau Whistler, comes immediately to mind when Ben McLaughlin, the gallery’s director of communications and senior sales associate, is asked about the many inspiring female artists they represent. Renowned for her bear portraits, which show Whistler’s ursine neighbours as independent creatures with characters and lives worth contemplating, Moodie was recently named the primary artist for the Grizzly Bear Foundation, an organization dedicated to the conservation of grizzlies

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TOP: STUDY: PAINTING IN TWILIGHT BY ANGELA MORGAN, AT ADELE CAMPBELL FINE ART GALLERY. ABOVE: THE OBSERVER BY DORIA MOODIE, AT MOUNTAIN GALLERIES AT THE FAIRMONT CHATEAU WHISTLER.

through research and public education. “The bear portraits are all based on travels and residencies she has done up at Knight Inlet in the Great Bear Rainforest,” says McLaughlin. “The bears’ eyes, in particular, seem to strike an emotional chord in people. Many feel that Doria’s paintings have a soul.” Moodie’s work can be seen at the gallery’s most significant show of the summer, Wild and Sacred Places. McLaughlin adds: “It’s a revolving exhibition of our top artists, who are providing new work, and it runs all summer.” Other female artists in the Mountain Galleries show are Shannon Ford, who inserts gemstones in her work, and Linda Wilder, who captures the mood and emotion of her environment.


ADELE CAMPBELL FINE ART GALLERY Painter Angela Morgan is known for her colourful, stylized outdoor scenes where people are centre stage, paintings which are both whimsical and provide a sense of community. They are wildly popular. Liz Harris, owner of the Adele Campbell Fine Art Gallery, is pleased to be featuring Morgan at an exhibition of new paintings that opens on Aug. 11, adding that many of the works are takeaway pieces that are “smaller, approachable paintings.” “When Angela first started as a painter, I think she was more known across the country for women, celebration, and children playing. There were a lot of beach scenes — a lot of joie de vivre,” Harris says. “She shifted her style for us when she started showing at the gallery in 2007, and her winter scenes really took off. But she has stayed true to her summer style.” Morgan will also be dropping by this summer to do an artist demonstration. “It’s a more casual format. We have this gorgeous courtyard outside and if the weather is good, it is a nice way for her to connect with the clients,” Harris says. “It’s a little window into her process; she works for an hour or so on a painting and takes it home to make it perfect. That is exciting. People like to have that connection.” W

WHISTLER’S CANADIAN ART DESTINATION AT THE SHOPS AT THE WESTIN

A AD DE E LL E E C CA AM MP PB BE E LL LL F F II N NE E A A RT, RT, W WH H II SS T TL LE ER R

whistler galleries AUDAIN ART MUSEUM Open Monday, Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday, Friday 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Closed Tuesday. 4350 Blackcomb Way, 604-962-0413 ADELE CAMPBELL FINE ART GALLERY Open daily from 11 a.m. in the Westin Resort, 604-938-0887 ART JUNCTION GALLERY & FRAME STUDIO Open Tuesday to Saturday from 11 a.m. 1068 Millar Creek Road, Function Junction, 604-938-9000 BLACK TUSK GALLERY Open daily from 11 a.m. in the Hilton Resort, 1-877-905-5540 FATHOM STONE ART GALLERY & STUDIO In the Westin Resort, 604-962-7722 MARK RICHARDS GALLERY Open daily from noon in the Hilton Resort, 604-932-1911 MOUNTAIN GALLERIES AT THE FAIRMONT Open weekdays at 9 a.m. and weekends at 8 a.m., in the Fairmont Chateau, 604-935-1862

UPCOMING EXHIBITONS ALL ARE WELCOME

MONTHLY SPOTLIGHT Featured Artists TBA

APRIL, MAY, JUNE, JULY, SEPTEMBER, 2018

ANGELA MORGAN

Summery Smalls & Live Painting

AUGUST 11, 2018

THE PLAZA GALLERIES Open daily from 10 a.m., 22 – 4314 Main Street, 604-938-6233 THE GALLERY AT MAURY YOUNG ARTS CENTRE Open Monday to Friday from 9 a.m., Sunday from 4 p.m. at 4335 Blackcomb Way, 604-935-8410 SQUAMISH LIL’WAT CULTURAL CENTRE Open daily from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. 4584 Blackcomb Way, 1 866 441 SLCC (7522) SUZANNE JOHNSTON STUDIO GALLERY In the Westin Resort, 604 -935 -3444 VINCENT MASSEY STUDIO 8605 Forest Ridge Drive, 604-932-6455 WHISTLER CONTEMPORARY GALLERY Hilton Resort, 604-938-3001 (main) Four Seasons Resort, 604-935-3999

PAINTINGS

SCULPTURE

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JEWELLERY

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fine dining

FUELLING UP ON FINE CARBS

WHISTLER’S UPSCALE ITALIAN RESTAURANTS OFFER A TASTE OF EUROPE IN THE WEST COAST MOUNTAINS

STO RY BY E R IC THOM P SON PHOTOS BY DAVID BUZZARD

TRATTORIA DI UMBERTO EXECUTIVE CHEF RICARDO DOTTI, RIGHT, WITH RESTAURANT MANAGER WALTER WALLGRAM, LEFT, AND CHEF DE CUISINE FREDDY ROYER, CENTRE.


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N J O Y I N G E V E R Y T H I N G T H AT A

Whistler summer has to offer requires a great deal of energy, whether it’s a morning shredding in the bike park or an afternoon lazing on the lake. In order to make the most of it all, why not follow in the carb-loading footsteps of the thousands of Ironmen and Iron-women who descend on Whistler every summer for the legendary triathlon — fuel your body for fun. There’s no better place to do that than at some of the Village’s premier Italian restaurants with their fresh homemade pastas and authentic mouth-watering sauces. And while the promise of pasta may lure you in to one of Whistler’s fine dining Italian eateries, once there you soon realize: there’s so much more to good Italian food than fancy carbs.


TOP: THE NEWLY RENOVATED IL CAMINETTO RESTAURANT. BELOW: CARPACCIO, MADE WITH B.C. BLUE GOOSE BEEF, EGG YOLKS AND ARUGULA.

A fork, a glass, a drop of magic...

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NY TOUR OF HIGH-END DINING OPTIONS SHOULD start at the re-designed IL CAMINETTO. Originally established by chef Umberto Menghi more than 35 years ago, the restaurant was purchased last year by the Toptable group, famous for other Whistler hotspots like Araxi and Bar Oso and Vancouver’s Blue Water Café. After undergoing renovations this winter, the new, sleek and casual Il Caminetto re-opened on Dec. 28. Along with layout changes, executive chef James Walt, formerly Araxi’s executive chef for 20 years, is also bringing a new approach to the kitchen. Thanks to upgrades in equipment all brought over from Italy, Il Caminetto is capable of producing everything on the menu fresh and in-house. That includes nine different freshly made pastas, loaves of bread baked daily in a Pavalier oven and cold, sweet gelato for dessert. “We’re trying to use Italian sensibilities and then pair them with local produce, meats and seafood. It’s the same mandate we use at Araxi but more with an Italian twist,” explains Walt. The menu mixes seasonal choices with perfected mainstays. For any newcomers, Walt recommends starting with the carpaccio, made with B.C. Blue Goose beef, egg yolks and arugula. Then on to fresh pasta paired with one (or more) of their six authentic Italian cheeses. To put it simply, Walt adds: “We’re just doing really good quality stuff and we’re hoping to attract anybody and everybody who wants to have a good dining experience.” >>

MODERN CANADIAN CUISINE OPEN WEEKDAYS FROM 5PM | WEEKENDS FROM 3PM DINNER FROM 6 PM | COMPLIMENTARY VALET PARKING 4121 VILLAGE GREEN | ADJACENT TO LISTEL HOTEL 604 932 3433 | BEARFOOTBISTRO.COM

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VEAL OSSO BUCO WITH SAFFRON RISOTTO FROM TRATTORIA DI UMBERTO.

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O R T H O S E T H AT LO N G F O R Umberto Menghi’s decades-long take on Italian food in Whistler, he still has a presence in the Village with his well-loved TRATTORIA DI UMBERTO. The long-standing restaurant offers traditional Tuscan cuisine in an authentic setting. Following the classic four-course meal structure: antipasto, primo, secondo and dolce, Trattoria packs a variety of taste into one outing. “It is traditional, it’s not modern, it’s authentic. We reflect the produce of B.C., but we also promote Italian products,” says chef Ricardo Dotti. By bringing in pastas from Fiorentino and burrata (“buttery” or creamy cheese) from Andria, Trattoria is able to transport the true tastes of Tuscany right into their Mountainside Lodge location. With a notoriously friendly staff, Trattoria is a favourite among locals and tourists alike, meaning if you’re looking to get a table most nights, a reservation is suggested. Dotti recommends trying the veal Osso Buco, slow-braised in wine for 12 hours and served with a saffron risotto. Along with the classics, they offer a menu that capitalizes on seasonal local game, mushrooms and greens. “It’s like cooking in your house, like having a meal with your grandmother in a high level of cuisine,” adds Dotti. >>


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THE SPECIAL SPAGHETTI QUATTRO AT WHISTLER'S QUATTRO RESTAURANT.

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H E C H E F S AT Q U AT T R O , another Whistler Italian mainstay, are doing some very creative things with pastas and sauces. Take the house specialty “Spaghetti Quattro,” a dish that relies on faith alone that you’re in good hands when you come to Quattro. The ingredients for this dish aren’t listed on the menu — it simply reads “for Italians only.” But here’s a little hint of what you’ll get when you order it: minced chicken, black beans, garlic, extra virgin olive oil and a touch of tomato sauce. Quattro offers a variety of meat, fish, and pastas including a house-made gnocchi and seasonal raviolis. General manager and sommelier Geoff Weddell believes that Quattro offers the best deals in town. “I’ve always said that Quattro represents the best value in Whistler,” says Weddell. “We’re affordable, we’re upscale, we can offer fine dining or casual dining, whatever you decide. You can walk in and see our warm, inviting contemporary Italian dining room with art on the walls and fireplaces, you can sit down and have a very satisfying meal. You aren’t going to leave hungry.” You’re sure to find a palette-pleasing wine to pair with each meal as well, since Quattro’s wine menu is 27 pages long. >>

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European Comfort Locally Sourced

Addictive Italian cuisine since 1996 Inviting service Two private dining rooms Dinner nightly 4319 Main Street at the Whistler Pinnacle Hotel 604.905.4844 Reservations recommended quattrorestaurants.com

Wood fired pizza, steak, pasta and seafood.

Local’s favourite patio Lunch and Dinner daily Town Plaza w

(604) 938-1879

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WHY NOT

TONIGHT?

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PROSCIUTTO, SALAMI, ARUGULA, AND PARMESAN WOOD FIRED PIZZA AT CARAMBA.

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N D W H AT A B O U T P I Z Z A ? Look no further than CARAMBA. To be fair, executive chef James Paré would rather classify Caramba as “European comfort food” because of the wide variety they offer. “We are proud of each dish that we put out,” he says. “There are multiple items on the menu to choose from. Again, I go back to ‘comfort European’ because we do a nice lamb shank with a cheesy spaetzle cooked in a very French traditional way.” Naturally, Italy is also a big influence as Caramba boasts a wood-burning pizza oven, capable of cooking light bubbly Neapolitan pizza in around three minutes. Guests can watch their pizzas as they cook to perfection at the pizza bar. The open kitchen helps create a lively environment capable of satisfying the whole family. Paré and his uncle Jay Paré took over Caramba from long-time local restaurateur Mario Enero in 2014. Since then, the family has strived to continue the legacy of upscale casual dining that Enero started while introducing some new elements. “We’re proud to say that this is still open as Caramba, just under different ownership,” says Paré. “As Jay and I took over, we’ve made some changes slowly as we go, but we’re trying to pay homage to Mario’s original philosophy and idea. I feel like he was ahead of his time when he started it, which is kind of cool to be part of that.” And so, the philosophy of bringing world-class dining to the laid-back West Coast mountains remains to this day. W


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Experience an atmosphere inspired by dishes crafted from fresh, locally sourced, seasonal ingredients. OPEN DAILY 5:00PM - 10:00PM

located in the westin resort & spa, whistler. 4090 whistler way | 604.935.4344 | grillandvinewhistler.com

LOCALS’ FAVOURITE SINCE 1982!

Unwind with a cool beverage on Whistler’s Sunniest Patio Traditional gastro pub and comfort food made with the freshest ingredients Big Screen TVs and Pool Tables Breakfast, Lunch, Après & Dinner OPEN ALL DAY

HILTON WHISTLER RESORT & SPA t: 1 604 932 1982 4050 Whistler Way

hiltonwhistler.com/dining.html

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CHILL OUT WITH A SPARKLING DRY LAMBRUSCO

BONNY MAKAREWICZ

WORLD OF BUBBLES PERFECT PAIRING BY SAMANTHA RAHN

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The Nijjar family is pleased to introduce you to the Royal Taste of India. Our chefs provide the essence of traditional Indian Cuisine with a modern touch, preparing each dish to your specifications. Our sister company Kismet Estate Winery, located in Oliver BC, produces VQA quality red & white wine to pair with our exotic menu. Fine Dining & Take Out Catering Available WHISTLER MARKETPLACE

604-932-2010 Open ALL DAY from 11am to late

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2018

E A R LY E V E RYO N E LO V E S Italian sparkling wine. Prosecco consumption has been growing at an exponential rate in the last several years, and fizzy, lightly-sweet and delicious Moscato continues to charm. But what about the classic bubble from the heart of Emilia-Romagna in Italy: Lambrusco? Plenty of it was (and is) mass produced in the sweet, cloying style of decades past, and that may perhaps have given Lambrusco a bad rap. This season, however, I challenge you to explore the fabulous, foodfriendly, dry-style Lambrusco for every occasion. You'll avoid the nextday headache from the more traditional sweeter version, allowing you to enjoy your hike, round of golf or day in the bike park, and you'll be part of the trendsetting crowd drinking this sparkling red. I have two to recommend that are available in Whistler, in two different styles: First, the medium-pink cranberry-toned Piria from Paltrinieri. It's super dry, with bracing acidity that can cut through a rich creamy sauce of your favourite pasta, or a plate of Prosciutto di Parma, its natural, neighboroughly match. It features plenty of red berry aromas which come from Lambrusco di Sorbara grapes blended with some Lambrusco Salamino grapes and comes from Sorbara DOC, just outside of Modena. It's so versatile, from refreshing patio sipping, first courses and even sushi, to salami and cheese. $21.99 at BC Liquor Stores. The second choice comes in the decisively dark, purple-red style of dry Lambrusco, and for that you must try Medici Ermete Concerto from Lambrusco Reggiano DOC. You’ll recognize the Reggiano from the famous cheese, Parmigiano-Reggiano, and this robust fizz works well with its countryman as the tannin is softened by the sharp, salty goodness of great aged cheese. The glass bursts with mountains of dark berries, and the texture is rich enough for meaty lasagna, savoury-stuffed pasta and every manner of BBQ fare. $19.99 at BC Liquor Stores. I keep a bottle of each of these beauties in the fridge as often as I can to serve well chilled for every occasion. Ask for them at your favourite restaurant, shop and patio and be part of the Lambrusco revolution!

— Samantha Rahn is a passionate sommelier and world-traveller, and the Wine Director at Araxi.


7:34 PM

The moment you realized what it meant to savour every Whistler experience.

Everybody’s favourite Upper Village eatery has something (delicious) for everyone. An elevated casual dining experience delivered by an animated open kitchen, Portobello’s made-to-order sandwich selection and gourmet pastry and coffee operation have expanded to include open-flame rotisserie chicken, pork ribs and delectable smoked brisket. From the rustic, modern alpine design and expanded full-service bar focusing on local craft beers, to the new market-style retail space, it’s always a good time to see what’s cooking at Portobello.

P O R T O B E L L O

VISIT FAIRMONT.COM/WHISTLER/DINING

BREAKFAST: 7:00 A.M. - 11:00 A.M. | LUNCH: 11:00 A.M. - 4:00 P.M. APRÈS: 4:00 P.M. - 5:00 P.M. | SMOKEHOUSE DINNER: 5:00 P.M. - 9:00 P.M. Open daily, times may be subject to change.


Indian cuisine that uses a palette of flavours ~ you’ll feel as if you’re halfway around the world! Open 7 days a week for Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner NEW IN THE HILTON WHISTLER RESORT Overlooking Mountain Square, Whistler Village | 604-932-9900

www.indianmasalabistro.com

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casual dining

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SHARING CHARCUTERIE TASTY BOARDS OF MEATS, CHEESES AND BREAD TEMPT BY DAY OR NIGHT IN WHISTLER

BAR MANAGER JASON REDMOND (RIGHT) EXPLAINS THE DETAILS OF BAR OSO’S HOUSE-MADE CHARCUTERIE.

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F APRÈS-STYLE NACHOS WERE THE GO-TO group appie in Whistler’s nascent days, charcuterie is the new standard share fare. And could anything be more perfectly Whistler than a good charcuterie board? Arguably not. Low-key and fun, with a decidedly international flavour and often some local flair, it is the perfect shared experience to relive a moment or a day in the mountains. >>

STO RY BY A LI S O N TAY LO R

PH OTO S BY DAV I D B U Z Z A R D


TRY ONE OF BASALT’S CHARCUTERIE BOARDS WHILE ENJOYING THEIR AMAZING VILLAGE STROLL PATIO.

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BASALT WINE + SALUMERIA APTLY-NAMED “THE STROLL,” Basalt’s largest charcuterie board is best served on the edge of the Village Stroll, on one of Whistler’s best patios. There, you can languish and relish the different flavour profiles of Basalt’s complex charcuterie boards, all while watching the world walk by — the mountain bikers, the tourists, the locals. But where to begin? The elk salami from Vancouver’s Two Rivers Speciality Meats adds some spice; or from farther afield, a little fennel seed Finocchiona from Italy or an earthy bite of Tartufo salami, made with truffles. And let’s not forget the cheeses — the buttery gouda Beemster from Holland melting in your mouth or waking up with the sharp Spanish manchego. Better yet, sample a little taste of Whistler with the in-house herbed labneh. “We salt it and hang it for three or four days,” explains Basalt’s manager Kirsten Reddaway of the Middle Eastern-style curd cheese. “It’s a soft spreadable yoghurt-flavoured cheese which is quite delicious.” Also, made in-house, is Basalt’s Rossdown Farms chicken liver mousse which may be the most popular thing of all in its charcuterie line up. “We’ve had it on the menu since day one and people ask us for the recipe all the time,” says Reddaway. Chef may have even passed along the recipe to one or two international guests, she adds. One bite of the mouth-watering mousse and… it’s easy to see why. Build your own board or let Basalt do it for you.

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“FOR US IT’S MORE ABOUT EATING TOGETHER — THE FAMILY, THE FRIENDS — AND BEING ABLE TO SPEND TIME TOGETHER.” — Jorge Munoz Santos

BAR OSO (opening page) AND THEN THERE’S BAR OSO. Tucked behind Araxi, still on the Stroll, Bar Oso needs no introduction when it comes to charcuterie; it’s the backbone of the Bar Oso experience. Madrid-born chef Jorge Munoz Santos cut his teeth in Whistler as sous chef at Araxi in 2011 before taking the helm at Bar Oso, two and a half years ago. The idea was to bring a little piece of Spain to Whistler, particularly in the way the Spaniards share food. “For us it’s more about eating together — the family, the friends — and being able to spend time together,” says Santos. The trick, however, to any good charcuterie board, is in the quality of the meat, he says, and the food at Bar Oso speaks for itself. Bar Oso’s fresh charcuterie board is all made in-house — duck liver parfait, rabbit rillettes, pheasant pâté and ham hock terrine. If the fresh board is a little overwhelming for the beginner palate, there’s the traditional cured board too — prosciutto, salami, serrano, chorizo, wagyu bresaola. All the cheeses at Bar Oso are Spanish. Over time, Santos has seen people embrace the shared experience, particularly as he interacts with them at the bar while building the boards. “I was able to change their minds of being able to share food and eat it together.” >>


BY JEEP OR ATV

CRYSTAL HUT

SALMON BAKE AT 6000 FT ON BLACKCOMB MOUNTAIN

604.938.1616

CANADIANWILDERNESS.COM ADVENTURE DESK: Carleton Lodge, 4282 Mountain Square

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CURE LOUNGE & PATIO AT NITA LAKE LODGE

CURE LOUNGE’S CHARCUTERIE BOARD FEATURES ITS HOMEMADE BREAD.

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– Tandoor Oven – – Great Vegetarian Selection –

Tandoori Grill Indian Cuisine

WHEN A SOURDOUGH bread starter has its own name, especially a name like “Fonster,” there’s every chance you’re going to taste the homemade difference. Nita Lake’s “Fonster” does not disappoint. It’s the perfect complement for Cure’s charcuterie board and has been at the heart of all the fresh homemade bread coming from this boutique lodge in Creekside these past seven years. And it’s still going strong. “It’s been treated with love,” says Jen Girardi, marketing coordinator at the Nita Lake Lodge of the special starter, of the bread that sets the tone for the rest of the Cure’s charcuterie board. This board is all about the meat from the fennelflecked finocchiona salami to the emperor ham. With taste teasers like fruit chutney and olives on the side, this is a great starter to whet the palate. It’s also a nice share plate, the ultimate complement to the setting — a large welcoming deck, with often a warm breeze sighing from the edges of Nita Lake and the sun setting over the mountains. The menu changes seasonally with additions from the rooftop garden and seasonal fruits and vegetables. The charcuterie, however, remains a staple at Cure.

OPEN LATE

Mon. to Sat. till 3 a.m. Sun. till 2 a.m.

4368 Main St. # 201, Corner Northlands Blvd.

604 .905.4900

Restaurant and Take-Out

ENTREES FROM $15 We serve free-run chicken dishes from the Fraser Valley Farm (raised with no added hormones or steroids), grass-fed lamb and OCEAN WISE (TM) Prawns and Fish

MENU AND ONLINE OPTIONS: tandooriwhistler.com VANCOUVER VENUE: originaltandoorikitchens.com DINNER DELIVERY DIRECT: 604.966.6866 or whistlerdinein.com Lunch from 11:30 am Dinner from 5 pm

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(604) 932-0410 4368 Main Street


STONESEDGE IT’S NO SURPRISE that some of the cheese on the Stonesedge charcuterie board is from Natural Pastures on Vancouver Island; you can taste freshness in the Smoked Boerenkaas. The beauty in working with local suppliers is the chance to get input directly from them and then put it to the test. And so, the Stonesedge charcuterie never stays exactly the same, which is one more reason to keep coming back. “I think it’s the ability to change it up,” says general manager Ben Harris of the Stonesedge difference. “(The local suppliers are) always bringing new and different ideas.” There are also the unique and subtle Stonesedge touches — the generous spoonful of homemade blueberry chutney beside the blueberry gorgonzola, the homemade beer mustard next to the locallysourced meats or the toasted maple pumpkin seeds for that extra dash of sweetness. “A lot of our menu is geared toward sharing,” says Harris. Unlike the other options, charcuterie is a go-to order any time of the day — from a sunny brunch on the Stonesedge patio on the edge of the Village to a cozy late-night snack. “It pairs really well with sangria during the summertime,” adds Harris. Sangria, sun, and charcuterie. Not a bad way to while away a Village patio session in the height of summer. W

THE STONESEDGE CHARCUTERIE BOARD IS ALWAYS CHANGING, WITH NEW PRODUCTS FROM LOCAL SUPPLIERS.

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Whistler’s Best Patio

Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Whistler’s Best Patio - Lakeside! Daily Specials & Weekly Features Happy Hour 3-5PM Monday - Friday for all up to date info and menus and to book online

tablenineteen.com 604.938.9898

Table Nineteen at Nicklaus North Golf Course 3 minutes north of Whistler Village - Free Parking Reservations highly recommended EVERYONE WELCOME (no dress code for clubhouse)

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village vibe

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SPICE UP SUMMER A DASH OF BITTERS WITH SOME OF WHISTLER’S BEST COCKTAIL CRAFTERS

STORY BY BRAD E N D UP UIS

THE FAIRMONT’S GUILLAUME NOEL’S NOT-SO-SECRET INGREDIENTS FOR CRAFTING HIS OWN BITTERS.

F

OR T HE U N I N I T I AT ED , D I V I N G PAL AT E- FI RST into the world of bitters might seem somewhat daunting. The possibilities are, after all, quite literally endless. “The bottom line, the whole purpose, is bitters will add depth and character,” says Scott Barber, bar manager at BEARFOOT BISTRO. There are some common, traditional takes — Angostura bitters is used in many cocktails — but they can be anything, really. “I have almost 20 different bitters, at least, back here,” says the Bearfoot’s award-winning bartender. “Plum bitters, rhubarb bitters, orange bitters, whiskey bitters, chocolate bitters, celery bitters, mint bitters… pretty much anything and everything.” But when using bitters, less is always more. “They’re really high alcohol, and you literally use just dashes — we’re talking one-to-three dashes in most cocktails,” Barber says. There are, however, exceptions to every rule. “A Trinidad sour has an ounce — one full ounce of Angostura bitters — which is very intense. Very, very intense.” This summer, Barber’s cocktail menu will likely feature creations crafted from orange, rhubarb and chocolate. >>

P H OTO S BY DAV I D B U Z Z A R D WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2018

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“WE’VE DONE SOME WITH LABRADOR TEA (PLANT) THAT I GRABBED AT THE BASE OF ALTA LAKE, JUST BY THE WATER.” —Guillaume Noel

SCOTT BARBER OF

CLASSIC COCKTAILS

BEARFOOT BISTRO.

FROM ARAXI.

RENE WUETHRICH IS ALWAYS up for the challenge of creating something special. The long-standing bartender has worked at the award-winning ARAXI RESTAURANT + OYSTER BAR for years. And as such, he has had a hand in creating a stellar reputation and shepherding the large and loyal following at the upscale bar. Don’t be afraid to challenge the bartenders with some out-there requests, he says; there’s a good chance they’re way ahead of you. As for bitters, “they enhance the flavours of the cocktails. That’s what we use it for, mainly in classic cocktails,” Wuethrich says. “So old fashioneds, manhattans… especially piscos, and in the summertime we do a lot of old fashioneds with more seasonal fruits like plums and rhubarb.” If you’re stopping by the restaurant this summer for a drink, Wuethrich recommends just that: a rhubarb or plum old fashioned. “We infuse the bourbon with the fruit and add all the ingredients to it,” he says. “So lots of alcohol.” AS THE MAN OVERSEEING THE FAIRMONT CHATEAU WHISTLER’s entire beverage program (which includes no fewer than seven restaurants, including the Mallard Lounge), Guillaume Noel has to play to a wide range of taste buds. “Stop me if I get in too deep,” says Noel, with a laugh. With his self-crafted stock of bitters, he’s got a lot

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to work with. “A lot of people describe it as a bartender’s salt and pepper,” he says. “It’s just a fun way to season your cocktail, and it’s surprisingly easy to make, it just needs quite a bit of patience.” In crafting his own bitters, Noel likes to give visitors the full flavour of Whistler and the Sea to Sky corridor. “We’ve done some with Labrador tea (plant) that I grabbed at the base of Alta Lake, just by the water, or some lavender from our rooftop garden has been used as well. I found some huckleberry last summer… so I have a bitters for (this) summer that I’m planning to use with huckleberries and orange.” Once he’s got his experiment-of-the-month picked out, Noel adds the “fancy bitter ingredients” — seeds, spices, black pepper and the like — and dumps the whole mix into the highest proof alcohol he can find (usually 50-percent vodka or rum in B.C.). Four months of steeping and another month simmering in water, and the homemade creation is almost ready for testing. The local flair of native plants connects visitors to the places they can see and explore right around Whistler. “Lots of people will tell you it’s not worth making bitters nowadays because there are so many awesome bitters you can buy, and you know, somebody went through the testing phase for you,” Noel says. “But it’s a nice story, and the bartenders are proud to use their own stuff.” W


at The Keg

Daily Happy Hour Specials

3pm-6pm food & drinks | 10pm-1am drinks

10pm No Cover

WILDIN’ OUT FUNK NIGHT ALL LOVE NO CLUB THEORY Wednesdays DJ KEVLAR

Thursdays DAKOTA

Fridays & Saturdays TyMETAL & TIM LIVINGSTONE

Sundays TyMETAL

4 4 2 9 Sund ial Plac e. 60 4-9 32 -51 51 whist lersport sbar. c om

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shopping whistler

NC

ESSENTIALS & INDULGENCES Spring and summer bring a renewed sense of growth, longer days and an urge for adventure. Whistler has you covered for all sorts of fun, whether you’re heading into the mountains or strolling through the Village. From mouth-watering treats to stylish fashion to functional gear, each item in our latest shopping guide will soon become a staple in your life. — Brigitte Mah CLASSIC CANADIAN MUSKOKA CHAIR Sit back and make some Canadian memories with the Classic Canadian Muskoka Chair available at Camp Lifestyle + Coffee Co. The iconic national deck chair gets a funky facelift in a full gamut of 16 brilliant colours, from Canadian red to yellow, orange, pink, green, charcoal, blue and more. Made from recycled plastics, the chair is not only environmentally-friendly but it also can sustain the elements of all four seasons. $399.99

MOUNTAIN PENDANT This unique sterling silver and rose gold mountain pendant from Keir Fine Jewellery is the perfect Whistler memento to cherish for years to come. The pendant includes a single Canadian diamond. $275

JO LUDWIG’S ToB Short for “Thing of Beauty,” each Canadian-made ToB is a one-of-akind art glass vessel reflecting a brilliant array and blend of colours and ranging from 4 cm to 9 cm. The glittering bowls are made from fused circles of stained glass that are fired into a scorching kiln several times until the captivating effect is achieved. Available at Audain Art Museum. $150 to $550

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SHOPPING AREAS Nesters

UPPER VILLAGE

Village North

WHISTLER VILLAGE

WILDWOOD YOUTH SKATER POLARIZED SUNGLASSES No need to worry about replacing your child’s sunglasses this summer. Made from 100 per cent sustainably sourced bamboo, the Wildwood youth skater polarized sunglasses from Mountain Kids Outfitters Ltd. float if they’re dropped in water. And if your child loses or breaks them in the first year, Canadian brand Wildwood will replace them for free. $49.99

GSI GLACIER STAINLESS COMMUTER JAVAPRESS Get up and go with your coffee press and travel mug all rolled into one. The sleek design of the GSI Glacier Stainless Commuter Javapress from Escape Route not only keeps your java warm for several hours but allows for you to toss it around without the grounds seeping into your drink. $39.99

FUNCTION JUNCTION

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WHISTLER CREEKSIDE

Whistler Village is the hub of activity at the base of the mountains. A pedestrian-only paradise, it offers over 200 stores, galleries, restaurants and bars. Village North is centred

around Whistler Marketplace, which offers a supermarket, liquor store and many fine shops and amenities.

Upper Village, situated at the base of Blackcomb Mountain, is another walking-only area with many wonderful stores, restaurants and galleries. CALFSKIN MOTO JACKET Danger meets chic. A modern and luxurious take on the classic Moto Jacket, this fitted jacket is made of genuine calfskin with a removable fur collar, exquisite buckle detailing and leather trim. Available at Snowflake. $2,850 >>

Nesters is just two minutes north of Whistler Village and offers a variety of shops and restaurants, with a liquor store, grocery store and restaurants. Rainbow Plaza is five minutes north of the Village. Brand new with grocery store, liquor store, coffee shop, gas station and more.

Whistler Creekside, just a

five-minute drive south of the Village, is a shopping area near the base of Whistler Mountain.

Function Junction is just 10 minutes south of Whistler Village and offers hardware, organic groceries, breweries, bakeries and many more shops and services.


shopping whistler PATAGONIA ASCENSIONIST PACK 30L Sleek, light and durable, Patagonia’s Ascensionist pack can take you from the mellow to the gnar and everywhere in between. Its wide top makes it easy to drop your gear in and go, and the streamlined loops and daisy chains make it possible for you to clip on everything from your ice axes to snowshoes. The fabric has a light polyurethane coating, making it moderately weather resistant. Available at Patagonia. $179

Organic Smoothies Juice and Coffee Bar Fresh and Local Organic Produce Organic Grocery and Convenience Needs

Organic Salad Bar for All Diets Organic Soup of the Day and Sandwich Combos

House Made Salad Dressings and Dips Fresh Baked Goods Daily – GF and VE Available

Self-Serve Frozen Yogurt Bar

Specialty Desserts for all Diets Preservative-Free, Delicious Meats and Pepperonis

Catering Available

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olives Community Market Vancouver

Open every day from 8am to 7pm 101-1200 Alpha Lake Road | 604.932.3484 info@olivesmarketwhistler.com www.olivesmarketwhistler.com

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THE PROUST QUESTIONNAIRE If you’ve ever picked up a copy of Vanity Fair and flipped to the back, you’ll have read Proust Questionnaire answers from celebrities. Popularized by the French essayist and novelist Marcel Proust, who believed that in answering these questions a person reveals his or her true nature, the book includes questionnaires that have been filled out by notoriously influential individuals, along with ones for you and your friends to answer, including “What is your idea of perfect happiness?” Available at Get the Goods. $65 CLASSIC AUTHENTIC GUCCI GG MONOGRAM BELT BAG Gems like the vintage classic authentic Gucci GG monogram belt bag are the reason consignment shops are a delight to visit. The three pockets are ideal for separating your essentials, and the new condition of the bag would fool everyone into thinking you paid top dollar. Available at Déjà Vogue Boutique. $300 (retail $850) >>


accessories ltd.

It’s not what you need... It’s what you want.

Located at the base of the Whistler Village Gondola 604.932.4100 O P E N

L A T E

Proudly supporting local designers. Whistler Town Plaza 604.905.6290

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Fuel yourself and your family.

Whistler’s Largest Grocery Store

Marketplace, Whistler. Open 9am - 9pm daily. Free Parking.

604-938-2850 • www.marketplaceiga.com

shopping whistler

ROCKY MOUNTAIN CHOCOLATE FACTORY’S FUDGE It’s not often you get to see your food made right before your eyes, but at the Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory you can watch the famous velvety fudge made in a large copper kettle, then poured onto a giant marble slab and rhythmically creamed by hand into a loaf. There are over 25 flavours to delight your palate including maple walnut, dark chocolate orange, vanilla hedgehog, rocky road and red velvet. $9.99 (half pound) or $14.99 (one pound)

COW WARS T-SHIRT Look out, Darth Vader. Ham Solo and Moobacca are on the loose and coming for you. The witty parodies of Cows T-shirts have become iconic souvenirs, offering both humour and popular culture connection. All shirts are screen printed in Prince Edward Island, making them a unique remembrance of Canada. Available at Cows. $14.99 (kids) to $21.99 (adults) GOURMET POPCORN Whoever said that popcorn is simple hasn’t tried gourmet popcorn. With flavours ranging from sweet Canadian Maple Sea Salt to savoury Pickles and Cheese or the middle ground of Snowy Cheese and Barbeque Parmesan, there’s a flavour you haven’t tried and will enjoy. Available at Great Glass Elevator Candy Shop. $3.29 to $11.99, depending on size W

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Function Junction Whistler’s only fashion footwear store LOCATED IN THE WESTIN

110-4090 Whistler Way 604.905.0036

Discover the Locals’ Secret 8 minutes south of the Village The

Daily Planet Home Interiors Inc.

ANTIQUES ORIGINAL ART FURNITURE HOME DECOR COOL STUFF

Award-winning craft beers, ice-cold off-sales, complete keg sale packages, special events & beer-inspired food

Open 7 days, 11am – late

TAPHOUSE HOURS: Sun–Wed, noon–8pm Thurs –Sat, 11am–10pm BREWERY TOURS: Tues–Sun, 2:30 or 4:00pm

1-1030 Millar Creek Road

604.938.6336

solesofwhistler.com 1

dailyplanet whistler.com

2

We are purebread, a nice little bakery in Function Junction. Our aim is a simple one: to make really great bread and great tasty treats.

'Gently~used' & new clothing, footwear & accessories for guys & gals!

Open 7 days 8.30am - 5pm Also visit us at our Village location on Olympic Plaza, open 7 days 8am - 6pm

Come down and Deja Vogue with us. We'd love to see YOU!

Follow us on Twitter @purebreadwhis

A charming and unique selection of gifts and kitchenware for you to choose Mugs • Dinner Plates • Platters • Placemats Practical Kitchen Accessories and more

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604-932-DEJA [3352] #104~1055 Millar Creek Road

1-604-938-3013 Function Junction

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1-1040 Millar Creek Rd.

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102-4295 Blackcomb Way

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services Directory 2017

To advertise in the Services Directory, call Catherine Power-Chartrand at 604-932-1672

MASSAGE CLINIC

New Patients & Emergencies Welcome

604-938-0777 www.bluehighways.ca

SERVING WHISTLER FOR 25 YEARS

Voted Best Dental Clinic

bookings@bluehighways.ca

For appointments call: 604-938-1550 #317 – 2063 Lake Placid Rd., Whistler

2nd Floor, #206-4368 Main Street, Market Pavilion LOCATED IN THE HEART OF WHISTLER VILLAGE

PROVEN RESULTS –

I’m with you every step of the way Specializing in Residential and Investment property in Whistler

(next to Creekside Market)

Rentals Skills Tours

Carolyn Hill, ASSOCIATE BROKER PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION

Delivering the Dream – Whistler cel: 604-907-0770

email: chill@whistlerbuyer.com www.whistlerbuyer.com Voted Whistler’s Best Realtor

Everything you need for your Health, Beauty and Convenience, right in the heart of Whistler Village Prestigious Beauty Boutique Full Service Pharmacy offering Travel Vaccinations & Medication Reviews Prescription Deliveries and much more Whistler Village (near The Keg & Movie Theatre)

604-905-5666 www.shoppersdrugmart.ca

in Lost Lake PassivHaus

whistler • 604.905.0071 • crosscountryconnection.ca

ACUPUNCTURE | TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE LASER ACUPUNCTURE | OSTEOPATHY REGISTERED MASSAGE THERAPY HOURS: OPEN FROM 10– 6, MON-SAT 208-4368 Main Street (next to the Whistler Eye Clinic) 604.962.8828 | whistlerintegrative.com

WHISTLER RECEPTION SERVICES Providing a World Class Greeting in a World Class Resort

TM

STUDIOS

Countryand Connection Files in PDF format, greyscale or CMYK Now available - Luxury HomeCross Management Care Advertisement Yoga and wellness services in the heart of Whistler Village!

Summer 2017 We offier many different styles to suit all levels of practice. Our class A unique central check-in – concierge in-resort contact for Adand # CXC-Summer2017-Ad-1 services directory confirmation: call Ian at 604.905.0071 cap of 15 maintains personalized attention and a sense of community. guests, owners and managers of vacation rentals and properties Publication: Whistler Magazine WHISTLER VILLAGE IN DEER LODGE AND UPPER VILLAGE IN GLACIER LODGE BOOKING ONLINE OR BY PHONE IS HIGHLY RECOMMENDED ad size: (3.5 W x 2.25 H) technical concerns: Brian Hydesmith 604-935-2020 info@whistleryogacara.com March 28, 2017 design@hydesmith.com or call 204.487.0 Call 604-966-0999 to set upDate: a free consultation! www.whistleryogacara.com www.whistlerreception.com / info@whistlerreception.com WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2018

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PIQUE NEWSMAGAZINE

Pop superstar Justin Bieber surprised Whistler’s midget A1 Winterhawks hockey team by joining them in a scrimmage in November.

Italian DJ/producer/chart-topping megastar Benny Benassi performing at the Longhorn in February.

Whistler luger Reid Watts (centre) finished 12th overall in men's singles at the 2018 PyeongChang Olympic Games. He's joined here by dad Jim Watts and mom Suzanne Thomas.

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Mezzo-soprano Marion Newman with the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra in the Whistler Olympic Plaza outdoor concert space last summer.

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First Nations Coast Salish poet and author Lee Maracle reading from her most recent book, My Conversations with Canadians, at the Whistler Writers Festival in October.

Singer Jimmy Buffett with longtime Whistler Blackcomb employee Rebecca Bowie in March.

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WHISTLER PRIDE

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Comedy icon Margaret Cho headlined the Whistler Pride and Ski Festival in January.

Finnish DJ Darude (right) performed two shows at Moe Joe's in March.

TOURISM WHISTLER/JUSTA JESKOVA

Eleven-year-old Whistlerite Mischa Arnott enjoyed some special one-on-one time with singer Katy Perry before Perry’s February concert at Rogers Arena.

Comedian and TV host Chelsea Handler with Whistler DJ Peacefrog, at Buffalo Bill’s in January.

Artist Jessa Gilbert working on a painting at the Fall for Arts kick-off party in August at the Maury Young Arts Centre. W

TOURISM WHISTLER/JUSTA JESKOVA

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Actor Rob Lowe with Whistler weekender Janet Carswell, at the Roundhouse this winter.

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KEEP YOUR EYES OPEN — YOU NEVER KNOW WHO YOU MIGHT SEE!


PHOTO / CHRIS BEZAMAT

AVAILABLE AT:

THE NORTH FACE

STORE OWNED AND OPERATED BY WHISTLER BLACKCOMB

Deer Lodge, Across from the Brewhouse, Whistler Village 604-938-7432 DATE:

APRIL 3, 2018

FILE:

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SUMMER 2018

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Profile for Whistler Publishing

Whistler Magazine Summer 2018  

Whistler’s premier publication since 1980

Whistler Magazine Summer 2018  

Whistler’s premier publication since 1980

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