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Wairarapa’s locally owned community newspaper

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2019

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Aratoi going on 50 years Emily Ireland Art and culture are essential to people’s wellbeing. That’s the philosophy that has driven Aratoi Regional Trust chair Barbara Roydhouse to support the Aratoi Wairarapa Museum of Art and History across multiple eras. This year, the museum is celebrating its 50th birthday, and a special exhibition marking this anniversary is opening on Friday night. The exhibition, titled “50/fifty – 50 Years of Aratoi” represents 50 years of collecting. With more than 3000 items to choose from it has been no easy task to put together. The selection reflects the highlights and significant events, as well as the many gifts received, that have helped form the Aratoi collection. From the obvious, such as Taonga Maori and work by icons Colin McCahon, Robin White and Barbara Hepworth,

to the less obvious: moa bones and an 1869 ship’s biscuit with a tale to tell of the visit of a prince, there will be some surprises as items never shown before emerge into the light. Aratoi, formerly known as the Wairarapa Arts Centre, opened on October 11, 1969. The full cost of the arts centre, including furnishings and fittings, was $45,741, which was met by the Arts Hall Trust Fund to which the Masterton Trust Lands Trust (MTLT) had contributed a total of $22,042. MTLT is still a main funder of Aratoi today. Prior to the opening, a group of residents – including John Maunsell of Hansells – purchased the Barbara Hepworth sculpture “Galliard – Forms in Movement” in 1963 at a cost of 475 guineas, for the projected arts centre. This was the first of many actions of community support for the regional cultural

institution. Entering into the 1980s, finances were getting tighter and tighter, according to Roydhouse. She was a committee member of the Wairarapa Arts Centre from 1984-1989 and was president from 1989-1993. Back then, the building was “like a rectangle”, she said. “It was right on the footpath; it wasn’t very wide. “You walked in and there was a foyer, and the office, a little kitchen, and then one gallery. “You could practically stand at the doorway and see everything there was to see.” With an economy in recession, money was tight. “I remember being more worried about how we were going to pay the power bill than almost anything else,” “That’s how tight the money was. Continued on page 4 The Wairarapa Arts Centre. PHOTO/WAIRARPA ARCHIVE

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2 Wairarapa Midweek Local News Wednesday, August 14, 2019 Trusts

Newsweek

Carterton

New cycle park on cards

Trust fi nances strong

Masterton Trust Lands Trust (MTLT) recorded an operating surplus of $5.3 million and a 10.9 per cent increase in equity to $46.3 million. Full story P24

The Lions Club of Carterton plans to celebrate its 50th birthday by building a new bicycle skills park at Carrington Park in the heart of Carterton. Full story P26

Music

Budding reggae stars

It’s been an exhilarating couple of years for Makoura College’s Fresh Noiz. Full story P33

Funeral

Martinborough

Farewell, Sir Brian

CCTV cameras in town

CCTV cameras and vehicle registration plate identification cameras are being installed in the centre of town to deter criminal behaviour and provide peace of mind. Full story P47

Masterton has farewelled its favourite son, Sir Brian Lochore, with the help of a large collection of former All Blacks, a tonne of respect, and plenty of humour. Full story P44

Inside

Contact us

Interact

Local News 1-8

Lifestyle 17-44

Puzzles 49

Carterton 10

Rural 45

Events 50-51

Opinion 12-13

Business 46-47

Classifieds 52-53

Extra 14

Wai Write 48

Sport 53-55

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Wednesday, August 14, 2019 Local News Wairarapa Midweek

3

Woman killed in Solway crash Emma Brown A woman has died and three others were injured in a single-vehicle car crash on High St in Masterton last Wednesday night. Emergency services were called to the scene, just outside the entrance to South Park at about 9.30pm. The car was traveling south out of Masterton when it crashed into the park’s brick and iron entrance. The female driver died at the scene. Fire, ambulance, and police attended, and the area was cordoned off while the Serious Crash Unit investigated. There were four occupants in the vehicle, all whom were injured during the crash. The Life Flight Westpac

rescue helicopter landed in the park bordering the crash, and two of the passengers were airlifted to Wellington Hospital – one in a critical condition and one in a serious condition. They are both now in a stable condition. The third passenger, a 22-year-old female, was taken to Wairarapa Hospital. This is the fourth road death in Wairarapa this year. A bystander who did not want to be named said they heard a very loud bang and saw the car. “It was a pretty horrific scene. “I saw about three people on the ground and

Emergency services blocked off a section of High St till 4am after the crash. PHOTO/JASON IRELAND [Inset] Vehicle from the deadly crash along High St. PHOTO/SUPPLIED

there were about seven other people there helping the people. “It was pretty serious.”

The scene was cleared, and the road was back open just before 4am. Detective senior sergeant Haley Ryan said the cause and

circumstances were being investigated by police. The crash has been confirmed not to have been during a police chase which had been

speculated online. Police would like to hear from anyone who saw the crash, if they had not yet spoken to police.

Chaotic joyride ends after 18km on the rims Emma Brown A man’s joyride of Wairarapa in a stolen vehicle sparked a police pursuit through Wairarapa on Thursday night – with the last 18km of the chase driven “on the rims” after the tyres of the vehicle were spiked. Police received several calls late Thursday afternoon regarding a car driving dangerously and doing burnouts in Lower Hutt. One person reported seeing the car doing burnouts outside of the Lower Hutt police station at one point. Police attempts to locate the car were initially unsuccessful. At 7.15pm police were advised that a black Commodore had collided with another ute on SH2, near Marchant Rd, Pakuratahi, in Upper Hutt.

The driver of the Commodore allegedly threatened the driver of the ute, before taking it and driving north on SH2, over the Remutaka Hill. The police pursuit began in Featherston, with two lead cars involved, though some witnesses reported there were several more police cars involved. This could not be confirmed by police. The chase continued through Greytown and Carterton, with police deploying road spikes at the Waingawa Bridge, south of Masterton, which police said caused the front tyres of the offending vehicle to deflate, but the driver did not stop. One witness opposite KFC in Masterton said they saw a ute come “rattling” past. “It was grinding the road, running on the rims.” He said he saw two police

cars in very close pursuit and another six police cars following. A SH2 resident in Opaki heard a loud vehicle go past with at least four police cars behind it. “The vehicle was making a loud flapping noise,” thought to be the shredded tyres. The chase continued north of Masterton, ending near Mikimiki Rd, where the vehicle finally came to a stop. The driver was arrested at about 8.10pm. The driver, a 31-yearold Napier man, is facing a number of charges, including failing to stop for police, assault, reckless driving, dangerous driving, possession of an offensive weapon, and endangering transport. He appeared in Masterton District Court on Friday and has been remanded in custody until August 15.

A logging truck lost its load in Clareville last week, blocking the morning traffic.  PHOTO/EMMA BROWN

Rolled logs block traffic Emma Brown Runaway logs caused chaos during last Thursday’s morning rush after a logging truck lost its load on SH2 at Clareville at around 7am. The truck was heading south towards Carterton just after the Hughes Line turnoff, when the truck’s trailer tipped

onto its side, and a number of logs fell onto the road. One hit another truck and car. No one was injured during the crash and the only damage was to the vehicles. There was debris blocking the road and the logging truck’s trailer

could be seen on its side next to fallen logs. Diversions were in place at Chester Rd and Hughes Line, adding about 15 minutes to travelling times. A crane and a digger were required to remove the logs and the road was not cleared until just before lunchtime.


4 Wairarapa Midweek Local News Wednesday, August 14, 2019

Aratoi to celebrate 50 years of Continued from page 1 “We were funded by the councils and the trusts – and it sounds ungrateful to say this – but it was never enough. “The string was always too short.” By the 1990s it was evident that the Wairarapa Arts Centre building was inadequate, particularly for the growing collection of art works and taonga Maori. It was unable to provide collection space for historic objects, many of which went out of the region to the Dominion Museum, now Te Papa. In 1996, the Wairarapa Cultural Trust, now Aratoi Regional Trust was set up. This was the organisation that ran the centre and saw the new, much-larger building come to fruition, which opened in February 2002. This new building was named Aratoi. Masterton Trust Lands Trust provided the land and funded the architecturally awardwinning building and fitout, and Masterton District Council was to provide the bulk of operational funding, with contributions from Carterton and South Wairarapa councils and other local trusts. “Bob Francis was the mayor at the time, and people involved in the new build would meet every week to ensure this all happened,” Roydhouse said. “I think it’s a miraculous building for a town this size.” Roydhouse said the biggest similarity now to 50 years ago is that the community has always “worked very hard to have a flourishing and stimulating gallery for all the people of the Wairarapa”. “We have the foresight of the trustees of the Masterton Trust Lands Trust to thank for an establishment not seen in other similar sized regions. “The difference between Aratoi and the Wairarapa Arts Foundation, is that

Aratoi Wairarapa Museum of Art and History was formerly the Wairarapa Arts Centre.

PHOTO/WAIRARPA ARCHIVE

The opening of Kahungunu Ka Moe – Ka Puta at Aratoi Wairarapa Museum of Art and History, 2004.

once Aratoi was built, the caring of our taonga stored in other places could be returned, cared for and viewed.” Ian Grant, who has also been involved with Aratoi in various capacities over many eras said the Wairarapa Arts Centre was “ahead of its time”. “In the early 1960s, when they first started talking about it, Masterton’s population was about 15,000, maybe less. “No other community

this size has done anything like this.” Grant, who admits his artistic skills don’t go much further than drawing a straight line, said he has always been interested in art arts and culture. “It’s something I have always felt has been important – it’s an important part of the soul. “People who manage to live their lives without the arts are missing something. “We are trying to provide that for everyone.”

Grant was on the Wairarapa Arts Foundation committee from 1975, was president of the foundation from 1976 to 1979, and then deputy chair for several more years. He was on the committee again for a period in the late 1980s and early 1990s and was Roydhouse’s deputy for a period. He was also a board member of the Aratoi Regional Trust from 2010-2013.

PHOTO/FILE

Aratoi Wairarapa Museum of Art and History director Susanna Shadbolt has been working closely with staff to ensure the 50th anniversary programme – supported by Hansell’s, Goodeye, Resene, Trust House and Friends of Aratoi – can be enjoyed by everyone in the region. The exhibition showcases works acquired from each decade since its opening in 1969. The sponsorship from

Resene means that several sections of the gallery space are coloured differently to draw a distinction between the decades. In the most recent decade, a bicycle from 1893, thought to be the link between the Penny Farthing and the modern bike, will be displayed. It will be exhibited in the most recent decade because it was returned to the Aratoi collection in 2012 after being held in Wellington.


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Wednesday, August 14, 2019 Local News Wairarapa Midweek

5

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NZ Chicken Breasts (Skinless Boneless) Ian Grant and his wife Diane at an event at Aratoi last year.

PHOTO/FILE

showcasing these things which is so accessible to both locals and visitors alike”. “We are extremely proud to have contributed to Aratoi’s first half century and we look forward to continuing our relationship in the future.”

Aratoi’s 50th Anniversary programme details:

Aratoi director Susanna Shadbolt, with Aratoi Regional Trust chair Barbara Roydhouse. PHOTO/FILE

It was originally part of the Masterton Museum Collection. “We are really telling the story of the collection through this exhibition,” Shadbolt said. “It is an account of 50 years of collecting … you can really tell what happened at the time – what was important.” She said the best part about her job was “changing perceptions”

that people had about the museum. “What is really worth celebrating is the past few years where we feel the community has really come on board and is recognising Aratoi as the caretaker of their cultural, and visual history, which is really special. MTLT board chair Leanne Southey said Masterton was “extremely fortunate to have a facility

The “50/fifty – 50 Years of Aratoi” exhibition opens on Friday at 5.30pm. Bob Francis will be the MC, the three Wairarapa mayors will officiate, and the guest speaker will be Luit Bieringa, former Aratoi Director and Director of the National Art Gallery (197989). There will be a free public talk on Saturday at 11am by Aratoi director Susanna Shadbolt and collection manager Bronwyn Reid. Free floor talks will also take place at Aratoi every second Sunday from September 1, at 2pm. A free education programme will run from Term 3, and a publication will launch on Aratoi’s actual birthday, Friday, October 11 at 5.30pm. Visit www.aratoi.org.nz for more information.

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6 Wairarapa Midweek Local News Wednesday, August 14, 2019

New face in SWDC mayoral race Marcus Anselm Martinborough resident Alex Beijen has set out his priorities for South Wairarapa if he wins October’s vote for mayor. Beijen, an engineering firm general manager, was the first confirmed challenger to incumbent Viv Napier. Signing the district up to the national CouncilMark rating scheme, tackling recycling, waste, and the ongoing water issues will be top of his to-do list if he gets the top job. Beijen, said recycling and reducing waste goals could be met, with central government assistance, by “setting up a sustainable waste reclamation plant, like they’ve done in Raglan, which has 3000 people, very similar to Featherston, Greytown or Martinborough”. “They have got it to down to 76 per cent of waste recycled, and they’ve planted 1.7 million trees, and they have employed 40 people. “It could be done, and it could be done much better than what we’re doing. “We’re not responsible for our recycling or our waste, we’re giving it to someone else and paying

them by the tonne to do it. “And that’s not a sustainable model. We should have higher ideals than that.” His Facebook campaign page lists his key campaign matters. But he explained that a desire to improve culture and direction was a motivation. “I used to work for the Wellington City Council for two years as a senior advisor and that gave me a very good idea about how things shouldn’t be run,” Beijen said. “Also, the impact that a poor culture, a poor mayor and not having a strong direction can have on a lot of very good and very experienced people.” Beijen said getting South Wairarapa into the CouncilMark systems of ranking and rating local authorities was a priority. South Wairarapa District Council [SWDC] told the Times-Age the system was being considered by new chief executive Harry Wilson, who said he “would like to have a good understanding of the district and all the issues we face and also better understand the benefits of the CouncilMark process before going ahead with

it”. Masterton is already in the scheme. Like South Wairarapa, Carterton is also yet to sign up. “At the moment, how does any ratepayer know that the council is doing a good, decent, or bad job?” Beijen said. He accepted that getting the role may not make him popular, but he pledged to make performance improvements. “You’re on a bit of a hiding to nothing,” he said. You’ll make a lot of decisions that people aren’t happy with. But as long as you’ve pushed things forward proactively, and you’ve got a better council and a better community as a result, then you’ve done a good job. “The ultimate decider of that whether you get elected next time round, and if you get through your council without votes of no confidence, or whether you’re able to create a council which works together towards a common goal rather than arguing all the time. “That’s where I’m coming from. I don’t think it’s going to be an easy job. “The mayoralty can either be the best paid job

in the world or the worst paid job in the world depending how many hours you put in to make sure things are going in the right direction.” Beijen is the first mayoral candidate to file paperwork with SWDC. At time of publication, Councillor Lee Carter and her former colleague Dayle Harwood have stated their intent to run but are yet to submit their documents. Candidate papers must be in by midday, August 16.

Alex Beijen, candidate for mayor in the South Wairarapa district council elections. PHOTO/SUPPLIED

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8 Wairarapa Midweek Local News Wednesday, August 14, 2019

Ka pai, Carterton Tomorrow marks the start of Ka Pai Carterton’s three-day community brainstorm in the foyer of the Carterton Events Centre. This is a huge opportunity for the people of Carterton (and others who care about Carterton) to have a say in what they would like to see for their community in the future. First some background, Ka Pai Carterton (KPC) is the name of the community-led development programme that has come out of a partnership between the Department of internal Affairs (DIA) and Resilient Carterton. DIA requires the development of a Community Plan that represents and reflects the desires of the whole of the Carterton community. On completion of the Community Plan and its approval by DIA, then the work begins. Projects and initiatives are run by the community with support from KPC and DIA. That support can comprise a range of resources including funding: rates are not used, this is independent of council but they support it. The key thing is that

Comment

Mike Osborne the effort comes from people in the community, hence “community-led”. KPC is in the phase of producing the Community Plan. Cimone Grayson, the facilitator, has been out and about talking to all sorts of community groups around Carterton to find out what they’d like for the future. The event, starting tomorrow is designed to capture individual ideas of how we can develop a better community. You might think that your input will make no difference. It’s like buying a raffle ticket. You’ve got a chance of winning if you buy a ticket, but you have zero chance if you don’t. Actually, until you participate, you can’t tell what will happen – your ideas and dreams may be the same as many others in which case the chances of your ideas becoming reality go up hugely. You may get inspired by what others are suggesting and that

triggers new ideas for you – that’s what brainstorming is all about. The KPC team have set out to make the whole event fun, engaging and easy with added inducements like food and drink. Saturday is going to be really busy with a heap going on. If you prefer a quieter experience, get along on Thursday during the day or Friday during the day and early evening. Details are here – www. kapaicarterton.nz/events. What happens later? All the input gets collated for a “report back” event to confirm, clarify, and prioritise the different ideas. That will be the basis of the Community Plan. Once OK’d, you get to make the ideas a reality. It’s a hugely exciting opportunity for Carterton. It depends on one thing: your ideas and input over the next few days. Be there.

More volunteers needed at SPCA shop The SPCA is looking for more people to volunteer at the SPCA Masterton Op Shop [pictured] and make a difference for animals in need. SPCA’s Central Region general manager Ros Alsford said after a six-month shortage of volunteers, the call had gone out to the Wairarapa community to help out. “If you are interested in making a difference for animals in need, we have plenty of opportunities outside of our SPCA centres – in particular volunteering at our Op Shops,” she said. “Our Masterton Op Shop helps us raise valuable funds for the animals. All proceeds go to support the SPCA and our Op Shops are a key

link between SPCA and the community.” Op Shop volunteers help with customer service, sorting through pre-loved items that are donated to the Op Shop, steaming clothes, merchandising and mending items that need minor repairs. “Our Op Shop manager Colleen and assistant manager Carolyn have been particularly short of volunteers over the past six months. We need volunteers who can carry out a variety of tasks in a retail environment and help continue with the great work our Op Shop is doing in the Wairarapa Community.” “We have plenty of opportunities available so there’s something for

everyone – whether it is working on the cash register, tidying the shop floor or steaming some of our donated clothes.” The shop remained open during the time when SPCA had difficulties with funding in 2015. It currently has one volunteer and someone else on a trial basis through the Volunteering Wairarapa buddy programme. SPCA Op Shops elsewhere in the central region operated with 40 hours of volunteer work per week and the animal welfare organisation would like to get one or two more volunteers at the Masterton Op Shop there per day.

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10 Wairarapa Midweek Carterton Wednesday, August 14, 2019

Project seeks bright ideas

Carterton

Erin Kavanagh-Hall If you have a “big and bright idea” to help enhance Carterton – whether it’s a kids’ trampoline park, bike trails to Gladstone, better transport links, or a museum devoted to Freddie Mercury – the Ka Pai Carterton team are all ears. Cimone Grayson and Lucy McKenzie, dedicated staff for the community development project Ka Pai Carterton, will be hosting a series of public engagement events over three days this week at the Carterton Events Centre. Businesses, community groups, schools, and individuals will be invited to share any ideas to help improve, uplift, and better connect the Carterton district. Ka Pai Carterton, formed at the end of 2018, is part of a community-led development programme between community organisation Resilient Carterton and the Department of Internal Affairs (DIA). Under this partnership, DIA is able to support the community in achieving locally-led initiatives by helping secure funding and assistance from other government agencies, local

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Lucy McKenzie, left, and Cimone Grayson from Ka Pai Carterton.

authorities, and tangata whenua. Following this week’s public engagements, the Ka Pai Carterton team will “identify common themes” and bring these together in a community plan that will form the basis of a submission to DIA. Ka Pai Carterton has been working alongside Creative Forest, “a learning eco-system with specially designed purpose driven areas that provide the scaffolding

and guidance you need to utilise the potential of your community”, which will be helping facilitate the public events. As facilitator, Grayson has spent the past four months meeting with the district’s various community groups and has been impressed with the ideas people have shared so far – and the existing creative and industrious spirit in the district. “Basically, our goal is to help enhance the lives of

PHOTO/SUPPLIED

the people who live, work and play in Carterton,” Grayson said. “There’s a real buzz here already – Carterton people are doers; they like to take action. “We’re looking forward to seeing what big and bright ideas come out of the event- and identifying the leadership roles that can help make them happen.” Grayson, who has previously worked in talent management, is a fairly

new Carterton resident, and saw working with Ka Pai Carterton as a chance to get to know the community. This week’s public event will be an opportunity for Ka Pai Carterton to gauge which projects are most sustainable for the district, and who are the people and groups best suited to leading them. Ka Pai Carterton can then support the projects, assisting in writing applications, accessing resources and funding. The meetings will be facilitated by education consultants Creative Forests and will have a “forest theme”. The first two sessions will be geared more towards community groups, whereas the Saturday sessions is open to the public and more “family-focused” with food, prizes, and activities for the kids. Ka Pai Carterton’s public engagement meetings will be held on Thursday, August 15 between 9.30am and 4pm, Friday, August 16 between 10am and 4pm, and 5.30pm to 7.30pm, and Saturday, August 17 between 10am and 2pm. • Go to www. kapaicarterton.nz for more information.

No community ideas off limits There are close to 170 active community groups in Carterton, along with business and school communities, many of whom have been keen to meet up and share their ideas and concerns with Ka Pai Carterton. “We’ve been averaging 10 meetings a week – and for a part time employee, that’s crazy,” Cimone Grayson of Ka Pai Carterton said. “People feel really invested in the area.” Some of the themes arising from these meetings have been a

desire for more family activities in the Carterton township, particularly wet weather options, more connectedness, and collaboration between the different clubs, and better transport links. Ideas floated include an indoor entertainment centre for all generations, complete with trampolines, ball pits, and rock-climbing walls, a shared workspace for the different artistic groups, shared equipment for the various sports clubs, and more cycle tracks throughout the district.

recycling options and a need to improve safety of rural roading networks. Not to be outdone, the children of Carterton have not been shy about sharing their own wish lists. One child wrote down that they wanted Carterton to have its own Freddie Mercury museum, Grayson said. “They’ve had some cool ideas – having a pop-up gallery space for children’s art, a petting zoo, and improvements to the skate park.”

The transport issue is of particular concern to the Kuranui College community – as Carterton-based students have few options for getting home. “There’s only the one bus from Greytown after school, which is about 4.25pm- and that doesn’t suit a lot of people,” Grayson said. “It would be good to have more shared transport options for people reliant on public transport and needing more flexible services.” Rural dwellers raised the issues of insufficient

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CARTERTON DISTRICT

COUNCIL SNIPPETS

RECYCLING WHEELIE BINS 9th of September is the day to remember! Many of you have received your recycling wheelie bins already, and we’re excited to start this service the week beginning September 9th.

Stand for Carterton. Stand for council. We’re pretty proud of our little district and we are always striving to make Carterton the best place it can be. To do this, we need all members of our diverse and vibrant community represented on our council. Now is the time to take a stand.

• What’s the one thing Carterton needs to do for our future generations to thrive? • Is there a certain issue you’re passionate about that you want others to get behind? • Is there something you think our town can do to improve? If so, you should think about standing for council! Nominations are closing 12 noon this Friday so what are you waiting for?

It’s also really important you vote for the candidate you think best represents what you want for the future of Carterton. Every single vote counts! All the nominated candidates are listed on our website and we will be providing you with all the information you need on the voting process closer to the time. For more information visit cdc. govt.nz/your-council/elections/

It’s been another busy month for the Wairarapa Economic Development Strategy [WEDS] action group with an announcement on the work being done by a Vocational Skills Leadership Group.

The group is made up of iwi, education providers, Federated Farmers and WEDS leaders and led the establishment of a Primary Sector Skills group.

Another priority is to get in place a range of courses and training experiences designed to raise skill levels and increase participation in the broader primary sector workforce.

This has been developed by WEDS to work alongside the Government on its implementation of vocational education reforms in New Zealand.

The group is working on developing a skills leadership hub, with one of its early priorities being to help fill the gap created by the closure of Taratahi.

The hub will create a balance between formal training and earning by aligning with the existing services already offered by education providers and create an

It’s great to see so many of you wanting to get out and use all that extra space in your recycling wheelie bins but until then, you’ll need to continue using your crates as usual. For more information regarding the recycling wheelie bins, refer to the booklet which came with your bin or visit www.wairecycle.nz

earn as you learn scenario for students. It’s a new beginning for the primary sector and will focus on attracting, connecting and supporting both learners and employers. The group is actively working to have at least some providers contracted for delivery of training from early 2020.

HAVE YOUR SAY AND TELL US WHAT YOU THINK go to our website: cdc.govt.nz, email us on info@cdc.govt.nz or send us your thoughts by mail to: Carterton District Council PO Box 9 | Carterton 5743


12 Wairarapa Midweek Opinion Wednesday, August 14, 2019 EDITORIAL

MIDWEEK PHOTOS

Opinion

Road safety up to us I’ve never been more invested in road safety than I am now, working as a reporter in Wairarapa. The year I started working for the Wairarapa Times-Age, two people died on Wairarapa roads. Eight people died on Wairarapa roads the following year, five in 2017, and six in 2018. Last Wednesday’s crash in Solway takes this year’s road death number up to four. In the years I have been a reporter, I have attended the scene of several of these fatal crashes, including the most recent one last week where the young female driver died. I can’t imagine the heartbreak her family and friends are going through, but on the Wednesday night as I stood at the cordon, I saw and heard what it was to be heartbroken. Reporting on an incident as tragic as a fatal crash is not an easy job. But it’s an important one.

Piece of mind

Emily Ireland Regardless of the circumstances of the crash, it’s our job as reporters to pay tribute to crash victims if that is what the family would like. It’s our job to ask police and other emergency services what happened to cause the crash. And it’s our job to let the public know as much as we know in the hope that another family can be spared the grief that comes with losing a loved one tragically and suddenly. All crashes can be prevented. And it’s up to you to understand that every time you get behind the wheel, you are responsible for your life, the lives of your passengers, and the lives of others on the roads. I am an overly cautious driver. If I’m not confident in parking somewhere,

Have you got a photo you want to share with Wairarapa? Whether it’s a reader photo, a cutie, or a snap of you with your Midweek, email it to midweek@age.co.nz with ‘Midweek Photo’ in the subject line, and it could be featured in this segment.

CUTIE OF THE WEEK

I won’t. If I can’t see out my windows properly because of condensation, I do something about it. If I‘m not confident with pulling out into traffic, I’ll wait for a gap that’s big enough. If someone is going under the speed limit, I’ll wait for a passing lane before I pass. I don’t speed. I don’t drink and drive. I don’t want to be the reason someone doesn’t come home today. Regardless of the circumstances that have caused a fatal crash, someone has lost a brother, a sister, a son, daughter, father, or mother. It’s tragic and I always hope that the most recent fatal crash is the last one we need to attend.

The Wairarapa Midweek is subject to New Zealand Media Council procedures. A complaint must first be directed in writing to the editor’s email address. If not satisfied with the response, the complaint may be referred to the Media Council P.O Box 10-879, Wellington 6143. Or use the online complaint form at www.presscouncil.org.nz. Please include copies of the article and all correspondence with the publication.

Although not everyone would describe them as cute I find them so lovely. Observed this one in the lovely autumn sunshine on the sunny wall of my house.  PHOTO/MAXINE SMITH

South Wairarapa Spatial Plan – Our Future Focus 2050

Let’s start the discussion.

How do you want South Wairarapa to look in the future? What is strategically important for growth in our district? Where should development occur? What areas should be protected? How can I have a say? Me Pēhea Te Kōrero? The Discussion Document is available: • at www.swdc.govt.nz/spatial-plan, including feedback form • at Council offices, and Greytown, Featherston and Martinborough Libraries, including feedback form Close date for feedback has been extended to 5pm Friday 13 September. There will be another opportunity to provide feedback.

Nominations close Friday 16 August (noon) Visit www.swdc.govt.nz/local-body-elections-2019


Wednesday, August 14, 2019 Opinion Wairarapa Midweek

13

STREET TALK

Da Gillies Don’t change anything, you are who you are meant to be! It’s called life so live it! Anna Florencia Koata Patete Spend as much time with your best friend as possible and make his life an absolute thrill, you’ll regret not spending as much time with him for the rest of your life.

Shelley Marie Don’t let other people’s opinions shape who you are as a person. Always be true to yourself. Silvia E Sheppard No matter how much you plan and try to control things, life is unfair, and everything will change always. Lisa Antunovich Live at mum’s for longer, it’s so much cheaper than in the real world!

Karen Lenz Stay in school no matter the struggles. Believe in yourself and don’t listen to or hang out with negative people. Be honest and true. Rose Stevens Buy property in Greytown and Martinborough and sit tight. Saffron Mackenzie If people are mean to

Many people would tell their younger selves to embrace each day. PHOTO/STOCK.ADOBE.COM

you, just walk straight past them and don’t say anything. Megan de Roo Don’t get into any debt and save, save, save. And ignore bullying. Rainë Mackenzie Be wise about the people you share your life with. Carrie Groves Be patient. Experience comes with time, age, and patience. Lynda Crichton Enjoy each day, time goes so fast. Lorraine Hooper Don’t smoke, you don’t look cool, just stupid. Jean Cretney Don’t give up on your beliefs and dreams. Kim Goodall Use less freaking plastic. Richard Alan Dahlberg Don’t look back. And try to please others. Jocelyn Konig Don’t take any notice of people who want to take you down. Donna Marie Gray Don’t get married too young, and travel all of New Zealand. Christina Suzanne Hirst Don’t make the same stupid mistakes that

I’ve done and look after yourself better. Pearl Goodin Be positive, and love – life is short. Elaine Leggott WC Tell your loved ones you love them daily. Haylee Carswell Say yes to every opportunity. Patricia Pye Relax. Music-andMe Paku Think before you act. Wake N Renee Matthews Go to university. Cherie Taylor Don’t trust people. Mandy Cairns Say “no” more.

CONTACT US You may share your opinion in print and online. To comment online, message our Facebook page and feel free to comment on any of the stories. Please email letters to midweek@age.co.nz or post to Wairarapa Midweek letters, P.O. Box 445, Masterton. Include name, address and phone number. Noms de plume are not accepted. Letters may be edited for space and clarity.

f

Opinion

The piece of advice I would give my younger self is...

WHEELIE BINS ROLLING OUT The Wairarapa’s new recycling wheelie bins are rolling out across the region. If you’re in urban Masterton, Greytown, Featherson, Martinborough or Carterton and pay for kerbside recycling in your rates, one will be rolling your way shortly, if it hasn’t already. You will also receive a handbook outlining all the details about the cleaner, greener and smarter recycling service. Please check your letterbox.

THINGS TO REMEMBER Although you may already have your wheelie bin, the service doesn’t start until September 9th, so put it in a safe place and keep using your current recycling crates as you normally would until then. Once the service starts:

y y

Both your current recycling crates will be used for glass only. All your other recyclables will go into your wheelie bin.

y

For some Masterton houses, your pickup day will change. You’ll be notified by Council if this applies to you.

Recycling pick up will alternate; one week recycling wheelie bins will be picked up, the next your glass crates will be picked up. You’ll need to check which week you’re on (week 1 or week 2). Your wheelie bin will have either a number 1 or 2 on the side. If yours has a number 2, you will put your wheelie bin out on the first week of the service (starting Sept 9th). If yours has a 1 on the side, you can put your glass crates out and wait until the next week to put your wheelie bin out. All this is outlined in your kerbside recycling handbook that comes with your wheelie bin.

Any more questions? Head to www.wairecycle.co.nz

06 370 6300 161 Queen Street Masterton WWW.MSTN.GOVT.NZ

06 379 4030 28 Holloway Street Carterton WWW.CDC.GOVT.NZ

06 306 9611 19 Kitchener Street Martinborough WWW.SWDC.GOVT.NZ


14 Wairarapa Midweek Extra Wednesday, August 14, 2019 ARATOI KEEPERS

Felling Whatonga’s domain Pictured are three men cutting a tree in Te Tapere nui a Whatonga. It is from the Watkins collection at the Wairarapa Archive. This photograph is currently on display at Aratoi Wairarapa Museum of Art and History as part of the exhibition, Settled by the Land – Scandinavian Settlement in the Wairarapa, a collaboration between the Archive and Aratoi. Te Tapere Nui of Whatonga – Whatonga’s domain – once stretched from just north of Masterton to just north of Dannevirke. The forest was named

after Whatonga, Polynesian captain of the Kurahaupo waka. In the 1870s, Scandinavian families were recruited to settle with the promise of small farms. The Mauriceville settlers, first based in a rudimentary camp at Kopuaranga, worked their way north, creating roads and working on their new holdings. In the dry season they fired what they had felled. Their resulting crops grew prodigiously in the ash-rich soils. They settled the hills and valleys, working from daylight to dark, felling trees, some of which were

split into large slabs of timber to form the walls of their first houses, and shingles for the roofs. The Scandinavians’ hard work paid off for them – the land became subdued. Where forest giants once reigned, cocksfoot and clover took over; where huia and tui ruled the roost, cattle and sheep grazed lush pasture. Now, all that remains of the once vast Te Tapere nui o Whatonga, the Seventy Mile Bush, is a shadowy dark green remnant across the top of Pukaha, Mount Bruce, sanctuary to trees and birds alike.

DUMP CATS

COMMUNITY CENTRE BUZZ

Extra

Marina Lira This week, we would love to share with you a new monthly workshop being offered. If you are interested in music and all the processes of writing songs, this new workshop at the Wairarapa Community Centre would be a good opportunity for you. The Wairarapa Song Writers Initiative is being organised by Stefan Brown who is a well-known Wairarapa musician, song writer and music teacher. The workshop will approach subjects such as harmonies, melodies, rhythms and other technical components of song writing. Afterwards you will be able to start composing or improving your own songs. You can also access all the song writing material that Stefan has and practice with him. The workshop will be monthly so it’s a good idea to keep rehearsing in your free time. The Wairarapa Song Writers Initiative will conclude with an opportunity to perform at Aratoi Museum in Masterton. The cost for the workshop is $5 per person per attendance. For more information and to register contact Stefan Brown on 027 226 6019.

Centre’s cupcake madness workshop from 7pm to 9pm. Registrations required, contact Kim Siemonek – 06 3782453. Mosaic Menz group meet from 2pm to 3pm. Contact Jared Renata – 027 560 8999.

August 22

Kids need Dads meet from 7.30pm to 9pm. Contact Stuart – 021810821. Stefan Brown, has organised the Wairarapa Song Writers Initiative.  PHOTO/FILE

EVENTS AT THE COMMUNITY CENTRE THIS MONTH August 12, 19, 26

Starjam musical from 6.15pm to 8.15pm. Contact Nigel Martinez – 021782866.

August 15

Move with Ease from 5.15pm to 6pm. Contact Rupert Watson – 0275853822.

August 17, 21, 22, 23

St John’s First aid course from 9.30am Registrations required – 0800 78 5646.

August 21

Heart Help Group from 4pm-5pm: Contact Kit Cohr – 06 370 3890. Wairarapa Women’s

August 24, 31

Multicultural Learning and Support Services will be offering free English classes from 1pm to 3.30pm. To register, call 04 384 3693.

August 27

Youth Council meets from 4pm to 5pm. For further information Contact Cherie McNamara – 021308783.

August 28

Wool on Wheels NZ from 4pm to 6pm. For further information please contact, Julie Keegan on 0210607716.

September 4

Masterton Tramping Club meets from 7pm to 9pm. Contact Graeme Lenihan – 06379 6852 • Marina Lira is a media volunteer for the Wairarapa Community Centre.

A HOME FOR A PET Hi, I’m Dexter, a Labrador male just one year old. I am a big goofy boy with a heart of gold! I am super friendly and I love playing with other dogs. I am still a puppy at heart so I am looking for an owner who will have the time to take me on lovely long walks and trips to the dog park. I have some basic manners but I have endless potential so with some further training I will make an amazing companion. If you are looking for a big beautiful boy in your life come in and meet me. Do you think you could be my family? Give the SPCA a call on 0800 467 732 and find out.

We are Local Government WWW.MSTN.GOVT.NZ

Samson (known as Sammy) is the son of a cat left at the rubbish dump. His four-month-old mum arrived pregnant and Sammy was born into our care. He may look like a grown up, but he is just a mega meal sized kitten and less than five months old. Samson was named for his strength and size. This gentle fellow is a star. Affectionate and playful, he loves to cuddle on or against his people and isn’t made for solitude. He has a bright, outgoing nature. While he gets on with other cats he’ll climb over or under others to get to a hug. His adoption fee is $140. He is ready to be adopted now. If you want to take Sammy home, email us for an adoption form and we’ll help you through the process. • Dump Cats take cats from the Masterton rubbish dump, rehabilitates them, and helps them into loving homes. They are vaccinated, de-sexed, and treated for worms and fleas. • Their injuries are cared for and they are taught to believe in people again. • We want to thank Masterton District Council, dump staff, volunteers, donors, and Vetcare, for helping us to help these cats. • Dump Cats on Facebook: www.facebook.com/ DumpCat/ • Our Givealittle page is givealittle.co.nz/cause/ help-the-dump-cats# • Email: dumpcatsmasterton@gmail.com • We use Advocate, Royal Canin Baby Mousse tins, Breeder Celect cat litter, and Nutrience biscuits. • Donations of these, or other products, can be left for us at Vetcare on Chapel St in Masterton.


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Wednesday, August 14, 2019 Lifestyle Wairarapa Midweek

Canopus – the second brightest star in the sky.

17

PHOTO/GETTY IMAGES

Brightest stars together The brightest star in our skies, Sirius, is absent these days, but for a few nights this week, we will have a show of the next four brightest, albeit in opposite ends of the sky. It’s better you go out later in the week, as the moon will intrude Wednesday to Friday. You can still see these stars with the moon up, but the sky is so much better without the dang thing. On Saturday, get out no later than 7pm; Sunday 8pm, and Monday 9pm. On the northern horizon, is the blue-white Vega, the fifth brightest star in the sky, and 40 times brighter

Sky Watch

Nick Sault than our sun. In the constellation of the Lyre, it is the second nearest of these four bright stars, “only” 25 light years away. Over the next few weeks, it will never get far from that northern horizon – it’s like we borrow it for a while from the northern hemisphere. When facing Vega, turn completely about, and in the same position above the southern horizon is Canopus, the second

brightest star. This is a white giant, and the odd one out of these four, the other three being fairly local. This giant is 310 light years away, and if it was as close as Vega, it would be several times brighter than Venus at that planet’s brightest and would be a stunning object in the sky. It is in fact more than 10 thousand times as bright as our sun. Its distance reduces it to

its second place. Twist around again to the north, but turn a bit left to the north-west, and on that horizon is Arcturus, fourth brightest in our skies. In the constellation of Boötes the Herdsman, Arcturus is, for those in the northern hemisphere, their brightest star after Sirius. This is an old star, on its last legs, and though just about the same mass as our sun, it has expanded to 26 times its diameter, becoming a red giant. For the final star in our big four, turn around again and face south, but look halfway up the sky. You will see the

Southern Cross up there, but slightly higher in the sky, Alpha and Beta Centauri are brighter than the Crux stars. Alpha, named Rigil Kentaurus, is third brightest in the sky, but is actually the dimmest of the four mentioned today, as it is by far the nearest. At just over four lightyears away, it is our nearest star. Give it some time in contemplation because what you see is almost what our sun would look like from four light years away. Next week: Where have Venus and Mars gone?

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Wairarapa College enrolments are open for all year levels in 2020 plus

Digital Core Class Year 9 & 10 WaiCol on Stage Year 9 Option Sports Academies from Year 9 to 12 Whātonga Group Class

Visit www.waicol.nz for more details (all enrolments close August 30th 2019)


18 Wairarapa Midweek Lifestyle Wednesday, August 14, 2019 PEEK @ PUKAHA

The story of respected leader Rata Dear friends, If you walk around Pūkaha today, you will likely come across the large trunks and towering canopies of the rātā. This is one of our country’s more well-known trees, but do you know what it takes to become a rātā? It starts off as an epiphyte, attaching itself to other trees and taking its air and water. Over many years, the rātā will grow roots down to the ground to eventually form a tree that encloses its host. The host tree will then die and rot away, leaving the rātā completely hollow inside. Birds like the hihi and tui love the rātā because its flowers hold nectar. The tangata whenua would use the rātā as shelter as the trees would

sometimes grow very large. Rātā was also a man and his story is as follows. There was once a man named Rātā who wanted to travel to the Fish of Maui (as Aotearoa was referred to) because his village was always being pummelled by storms. To do this, he needed to build a waka and so he searched for the strongest, tallest tree to use. But after he’d cut it down, he realised that he’d not offered any prayers to Tāne, god of the forest. And the children of Tāne realised this too. The next day, Rātā went to where he’d felled the tree, ready to begin preparing his waka. But when he got there, he found that the tree was upright and firmly

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Wednesday, August 14, 2019 Lifestyle Wairarapa Midweek

ATTENTION DOG WALKERS: TAKE THE LEAD! It’s August and that means nesting season for our birdlife at Henley Lake. If you’re out walking Ruby or Rufus, please make sure they’re on a lead in the designated on-lead areas (highlighted below) for the next few months (until the end of November). We’ll be out and about at Henley Lake touching base with dog walkers making sure the on-lead areas are clear. But don’t worry! There are still plenty of room for Rufus to roam free in other areas of Henley Lake. C OLO

MB O R

OA D

TE O RE O RE R OA D

NEED TO VISIT COUNCIL? If you need to visit Council to pay rates, dog registrations, ask questions about building or planning or for any other Council business please still come to 161 Queen Street. Although some Council staff are moving into Waiata House soon, nothing will be changing for our community needing to come and see us. As always, you can give us a call on 06 370 6300 as well. GO TO WWW.MSTN.GOVT.NZ TO SIGN UP FOR EMAIL UPDATES

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20 Wairarapa Midweek Lifestyle Wednesday, August 14, 2019

Pobble 365 Competition

Every cycle students at MIS have an opportunity to submit their creative writing using Pobble 365 on google classroom. The blue text is the prompt supporting the picture, and the black text is the students writing. Here is a sample from term 2. Students go into the draw to win $50 for the best piece of writing and $50 just for entering! It was the dead of night. All that could be heard was the muffled beating of the creature’s enormous wings as it soared through the inky-black sky. Behind it, at the end of a frayed length of rope, sat the coachman. Coat wrapped tightly around his broad shoulders, his mission tonight was a straightforward one: to escort the two strangers to Castle Midnight. It all seemed straightforward to him. Even if it wasn’t, he always did as the Master bade. No one ever dared to disobey the Master, especially on a night such as this… he coachman sat quietly, his body worn out from the late nights he has had escorting people to the castle, but he dare not fall asleep, the master was a very dangerous person, and any person to disobey his orders would be punished, so he sat quietly and followed every order he was told, just like a sheep. As they drew closer to the castle, the coachmans body stiffened and he smoothed his hair to look presentable, the creatures wings beated harder and small grunts of frustration left its mouth. The coachman could hear the laughter and the ‘ooh’-ing of the two strangers inside, of course they didn’t know of how dangerous the master could be so they were excited to finally reach the castle and dance with their well known “nice” friend. They finally reached the large, royal purple fortress, rocky carvings covering the edges, it sat still and peaceful, yet menacing. The creature landed on a nice rocky landing right underneath the pale moonlight, just as the strangers had asked. The coachman quickly hopped off his little seat in the front of the little wooden carriage, he admired the wooden carvings on the side of it and ran his fingertips over the dark purple silk lacing the roof, then suddenly he remembered the people inside, he swiftly moved over to the door and swung it open, “Sorry about that” he said bowing slowly and then moving out of the way to let them get out, “No no, it’s fine we were talking anyway” the mans mouth was

T

PHOTO/www.pobble365.com She waded out into the shallows. Waves of water lapped up against her bare legs, sending a chill up her already trembling body. She stole a glance back at what she had left behind on the shore. No regrets.Fog wrapped its arms around the girl, adding to her feeling of growing trepidation. She held a lantern in her hand; it swayed gently by her side as she moved, leaking a milky light out into the night. That light was the only comfort she had.As she stole away, the outline of the ship crept out of the mist like a silent predator. Would the ship bring the solace she had been longing for? s the ship neared she began to tremor, her legs seemed to be chained back to her home. The lantern’s flame dulled slightly she took another step forward the light splash of the gentle waves against the hull of the ship was luring her closer, as the fog dived into her lungs she exhaled the air of her home inhaling the fresh air of freedom the shackles made from her morals and feeling broke as she began to sprint towards the ship. The deck of the ship was covered in rust, her feet drifted across the ruff rust, slowly it turned from rust to rotting wood covered in moss and open floorboards. She wandered alone listening to the sound of her footsteps against the age damaged floor. She turned a corner Standing before her was man his face covered by the coat he wore, his silhouette towering over her, he raised his hand a lantern swung from it. There was silence as the flame from the man’s lantern dampened then came smoke obscuring the man from sight. - Charlie McLeod

A

Many years ago, when I was just a small boy, we found a mysterious object washed up on the beach. It was a sort of silver-grey colour, and looked like a finger, only much, much larger. My friends and I had huddled together on the beach around the thing, holding our hands up to our faces to shield our eyes from the dazzling sun, talking excitedly about what it could be. Some hours later, after we had all made up wild stories about the origin of our new toy, we dragged the colossal item that was the size of our dining table up to the village. As we made our way slowly over the sand dunes, and the long, wispy grass that marked the end of the beach and the start of the fields, a crowd seemed to be gathering. Women and young children were leaving their houses, young lads were leaving tools and ploughs unattended in the fields, and rosy-cheeked men were stumbling out of the smoke-filled tavern, all hurrying with increasing urgency towards us. Over the next days, weeks, months and years, stories were told of how our land was in danger from some kind of threat. There was fretful talk of giants, and frantic warnings about unearthly automatons come to take our lands from us. For years, people had looked over their shoulders, fearful that they were being watched, fearful that something unexpected and terrible was about to occur. For years, unsatisfied farmers had complained about their disappointing harvests, prophesying that the end of the world was near! Of course, none of us believed them, and none of us thought anything as sinister as the end of the world was just around the

PHOTO/www.pobble365.com smiling but the rest of him wasn’t, They both got out and started strutting away towards the castle doors like they owned the place, the coachman stared at the pair until they had disappeared through the doors and the sound of the music had started, he sighed in relief, he knew then that the master would be busy for quite a while and he would be safe, even if it was only for a little while. The music played slowly and the laughter drifted through the open foggy windows, the ground was covered in a thick layer of fog that was drifting up slightly, making the already dark terrain, darker. The coachman silently walked over to the creature, listening to his footsteps and the cold rocky ground, pat, pat, pat, he reached the creature and stroked one hand over its tough dark grey skin, “Its ok” he said staring into its emerald eyes The creature grunted in reply, the coach man leaned down to check if anything had hurt its wings and when found nothing, returned to gazing into its eyes and stroking its head,

PHOTO/www.pobble365.com corner. But, we did seem to know in our heart of hearts that something was amiss. Something wasn’t quite right… 15 Years later… I stand on the edge of my lands, grasping my spear firmly in my steady hands. A determined grimace spreads across my face. This is the moment we had all feared. All feared, but never dared to take seriously. Well, now we would have to take it seriously. We would have to take them seriously. They had arrived… s I watched them get closer I realised there were too many to fight on my own, so I raced down to what was left of my village looking for people to assist me in this troublesome time. As I got closer to the ruins I started to notice that there was no one there, when I finally arrived it was to discover everyone had disappeared and I was on my own. I gathered what supplies I could find and headed to the safety of the caves.

A

“I see you get along with the creatures now cameron” The coachmans body stiffened, that was the master’s voice, he straightened up and turned around to face the master “Your highness i-” “Do not worry cameron, i’m not here to hurt you, just to observe” The coachmans face went pale, the master drew closer and the coachman gulped preparing for her to unleash her fiery rage upon him, but instead the master put and hand on his cheek, “I told you no more ‘your highness’ or any of that” The coachman stayed silent “What is my name cameron?” The coachman sighed and quietly said “Lea” “Good, now come on, the party won’t go on forever” Then she grabbed him by the hand and lead him away, into the castle doors, away from the pale moonlight. - Sasha Watson

When I reached the caves I found a young boy had also taken shelter from the awful destruction the giants had inflicted on the lands. I asked him what had happened to everyone he said they had been imprisoned on the flying ships by the giants he had escaped by hiding in the long wispy grass. We heard loud footsteps they had found us. The boy led me to a secret ladder that went to the top of the mountain when we got up there they had surrounded us we had no way of escaping. Suddenly one of the flying ships was in front of us. The villagers had managed to take over the ship and had come to our rescue. When we got on we realised that it wasn’t only people from our village but people from other worlds as well. When we asked them what the giants were they told us they were intergalactical planet pirates and the finger we had found 15 years earlier was a signal beacon which had activated by moving it. This ship was full of rebels who were fighting the giant pirates they took us safely to their new base were we spent the next 15 years trying to defeat them and saving as many planets and people as we could. Over time the rebel alliance had grown bigger and bigger until we defeated the giant planet pirates. As I am telling my story today I am watching my grandson play in the ruins that was once my village and hope my story and my village will be remembered. - Ethan Hayes

PHOTO/www.pobble365.com A low growl could be heard; a rumble that came from deep within the predator like a distant storm approaching. With milky grey eyes like miniature moons, the cat began to prowl stealthily out of the tall grass… he had to stay quiet if she wanted the kill. She was growling under her breath, her stomach whining like the wind. Everything was still and quiet except the gentle breeze ahead. Suddenly the animal poked its ears up and started to look around carefully like it was analyzing its surroundings. The cat froze, she couldn’t wait any longer to eat. She was starving to death. Did she have enough energy to catch the speedy deer? She had to at least try. Getting ready to pounce on the deer she lowered her front and raised her back as she prepared to make the leap. BOING! The chase began! The deer ran for its life. She had to try if she wanted the deer, she needed it. She ran like the wind and… She dug her long claws in the deer’s back. The deer stopped running and gave up. As the cat grabbed the poor deer’s throat, the deer took its last breath then she did it. For the first time in a week she finally caught some food. She scoffed the deer down and realized that she was being watched. The men were shouting at each other as they saw the white, frosty tiger approached them. They were holding there fire for too long. As their chief came out of his tent the he saw the tiger and was screaming tirelessly at his men to go back inside the tall, old tents. As the chief walked closer to the tiger, she ran away and hid. She didn’t know what he would do to her. And was too tired to go on anymore so she took a rest in the luscious, green grass. As the cat eventually woke up she found herself in a beautiful enclosure. Now she was safe but she was not free anymore. She ran to each wall trying to get out, nothing worked. She was being watched 24/7 by little faces unlike the chief she had encountered earlier that day. She growled like a storm that was brewing. The cat was unhappy where she was until a zoo keeper came in and gave her some lean meat and she realized she was going to be ok. - Ava White

S

The wind howled menacingly like a wolf at the full moon. Lightning licked across the evil sky: a serpent’s tongue tormenting the clouds. The Earth began to shatter… ife for humans began harder, young kids passed away at alarming rates, the sky greyer every passing day. They didn’t know what had hit them, but they had an idea. An adventurer wanted to discover why this tragic disaster had happened. The adventurer, Liam Sid, knew what had happened, he called it “The Greatest Strom.” Everyone one thought the world’s end was going to be something that the humans brought upon them self, but Liam thought otherwise. He decided to take a crew across the raging ocean to figure out the mystery of this tragic strom. He packed all the water and food he could, but he also packed a dairy that he would write in so if he died, one day something could find it. He and his crew set for the

L

The mountain of High Hrothgar had stood proudly for thousands of years, casting a solemn shadow for miles around. Few dared to venture close to its base, let alone scale its heights, fearing what awaited at the summit. For one brave adventurer, the folk lore surrounding the mysteries of High Hrothgar provided an opportunity just too tempting to resist. Some called him courageous, others foolish, but it mattered not to him now. Bracing himself against the torrent of icy wind that rushed towards him down the narrow pass, the lone figure prepared himself for the challenge ahead. He took a deep breath, feeling the frozen air rush into his lungs, and took a bold step onto the path to High Hrothgar… s Lewis began the climb he could feel strong wind whipping against his cheeks, creating a sharp tingling sensation. He could taste dirt and rubble in his mouth and he could feel his bare fingers going numb. The trees surrounding the path bent as

A

PHOTO/www.pobble365.com ocean in the early morning of Friday 29th June 3004. 29th June 3004. Dear Diary, I don’t know how long I will be gone for, but I am guessing I will

PHOTO/www.pobble365.com Lewis tumbled down the path. The high and solid widowing rocks threatened to fall as the top neared. As the top appeared 2 trolls appeared, “Oi, what are you doing here”, they said in unison. “Climbing High Hrothgar” Lewis said trying not to feel intimidated, they had green faces and pointy horns. Snot was dripping sluggishly down the larger one. “This is our territory mate”. Lewis was scared and couldn’t get past these

be gone for a very long time. I admit it, I’m scared but I can’t show it. 30th June 3004 Dear Diary, The boat is sinking, I am now overly scared, I admit it. Liam was scared but didn’t show it to his crew, he knew they would be worried about the sinking boat if Liam was scared. Then, something happened that would change everything, there, right in front of him was the wreckage of a boat, someone had tried what they where doing and failed. But then, he saw a light, like a tunnel in a movie, as the boat approached the light Liam stepped into it followed but his crew. No one ever say Liam again. Legend has it he and his crew are in an unknown universe. - Emiley Bracken

these hefty, burly and extremely ugly trolls. But he was definitely more agile. Lewis could feel his heart pounding in his throat. “Zoooooom” was all the trolls could hear as Lewis passed them. The looks of awe in their faces. Lewis didn’t want to use his powers to climb the large and sparsely populated mountain. But the only thing in the way of the top were the trolls and Lewis had passed them. As Lewis felt his feet reach flat yet bumpy terrain, a view of beautiful creatures and wonderful areas were visible. Lewis couldn’t believe it. A dark stone was implanted into the soil, it was Onyx. Lewis wandered to it and stood on it. The ground beneath him rumbled and shook for what felt like forever, then a gap opened and grew larger creeping slowly towards hypnotized Lewis. It was a whole new world, and it was all Lewis’s….. - Femke Bosma-Edie

Masterton Intermediate School Intermediate St, Masterton P 06 370 0088


Wednesday, August 14, 2019 Lifestyle Wairarapa Midweek

Street collectors needed Volunteering Wairarapa

Donna Robinson We all recognise street collectors – people with buckets and sashes (or onesies), out on the streets collecting for a cause. Street collections raise money for the organisation and help to put their cause out into the public eye. There are three major appeals coming up over the next few months. All of them rely on volunteers to go out into the community and collect donations.

Friday and Saturday, September 6-7: Wellington Free Ambulance Onesie Day

Wellington Free Ambulance is the only free emergency ambulance service in the country, and they respond to an average of 161 emergencies per day. On Onesie Day, anyone can celebrate these wonderful folks being here for us whenever they are needed, by putting on a collector’s bib, grabbing a collection bucket, and wearing your best onesie (onesie is not compulsory). Funds raised go directly towards new ambulances, life-saving equipment, and

advanced clinical training and research. There are multiple collection spots throughout Wairarapa, so there’s plenty of opportunities to get involved with a twohour shift.

Friday September 27: Arthritis New Zealand’s Annual Appeal

More than 670,000 New Zealanders are living with arthritis, and half of these are of working age. Arthritis New Zealand provides key services to the public, including workshops and clinics across the country, a freephone number manned Monday to Friday by Arthritis Educators, and an annual children’s camp for kids with arthritis and their immediate families. They’re asking for volunteers to help collect donations in local communities to allow them to continue to provide advice and support to everyone living with this condition.

Friday and Saturday October 11-12: Pink Ribbon Street Appeal

This helps the New Zealand

Masterton Mayor Lyn Patterson and other street collectors at last year’s Wellington Free Ambulance Street Appeal. PHOTO/SUPPLIED

Breast Cancer Foundation with the running of its education, awareness, support, and research programmes. Breast cancer is the third most common type of cancer in New Zealand. This appeal helps make a difference in the lives of everyone who has been touched by it. Breast Cancer New Zealand is currently looking for area coordinators to manage small teams of volunteers on one or both days.

AUGUST

2019 Winter Walking group for all Cancer Survivors: Mondays 9am (time and place may vary): Phone Margaret 0271364323 for more information

Rehab required post treatment ladies? Check out our partnership deals. Contact the Centre for details. Bowel Cancer Support Group: 9th August 10-12midday. Anyone completed treatment is welcome. Prosthesis Fitter: 13th August Ph 0800 264 822 for an appointment. Outreach services in South Wairarapa. Mindfulness and Relaxation workshop 16th August at Richmond House. Bookings essential. Limited numbers. We Host “Look Good Feel Better” Workshop NEXT 16th August 10-12 midday. Bookings essential. Ph 0800 865 432. Any Cancer Men’s Support Group: Monday 26th August 1-2.30pm. All welcome. NEED Transport to treatment outside of the Wairarapa? Phone the Centre to arrange a volunteer driver (06) 378 8039. 19th August : Thrivers & Survivors morning tea 10am-12. All Welcome. Speaker Public Trust How to Make a Will.

CANCER SOCIETY WAIRARAPA

37 Te Ore Ore Road, Masterton. Phone 06 378 8039 Want to talk to a Nurse about Cancer? Phone 0800 226 237 CANCER INFORMATION HELPLINE

You’d need to be available for some preparation beforehand. They will be looking for street collectors later in August. • If you’re interested in helping out with any of these events, contact us on 06 929 0960 or admin@waivc.org.nz.

Opportunities at Volunteering Wairarapa Street Collectors needed for September 6 and 7 Wellington Free Ambulance Onesie Day

need street collectors for two-hour shifts around Wairarapa. Volunteering Wairarapa AGM Monday, September 16 at 4.30pm at the Wairarapa Community Centre. Guest Speaker is Bob Francis telling us the story about how we became an event-filled province. All are welcome. • Interested in finding out more: Contact Donna Robinson on 06 929 0960 or email admin@ waivc.org.nz

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22 Wairarapa Midweek

Wednesday, August 14, 2019

National Teen Parent

Netball Tournament Wairarapa Teen Parents host National Netball Tournament

21AUGUST 2019

Everyone is welcome to attend the National Teen Parent Unit Netball Tournament 2019 in Masterton next week. Students of the Wairarapa Teen Parent Unit are not only competing in the tournament, but also hosting it at Trust House Netball Wairarapa Centre in Colombo Road next Wednesday 21st August. Locals can cheer them on as well as enjoying a range of kai put on by the students with the competition running from 9.30am to 2pm. There are 25 teen parent units in New Zealand with eight teams coming to Masterton from as far away as Taranaki and the East Coast. One of the aims of the tournament is “whakawhanaungatanga - to enhance, embrace and promote the wellbeing of our young parents.”

STUDYING AS A PARENT

Wairarapa Teen Parent Unit offers a supportive learning environment to push teen parents to success.

• Individualised programmes • Wide variety of subject choice • High quality trained teachers & support staff • Quality ECE Service • Transportation • Lunch & stationery supplied • Support agencies

WAIRARAPA TEEN PARENT UNIT 06 377 3491 0800 924 878 29 Makora Road, Masterton

As well as being a fun experience, some students are using the planning and staging of the event as part of their study towards NCEA Level 2 Health. The tournament is held whenever a teen parent unit is prepared to host it, says student Peaches Matthew, “so we thought why not have it here and utilise our new local netball complex.” Fellow student Teina Walker, says all 20 students in the Wairarapa Teen Parent Unit are helping to organise and run the tournament. “There is a kai group organising hot food for the spectators and players to purchase, a cultural group providing entertainment, and a stay-and-play group organising the matches and accommodation.” The night before the tournament, the students are organising a Hui-A-Kura Po Whakangahau for the visitors at Makoura College, which will include a powhiri and sharing of kai, followed by entertainment from the Makoura Poly group and the local secondary kapa haka group Wairarapa ki Uta Wairarapa ki Tai, which is made up of combined secondary school students of Wairarapa, says Teina. “We will be able to meet other young parents, and connect in a supportive and inclusive environment,” says Peaches.

The purpose of the Wairarapa Teen Parent Unit, says Jo Booth, one of the unit’s teachers, is to support young parents who are pregnant or have a young baby, so that they can continue their education. People often ask why a Teen Parent Unit is necessary, Jo says. “Young parents have challenges to further study that other students don’t have. They can come here and get the support they need for a positive future for them and their whanau. The students learn in small groups with each student having their individual learning plan that may include study towards NCEA qualifications as well as parenting, budgeting and life skills tuition.

Come along on the 21ST August 2019 and support the Wairarapa Teen Parent Unit, who will be proudly hosting the annual National Teen Parent Netball Tournament.

PROUD TO SUPPORT

THE BEAUTIFUL

WAIRARAPA

Each teen parent unit is required to be attached to a secondary school. Wairarapa Teen Parent Unit is located at Makoura College, which is involved in the tournament, along with local volunteers and sponsors, with food, refereeing and general support. The tournament is a great opportunity to show community support for the students as they stage a healthy physical event. Come and support the Teen Parent unit in its netball tournament goal. Entry to the tournament is free.

COMMUNITY SPONSOR

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Proudly supports the Wairarapa Teen Parent Unit


Wednesday, August 14, 2019 Wairarapa Midweek

23


24 Wairarapa Midweek Lifestyle Wednesday, August 14, 2019

Trust has strong finances Masterton Trust Lands Trust (MTLT) announced positive financial results and an increase in grants for the 12 months ended 31 March 2019 at its annual general meeting on Monday. The communityowned trust recorded an operating surplus of $5.3 million and a 10.9 per cent increase in equity to $46.3 million. Rental income increased marginally to $5 million as a result of a 100 per cent occupancy rate and strong rental growth. Movements in MTLT’s property portfolio included the sales of Waiata House and Burger King. The sale of Waiata House to Masterton District Council was subject to major structural remediation of the building which took almost a year to complete. The property was handed over to the council in February this year. After adjustment for these sales, the overall value of MTLT’s property portfolio increased by 5.4 per cent over the previous year. The property sales supported repayment of $5 million of debt and an improvement in MTLT’s debt ratio from 40.2 per cent to 33.3 per cent. Total grants for the year

We’ve been working with our tenants to progress the remediation work in a way that minimises the potential disruption to them and their businesses. increased by over 15 per cent to $783,445. The trust distributed $283,375 in education grants, $479,070 in concessional rental grants to community groups such as Aratoi, Masterton Foodbank and Harlequin Theatre, and a civic grant of $16,000 to Masterton District Library. MTLT chairperson Leanne Southey said that while the trust had recorded strong results for the year, it would continue its conservative approach to borrowing, property development and grant distribution due to the ongoing structural remediation work and associated litigation. “This approach is designed to ensure the trust’s sustainability in the longer term and significantly improve our level of grant distribution to the Masterton community in the future.” Southey said work is

continuing to address the structural design issues in a number of MTLTowned buildings that were identified three years ago as not being up to standard. “We’ve been working with our tenants to progress the remediation work in a way that minimises the potential disruption to them and their businesses.” The litigation process to recover the costs of remediation is ongoing and is expected to take at least another year to resolve. Considerable maintenance work took place during the year to upgrade a number of MTLT-owned buildings. “Our ongoing maintenance programme aims to ensure our tenants have safe, productive and pleasant working environments to run their business or organisation, and to enhance the value of these community-owned assets.” Southey said the trust had recently developed a new six-year strategy that sought to strengthen the long-term viability of the organisation and ensure its growth keeps pace with inflation and population growth in the Masterton district. “Our ultimate goal is to

progressively increase the distribution of grants to the community to double the current level by 2025. This would take annual grants to around $2 million, which would significantly increase the range of education, arts and community initiatives we could support each year.”

Masterton Trust Lands Trust chairperson Leanne Southey. PHOTO/SUPPLIED

50

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ANNIVERSARY MASTERTON PLUNKET

DAFFODIL PICKING

STREET MARKETS

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HORSE DRAWN SURREY CARRIAGE

CARTERTON TO MASTERTON, leaves Carterton at 10.50am sharp. Report to the station at 10.25am. Stop-over in Masterton (approx 1 hour) and arrives back in Carterton at 1pm. CARTERTON TO WELLINGTON, final Steam Train leaves Carterton at 2.45pm. Tickets available at www.cartertonrailwaymuseum.org.nz

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Tickets include supper and a glass of bubbles on arrival. Tickets can be purchased from:

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Southey said MTLT had also been benchmarking its work against that of similar community-owned trusts in New Zealand. “The focus of this work is to ensure our operations and grant distribution meet industry best practice and are in line with other top performing trusts around the country.”

FREE DAFFODIL BUSES

from Carterton to Middlerun will be running throughout the day. First bus departs from Masson Street, Carterton (outside Kings Woodworking) from 10am and will cycle between Carterton and Middlerun continuously returning to Broadway. Daffodil picking will cease at 3pm. There is NO PARKING at Middlerun - please catch the FREE buses

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26 Wairarapa Midweek Lifestyle Wednesday, August 14, 2019

New cycle park on cards Gianina Schwanecke The Lions Club of Carterton plans to celebrate its 50th birthday by building a new bicycle skills park at Carrington Park in the heart of Carterton. The new track will incorporate a set of traffic lights, a roundabout, intersections, a pedestrian crossing, a maintenance corner, bus shelter, benches, and picnic tables. “It will be the first set of traffic lights in Wairarapa since 1987, I think,” Lions track convenor Pascoe Reynolds said. He was the one to suggest the cycle park having seen the one in Palmerston North. “I have young kids of my own,” he said. “Youth is one of the key focus areas of all Lions Clubs, and road safety cycle tracks are becoming very popular throughout New Zealand. “This track will provide a facility to encourage children

The design proposals of the new road safety cycle park being built by the Lions Club of Carterton. IMAGES/SUPPLIED

He envisions parents coming together over takeaways and picnics while watching their children play together. “It’s all part of bikes in schools. We’re trying to get young people education about safety on the roads.” It was endorsed by the Carterton District Council

to learn first-hand road safety while enjoying themselves and having fun.” Carrington Park was chosen for its central location and access to surrounding Carterton schools. “It’s in the middle of the community. It’s the hub of Carterton,” Reynolds said.

at a meeting in March to feature as the centerpiece of an integrated community promotional programme to encourage children to cycle. The council will provide a range of facilities and a cycleway that will safely link all the schools to the park. The bike skills park would be positioned in currently unused grassed areas with work set to start in January. A concrete pad in the centre of the park will be moved and the popular flying fox will be rerouted. The Lions Club of Carterton has raised more than $50,000 of the $130,900 budgeted for the track but are still looking for some funding from local businesses. “It will be a positive thing for the community,” Reynolds said. An honour board at the track will acknowledge community sponsors with a range of sponsorship packages available – platinum [$1000], diamond [$500], gold [$250], silver [$100], and bronze [$50]. • More information can be found by contacting Reynolds at: pascoerey@gmail. com.

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Wednesday, August 14, 2019 Lifestyle Wairarapa Midweek

Care and Craft’s birthday Earlier this month, Masterton Care and Craft celebrated its 29th birthday. Upon entering the doors on the Friday morning, it was clear the morning was going to be filled with entertainment, fun games, and spot prizes. First stop was at the sales table with a great amount of home baking, DVDs, clothing, and plants. Next stop was to take in a ticket or two at the raffles, before sitting with everyone at tables. People attending were entertained by the musical group the Silver Ukuleles who performed a wide variety of old songs and well-known tunes. To the delight of those attending – people were also entertained when one of the players, Cyril Lintern, pulled out the spoons and played along with his team. The group was given a donation of appreciation and was invited to have morning tea. Masterton Care and Craft secretary Shaun Evans then started the birthday games with a challenge for people to guess the number of sweets in the lolly barrel. This was won by Ann from Volunteering Wairarapa who guessed

the correct number of 240 lollies and was presented the barrel as the prize. Then a memory game was played where people were presented with familiar items. The game fooled everyone with most only remembering about four items. Several prizes were awarded. The Final Game was guessing the TV theme where Shaun played different themes from television. With a mixture from Coronation Street to Steptoe and Son, Bewitched, and even Doctor Who, the game was met with a lot of laughter and singing. Lunch was a treat of fish and chips before the raffle was drawn. Winners were Judy Stark, Olive Hintz, and Kay Chung. Terry Thompson, being the oldest member, blew out the candles and cut the Masterton Care and Craft birthday cake. Masterton Care and Craft would like to thank Alison Thompson, Noreen Evans and her group from Featherston Care and Craft, Anne and Josie from Wairarapa Volunteers, and the Masterton Senior Citizen group.

HAVE A DRESS UP DAY Masterton Care and Craft’s 29th birthday celebration at the Senior Citizens Hall in Masterton. PHOTO/EMILY IRELAND

Silver Ukuleles were the main entertainment for the morning. PHOTOS/SHAUN EVANS

Paint our towns

Terry Thompson blew out the candles and cut the Masterton Care and Craft birthday cake.

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28 Wairarapa Midweek

Wednesday, August 14, 2019

MASTERTON TRUST LANDS TRUST

Annual report for the year ended 31 March 2019

Year in review The focus for the 2019 year has been on delivering our grants programme while continuing to address the structural issues that have affected a number of MTLT-owned buildings.

www.mtlt.org.nz Finance Our continued approach of careful financial management and strong asset value growth has produced positive financial results for the year, with a surplus of $5.3 million before the distribution of grants. The property sales that took place supported the repayment of debt and an improvement in our debt to debt plus equity ratio. Equity increased by 10.9 percent over the previous year to $46.3 million. While strong results have been recorded for the year, the Trust will continue our conservative approach to borrowing, property development and grant distribution due to the ongoing structural remediation work and associated litigation. This approach is designed to ensure the Trust’s sustainability in the longer term and improve our ability to distribute grants to the local community in the future.

Grants

Handover of Waiata House to Masterton District Council in February 2019

Property Developments within our community-owned property portfolio included the sale of two properties during the year. The property sales included the settlement and handover of Waiata House to Masterton District Council in February 2019. This sale was subject to major structural remediation of the building, which took almost a year to complete. The Burger King property in central Masterton was also sold. After adjustment for these sales, the overall value of our property portfolio increased by a healthy 5.4 percent. Maintenance work was undertaken on a number of Trust-owned buildings during the year, including the Tile Warehouse, Resene ColorShop and City Fitness gym. This work is part of our ongoing efforts to maintain and improve the buildings in our portfolio, and to preserve the community’s investment in them. The Trust welcomed a number of new tenants during the year, including Little Lollies Ice Cream Parlour in Queen Street and Quality Builders in Church Street. We were also able to assist the Masterton Foodbank and Access Radio when these community organisations had to move out of the Empire Building after it was sold for demolition. The organisations are now housed in Radio House which provides the ideal space for them to continue delivering their valuable services. Work has continued to address the structural design issues in a number of Trust-owned buildings that were identified three years ago as not being up to standard. The litigation process to recover the costs of remediation is ongoing, with the process likely to take at least another year to resolve.

The 2019 grants programme provided support for a range of education, arts and community initiatives. The Trust distributed $783,445 in grants for the year, an increase of over 15 percent on the previous year. Education grants included professional development support for teachers and leadership initiatives for students, including the successful Nga Tama Toa and Poi Porotiti programmes. Support for education outside the classroom included funding for the inaugural Wings over Wairarapa Schools Day. This initiative, which was part of the biennial air show, provided the opportunity for over 4,500 students to take part in an action-packed day of activities including the chance to learn about careers in aviation-related industries. A grant was provided to fund an education programme for local schools at Aratoi. A specially trained educator led students through engaging discussion tours of a number of exhibitions, followed by practical craft sessions. Our support for ongoing education was demonstrated with the launch of our Tenant Apprentice Scholarships during the year. The scholarships, worth up to $1,000 each, are awarded to assist apprentices employed by tenants of MTLT with industry training fees and encourage them to consider further learning opportunities.

Wings over Wairarapa Schools Day


Wednesday, August 14, 2019 Wairarapa Midweek

Arts education programme for local schools at Aratoi

The Trust’s commitment to working with the local community to support learning opportunities was reflected in a new initiative involving the Wairarapa College farm located on MTLT-owned land near the college campus. An advisory panel involving local industry experts was established to provide expertise and input into the college’s agricultural programmes, and to help ensure the teaching and skills developed at the farm are in line with what the rural sector needs. The financial impact of the building remediation work has continued to limit the funds available for community grants. A grant was provided to Masterton District Library to purchase new reading and information resources and to enhance the literacy and digital services available to the local community. Community grants were also provided in the form of concessional rents to some community, arts and education-related organisations who are housed in Trust-owned property. Concessional rents for the 2019 year totalled $479,070.

New learning and career opportunities at Wairarapa College farm located on MTLT-owned land

Looking ahead MTLT has recently developed a new six-year strategy, with the underlying key theme of ‘resilience’. The main focus of the strategy is to strengthen the long-term viability of the Trust and progressively increase our grants distribution to the local community to double the current level by 2025. Objectives within the strategy will ensure the Trust grows and keeps pace with inflation and population growth in the Masterton district. We are also working to ensure our approach and operations meet industry best practice and are in line with other top performing trusts. The Trust will be working towards these long-term goals as we continue to support and serve the Masterton community in the years ahead.

Leanne Southey Chairperson

MTLT Trustees Leanne Southey (Chairperson) Karl Taucher (Deputy Chairperson) Christine Brewster John Bunny

Concessional rents were provided to a range of community organisations including Masterton Foodbank

Bex Johnson Rick Long Frazer Mailman Sandy Ryan

The full 2019 Annual Report is available at www.mtlt.org.nz or from the MTLT office at 189 Queen Street Masterton.

29


30 Wairarapa Midweek Lifestyle Wednesday, August 14, 2019

Kids help restore stream A stream in South Wairarapa is getting a helping hand from a bunch of Featherston Year 6 students keen to restore and protect its native biodiversity. The children from St Teresa’s School have been doing riparian planting on a section of Donald’s Creek at the south-eastern corner of town. In chilly conditions recently the students planted 300 native grasses alongside the stream in one day in an effort to improve the environment and to encourage life back to the water. The planting was the first of what the students hope will be the start of many more to come and a source of pride in the community. Donald’s Creek is part of the Featherston landscape, marking the eastern boundary before cutting under SH2 and passing between several properties on its way to Lake Wairarapa. South Wairarapa District Council granted guardianship of the area being planted to Featherston schools in 2016. St Teresa’s classroom teacher Liz Lark said students are genuinely interested in their local waterways and have been learning about stream health and stream

St Teresa’s School students Benjamin Everlein, left, Van Rozing, and Rosie Renshaw get stuck into planting at Donald’s Creek in Featherston. PHOTO/SUPPLIED

restoration. “We’ve been working with the team from Mountains to Sea Wellington, monitoring stream health, and developing a restoration plan for this section of Donald’s Creek”, Lark said. “They know that through planting native grasses and shrubs, they will encourage greater biodiversity.” Year 6 student Van Rozing said this means

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more fish and eels in the stream, and more birds and insects hanging around in the shrubs. As well as providing habitat for wildlife, when established, the plants will create much needed shade for fish in the stream too, said Van’s classmate Rosie Renshaw. Lark said the students have aspirations for the area one day being made a public place that people can

come and enjoy it. “They know it will take a lot of time and effort to achieve, but long term that is their vision and I think it’s something the whole community will be really supportive of,” Lark said. Student Benjamin Everlein encourages “everyone in Featherston” to roll up their sleeves and get on board. Mountains to Sea Wellington Director Zoe

Studd said the enthusiasm and passion of the students and their teacher is “inspiring”. “They want to see fish and native animals thrive again in this forgotten spot, and they are doing something about it . . . that’s so exciting,” she said. It’s going to be really important for them to have lots of community support to help realise their vision, she said. The students’ hopes and aspirations fit into a much wider initiative, the Wairarapa Moana Wetlands Project, a joint venture involving Local and Central Government, and local iwi. The project was launched in 2008 with the aim of restoring this “wetland treasure”. Greater Wellington Regional Council is a key partner, and also a funder of Mountains to Sea Wellington. Wairarapa Moana is the largest remaining wetland in the lower North Island. It is of national and international importance due to its significant cultural, ecological, and recreational values. • For more information on the Wairarapa Moana Wetlands Project, go to www. waiwetlands.org.nz.


Wednesday, August 14, 2019 Lifestyle Wairarapa Midweek

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32 Wairarapa Midweek Lifestyle Wednesday, August 14, 2019

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Wednesday, August 14, 2019 Lifestyle Wairarapa Midweek

NIGHT CLASSES TECHNOLOGY Excel Basics

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Excel Next Steps

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Jerome Lopa, Paselio Manesa, Maia Karaitiana, Julie Leveridge, Tyreece Jackson.

PHOTO/JACK MOSER

Successful year for reggae stars Erin Kavanagh-Hall With two Rockquest category wins, an award for outstanding musicianship, first place in a local “battle of the bands” competition, a performance at a successful student-led festival, and several new tunes under their belt – it’s been an exhilarating couple of years for Makoura College’s Fresh Noiz. The five-piece band, whose members range from Year 9 to Year 12, took home the top award in the Tangata Beats category of the 2019 SmokefreeRockquest Wairarapa regional final, held at the Carterton Events Centre. Tangata Beats showcases original music which captures the “unique cultural identity of Aotearoa and the South Pacific” – and Fresh Noiz fulfilled the brief, impressing the judges with their trilingual lyrics and infectious pop-reggae sound. This was the second Rockquest success for the band – they won the Tangata Beats category last year and came third in the region overall. Also coming out on top was youngest member Paselio Manesa, whose skills behind the drum kit earned him the Best Musicianship award for the overall Wairarapa competition. Paselio, 13, is carrying on the Fresh Noiz family legacy – his brother Mate Manesa was the band’s drummer until the end of last year. Also thrilling for Fresh Noiz was a last-minute entry into the first annual Clash Of The Chords, a competition for young musicians organised by the Wairarapa Youth Council, in which they won the public vote, and a $500 cash prize. Though the band has not yet made it into the national Rockquest finals, the members – Paselio, Jerome Lopa (vocals/ guitar), Maia Karaitiana (vocals), Julie Leveridge (vocals/keyboard) and Tyreece Jackson (bass) – have “honed their skills”, both as performers, and song-writers, says music teacher Eileen Scott. “I’m proud of them – they’ve worked hard,” Scott said. “They’ve been writing some radio-calibre songs, with some

meaningful lyrics and catchy hooks and riffs. “Being in a band has taught them leadership skills, to be organised and self-disciplined, and to refine their craft – go back over their lyrics and make sure every word fits. “They know if they want something to be excellent, rather than just completed, they have to put the work in.” Fresh Noiz has been together since 2017, though has had a few line-up changes with members leaving school. Since forming, the band has been writing their own music – a

They’ve been writing some radio-calibre songs, with some meaningful lyrics and catchy hooks and riffs. Being in a band has taught them leadership skills, to be organised and self-disciplined, and to refine their craft – go back over their lyrics and make sure every word fits. process, frontman Jerome says, “can take three days, or up to three months”. Scott said songwriting is a big part of Makoura’s music curriculum, with many students studying composition and “coming up with some amazing creative expressions”. Jerome and pianist Julie (both Year 12), who take the lead on writing lyrics for Fresh Noiz, are taking Level 3 Music Composition which requires students to come up with “substantial songs with complex lyrics, which interact with the melody in a nuanced way, and express imaginative thinking”. “They can’t just write simple songs if they want to meet the standard,” Scott said. “But, they’ve done well – they’ve got inherent musical knowledge

they didn’t know they had.” So far, in their music, Fresh Noiz have explored the themes of cultural diversity and courage with “a funky love song” about people from different backgrounds, and the media response after the Christchurch mosque attacks. Their song “Appreciate”, which helped clinch their Tangata Beats win, was written in English, te reo and Tokelauan – with Jerome’s Tokelauan whanau and Maori Studies teacher Shari Taylor helping with translation. The band members worked hard ahead of Rockquest, “practising themselves into exhaustion” – but it was worth it for the experience of “performing on a big stage, with the professional lighting and sound, in front of a big crowd,” Jerome said. “It was cool seeing the audience reaction to our music – lots of people were up the front dancing,” vocalist Maia added. “It does help your performance – it makes you get into it more.” The band were elated with their win, especially “little legend” Paselio who, before joining Fresh Noiz, had only played in church. “He was pretty rapt – I think he was a little reticent about coming on board and replacing his brother, but he’s picked everything up really well,” Scott said. As well as putting on a “polished and professional” showing at the Clash of the Chords competition, Fresh Noiz also enjoyed the opportunity to perform at Tu Whakahi, a festival “celebrating cultural diversity”, organised by students from Makoura, Kuranui College, and Te Kura Kaupapa Maori o Wairarapa. Band members have also had some individual successes this year. Jerome was runner up in the Over 14 category at Talent Wairarapa, and has joined a band, The Seki Bradaz, with three former members of Fresh Noiz. Maia, a member of kapa haka group Wairarapa ki Uta Wairarapa ki Tai, was awarded “Best Female Vocalist” at the 2019 Regional Secondary Schools Kapa Haka Competition in June. The band also plans to record a CD by the end of the year.

Tracy will help you demystify your device and provide you with tips to make sure it operates as you need it to. Increase your confidence to use your tablet or smartphone as a capable computer. Where: REAP House, Masterton: Dates: 24, 25 September Time: 6.30pm – 8.30pm Tutor: Tracy Graham Cost: $55 Must Enrol by: 3 October

Personal Computing (PC) Next Steps

We have had a few people looking to extend their skills with PCs. We are looking to develop this into a course during Term 4, (likely start October) so if you are interested, please contact Jude, reapplus@reapwairarapa.nz or on the number below.

SKILLS

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Our Term 4 class 23 Oct - 11 Dec has 2 places available, so enrol now. We are also taking names as a waiting list.

Fly Fishing for Beginners

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Find out the equipment needed to start you off, the casting techniques to catch your fish and the places to go to find the elusive trout. All in the capable hands of the Wairarapa Fly Fishing Club members. This 6 week course will mostly be held at the Education Centre, 22 Dixon Street, Masterton; but will also include field trips. Where: MTLT Education Centre Dates: 10 September (Tuesdays for 6 wks) Time: 6.30pm - 8.30pm Tutors: John Pansters & Howard Thomson Cost: $90

PERSONAL Coping with Grief

#07011

A two hour seminar to help people better understand the feelings and emotions often experienced after losing a close relative or friend, and to offer some helpful tools for dealing with those tough times. Date: Tuesday 5 November Time: 7.00pm – 9.00pm Tutor: Hazel Neser Where: Rosewood Funeral Lounge Cost: Donation Please register at REAP or through Rosewood.

Enrolment essential if you wish to attend, so... ENROL NOW For more information or to enrol, contact: Email reception@reapwairarapa.nz Phone (06) 377 1379 0800 WAIREAP www.reapwairarapa.nz or pop into REAP House, 340 Queen Street, Masterton.

PLUS

Note that payment confirms your enrolment.

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34 Wairarapa Midweek Lifestyle Wednesday, August 14, 2019

The power of creativity Marina Lira recently moved from Brazil to Featherston, giving her a fresh outlook on what Wairarapa has to offer. Join her as she shares her experiences navigating her new community. You have probably heard of or seen Millie Ogg, a local artist from Masterton who has been showing her art in exhibitions throughout Wairarapa. As a young child, Millie started doing art classes in school. After a few years, she decided to invest more time in her passion and dedicate her life to art. In 2015, she enrolled at The Learning Connexion studying for a Certificate of Art and Creativity. To finance her studies, she crowdfunded half of her course costs with a campaign called “Take the next step with Millie”. The other half was covered by the Frank Davis Scholarship which was awarded to her by The Learning Connexion.

Through my eyes

Marina Lira researching the subject in She studied part time detail beforehand. through distance delivery One of her favourite from May 2016 to April compositional techniques 2017. is to use acrylic and During this time, watercolours. she was tutored by Of all the elements graphic designer of composition; Matthew Moriarty, mixing and making and the tutors in different colours is King Street the most crucial Artworks in to Millie’s Masterton own sense of were also very Wairarapa creativity. helpful and Women’s Besides supportive. Centre painting, she also One of Millie’s designed and made favourite styles letters out of wood and is steampunk – it’s created some collage a subgenre of science projects. fiction that incorporates She has been branching technology and aesthetic designs inspired by 19thout into pottery as well. century industrial steamAt King Street Artworks, powered machinery. her second home, she She uses aspects of the creates her projects with genre in her painting and the help of tutors. on her sewing projects Millie has displayed a at Come Sew With Me in few pieces of her work Masterton. at their recent annual Along with a community exhibition at Aratoi of steampunks, Millie likes Wairarapa Museum of Art to create her costumes to and History. go to steampunk events You can also find Millie’s like The Time Traveller’s work at Heart for Arts, Ball. a community gallery in Millie’s technique for Carterton. starting a new art project For Millie, art is more involves studying and than her work, it’s a

passion that gave her the opportunity to meet people that share the same interests, keep busy and help with her mental health. Being involved with this activity and in the community helps her feel more focused, communicative, and confident in her life. Millie is one of the committee members heading craft class At Te Awhina Cameron Community House. They create abstract art with different materials, painting, work with wood. Now they’re working on painting different sizes of tins. The thing that impressed me the most is how we can actually see the personality of the artist through their art. Millie is a lovely woman, and using her art, she finds a way to communicate with the world and express her feelings. Art is definitely a good activity to let our imagination guide us and we have different organisations in our community ready to support and encourage that.

Come along and catch up with creative people at Te Awhina on Wednesday from 10.30am until 11.50am. Also, King Street Artworks is another place with tutors ready to give you a hand. Like Millie it’s time to find something you like and let your imagination run free. • Marina Lira is a Volunteer Youth Buddy at the Wairarapa Women’s Centre.

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Masterton artist Millie Ogg. PHOTO/ SUPPLIED


Wednesday, August 14, 2019 Lifestyle Wairarapa Midweek

Rathkeale rugby reunion

35

Emily Ireland Thirty years ago, a 25-strong rugby squad from Rathkeale raised $50,000 to embark on a rugby tour of the United Kingdom and France. At the end of June this year, almost all of the team members from the 1st XV squad reunited at the Masterton Club. Team manager and parent Pat Rutherford said the reunion was “quite extraordinary after 30 years”. “My son sent out three lots of emails, and we weren’t quite sure who was going to turn up,” she said. “Twenty-one turned up, including people from all over New Zealand. The team played eight matches in England, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland, and spent six days in France between Christmas and New Year during which time they played the Nyon Rugby Club near the Swiss border. They won each of their matches on the overseas tour, Rutherford said. But the best memories of the tour experience came before they had even departed when they worked for 12 months to raise enough funds for the experience. Not only did each have to raise their $2500 air

Rathkeale 1st XV rugby squad at the 30 year reunion at Masterton Club in late June. PHOTOS/SUPPLIED

[Left] Tim Kinvig and Jeremy Gray. [Right] Matthew Wilton, Joe Nutting, Daniel Dobson, and Fergus Rutherford.

fare, but all contributed to a $50,000 team fund to cover international travel expenses. Fundraising for the

trip began with the sale of Christmas trees and potato and pumpkin crops, grown by the students at Rathkeale.

However, it soon became apparent that a much larger cash inflow was needed. According to a

Wairarapa Times-Age article from 1989, the students began contracting their labour out, and as the public became aware of the hardworking and conscientious labour pool available at the college, the jobs came quickly. All work was undertaken by students in addition to their normal school duties and examination study. Asparagus picking and sign erection work for AA Wairarapa netted $12,000 for the team funds, while painting contracts and farm labouring were other substantial earners.

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36 Wairarapa Midweek Lifestyle Wednesday, August 14, 2019

Issue with ‘keeping score’ Lakeview School principal TIM NELSON endeavours to learn something new every day by reading books, listening to podcasts, and engaging with a wide range of other content.

One of the worst things that can be done in a relationship is when each partner “keeps score” on what they contribute. PHOTO/STOCK.ADOBE.COM

Don’t keep score in relationships

More advice from Scott Galloway, the author of The Algebra Of Happiness, this time around relationships, particularly partners (husbands, wives, girlfriends, boyfriends). Scott believes that one of the worst things that can be done in a relationship is when each partner ‘keeps score’ on what they contribute. This could be in regards to household chores, finances, or anything else that is part of being together. Keeping score builds resentment, which leads to the deterioration of the partnership. Instead, focus on contributing in any way you can to make the relationship a successful one.

Why New Zealand are the netball world champions

Recently, I have written about the high standards and expectations of Noeline Taurua, the coach of the Silver Ferns (the New Zealand netball team). I wrote about her high expectations and the demands that she had of players who were up for selection for the team. I had read in an article how she didn’t accept players not meeting fitness standards, regardless of who they were, and that such players wouldn’t be selected for the squad. I am sure that many felt that, because the team was at an all-time low, exceptions should have

Midweek Musings

Tim Nelson been made, perhaps just for the short term. Within a relatively short period of time, the demands and expectations of Noeline Taurua have proven their worth. She didn’t compromise, and the team have gone on to become world champions for the first time in 16 years. Noeline felt that the players should, as full-time athletes, be held accountable. The final of the world championship title series was won by one point; there was no room for error and the Silver Ferns held their nerve under huge pressure. This would have come down to many things, none less so than the level of fitness of every player. Well done to Noeline Taurua for not being prepared to compromise.

Learn to deal with rejection to experience success

In his book The Algebra of Success, author Scott Galloway shares how he has had numerous failures and rejections in his life. These have included the likes of missing out on running for class and school leader positions, not being accepted into college fraternities, missing out on dates, businesses failing, not being accepted into universities and courses, missing out on jobs, and

many more. However, because he has been prepared to deal with rejection and failure, and to keep going after numerous setbacks, he has invariably gone on to becomes successful in each of the areas where he has experienced setbacks. Scott Galloway has gone on to become someone who is considered to be a success, he certainly is in my eyes, but this is only the case because he hasn’t given up when most would have, and has learned that a rejection isn’t a sign to give up, it’s a sign to ask someone else.

Why Novak Djokovic is so good at tennis

Novak Djokovic is one of the greatest tennis players of all time, possibly on his way to winning more grand slam majors than any other player. When interviewed on the On Purpose Jay Shetty podcast, he shares his story on what he has done from the time he first started playing until now to achieve so much success. One key aspect is the amount of time he puts into preparing and training, seemingly more than almost anyone else in terms of the fine detail and effort. Nothing is left to chance, from the conditions that it’s likely the game will be played in, to the strengths and weaknesses of his

opponent. Because tennis is a game of fine margins, it’s important to do whatever it takes to get that edge over opponents; the prep of Novak gives him this edge, something that he has held over almost all other players for almost 10 years. Others could learn from his example, but it seems that few are prepared to.

Things to be remembered by

More from author Scott Galloway, this time from The Good Life Project Podcast. The discussion got to a point in which Scott and the host talked about legacies and things that are truly important. Scott looked at things from the perspective of what people would respect and admire at his own funeral. His comment was that no one would ever consider a life lived with too much kindness or generosity to be one that wasn’t lived well, meaning that these are two qualities that we should all strive to practice more, not just enhance our own lives, but also to make the lives of others just that little bit better.

How to get things done

Payal Kadak is the founder and chairman of ClassPass as well as the artistic director for the Sadance company. Sharing her thoughts on how she has achieved the success she has the recipe is simple one; when she has tasks to complete towards a goal she will block out the time on her calendar, then go

Introducing Champ Wick Sri Lankan Veterinarian

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Champ Wick is a qualified Sri Lankan Veterinarian studying towards his NZ Veterinarian registration. He graduated with a Bachelor of Veterinary Science and completed a Post Graduate Diploma of Applied Science from Lincoln University in 2013. In 2018 he finished a Certificate of Small Business Management and owns a small animal clinic in Sri Lanka. Champ will endeavour to share his wealth of animal husbandry and veterinary knowledge with you. His interests include playing and watching cricket, watching soccer, and also travelling with his wife and son.

FOLLOW THE LOCALS

ahead to use the time to do the work. There’s no rocket science here, it’s just a case of knowing what you need to do, scheduling the time, then doing it. An outcome for Payal from this process is that through being organised and systematic with her time for the things that she may now want to do, she ends up having more time to do the things she enjoys. We all have the same amount of time, however, we don’t all make the most of such a valuable resource.

Get outsiders to solve your problems

This is an idea shared in David Epstein’s book, Range. The general theme of the book is the idea of not over-specialising in any one area, instead, look at having a wide range of experiences to gain knowledge and skills across a broad spectrum. Through a breadth of knowledge and experiences we gain the ability to use what we know and can do over a wide context. In Range, David Epstein shares numerous examples of how people outside of a specific area of expertise have been able to solve complex problems that have stumped experts. This is because the expert perspective becomes narrower and narrower, limiting the scope of ideas to draw from, whereas the non-expert who has a breadth of knowledge is able to unearth the unconventional idea. This unconventional process has an actual name, this being the Outside In approach, literally meaning that the outsider is looking in at the problem before coming up with the solution. An example being Tapiwa Chiwewe, a Johannesburg resident who noticed the pollution haze over his city one day, leading to him doing research on the impact of pollution, then coming up with a strategy to discover trends in pollution that enable city planners to make better decisions.

A place where change is possible If you are experiencing troubling issues like anxiety, grief or depression, or if you’ve been affected by family violence, we can help. We offer a non-judgmental, respectful, caring space where we help people through their process of change. P: 06 3775716 E: ang@changeability.org.nz www.changeability.org.nz


Wednesday, August 14, 2019 Lifestyle Wairarapa Midweek

37

ADVERTORIAL

Enliven elders enjoy pāua gifts In Māori culture, Pāua are recognised as taonga (treasure) as discovered by residents of Enliven’s Kandahar Home who visited Wairarapa’s Pāua World recently. The elders, including Kandahar Home’s resident carver Kelvin Thacker, were offered an individualised ‘back-stage’ tour with Pāua World staff. Wairarapa District Health Board’s youth oral health coordinator, Rachel Clarke. PHOTO/SUPPLIED

Youth urged to visit dentist Eli Hill About a third of Wairarapa’s 13 to 18-yearolds are not taking up the opportunity to access free dental care, and Wairarapa District Health Board’s youth oral health coordinator, Rachel Clarke, wants to see that change. Children and young adults in that age range can receive routine dental care free from any of the seven Wairarapa dental clinics. “Everyone loves a freebie, and getting your health for free is pretty exciting,” Clarke said. “But Wairarapa people are missing out, and there’s absolutely no reason for that. I want to make sure our rangatahi [youth] get along to receive the care they are entitled to.” Youth can attend a dental practice for a free check-up once a year – this will include the treatment

they need. Enrolment forms are completed during Year 8, Clarke said. “Every dental clinic in Wairarapa, and there are seven of them, all provide this free service for Year 9 to 18-year-olds. “If you know your teenager has not received their free dental care, book an appointment with the dental practice of your choice and they will sort out the enrolment at the first appointment. It’s just as simple as that.” With a background in nursing, Clarke worked as a health specialist with Special Olympics New Zealand before shifting to the Wairarapa DHB. Children below Year 9 enrol with the community dental service. There is a clinic based at Masterton Intermediate School and two roaming

mobile clinics that travel to various sites throughout the region. Other advice Clarke had for young people included brushing their teeth twice a day with fluoride toothpaste, flossing regularly, and making water their drink of choice. Wairarapa DHB spokesperson Anna Cardno said while Wairarapa statistics for the number of adolescents accessing care has improved over time, there was still a shortfall. “Last year, only 70.5 per cent of our Wairarapa youth received treatment, which means nearly 30 per cent missed out on their free dental care. The target for the DHB is 85 per cent. “Previous years have reported poorer youth access rates, with 67 per cent in 2015, 64 per cent in 2016 and 65 per cent in 2017.”

Feathy foodbank gets a new home

South Wairarapa Foodbank opened its doors last week at a new Featherston home. The service will operate out of the Old Courthouse, at 70 Fitzherbert Street, after its future was in doubt earlier this year. The Family Works agency had managed the foodbank since 2006 from Turret House, its home for the last 30 years.

In April, they were leaving the Fox St building and moving to a new base in Masterton — this would have left the foodbank with no premises. A collective was set up to ensure emergency food parcels remained available to South Wairarapa residents in need. Foodbank coordinator Indigo Freya said the collective was working closely with foodbanks across the region,

The donation will be put to good use, says Kandahar Home recreation officer Di McCuish. “In the past we’ve used donated pāua in our men’s shed activities and during craft days. “Pāua World’s latest donation will be used to decorate wooden dolphins that residents and volunteers have been carving recently. The residents are really looking forward to using these beautiful shells.” Di says the residents also enjoyed perusing the gift shop at Pāua World. “Some of the elders still really enjoy a spot of shopping, there were lots of extra sparkles in the van on our way home. “One man gave his wife a lovely necklace and she was rapt by the thoughtful gift.”

independence purpose trusted

Kandahar Home residents including Jean Bell, pictured, have been gifted craft supplies from Pāua World in Carterton.

Kandahar Home’s recreation team is always on the hunt for new places to visit as part of the home’s extensive recreation programme. “If you have a great suggestion, we’d love to hear from you,” says Di. Enliven’s Kandahar Home in Masterton offers rest home and hospital level care, while nearby sister-site Kandahar Court offers secure dementia care. To find out more visit www.enlivencentral.org.nz or call the friendly team on 06 370 0447.

community

fun

variety

caring

active

support

choice

Two caring communities in Masterton Enliven creates elder-centred communities where older people have companionship, choice and control, meaningful activity as well as quality care. South Wairarapa Foodbank coordinator Indigo Freya at work at the new premises at Fitzherbert St, Featherston. PHOTO/MARCUS ANSELM

Marcus Anselm

After the visit, residents enjoyed tea and coffee in the cafeteria, where co-owner Rosie Carter gifted the elders materials to craft their own pieces of art back at Kandahar Home.

WaiWaste Food Rescue, and other services to keep stock levels up. The foodbank will be open at the Old Courthouse, Monday to Friday, 2-3pm [except public holidays]. • The South Wairarapa Foodbank can be contacted on 022 6463702 or by emailing: swfoodbank@gmail. com.

Kandahar Home

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8 Roberts Road Phone: 06 370 0447

2 Colombo Road Phone: 06 370 0449

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Kandahar Court offers specialist dementia care including respite and a day programme in a safe, secure and caring environment.

Free phone 0508 ENLIVEN or visit www.enlivencentral.org.nz


38 Wairarapa Midweek Lifestyle Wednesday, August 14, 2019

By Vet Services Wairarapa

THE IMPORTANCE OF GETTING ANNUAL HEALTH CHECKS What do we check during an annual health exam? This often called a “tip to tail” exam – the whole body will be examined or palpated (as long as temperament allows) including: teeth, eyes, ears, skin, feet, joints, heart, lungs, lymph nodes, abdomen, genitals and a body weight recorded. The vet will also ask questions about your pet, this can include questions about: appetite, thirst, flea control, worm control, other pets in your household, lifestyle (eg. Indoor, or outdoor cat) and socialisation. Why do we recommend seeing your pet for a check-up each year, even if they aren’t due for a vaccination, and seem healthy? There are a number of reasons why annual checks are really important. • Cats & dogs age approximately 7 times faster than people. This means only seeing the vet every 3 years would be similar to you not seeing a doctor for over 20 years! • Early detection can result in better outcomes for many diseases. Subtle changes may not be noticed at home, but may be detected during an exam. • Pets on long term medication need annual checks to allow

us to continue prescribing their medication. This helps in the monitoring of their condition, as well as to check the success of the treatment, and whether any changes are needed. Blood tests may be recommended when some drugs are used long term to check liver and kidney health. • Dental disease is extremely common by the age of 4-6 years in both cats and dogs – regular dental checks and treatment can help avoid tooth loss and dental pain. Dental disease if left untreated can also lead to heart and kidney disease. By the time cats and dogs are showing discomfort eating, or have bad breath, there can be severe dental disease present. • Regular weight checks can help detect either an increase in weight which may require diet and exercise changes to avoid obesity, or a decrease in weight which can be an early symptom of disease. • Life stage discussions can help owners to understand what potential symptoms to keep a lookout for, and when to be concerned. The types of conditions seen commonly in senior pets can be quite different to those seen in younger animals. So if your pet hasn’t had their annual health check make sure you contact our clinic to make a booking.

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Wairio Wetland now covers more than 132 hectares of land bordering the eastern side of Lake Wairarapa.

Wairio: A template for wetland restoration Walt Dickson It’s not so much from “small seeds that mighty trees grow”, but rather small seedlings. This is the case on the eastern shores of Lake Wairarapa where Wairio Wetland is a shining light of what can be done to restore health to a damaged ecology. Poke a seed in the ground and it is unlikely that it will ever get enough light to germinate and rise above the thick mat of grasses. But a staked seedling, plus a bit of tending to during its first couple of years, that’s a different story. Thanks to the sheer doggedness of some ardent “duck enthusiasts”, the once devastated wetland is well on the road back to its former glory. And the mighty tōtara and kahikatea that towered over the wetland forest and surrounding bodies of open water are now returning. Wairio Wetlands is a joint venture between conservation group Ducks Unlimited New Zealand and the Department of Conservation and is supported by Greater Wellington Regional Council. The project has been going for 14 years, it covers 132 hectares of which 100 hectares is open water. The transformation from bare paddocks with poor pasture, (an outcome of the Lower Wairarapa Valley Development Scheme during the 1960 and 1970s), back to thriving wetland is extraordinary. The area is now teeming with flora and fauna including endangered bird species as well as numerous common waterfowl and waders. For Ross Cottle, chairman of Ducks Unlimited, it is “enormously gratifying” to see the flourishing ecosystem they have created. “It’s a leader in this region and a template for how to restore a wetland,” Cottle said. As the template shows, it requires a vision, huge effort and lots of money. To date, the project has cost more than $200,000 for planting, diverting water, and fencing to limit stock access. Cottle said the early years were

Ross Cottle and Jim Law of Ducks Unlimited NZ, two of the leading drivers behind the restoration project, were mucking in during a recent planting day. PHOTOS/SUPPLIED

hard work but, as “significant funding” became available and boots ’n’ all support was received from Victoria University and community volunteers, progress had gathered pace. “There have been a number of Victoria University students using the project for their masters thesis enabling us to put some better science behind the whole project,” Cottle said. Led by Dr Stephen Hartley of Victoria University, students were back at Wairio this month, along with other volunteers, carrying out “in-fill planting” of larger varieties of native trees. Specimen trees, such as tōtara, were planted in among previously planted nursery trees. Joining them were Patrick and Janet Velvin who are supporting the project with a donation. Velvin said they became aware of the Wairio Wetlands through the book, Wairarapa Moana: The Lake and its People, edited by Ian Grant and published in 2012 by Masterton-based Fraser Books. “The area [Lake Wairarapa] is in a very poor state, and the difference the project has made to this wetland is really encouraging,” Velvin said. The Velvins live in the greater Wellington region and believe strongly in the importance of improving water quality and conservation.

Wairio is not the first restoration project that the couple have supported. Each time they have used an intermediary, Wellington-based The Gift Trust, which carries out due diligence on recipient organisations on behalf of benefactors. Cheryl Spain, executive director of The Gift Trust, said they found Wairio to have impressive credentials. Wairio Wetlands is part of a much wider initiative – the Wairarapa Moana Wetlands Project, a joint initiative of Greater Wellington Regional Council, the Department of Conservation, South Wairarapa District Council, Kahungunu ki Wairarapa and Rangitāne o Wairarapa Inc. The project began in 2008 with the aim of enhancing the native ecology, recreational, and cultural opportunities on public land in the area, and includes restoration work at Ōnoke Spit, Lake Domain Reserve, Donald’s Creek as well as Lake Ferry and Ōnoke/Ōkorewa Lagoon. Wairarapa Moana is one of the largest remaining wetland complexes in New Zealand and has ecological values of national and international significance. There is a walking track around the whole wetland for the public to enjoy.


Wednesday, August 14, 2019 Lifestyle Wairarapa Midweek

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40 Wairarapa Midweek

Wednesday, August 14, 2019

SOTHYS OF PARIS AND AROMATHERAPY ASSOCIATES NOW AT ESSENTIALLY YOU

NEW RANGE OF LINGERIE TAKES ENGINEERING TO ANOTHER LEVEL

Essentially You of Greytown has two new skin care brands for its facials, both with long and illustrious histories!

The new season lingerie range is now arriving at Shalari with a rainbow of colours including your traditional basics.

Established in 1946, Sothys of Paris has grown into a global network, renowned for its commitment to research and innovation.

What is striking about them, says owner Tina Dunlop, are the new techniques and fabrics for amazing strength and even better personal fit.

Essentially You’s other choice of skincare brand is the luxurious Aromatherapy Associates which traces its history back to the beginnings of modern aromatherapy in the 1970s. Last month saw the introduction of Dermapen 4 micro-needling to smooth skin, decrease fine lines, scarring, pigmentation, stretch marks and acne.

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The Main Street beauty clinic also offers the professional services of Laser Aesthetics with registered nurse with Sarah, for botox, laser hair removal, spider and varicose veins, and skin rejuvenation.

Tina has chosen a selection that is specifically suited to her clients, giving them a broader range of choices. “I like to be confident that I am giving the customer exactly what will work for them.” Tina will give you a personal fitting - if you haven’t had one from her already - and help you find the right lingerie that says “spring!”

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For the month of August you can discover the beauty and luxury of either of our new skincare brands; Sothys of Paris or Aromatherapy Associates in a 75 minute ‘Discovery Facial’ and skin analysis at the introductory price of $85. 06 304 8307 146B Main Street, Greytown www.essentially-you.co.nz sorry, no gift vouchers valid on promotions

MEATY WINTER MEALS AT GREYTOWN BUTCHERY Winter is a time for nourishing meaty meals. Whether you feel like a traditional roast beef or chicken, casserole, stew or curry, you will find them all at Greytown Butchery. It sources all its lamb and beef from Palliser Ridge farm on the Wairarapa’s south coast with everything prepared on site. Greytown Butchery’s range of chicken includes free range and certified organic. It sells savoy ducks, whole, breast and leg, as well as duck fat for making crispy roast potatoes. Not to mention pheasants, quails and poussin. If you are getting home from work and don’t have much time to cook a meal, Greytown Butchery sells a big selection of award-winning sausages and pre-prepared meat dishes. All you have to do is put them in the oven or the frying pan, and in a few minutes they are good to go.

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• Wairarapa Palliser Ridge Lamb • Game Meats & Organic Meats • Free-Range & Organic Chicken • Free-Range Pork & Smallgoods • Multi-Award Winning Sausages • Gluten Free Sausages & Bread • Homekill Processing Options OPEN 7 DAYS

A SMALL YARD, BUT BUILDING IS BIG BUSINESS AT CRIGHTON ITM GREYTOWN Appearances can be deceiving. While the yard at Crighton ITM Greytown may be small, around 80 percent of its customers are commercial builders who purchase their construction materials from the Main Street South hardware store - including roofing, trusses, framing, interior lining and exterior cladding, flooring, piles and even concrete. “Often builders bring their plans in, and we do a quantity survey and price list, and then supply them with the materials they want,” says Branch Manager Jim Rodger. “We get a lot of original designs.” Mike Turley, who has many years’ experience in the building industry, is responsible for the business accounts at Crighton ITM Greytown.

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Shalari Boutique Lingerie 104 Main Street, Greytown • Ph 06 304 7170 www.shalari.co.nz Private fittings are available by appointment

GUESTS INVITED TO EXPERIENCE WHAT CLUB HAS TO OFFER

GREYTOWN DENTAL SOUTH WAIRARAPA’S OWN DENTAL PRACTICE

South Wairarapa Working Men’s Club invites anyone thinking of joining the 141 year-old club to pop in and see just what it has to offer. It has a full TAB facility, two full sized snooker tables and three pool tables, and 10 dart boards. The biggest night of the week is the Wednesday Draw night. There is usually live music once a month on a Friday Night with a variety of styles from country to swing era. The club is popular for weddings, funerals and anniversaries. Its restaurant has an excellent reputation, offering full dinners on Saturday and Sunday and snack meals on Wednesday and Friday.

Located in The Hub, Greytown Dental is a modern dental practice with four dentists and a hygienist. With modern surroundings and calming views, it offers a “people first” approach, providing professional and affordable services with the aim of meeting every need. It offers finance options for 12 month interestfree Q card, and discounted services for gold card holders and community service card holders. Greytown Dental does every-day dentistry but also implants and all ranges of cosmetic services. Greytown Dental makes its own crowns with ceramic milling and a 3D scan, with all the work done in single appointment. Greytown Dental is open on weekends.

Celebrate your smile Make a booking with a modern and established dental practice with great patient satisfaction today!

Greytown Dental The Hub, 78 Main Street, Greytown 5712 ESTD 1854

Phone: 06 304 8906 contact@greytowndental.co.nz www.greytowndental.co.nz


Wednesday, August 14, 2019 Wairarapa Midweek

41

OUT & ABOUT IN

GREYTOWN

MINI EXCAVATOR IDEAL FOR HARD TO GET TO PLACES Pope & Gray now has its own mini excavator which is ideal for drain laying, landscaping and other projects around your home or business. It is especially suitable for hard to reach places as it has a very small width and tracks that are adjustable to get into even tighter corners, for instance between buildings and boundary fences. The excavator (pictured) is quite light at 1.7 tonnes and so is easy on the ground underneath and easy to transport to jobs anywhere in the Wairarapa.

PINEHAVEN KEEPS GREYTOWN’S FRUIT GROWING TRADITION ALIVE When you buy apples – and many other fruits – at Pinehaven’s shop just north of Greytown you can be certain they were home-grown. Pinehaven Orchards marked its 104th anniversary this year and is still owned and operated by the Meyrick family. It grows and sells many Kiwi classic varieties including Gala which was first discovered in one of its orchards, along with 11 other varieties of apples. Pinehaven Orchards grows six varieties of pears, stone fruit including nectarines, plums and peaches, berries, and some vegetables. There’s always a wide selection of other fresh fruit and vegetables in store, as well as some gourmet foods, and basic groceries like eggs and soft drinks. You can enjoy its real fruit ice cream – or some home grown fruit – in the picnic area beside the shop which is open 8.30am to 5.30pm every day.

• Subdivisions • Driveways • Concrete Kerbing • Chip Sealing and Asphalt • Farm Tracks • Draincleaning • Drainlaying • Septic Tanks • Water & Sewer Connections • Landscaping • Lawns • House Sites

The One Stop Shop Please contact

Pope & Gray on 06 304 8911 or Visit: www.popeandgray.co.nz

PINEHAVEN GROWN CROWN PUMPKINS $2 EACH Valid until 21st August 2019

Ph: 06 304 9736

2471 State Highway 2, Greytown

Isabella Walker’s Peter Pan battles Hayden Tankersley’s Captain Hook as Florence Cater (Wendy) and Amelia Butcher (Tinkerbell) watch on. PHOTO/CATHERINE ROSSITER-STEAD

School’s Peter Pan show to support kids Rehearsals for Kuranui College’s production of Peter Pan have started, and this year the South Wairarapa school will donate the proceeds to the new Wellington Regional Children’s Hospital. Wellington Hospital Foundation chair, Bill Day is thrilled to have the support of the school. “Peter Pan is a magical person, and our new Wellington Children’s Hospital plans to be a magical place for sick children,” Day said. “We are so thrilled that Kuranui College with their upcoming performance of Peter Pan are joining us on this wonderful journey to support sick children who will need our new hospital.” The Kuranui College performing arts crew are renowned for their unique spin on classic stories, and this year’s production of

the timeless classic Peter Pan promises to be no exception. Auditions took place in June, with the crew beginning rehearsals recently. Directed by head of performing arts, Juanita McLellan, the production will bring Kuranui’s sense of fun and creativity to light. The production features Year 12 students Isabella Walker as Peter Pan, and Florence Cater as Wendy, alongside the powerful stage presence of Year 13 student Hayden Tankersley as Captain Hook, and Year 13 dance enthusiast Amelia Butcher as Tinkerbell. “We are playing around a lot with shadows and lights, so we are spending a lot more time behind the cyclorama. “For example, Tinkerbell when she is flying, there

are times when we use torchlight to show it, a lot of the lighting is very important,” Walker said. “We’ve also put a bit of a spin on it by casting a female lead, and I have to be very childish and light on my feet, moving around a lot because Pan is often flying.” Students will be rehearsing twice a week until the lead up to the shows at the end of September, when they will be adding in weekend rehearsal time to ensure the shows are just magical. The matinées will take place on Wednesday, September 25 and Thursday, September 26 at 1pm, while the evening shows will be on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, September 2628, at 7pm. Tickets will be available through the school office.

Levansa Trio concert

Three prominent musicians, cellist Lev Sivkov from Siberia, violinist Andrew Beer from Canada, and Kiwi pianist Sarah Watkins, have combined for a recital tour under the name of the Levansa Trio, and will be performing in Greytown this Saturday. Sitkov began to learn cello when he was five. He moved to Basel, Switzerland at the age of 16 where he was mentored by NZ Cellist Gillian Harris. He has been involved with Harris and her family ever since and she has been instrumental in arranging his New Zealand tour. He is, when at home, principal cellist of the Zurich Opera.

Watkins, well-known from her years of playing as a founding member of the NZTrio, is now a freelance pianist, enjoying playing with orchestras and with a variety of chamber music combinations. Most recently she has been involved with the Michael Hill International Violin Competition as official pianist. Beer has been concertmaster of the Auckland Philharmonia since 2014 and after growing up in a frosty part of Canada, he is overjoyed to be harvesting fruit and vegetables all year round in his garden in Auckland. Those who attended the NZTrio Tapas concert at Featherston in 2017 may remember Andrew’s

virtuoso performance when he stood in for the Trio’s usual violinist, Justine Cormack. The Trio members will play a Sonata for Violin and Piano by Debussy, Martinu Duo for Violin and Cello, Myaskovsky Cello Sonata No 2, and the Beethoven “Archduke” Piano Trio in B flat major. Myaskovsky was a contemporary of Prokofiev and Khachaturian. The concert will be held at 57 Wood Street Greytown at 4pm on Saturday, August 17. Admission is $25 for adults, $10 for students. • Contact Ed and Juliet Cooke to reserve a seat on 06 304 9497 or email efjac@xtra.co.nz.


42 Wairarapa Midweek Lifestyle Wednesday, August 14, 2019 ADVERTORIAL

An early spring deal to match the early spring weather at Langlands Honda Greytown Weather forecasters are expecting an early spring, with NIWA predicting above average temperatures and near normal rainfall for Wairarapa (www.niwa.co.nz). That means lots of early spring growth of lawns, shrubs and trees. Fortunately, Q Card and Husqvarna New Zealand have joined together to offer an early spring deal that should help Wairarapa home owners manage this growth. When you spend $3000 or more on Husqvarna product, or combination of them, using your Q Card at Langlands Honda Greytown you won’t have to pay any interest for two years - enough time to comfortably pay off your purchase interest-free. If you don’t have a Q Card, you can apply for one in the store, located at the north entrance to Greytown, with pre-approval taking around 20 minutes. New to Langlands Honda Greytown is Husqvarna’s new range of professional standard sprayers to keep your lawn and garden vibrant.

Op shopping fun: Op shopping is a great way to keep the fashion and homewares industry sustainable. Keen op shopper BEA NORMAN shares her Wairarapa experiences.

8 Litre Handheld Sprayer is versatile and perfectly sized for smaller jobs and spot treatment applications. The $219 Professional 15L backpack sprayer is designed to meet the spraying needs for any commercial and residential landscape application. Like everything Husqvarna does, these three sprayers have been designed and constructed to the highest standards. The 1.5 litre sprayer has features like a weighted dip tube which allows you to spray at multiple angles, and the ability to use up all of the chemical in the tank. A pressure release valve allows you to safely remove the internal pressure prior to opening the sprayer to refill. At the other end of the scale, the 15 litre backpack sprayer includes a deluxe comfort harness with lumber support, an internal no-leak pump design so chemicals don’t drip down your back, and genuine Viton® seals throughout the pump and shut-off for long-term resistance to chemicals.

PETROL ALL NEW TO THE PETROL PERFORMANCE HUSQVARNA RANGE! PERFORMANCE BATTERY BATTERY CONVENIENCE

It’s all about the treasure, and Wairarapa is full of treasure. I can’t say I have a favourite op shop, but on a given week, and looking for a particular item, I would have a favourite shop where that item is likely to be at. I love clothes, shoes, and garden treasures. I’m also frantically doing all types of craft things on the side for my home and garden, and at op shops, the wealth of objects ready to feed my imagination are everywhere. Today I’m on the hunt for an ornamental item to glue onto a brass base of what used to be a small round hall table. The brass base could

become quite the feature in the garden if I could find a suitable bowl, dish, or ceramic ornament. There are a couple of places which will hold the interesting feature, but first, I hit my favourite

place – Vinnies. Vinnies (Society of St Vincent de Paul) is situated on High St in Carterton. They have large items under a lean-to attached to the main shop.

The $29 handheld 1.5 litre sprayer is perfect for spot treatments, the $79

CONVENIENCE KIT PRICE KIT

Debbie Jones, Michaela Leask, Lillian Jones, Andrew Herd, and Emma Matthews. PHOTO/SUPPLIED

Banking a donation

Earlier this year, Carter Court rest home in Carterton was gifted $2860 by the ANZ Staff 1.5 litre 8 litre Foundation to buy 10 over-bed tables for their Handheld Handheld residents. sprayer sprayer At the end of last month, three staff members from $ .00 $ .00 ANZ Masterton branch along with Andrew Herd, 15 litre Senior Systems Analyst Backpack sprayer at ANZ, who works from his home in Carterton $ .00 36VLi-Ion Li-Ion- 12" - 12" 4.15kg battery) 36V BarBar - 4.-15kg (incl(incl battery) 2-days a week away from $ Offervalid valid01/04/19-31/07/19 01/04/19-31/07/19 at participating Husqvarna Dealers stocks last.BLi20 Kit incl: Skin, QC80 BLi20Charger. Battery, QC80 Charger. RRP $699 RRP 699 Offer at participating Husqvarna ServicingServicing Dealers only, while only, stockswhile last. Kit incl: Skin, Battery, his Wellington-based job, enjoyed attending ALLlocal INauthorised STOCKHusqvarna NOW!Servicing COME &Dealer: SEE THE HUSQVARNA DIFFERENCE Your Dealer: Your local authorised Husqvarna Servicing a morning tea with the Carter Court residents to see first-hand where the proceeds of the Staff 2491 State Hightway 2, Greytown 5794 Foundation donation had gone and to enjoy tea and P 06 304 8482 2 cake with the residents. E greytown@langlandshonda.co.nz Carter Court is a not-forprofit organisation that is fully community owned WWW.HUSQVARNA.CO.NZ and operated.

599* 599

$ PRICE

$

*

29

79

120iBATTERY BATTERYCHAINSAW CHAINSAW 120i *

*

219

LANGLANDS HONDA GREYTOWN

2

www.langlandshonda.co.nz WWW.HUSQVARNA.CO.NZ

The ANZ Staff Foundation is a charitable trust funded through staff payroll donations and matched by ANZ $2 for every $1 donated. It has already given $6 million to more than 650 kiwi charities since its inception in 2000. As a not-for-profit, Carter Court relies on donations to purchase new equipment such as the over bed tables. Manager of Carter Court Rae Andrews said a lot of their new residents were “increasingly frail and in need of a greater level of care”. “Having equipment like the over bed tables is incredibly helpful. “Residents can use them over their comfort chairs or beds to do crosswords, read, and have meals or

refreshments.” She said it was the first time Carter Court had received a donation from the ANZ Staff Foundation and she was “very grateful”. “I placed the order for the tables on the day we found out we’d been successful in our application, they arrived the next day and were in use 10 minutes later.” Senior Systems Analyst at ANZ Bank Andrew Herd said it was an easy decision support Carter Court’s application to the Staff Foundation. “My own grandmother was a resident there in mid-2000s and I know that as a not-for-profit they’re always looking for funds. “I’m glad that we were able to help.”


Wednesday, August 14, 2019 Lifestyle Wairarapa Midweek

Your next adventure awaits

Sometimes you can forget what you were looking for at op shops. PHOTO/STOCK.ADOBE.COM

Here, I often find tables, drawer sets, garden tools, chairs and always an unusual item that I creatively see appearing in my garden with a little mosaic skill. But today, it’s wet and

raining and I’m keen to bargain hunt. There is always a smile and greeting from this friendly bunch, and if you tell them of your latest creative venture, their interest will boost

your eagerness, and they may even direct you to the right spot for your treasure hunt. St Vincent De Paul run these shops to raise funds for food banks and other welfare needs in the

community. This is the main way for the society to raise funds. But donated goods are also providing struggling families or individuals identified through their home visitation process, so I always feel the ripple effect to my purchases from Vinnies and I love supporting them in my op shop adventures. Inside the Carterton shop, I head straight to their lovely back wall display of crockery items and it always sends me into a memory session of who used to own one of those. There’s glassware, cups and saucers, vases, and ornaments galore. I have an op shop system in my head – I venture to the books and puzzles, then switch sides to the shoes in hope of finding an amazing size 8 colourful pair. Coats next – and I’m always looking for something just a bit different. Dresses, tops, skirts, pants, and jeans. The key here is to look through the black items. I’m a bit of a magpie – I usually go for anything shiny and bright – but no one bothers to search the black properly, and

KEINZLEY AGVET LTD

MEET THE TEAM

Town & Country - Everybody welcome

Camille Petersen Mixed Animal Veterinarian

Craig Dickson Large Animal Veterinarian

Champ Wick Sri Lanken Veterinarian

(Studying towards NZ Registration)

Bonnie MacPhail Technician Vet Nurse

Large Animal 134 High Street South, Carterton Ph 06 379 6534

sometimes the best bargains will be in the black items. The bright jacket I’ll find next time will compliment that dark awesome discovery. I’ve scanned the handbags now, and jewellery, and skimmed past the counter display, which will always make me pause at something extra special on display. Then I stop at children’s books as I’m such a collector of beautiful stories and illustrations. I grab some lace and buttons for future craft – I always finding something that you can no longer buy in shops. Vinnies Carterton have a great little nook with patterns, cottons, and beads – great for those rainy-day craft sessions with grandchildren. Now, the back section is a bit of everything. It could be an unusual jar in that box, or a small white dish. By this time, I’ve gotten so side-tracked with so much to see that I’ve literally forgotten what I came in for. As I’m driving home, I think again of the brass base that my shop was all about, oh well next op shop here I come.

Andy Cassells Small Animal Veterinarian

Rob Hickson Mixed Animal Veterinarian

Chantelle Leban Vet Nurse

Small Animal 127 Te Ore Ore Road, Masterton Ph 06 377 3819

Shael Duckworth Vet Nurse

Paula Gillies Vet Nurse Receptionist

FOLLOW THE LOCALS www.keinzley.co.nz

43


44 Wairarapa Midweek Lifestyle Wednesday, August 14, 2019

Favourite son farewelled Marcus Anselm and Chris Cogdale Masterton has farewelled its favourite son, Sir Brian Lochore, with the help of a large collection of former All Blacks, a tonne of respect, and plenty of humour. From an underweight infant who fancied himself as jockey, to a physical and metaphorical giant, Sir Brian’s humble nature was highlighted at his funeral last Thursday, as was his gift of making everyone he met feel important. His Memorial Park stamping ground, and the stand that bears his name, was near capacity to say haere ra to a “great kauri”. Family, friends, players, and supporters from across the country heard touching tributes from his son, David, the Reverend Steve Thomson, long-time mate Ivan Grieve, his doctor and golf buddy Aage Terpstra, and Gilbert Enoka, the All Blacks’ mental skills coach, who represented the current squad preparing in Perth for the first Bledisloe Cup test against Australia. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern joined local MPs, and the region’s mayors in attendance, but this was a chance for family and friends to take centre stage in farewelling Sir Brian. Mourners from as far as Dunedin and Auckland arrived in midday sunshine, as did schoolmates of Sir Brian. Thomson said Sir Brian spent his first two years as a townie “and for the next 76 years he was very much a country boy”. He gave the description of a “busy child – code for pain in the backside, who constantly found his boundless energy got him into daily strife”, and spoke of a Shetland pony called Winkle, who sparked Sir Brian’s initial sport ambitions to be a jockey. There was talk of Kumara Club, described by David Lochore as “recycled teenagers”. It was first formed to attend the 1991 Rugby World Cup in UK and France. Sir Brian was the club’s “ambassador” and set “giant standards”.

Masterton-born Enoka described how he had been privileged to work with his “boyhood hero”, who then became a friend. Enoka said that when they worked together, “BJ called me ‘the shrink’ and himself the ‘bush psychologist’ and together we went about our work”. “It certainly was the odd couple. What a beginning. But what a journey we went on. “And what a bush psychologist he was. He was a living example of the fact that you don’t have to have academic degrees to have knowledge and wisdom.” He explained his influence on the national rugby team’s culture and said, “He was the author of the phrase ‘better people make better All Blacks’, which is now known around the world. Friend and family doctor Aage Terpstra described how the determination and fierce sportsmanship which saw him rise to top of the rugby world carried on to his other sporting passions, such as golf. “I’ll always remember him at the 19th,” he said, “with a beer in his hand, and a group of very diverse friends from all walks of life who got together on a Sunday afternoon to play golf somewhere in the Wairarapa or on a trip.” The most touching tribute came from Sir Brian’s son David. The younger Lochore spoke of a beloved and loving family man, his skills as farmer, and some moments of fun in family life. He had toured and visited wonderful places, “but chose to live his whole life in the shadows of the Tararuas”. “This is where he was most comfortable, this is where he wanted to be. This was home.” As with all speakers, he paid tribute to his mother, Lady Pam. The casket left the stadium after the hymn, Guide Me, O Thou Great Jehovah, with the hearse passing through an honour guard of All Blacks legends, pausing as pupils from Sir Brian’s alma mater Wairarapa college delivered a stirring haka.

PHOTO/PETE NIKOLAISON

Sir Brian Lochore: In their words “He was a man of mana. He was man that was able to talk to individuals – it didn’t matter who you were. He was able to bring all of us from our own different spheres of influence and make us a team.”

- Carl Baker, member of 1981 Wairarapa-Bush team who won promotion to the first division

“He was the father of the modern game. I can remember the big fatties in the front row out there passing the ball like backs. When we teamed up for things it was always about us. It was about us as a team. There were no I’s in our rugby team.”

- Bob Pringle, Masterton Rugby Club and Wairarapa teammate

“I think he believed in me, he saw something in me and I think that was one of the great gifts of Sir BJ – that he saw potential in people and then he just invested his time to bring out the best in them, whether it be as an All Black or a Wairarapa College student, or someone at the tennis club or wherever. That’s the mark of the man.”

- Sir Michael Jones, member of 1987 World Cup winning team

“I was lucky enough to have one test with him. He was pulled into the team [third test against the Lions,1971] and he‘s been a friend ever since. He was a great man, smart. People would go to the trenches with him and he’d be up front.”

- Tane Norton, All Black 1971-77

“The thing I remember about BJ was my first All Blacks trial at Palmerston North. I’d played six games for Varsity and I got thrown in the trials. I made a break and BJ was as usual corner-flagging, and I just thought, ‘Don’t look in

his eyes; I just sidestepped him and I was away’. To me the best achievement for BJ was getting WairarapaBush to the first division and keeping them there; now that’s real coaching.”

- Grahame Thorne, All Black 1967-70

“He played a massive part of me staying here in 1996. I got an offer from Wellington and was picked in the Lions’ squad to go to New South Wales. Dad and I went to him see if it was a good idea and he thought that it wasn’t. He thought I’d get chewed up down there and he thought I needed another season here and thankfully that advice I took. He basically had that aura about him. Whatever he said, everyone stopped and listened. He didn’t say a lot of words but what he said resonated with everyone. He was famous for the two arms and legs speech; if we were playing a big opposition like Wellington, he would just say, ‘They’re like you and I, two arms and two legs’.”

- Mark Childs, Wairarapa-Bush, 1990s

“As a player I admired him. I played a fair bit under him. I always enjoyed playing against him. I always knew where the ball was; it would be with BJ somewhere. He always treated everybody equally and it didn’t matter who you were or what you said, he was always the same, he never changed. “There’s never going to be anybody like him, never again. Well, not in my time anyway.”

- Dermott Payton, Wairarapa teammate and club opponent

PHOTO/GETTY IMAGES


Wednesday, August 14, 2019 Rural Wairarapa Midweek

Emissions debate continues Gianina Schwanecke

PHOTO/FILE

Submissions close on August 13 at 5pm. PHOTO/GIANINA SCHWANECKE

farming community. Many in the audience repeatedly raised the issue that the pricing system was “euphemism for taxing” those in the agriculture sector. Wairarapa Federated Farmers president William Beetham asked whether the government’s consultation process had only looked at pricing emissions as a way to reduce them. Homewood farmer, George Tatham, raised concerns about the government proposal not recognising early work already undertaken by farmers to reduce emissions. Audience members

asked about the ways farmers were working to reduce emissions, including genetic modification and engineering, soil carbon sequestration, and the use of biochar – a carbon and nutrient rich charcoal used as a soil amendment. Questions were also raised about how funds raised from the emissions pricing would be put back into the sector for further emissions reduction activities. “It’s about working together with the government and the sector to ensure that funding is appropriately recycled back into the industry,” MFE climate change policy manager Janine Smith said. “It’s a critical step which would be designed before this process starts in 2025. “It’s really hard to quantify the upsides of the

environmental benefit – it’s really hard to put a dollar on it.” Federated Farmers arable chair Karen Williams asked about the dual purpose of reducing emissions and proposals relating to protecting sustainable food production. “The focus is very much on reducing our emissions and not how we will feed our growing population,” she said. The response was that regular reviews would continue to monitor whether the scheme was working and the rate at which agriculture emissions should be reduced in relation to competitor markets. Williams pointed out that the people appointed to oversee these roles would have a very influential role

in directing climate policy as it relates to agriculture. Notes were taken during the discussion and would be taken back to the capital, but perhaps the best way for farmers to have their say is to make their own submissions before August 15. More information about this process can be found online at: mfe.govt. nz/consultation/actionagricultural-emissions The discussion will continue at an event hosted by Business Wairarapa focused on better understanding the Zero Carbon Bill. It will be held on August 15, at Farriers in Masterton, from 5.30pm. Federated Farmer’s Andrew Hoggard will appear alongside Susan Kilsby, agricultural economist at ANZ Bank.

COUNTRY LIVESTOCK Report for Week Ending 09/08/19, by Ian Hicks. Calves Fr Bulls up to $100, HX Bulls up to $130, Ang Bulls up to $115, HX Heifers up to $170, Ang Heifers up to $105.

Sheep Ewes: Lyford 3 at $180, McLeod 13 at $150, Concept & Creation 2 at $178, 5 at $71, Taylor 5 at $72, 1 Ram at $88, Bryant

Rural

The debate about how best to reduce New Zealand’s agricultural emissions continued in Carterton last Monday, at an information session organised by the Ministry of Primary Industries and Ministry for the Environment (MFE). It follows the report released by the Interim Climate Change Committee (ICCC) last month. The report recommended the government price livestock emissions at the farm level, and fertiliser emissions at the processor level, through the New Zealand Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS). By 2023, farmers would be asked to voluntarily declare their emissions, by 2024 reporting would be mandatory, and by 2025 they would have to pay for these emissions – granted with a 95 per cent free allocation of emissions units. The information session also looked at a proposal put forward by those in the agriculture sector which sets out a programme of action to support on-farm emissions reductions. Many feel this option gives farmers more ownership of the process, but there are also concerns about ongoing uncertainty about climate policy impacting markets and a risk of delayed implementation of emissions reduction efforts. The session included presentations about research undertaken by the government into the issue and an hour-long feedback session, where farmers were asked to voice their concerns and ask questions to clarify details in the proposal. One or two questions about the government’s targets to limit global average temperature increase to 1.5°C above preindustrial levels suggested there were still a handful of climate sceptics in the

45

1 Ewe at $150, 1 Ram at $57, Saywell 6 Ewes & 10 Lambs at $65, Mitchell 4 Ewes & 7 Lambs at $40. Lambs: Bryant 1 at $151, Lowe 7 at $185, McLean 6 at $172, Rosemarkie P’ship 4 at $91, 5 at $97, Thompson 3 at $110, 12 at $180, Saywell 2 at $85, 14 at $64, Dagg 6 at $147, 4 at $122, Herrick 12 at $160. Orphan Lambs $31 – $85.

Cattle Johnson Farming 5 Fr wnr Steers at $200, Kelly 3 Fr ylg Bulls at $600.

NZ’S LEADERS IN

Introducing Rob Hickson Mixed Animal Veterinarian Rob has come over to New Zealand from Australia in search of rain and with a determination to make up for the 700,000 Kiwis who have made Australia their home. Having grown up on a beef cattle property, he has a strong practical approach to large animal veterinary practice. He has bought a beef and sheep farm out near Castlepoint which gives him a valuable “insiders” understanding of the red meat industry. Rob is also looking forward to helping out with the Keinzley Agvet small animal hospital and surgery in Masterton.

FOLLOW THE LOCALS

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46 Wairarapa Midweek Business Wednesday, August 14, 2019

people who mean business REAL DEAL FURNITURE

Wairarapa Aluminium Door and Window Services

MOVERS NOW IN

WAIRARAPA Dean Cooper of Real Deal Furniture Movers specialises in all aspects of removal, both households and offices. Dean can take care of all parts of the process including packing and storage which Dean is happy to arrange for customers.

removal service, with extra attention paid to the careful handling of all their possessions. My staff are very experienced, friendly and take pride in moving furniture safely.”

Dean offers competitive rates - the same on weekends as weekdays - with Gold Card discounts, WINZ quotes and over the phone quotes.

Originally from Featherston, Dean has operated Real Deal Furniture Movers in Whangarei for the past 11 years, serving all of the North Island. Now based in Masterton, Dean has now brought the business to the Wairarapa.

“Our aim is to provide our customers with a high quality, friendly and prompt furniture

For more information, quotes and bookings contact Dean on 0800 101 434 or 021 243 1327

ALUMINIUM REPAIRS

WAIRARAPA ALUMINIUM DOOR AND WINDOW SERVICES For all your Residential and Commercial Repairs and Maintenance

Rod Lawrence PH: 0800 258 737 E: rdglawrence@gmail.com

TREESCAPING

QUALIFIED ARBORISTS

For all tree work, powerline clearance, stump grinding, hedges

Powerco Approved Contractor CONTACT KEVIN WALSH: 0800 WAI TREE 0800 924 8733 “No tree too tall or too small”

BUDGETING

CATTERY A small, personalised cattery right in town, perfectly set up for a family of cats, or just the one.

Wish you were here? Contact 027 877 6185 for more info. F cap money - wairarapa E jacqueline.lockyer@capnz.org

Ph 06 370 4048 for an appointment 25 Vivian St, Masterton www.alcatrazcattery.co.nz

EAR WAX REMOVAL

FURNITURE REMOVALS

BEFORE AFTER Wairarapa Ear Health Clinic Wellness Centre Masterton Medical To book appt

ph: 06 370 6730

or visit www.ears2you.co.nz

MOBILE BLASTING

We are a dustless mobile surface preparation company that services the entire Wairarapa region. Automotive • Residential • Industrial Call Evan: 027 6649507 evan@mobiledustfreeblasting.co.nz mobiledustfreeblasting.co.nz

For advice and service on all aspects of your aluminium doors and windows including screen doors give him a call on his toll free number 0800 258 737.

WAIRARAPA

wairarapatreescaping@yahoo.co.nz

ACHIEVABLE OUTCOME

experience has set up in business to cover this field of maintenance and repair work. His work is not only restricted to older style doors and windows, as the number of repairs to poorly or incorrectly installed doors on new and recent builds appears to be on the increase. Rod can supply parts for all the major brands including First, Rylock, Fisher, Doric, Nebulite, Henderson, Lockwood, and Legge.

AUTO TUNING

Locally owned and operated

A FREE CAP Money Course that will help you budget, save and spend well.

Wairarapa Aluminium Door and Window Services is a relatively new business in the area started by Rod Lawrence, due to a need for a specialized repairman for aluminium joinery. Rod has been the repairman for Hollings First Aluminium for a number of years and with many of the doors and windows getting to the age where they are now in need of some maintenance work, it is timely that someone from the area with the

Call us at Lamberts Engineering 027 275 7574

PH: 06 929 8955 E: rayandloriswhitcombe@gmail.com

DEBT

Struggling with Debt? CAP offers free debt counselling to help you take care of debt that could be weighing you down.

Kirkland Decorating

Call free on 0508 227 111 to set up an appointment with a local CAP Debt coach.

• Plastering • Interior & Exterior Painting • Wallpapering Specialists • Domestic or Commercial • Colour Consultations • No job is too big or too small

F facebook.com/capnewzealand W capnz.org E info@capnz.org

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Dean Cooper Owner/Operator P: 0800 101 434 or 021 243 1327 E: realdealmovers@hotmail.co.nz www.realdealmovers.co.nz

Free Quotes/Local or Nationwide Full Packing Services Short Term Storage

ROOF PAINTING

PAINTING

AND REPAIRS Contact Craig on

0274 251 313 or 06 304 7931

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Professional Leather Cleaning Recolouring - Repairs - Refinishing For our complete range of services visit

www.leatherwise.co.nz Call Andre 027 565 9244

PLASTIC & PANEL REPAIRS

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Interior and exterior Domestic and commercial Over 20 years experience Painting maintenance Free Quotes Workmanship guaranteed

Phone Dan 021 258 5900 dan.paintingservices@gmail.com

automotive plastics  bumper repairs  farming equipment  household items

Craig Morris 027 143 Cornwall St, Masterton

craigl.morris@yahoo.co.nz

244 8579 PANEL REPAIRS SPRAYPAINTING


Wednesday, August 14, 2019 Business Wairarapa Midweek

PEST CONTROL

PESTS

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PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

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Call David Pope on 06 3049 653 or 027 3049 653 Email: propertywash@hotmail.co.nz www.wewashhouses.co.nz

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Planning a holiday? I can help! 0800 R D SFTY • Tree felling • Pedestrian Guidance • Public & private events • Road works • Mobile operations • T.M. Plans • All trades • State highway operations Contact Richard Shepherd 0800 737 389 ricshep@hotmail.co.nz

VEHICLE AND FREIGHT TRANSPORTER We can move vehicles or anything that fits on the truck with a winch or by hand. Free removal of wrecked or scrap vehicles. Locally owned and operated.

Contact me today for travel advice and planning.

Lynne Carlyon - Travel Broker P: 06 370 1119 M: 0274 110 233 E: lynnec@nztravelbrokers.co.nz W: www.nztravelbrokers.co.nz

WINDOWS

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47

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Tony Stevenson of Martinborough-based business Securatel Smarter Living is set to begin installation of CCTV cameras in town. Also pictured, (from left), from the Martinborough Business Association is Allan Hogg, Charlotte Harding and Mike Anders. PHOTO/WALT DICKSON

Watching over Martinborough Walt Dickson Martinborough’s cando attitude is making residents and businesses feel a lot safer in the South Wairarapa town. Led by the Martinborough Business Association (MBA), CCTV cameras and vehicle registration plate identification cameras are being installed in the centre of town to deter criminal behaviour and provide peace of mind. The six-camera setup is costing about $30,000 with money coming from the MBA, Rotary, Martinborough Community Board, and a Give a Little campaign. Trust House Foundation has provided the biggest injection of cash with a grant of $7000. There has been other support in-kind with Campbell Technologies supplying all of the cabling required for free. The cameras will be covering exit and entry points to the town square. Only police will have access to recordings, which can be done remotely from the Masterton Police Station. MBA committee member Mike Anders said the primary motivation for

installing the cameras is to act as a “deterrent”. “It is about protection and prevention as opposed to catching criminals,” he said. “It will also help to provide peace of mind to businesses and the community.” South Wairarapa Police Sergeant Richie Day said the Martinborough community is not immune to crime and the town is seen as a soft target by predominately out of town criminals due to the remoteness of the town. They target the local businesses and also the holiday and weekend homes, he said. “Having cameras installed will not only assist police in solving crime and holding offenders accountable for their actions, but the cameras will also prevent crime,” Day said. CCTV cameras in Masterton have assisted police in making numerous arrests for various crimes, he said. The cameras have also prevented many crimes from happening and numerous people from becoming victims, he said. “I believe the installation of CCTV cameras and vehicle registration

identification camera’s is a very good idea and it will greatly benefit the whole Martinborough community.” The CCTV project has been on the MBA’s to-do list for some time but had stalled because of the cost. All that changed however when Charlotte Harding was appointed secretary earlier this year, Anders said. “Charlotte coming on board gave it the impetus that was required to make this a reality,” he said. Since picking up the secretarial role, Harding has been progressing several other MBA projects which include, rebranding the organisation, plus creating a new website, scheduled to be launched in spring. She said the support for the CCTV project had been tremendous. “A lot of businesses and locals recognise it as being a good thing. “Martinborough is a popular tourist destination and only expected to get busier with the Dark Sky Reserve, so having more and more people visiting and walking around at night it is so important that they can do so while feeling safe.”

Auction marks end of an era

A big crowd turned out in Carterton on Saturday to mark the end of an era as tools, cabinetry, machinery and timber from Kings Woodworking went under the hammer. After four generations, craftsman Peter King has closed the joinery business which was established in 1887. His 94-year-old mum Nola was there to share a last look at the business’ ingredients.

PHOTO/STEVE RENDLE


48 Wairarapa Midweek Wai Write Wednesday, August 14, 2019

Building the new house

Wai Write

Patricia Byl Jim Platt worried constantly about rising insurance prices. In fact, he seemed somewhat depressed. When each of his four children visited him at varying times, they all had the same suggestion. Sell your next-door section and that money will cure all your finance worries. But he seemed not to hear, and each of his children went away worried. One day Jim’s daughter Pam visited and found her father back to his old cheerful self. How thankful she was. “Pam. I’ve had a magnificent brainwave. I am going to sell the section and I’ll have no more money worries.” “Why didn’t I think of that?” quipped Pam. “Never mind,” Jim said kindly, “you’re still very young.” Pam thought, thirty-nine going on forty, how young is that? In a very short time, the section was sold, and the concrete floor was laid for the new house that was to be built there. The first day the three builders came was bitterly cold. Jim went over there

The best thing Jim ever did was sell his section.

through the little garden gate and introduced himself. He suggested, as it was so cold, they might like to come over to his house at lunchtime with their sandwiches and he could make them a hot drink. Andrew, the eldest, accepted for all of them. At lunchtime, the four of them chatted happily. Andrew said, “Were you a chippy before you retired? I noticed the other day that your picket fence and garden shed looked as though made by a carpenter”. Jim said, “I was a professor of languages”.

“Crikey. Boys, we have a professor in our midst,” laughed Andrew. Jim remarked thoughtfully, “I would have been a very happy carpenter, but I just happened to go a different road”. One morning Andrew came over, he was a man short. He asked Jim to come over and give a hand. “I don’t want to get behind schedule.” Jim was very pleased to go. It would give him something to do. Also, he was very interested in the speedy

PHOTO/STOCK.ADOBE.COM

way the house was coming along. Jim found he could be a useful member of the team. At lunchtime, Andrew said, “Of course, I put you on the pay roll”. “That doesn’t matter,” said Jim. About a month before the house finished Andrew asked Jim to make a couple of garden gates and build a picket fence. Jim was delighted. All too soon the new house was finished. That last day, the carpenters were only there in the morning to tidy up. They all came over to say good bye to Jim and gave

Fagan Motors Ltd 75 Dixon Street, Masterton

P 378 6159

www.faganmotors.co.nz

him a bottle of wine. “I think the new house is really good. You blokes did a great job.” That afternoon Jim went out on the footpath and admired the new house. He felt proud to have had a hand in it if only for one day. A friend came walking by. “I see it’s finished. Looks great. Didn’t know builders did picket fences.” “No. I did that,” said Jim. “Good for you. Well I better keep walking.” As Jim took one last look at the new house, he thought to himself, best thing I ever did was to sell my section. Can’t understand why the young ones didn’t suggest it. • Patricia Byl is a member of the Blairlogie Writer’s Group. • The group meets on the last Friday of each month. • Phone 06 378 7606 or 06 379 8021 for more information.

If you have a flair for writing, send your short stories (up to 600 words) to midweek@age.co.nz to be considered for publication.


Wednesday, August 14, 2019 Puzzles Wairarapa Midweek

WORDSEARCH

HAVING A LAUGH

49

BUMPER WORDFIT

Can you find all the words hidden in the grid? Read backwards or forwards, up or down, or diagonally. The words will always be in a straight line. Cross them off the list as you find them.

NUMBER CRUNCHER

WORD-SEARCH WORDFIT

BLACK-OUT

TRIO

KER

SOLUTIONS

B O Y N A N M

N Q A U G U S T Y N F A R C H

M A G M A

D E P S N E E Z S C Y R E T P

D R A I N

I N I T I A L J T A N G L E D

A G E D

C I Q A L A A B O B W E A J N

D A T E D

I N H A L E D X P L A N E Q E

E T U D E

C Z O D E D O X E G R F T V C

S T O P

G U S H Y M M A D U B A S I S

I C E S G I I R O U N I N E L E N S O H I A W E I G H A T U T S C Y E L L I N G E A U T I T E M D A L E S A A T H O B D E P O T S R L L A E D O B R A W N Y E I A N G A E R E D S T E A L E R L I E C R Y A S C E N D H

Z F A G A M E G W U S X U S A

7 LETTERS PRAISED SENATOR STAYING TARTARE

2 digits: 12 28 44 91 3 digits: 025 075 146 182 503 525 580 627 704 769 4 digits: 2488 4122 5 digits: 24759 45965 67532 70255 85075 6 digits: 022230 022950 057542 297583 336591 960608 9 digits: 453667427 541685351 586675567

D S E T A B A R B A I E S O F M E C G P A C I L A Y E A S P

S O N I C X T A B L O I D H O

6 LETTERS LEARNS LINEAR RANKLE SKATER

Fit the numbers into the grid. Cross each one off as its position is found.

Find the threeletter sequence which will complete all these words

H A M S R A D O N A G A V E N P I E K A T E R L F E A R E D R A G E O I R E A I S E D F R E T S K S O D R V I A A L E R T F O R G O T O T E M

E F Q E W T I W H C M E E Z C

NUMBERCRUNCHER

S W I M E A D Y N S E T A S H U T S S O N E E R A P S P I K E F C I A L L P R A I T K E A A D R A Y P T I E U N A R M E R Y A T E

C R E W S Z S D O R D E R L Y

5 LETTERS ADAPT ADMIT AGAVE ALERT BEADY DATED DIRGE DRAIN EAGER EARED EGRET EMERY ETUDE FORGO GNAWS GRACE ICING LARGO LUNAR MAGMA

N G U R N U B E R A S L E D

I B L L T Q T O H I E G E G R

MOVIE NEPAL ONSET OVERT PEDAL RADON RAISE RIPEN SNEER TOTEM

TURF UNIT

I T C E E R M G R U E N Y I T S A L F E E A R E N W S E

D E B R I E F J C D C E Y A P

4 LETTERS AFAR AGED AIRY ANTS ATOM BAIT BONN CIAO DATE DEED DRAY EDEN EPIC FLAK FRET GREY GRUB HAMS IDES

IRKS LIED MYNA MYTH NULL OAFS ODES OGLE PIKE PUMA RAFT RAGE RAPS RASP SAFE SHUN SKIP SLED SNAP STOP SWIM TERM TIER

N E P A L

B S A D A I O M E G A B A I S

WAS YAM

I C I N G

H S T A B Z S O D R P I L E W

3 LETTERS ACE ASK AYE DIM EAR ELF ERA EWE FEE HAG ICE IRE KEA LOO NAG NET NUN ONE PIE RUM SOD TUT USE VIA

L A R G O

BLACKOUT

TRIO

Fit the words into the grid to create a finished crossword

G H O O T S R H H S N I G G E R S R

14/8

S O D

B A D I N A G E G G M E R R Y K P Y

G H O O T S R H H S N I G G E R S R

G R E A M U S E T U M R A G S E O B

B A D I N A G E G G M E R R Y K P Y

N U E V N E L Y L N A A P X H E E J

G R E A M U S E T U M R A G S E O B

I O L W B P V E H K A L A Z G T L C

N U E V N E L Y L N A A P X H E E J

LAUGHTER MERRY REPARTEE REVELS RIB-TICKLING SIDE-SPLITTING SMILE SNICKER SNIGGERS TEE-HEE TICKLE TITTER

GUFFAWS GURGLE HA-HA HILARITY HOOTS HORSE LAUGH HUMOUR JOCULAR JOKE JOLLITY LARKS LAUGHING MATTER LAUGHS

AMUSE BADINAGE BANTER BELLY LAUGH CACKLES CHORTLE CHUCKLE COMIC FUNNY GAG GIGGLE GLEE GRIN

I O L W B P V E H K A L A Z G T L C

T M G E S M I L E K C B Y K U R G W

T M G E S M I L E K C B Y K U R G W

T U R A L P T X P H T U P L A A R G

T U R A L P T X P H T U P L A A R G

I H M A H G A G M W E R H N L P U N

I H M A H G A G M W E R H N L P U N

L E F S S A G K S T J E E C I E G I

L E F S S A G K S T J E E C I E G I

P B L A U G H I N G M A T T E R B L

P B L A U G H I N G M A T T E R B L

S G U F F A W S G J O L L I T Y G K

S G U F F A W S G J O L L I T Y G K

E J N H P O H I L A R I T Y O I Y C

E J N H P O H I L A R I T Y O I Y C

D H L A U G H T E R S E X B Z N T I

D H L A U G H T E R S E X B Z N T I

I Z D Y L L A R K S U L W K N K C T

I Z D Y L L A R K S U L W K N K C T

S H O R S E L A U G H K E U O S I B

S H O R S E L A U G H K E U O S I B

C H O R T L E Q A F N C F V I K M I

C H O R T L E Q A F N C F V I K M I

J C A C K L E S W S N I C K E R O R

J C A C K L E S W S N I C K E R O R

A O R U J O C U L A R T Y A W R C U

A O R U J O C U L A R T Y A W R C U


50 Wairarapa Midweek Community Events Wednesday, August 14, 2019

Events

THURSDAY, AUGUST 15 Eat-n-Greet: Held at St James Union Church hall, 116 High St, Masterton, 11.30 for a noon start. Come and enjoy great food, make new friends and be entertainment. Everyone welcome. Open Mic Night: At the Greytown Hotel Top Pub, 8-10.30pm. Wairarapa Genealogists: Rooms open 1-4pm, at the Research Rooms, 79 Queen St, Masterton. The public are most welcome to seek help with their family history research. GirlGuidingNZ: Carterton Pippins, 5-7 years, 4.15-5.30pm. Call Sharon [021] 033-0550. Carterton Brownies, 7-9½ years, 6-7.30pm. Call Sharon [021] 033-0550. Digital Seniors: Computer, Tablet and Smartphone advice and coaching: Martinborough: St Andrew’s Hall, Dublin St, 9.30-11.30am. Featherston: Featherston Fire Station, Fox St, 1.303.30pm. Age Concern: SayGo, 9am, Senior Citizens Hall, Cole St, Masterton. Housie: At Carrington Bowling & Croquet Club [behind clock tower Carterton], at 1pm. Narcotics Anonymous: Meet at 6pm, at 15 Victoria St, Masterton. Carterton Community Choir: Meet 7.15-9pm, at Carterton School, Holloway St. Ability to read music not essential. Call [022] 373-4299. Masterton Petanque Club: Club day 1.30pm, in Queen Elizabeth Park. Call Joan Miller 377-7983. Social Learners Bridge: 1-4pm, Featherston Community Centre. Call Barbara [06] 304-9208. Wairarapa Model Aero Club: 9am-noon, at the Masterton Aerodrome. Red Star Table Tennis Club: Meet 5-7pm at Red Star Sports Association 10 Herbert St, Masterton. Call John 3702511 or Brian 377-4066. Featherston Menz Shed: 61 Fitzherbert St, open from 6.30pm. Whakaoriori Shufflers: Line dancing, Red Star clubrooms, Herbert St,

Masterton, intermediate, 1-2.30pm. Call 377-5518 or 377-1135. Masterton Senior Citizens & Beneficiaries Association: Meet 1-3.30pm for cards, Scrabble and bowls, Senior Citizens hall, Cole St. Call Ngaire Walker 377-0342. Wairarapa Fern & Thistle Pipe Band: Practice 6.30-8.30pm, Savage Club Hall, 10 Albert St, Masterton. Call secretary, Gloria [027] 628-5889. Masterton Toy Library: 10am-1pm, at rear of Masterton YMCA, 162 Dixon St.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 16 Aratoi Wairarapa Museum of Art and History: Celebrates 50 years of existence with an exhibition: Fifty/fifty – 50 years of Aratoi. From Colin McCahon to an 1869 ship’s biscuit with a tale to tell of the visit of a prince. Opening 5.30pm, runs until November 10; Publication launch: October 11. Aratoi is open daily, 10-4. Mainstream B&B: Live music, 7.30pmlate, at Tin Hut. Wairarapa Stop Smoking Service: Need support to quit smoking? Quit Clinic at Whaiora 9am-noon. Our support is available across Wairarapa and it’s at no cost to you. Call Whaiora 0800 494 246. Needlework and Craft Drop-In: 10amnoon, Featherston Community Centre. Call Virginia [06] 308-8392. Sewing and Craft: 10am-2pm, Featherston Community Centre. Call Petra [021] 234-1554. Free Community Fit Club: 6am and 11am, Carrington Park, Carterton. All ages, all fitness levels. Call Di [027] 498-7261. Carterton Craft Market: Open 7 days, 10am-2pm, 41 High St North, Carterton. Call Desley [027] 787-8558. Kids’ Song And Story: Fun songs, finger plays and stories for under-5s, during school terms, 9.30-10.30am, at Epiphany Church Hall, High St South, Masterton. Call Jill 377-4614. Greytown Music and Movement: For pre-schoolers, 10am, at St Luke’s Hall, Main St. Contact: email admin@

stlukesgreytown.co.nz Dance Fit: At Carrington Park, Carterton, at 6-7pm. If weather not good it’s in youth centre of Event Centre. Text dance groove to [022] 321-2643. Masterton Social Badminton Club: Play 7-9pm, all year round, at Masterton YMCA gym [371 Queen St]. Contact by text Hamish [021] 259-7684 or Sam [0210] 552-113. Masterton Masters Swimming Club: Club night 6-7pm, Genesis Recreation Centre back pool. Call Graeme 377-0507 or Lucy [021] 0204-4144. Masterton Croquet Club: Golf Croquet 9.15am, behind the Hosking Garden in the Park. Call Pauline Lamb 377-3388. Carterton Senior Citizens: Meet 1.30-4pm, play cards, Rummikub and Scrabble, Carterton Memorial Club, Broadway.

SATURDAY, AUGUST 17 Hillbilly to Hardrock: 1.30-4.30pm, St James Union Church, High St, Solway. All welcome. Tinui Craft Corner and Museum: Open Sat and Sun 10am-4pm, groups by arrangement. Call Jean [06] 372-6623 or Pam [06] 372-6459. Featherston Weekly Market: Fresh produce, fine food producers, creators and much more. Great atmosphere, amazing food and community spirit, 8am2pm, 33 Fitzherbert St. Harlequin Theatre: Wardrobe hire, 10am1pm. Call 377-4066. Women’s Self Defence: With Dion, 9am, band rotunda, Queen Elizabeth Park. Call [020] 4124-4098. Parkrun: Weekly 5km run/walk. Measured, timed, free. 8am start, at the Woodside end of the Greytown rail trail. Onetime registration essential. Info: parkrun.co.nz/greytownwoodsidetrail Wairarapa Genealogists: Rooms open 10am-1pm, at the Research Rooms, 79 Queen St, Masterton. The public are most welcome to seek help with their family history research. Martinborough Museum: Open 1.30-

3.30pm, 7 Memorial Sq, Martinborough. Featherston Heritage Museum: Behind the Featherston Library and Information Centre. Displays of WWI Featherston Military Camp, Featherston WWII Japanese POW Camp, and of Featherston and surrounding districts. Open Sat and Sun 10am-2pm, other times by arrangement, groups welcome. Call Elsa [021] 263-9403. Justice of the Peace: Service centre available at Masterton Library, 10amnoon. Carterton District Historical Society: 44 Broadway. Open by appointment. Call 379-9021. Toy Library: Masterton: 10am-1pm, at rear of YMCA, 162 Dixon St. Featherston Toy Library: 14 Wakefield St, 10am-noon. Call Merle [06] 308-8109. Farmers’ Market: 9am-1pm, at Farriers, 4 Queen St, Masterton. Locally grown and made food and artisan products. Find us on Facebook or see www. waifarmersmarket.org.nz Carrington Bowling & Croquet Club: Golf Croquet at 1.15pm for 1.30pm start, at the clubrooms behind the Clocktower, Carterton. Call Steve Davis [06] 304-7155. Carrington Bowling & Croquet Club: Bowls at 1.20pm for 1.30pm start, at the clubrooms behind the Clocktower, Carterton. Call Rex Kenny 379-7303. Masterton Croquet Club: Association Croquet 9.15am and 12.45pm. Call Ian Wyeth 378-6425 or 377-5762.

SUNDAY, AUGUST 18 XploratioNZ: Meet at 3.30pm in the Wesley Room at the back of Crossway Church, Queen St, Masterton. Continuing with Michael Dowd “The Epic of Evolution�: A Cosmic Timeline. All welcome. Toastmasters Wairarapa: WOW Club meets 11am. Call Val Ph 377-2035. or Justin [06] 304-9075. WAI: a multi-media exhibition, at Aratoi, 12 Bruce St, Masterton, open daily, 10am -4pm.

Martinborough Museum: Open 1.303.30pm, 7 Memorial Sq, Martinborough. Masterton Toy Library: 10am-1pm, at rear of Masterton YMCA, 162 Dixon St, Masterton. Wairarapa Model Aero Club: 9am-noon, at the Masterton Aerodrome. Featherston Menz Shed: 61 Fitzherbert St, open from 1pm. Masterton Petanque Club: Club day 1.30pm, in Queen Elizabeth Park. Call Joan Miller 377-7983. Masterton Car Boot Sale and Market: 6.30-11.30am, Essex St car park. Contact ja.murray@xtra.co.nz Carrington Bowling & Croquet Club: Association croquet, 9.15am for 9.30am start, at clubrooms behind clock tower Carterton. Call Robin Brasell [06] 222-4000.

MONDAY, AUGUST 19 Age Concern: Exercise For Seniors, 9.30am; line dancing, 10.30am, at the Senior Citizens Hall, Cole St, Masterton. East Indoor Bowling Club: Meet at 7pm, all members and visitors welcome. Call Julie 377-5497 or George 378-9266. Literacy Wairarapa: Offers free help with reading, spelling and maths at Te Awhina/Cameron Community House, 9am-noon. Club Wairarapa Rockers: Rock’n’roll, beginners 6-7pm; Intermediate level 7.15-8.15pm, at Club Wairarapa, Masterton. Call [027] 333-1793. Carterton Scottish Dance Club: Meet at 7.30pm, at Carterton School Hall, Holloway St. No partner required. Call Elaine 377-0322 or Julie 370-4493. Mah Jong: 1-4pm, Featherston Community Centre. Call Pat [06] 3089729. Senior Citizens Cards: 1-4pm, Featherston Community Centre Call Val [06] 308 9203. Red Star Table Tennis Club: Meet 6-8pm at Red Star Sports Association 10 Herbert St, Masterton. Call John 3702511 or Brian 377-4066. Wairarapa Stop Smoking Service: Need

Limelight Theatre Company presents

ŎŹĊĿĊŇ �ãŹĊš

by John Godber

$XJXVW6HSWHPEHU &DUWHUWRQ(YHQWV&HQWUH A community theatre production in association with Samuel French Ltd

WLFNHWV


support to quit smoking? Our support is available across Wairarapa and it’s at no cost to you. Call a Quit Coach based at Whaiora 0800 494 246. Play Gym: St James Church Hall 116 High St, Masterton, 9.30-11am, for 0-3-year-olds. Carterton Food Bank: 11.30am-noon Mon-Fri at Haumanu House [down the lane between Carters and the Clock Tower]. Call 379-4092. Carterton Community Toy Library: Events Centre, Holloway St, Mon-Sat during CDC Library hours. https://www.facebook. com/CartertonToyLibrary/ CCS Disability Action Wairarapa Office: 36 Bannister St, Masterton, 10am-1pm Mon-Fri. For Mobility Parking Permits, Disability Support and Advocacy. Call 378-2426 or 0800 227-2255. Free Community Fit Club: 6am and 11am, Carrington Park, Carterton. All ages, all fitness levels. Call Di [027] 498-7261. The Dance Shed: 450 Belvedere Rd Carterton. Line Dancing Class, 7-9pm, beginners followed by intermediate. Call Wendy or Don 379-6827 or [027] 319-9814. Epilepsy Support Group: 11am at the Salvation Army office, 210 High St South, Carterton. Call 0800 20 21 22. Citizens Advice Bureau: Free and confidential advice, Mon-Fri 9am-4pm, 43 Perry St, Masterton. Call 377-0078 or 0800 367-222. Masterton District Brass Band: Rehearsals at 7.30pm, in the Band Room, Park Ave, Masterton. Call [022] 574-0742. Not Your Nanna’s Sewing Circle: 7-9pm, Cobblestone’s Administration Room, 169 Main St, Greytown. Call Christine Healy [0274] 670-195 or Lynda Saint-Merat [06] 304-7026. Alcoholics Anonymous: Masterton: 7.30pm, St Matthew’s Church Hall, 35 Church St. Call Anne 378-2338 or Pete [020] 4005-9740. Carterton: 8pm, Salvation Army Community Rooms, 210 High St. Call Bob [021] 042-2947 or Martin [06] 372-7764. GirlGuidingNZ: Masterton Rangers, 12½-

18 years, 6.30-8pm. Call Sharon [021] 033-0550. South Wairarapa Guides [Greytown], 9-12½ years, 6-8pm. Call Sharon [021] 033-0550.

TUESDAY, AUGUST 20 Alanon: A group for anyone affected by another’s drinking, meet at 7pm at Cameron Community House, Church St, Masterton. Call 0508 425-2666. Wairarapa Spinners & Weavers: Meet 7pm in The Wool Shed, Dixon St, Masterton. Call Trish 378-8775 or Josie 378-6531. Wairarapa Embroiderers Guild: Meet at the Ranfurly Club Rooms, Chapel St, Masterton. Call Nola [027] 6878599 or Jenny 377-0859 or email Wairarapaembroiderers@gmail.com Masterton Toastmasters: Meet in the Salvation Army Hall, High St, Carterton, at 7.30pm. All welcome in a supportive, friendly environment for participation in public speaking, communicative and leadership opportunities. Call Pam [027] 669-9666. GirlGuidingNZ: Masterton Pippins, 5-7 years, 3.45-5pm. Call Sharon [021] 033-0550. Digital Seniors: Computer, Tablet and Smartphone advice and coaching: Carterton, Fire Station (new venue) 9.3011.30am. Greytown, The Offerings Café, 1.30-3.30pm. Wairarapa Consumer Complaints Support & Advisory Group: 11am - noon, at Te Awhina House, Cameron Cres, Masterton. Contact adviser Aileen Haeata goddessfitnz@gmail.com South Wairarapa Badminton Club: Featherston Sports Stadium Underhill Rd, at 7.30pm. New members welcome and rackets available. Harlequin Theatre: Wardrobe hire, 10am1pm. Call 377-4066. Dance Fitness: 6.30-7.30pm, at Fareham House Hall Featherston. Call Justine [0204] 105-2830. Wairarapa Senior Net: Invites people 50 years-plus to interesting computer and Smartphone course, at the Departmental

Buildings, 33 Chapel St, Masterton, 1.30-2.30pm. Wairarapa Genealogists: Rooms open 1-4pm, at the Research Rooms, 79 Queen St, Masterton. The public are most welcome to seek help with their family history research. Chair Exercise: Gentle chair exercises, 2-2.45pm, at St John’s Hall, Greytown. Tribal Fusion Bellydancing: At 15 Queen St, Masterton, at 6.30pm. Text Toni [021] 105-7649 or visit Wairarapa Steampunk Tribal Bellydance on FB for more information. Red Star Table Tennis Club: Meet 9am-noon at Red Star Sports Association 10 Herbert St, Masterton. Call John 3702511 or Brian 377-4066. Featherston Menz Shed: 61 Fitzherbert St, open from 10am. Juesday Art: 10am-1pm, Featherston Community Centre. Call Julia [06] 308-8977. Featherston Wahine Singers: 7-8.30pm, Featherston Community Centre. Call Susan [021] 246-4884. Art For Everyone: 7-8pm, Featherston Community Centre. Call Sandie [021] 157-4909. Carterton District Historical Society: 44 Broadway, 2-4pm, or by appointment. Call 379-9233 or [027] 271-6280. Clareville Badminton Club: Main Stadium at Clareville, 7.30pm -9pm. Call Steve 379-6999. Central Indoor Bowls Club: 7.30pm, Hogg Crescent hall. Call Mathew or Graeme 378-7554. Masterton Senior Citizens and Beneficiaries Association: Meet for social indoor bowls, 500 cards, or a chat 1-3pm, Senior Citizens hall, Cole St. Call Ngaire 377-0342. Free Community Fit Club: 11am, Carrington Park, Carterton. All ages, all fitness levels. Call Di [027] 498-7261. Woops A Daisies: Leisure Marching Team practise 4-5pm, at the YMCA. Call Cheryl [06] 370-1922. Masterton Toy Library: 10am-1pm, at rear of Masterton YMCA, 162 Dixon St, Masterton. South Wairarapa Workingmen’s Club:

Who do you wear it for? 30 AUGUST 2019

Games afternoon, including cards, board, darts, pool etc. Call Doff 304-9748. Girl Guiding: Pippins [5-7 years] 3.455pm. Call Chrissy Warnock 372-7646. Carrington Bowling & Croquet Club: Association croquet, 1.15pm for 1.30pm start, at the clubrooms behind clock tower Carterton. Call Robin Brasell [06] 222-4000. Carrington Bowling & Croquet Club: Bowls at 1.20pm for 1.30pm start, at the clubrooms behind the clock tower, Carterton. Call Rex Kenny 379-7303. Masterton Croquet Club: Golf croquet 9.15am, behind the Hosking Garden in the park. Call Pauline Lamb 377-3388.

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 21 Toi Wairarapa – Heart of Arts: 10 Minute Bites, 12.10pm, BYO sandwich. Wairarapa Spinners & Weavers: Meet 7pm in The Wool Shed, Dixon St, Masterton. Call Trish 378-8775 or Josie 378-6531. Wairarapa Senior Net: Invites people 50 years-plus to their Apple-Mac computer and Smartphone presentations, in their rooms, at the Departmental Buildings, 33 Chapel St, Masterton, 1.30-2.30pm. GirlGuidingNZ: Masterton Brownies, 7-9½ years, 5.30-7pm. Call Sharon [021] 033-0550. Digital Seniors: Computer, Tablet and Smartphone advice and coaching at Masterton Library, 10am-noon. Dance Fitness: 9.30-11am, preschoolers with parents or caregivers, music and movement and art, at Fareham House Hall Featherston. Call Justine [0204] 105-2830. Wairarapa Spinners & Weavers: Meet 10am in The Wool Shed, Dixon St, Masterton. Call Trish 378-8775 or Josie 378-6531. Cards: Come and join other enthusiastic “500” Players 1.15-4.15pm, at the Carterton Club. Call Barbara 379-6582 or Val 379-8329. AA Meeting: At 7.30pm. Call [027] 557-7928. Ukulele Classes: 1-3pm, Featherston Community Centre. Call Neil [06]

308-9341. Masterton Senior Citizens and Beneficiaries Club: Craft and chat afternoon 1-3pm, bring your crafts or just come for some company, Senior Citizens Hall, Cole St, Masterton. Whakaoriori Shufflers: Line dancing, Red Star clubrooms, Herbert St, Masterton, beginners 4.30-5.30pm; intermediate, 5.30-7pm. Call 377-5518 or 377-1135. Kiddie Gym: For 0-3-year-olds, 9.3011am, at St David’s Church, corner High and Victoria Sts, Carterton. Call Lorna or Abby 379-8325. Rangatahi to Rangatira Youth Group: Join us for sports, food, and leadership, Carterton Events Centre. Text “R2R” to [027] 742-2264. Masterton Art Club: 10am-2pm for browsing or painting, at 12 Victoria St. Call Sue 377-7019. Age Concern: Exercise For Seniors, 1.30pm, Senior Citizens hall, Cole St, Masterton. Carterton Women’s Golf: Nine-hole golf at 10.45am. Call Jane Brooking [021] 171-9249. Recreational Walking Group: 9.30am, Essex St car park. Call Ann Jackson, 3725758, or Ann Duckett, 378-8285. Te Runga Scouts: Cubs, 6-7.30pm, 45 Harley St, Masterton. Wairarapa Singers: 6.45pm, at Rosewood, 417 Queen St, Masterton. Call Sean Mulcahy 379-9316. Esperanto Club: 2pm, write to people using the international language worldwide. Call 377-0499. Soulway Cooking and Crafts: 10amnoon, High St, Masterton. Call Nikki Smith 370-1604 [church office]. Alcoholics Anonymous: Masterton: 7.30pm, Soulway Church, 227 High St. Call Darren [027] 334-2685. Carrington Bowling & Croquet Club: Golf Croquet at 1.15am for 1.30pm start, at the clubrooms behind the Clocktower, Carterton. Call Steve Davis [06] 304-7155. Masterton Croquet Club: Association Croquet 9.15am and 12.45pm. Call Ian Wyeth 378-6425 or 377-5762. * To have an event listed please email event@age.co.nz

51

Events

Wednesday, August 14, 2019 Community Events Wairarapa Midweek


52 Wairarapa Midweek Classifieds Wednesday, August 14, 2019

Classified Personal

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3 2 Freyberg StCt 3 $200 $400 6 Alamein $370 Paierau Rd 3 Country LivingSt 3 $210 $330 145H Perry $260 A Bit of Country 2 $220 $370 56 16 Boundary Road 3 River Rd $330 6 Intermediate St 2 $220 81 Manuka St $210 Solway - Room to Rent 1 Cars For Sale $220 CARTERTON 5/53 Opaki Rd $470 Country Living 5 MAZDA 3 2009 Auto $260 GREYTOWN 80D South Rd Silver 117,000 kms, wof & $495 2457 State Highway 2 5 rego and serviced, very $265 46 Kippenberger If you need help withSt good condition, only 3 your rental property, $285 15 Jeans St owners $11,000 ono. call us today! Phone 0274 795 006. We have preapproved $295 47 Michael St for a tenants waiting home.

Hire Services

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Firewood

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SEASONED Blue Gum mix OMP, $130 Trailer Ph 021 027 93633. 2 1 2 1

Public Notices

Masterton A & P Association

2

AGM

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8pm Thursday 29th August 2019 at the Pigeon and Poultry Rooms All welcome

3 4 3 3

MASTERTON TENNIS CENTRE AGM

FORKLIFTS, TRUCKS, office@mastertonrentals.co.nz $100 345 Waihakeke Rd TRACTORS, DIGGERS, MASTERTON PROPERTY LOADERS, TRANSPORTER MANAGEMENT (Storage Shed)LTD 0 Long or Short term all at James Trucks & Saturday 24th $245 3396 St Highway 2 3 Machinery Railway Road August, 2019 Firewood (off $335 14 Hornsby St 3 2.30pm yard. Phone Gary 06 377 @ M.T.C. 0550. Phone Chrissy DRY PINE $100Osborne per cm³ 06 377 4961027 413 Dixon St. Masterton delivered. Phone 9742 or 027 958 7621. MASTERTON PROPERTY

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SEASONED: Gum 4m³ $580, 2m³ $350: Douglas-Fir 4m³ $570 (BEST BUY), 2m³ $340: Macrocarpa 4m³ $570, 2m³ $340: Split Pine 4m³ $460, 2m³ $280: Gum & D/Fir $600: Gum & Mac $600: Gum & S/Pine $540: D/Fir & Mac $590: D/Fir & S/Pine $530: Mac & S/Pine $530: Bagged Kindling $15ea. WINZ Quotes. Prices incl. GST & del. Wholesale Firewood Supplies Ph (04) 232-9499, www.firewoodsupplies.co.nz

Sports Notices

Need to place your AGM notice?

Church Services

BIBLE SERVICES Masterton Senior Citizens Hall 8 Cole St, Sundays 4.30pm (25th August at 7pm) 73 Main St Greytown Thursdays 7.30-8.30pm We seek to teach and encourage people to follow Jesus and come to know God as their Father through messages from the Bible. All welcome Enquiries 027 484 9310

Funeral Directors

Contact Dick Tredwell on 372 3722 or dicktredwell@gmail.com

For Sale

Opening Hours: Tues, Wed, Thurs 7:30 - 5pm For all your iron and roofing needs call 34 Dalefield Road, Carterton Email: admin@CtnCF.co.nz

Employment

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Public Notices

SCALE A TEACHER (PERMANENT) To Start Term 4 2019 We are seeking a flexible, well organised and compassionate teacher to work in our Senior Hub (Year 6 - 8). You must be a positive and energetic teacher with excellent interpersonal skills. Visits to the school are welcome. For full application pack go to www.carterton.school.nz Closing date for application: 9am Friday 23rd August 2019

GENERAL FARM ASSISTANT Fixed Term The Wairarapa and Tararua Regional Funding Managers for the Tindall Foundation are Applications need to be focused on supporting families and social services. Please contact admin@tararuareap.co.nz or call 06 374 6565 ex:4 to get an application form and the Tindall Foundation funding criteria sent to you. Applications open 12 August 2019. The closing date for applications is 30 September 2019.

Masterton Dairy Unit runs 550 cows on 224ha and is supported by good facilities, including a 46 a side HB shed. Successful applicants will have the following attributes to be able to hit the ground running: No less than 12 month dairy farming experience. Good work ethic Positive and ability to work as part of a team. General farm duties from milking, stock work, fencing, weed control etc. For more details please phone Robbie Peat on 027 367 2697 or email your applications to Robbie.peat@nz.gt.com

Call or email us and we can place it in the Wairarapa Times-Age or the Wairarapa Midweek

ASSISTANT MANAGER / 2 IC Fixed Term

Phone: 370 6033 or Email: classads@age.co.nz

Masterton Dairy Unit runs 550 cows on 224ha and is supported by good facilities, including a 46 a side HB shed.

Wairarapa Maori Warden AGM Hui

30th August @ 6:00pm If you are interested in joining, haere mai. All Welcome

Public Notices

EAST COAST RFC 2020 SEASON The East Coast invites expressions of interest for Coaching positions for the Senior A, Senior B and Sevens sides.

Gardening & Landscaping

Carterton School BOARD OF TRUSTEES CASUAL VACANCY A casual vacancy has occurred on the Board of Trustees for an elected parent representative. The Board has resolved under section 105 of the Education Act 1989 to fill the vacancy by selection. If 10 percent of the eligible voters on the school roll ask the board, within 28 days of this notice being published, to hold a by-election to fill the vacancy, then a by-election will be held. Any eligible voter who wishes to ask the board to hold a by-election should write to: Chairperson Board of Trustees Carterton School PO Box 214 Carterton

NOTICE OF ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

For further information please contact the Manager, Arbor House, 48 Main Street, Greytown. Ph: 06 304 9483. E: arbor-house@xtra.co.nz

Successful applicants will have the following attributes to be able to hit the ground running: No less than 3 years dairy farming experience. Provide effective leadership to the farm as 2 IC and ability to work as part of a team and manage the farm in the Farm s absence. Experience in the operation, maintenance and use of tractors, machinery and equipment. Milk harvesting and quality management Calving and calf rearing Knowledge and good practice of health and safety

Employment

For more details please phone Robbie Peat on 027 367 2697 or email your applications to Robbie.peat@nz.gt.com

The Annual General Meeting of the Arbor House Trust Board will be held at the South Wairarapa Workingmen's Club Committee Room (upstairs) at 6.00 pm on Monday 26 August 2019. The Agenda will include the Chairman's Report, the audited Financial Report and appointment of Officers.

OFFICE PERSON Established Masterton retail apparel business requires a part-time office person. 9 hrs a week (9am-12 midday Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday). Good computer skills are essential, with a knowledge of online payment schedules, banking, collating and following up online orders. Duties also include management of layby and charge accounts, collating stock taking information, record keeping re staff hours. Handover training will be given. Applicant must have excellent people and telephone skills, very tidy presentation, and a willingness to work as part of a team. Apply in writing, including a CV to The Manager, Bullick Blackmore Ltd, PO Box 74, Masterton.

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SAVE Delivering you local news, opinion & sport. 6 days a week with free home delivery. Call 06 370 0975 or email circulation@age.co.nz Your locally owned newspaper


Wednesday, August 14, 2019 Classifieds/Sport Wairarapa Midweek

53

Employment

JOB OPPORTUNITIES SWDC is a small District Council compiling of approx. 50 staff. Its aim is to support the people of South Wairarapa to meet community needs in the areas of Infrastructure, Environment, Planning, and Public Protection. We currently have job opportunities available and welcome applications for the following positions:

United title longshots Meisha Boone scored United’s opening goal PHOTO/FILE

• IS15-19 Venue Coordinator (30 hours per week) – a new role providing an opportunity to promote our indoor recreational facilities to the benefit of the South Wairarapa community. • CE10-19 Committee Advisor (up to 35 hours per week, including some evening work) – providing an integral link between governance and operations of the Council through managing and recording of meetings. • IS10-19 Branch Librarian Martinborough Library (full-time, Monday to Friday, 9 am to 5 pm + rostered Saturdays 10 am to 2 pm) – providing an efficient and effective library service to the community. Job descriptions can be can be found on our website www.swdc. govt.nz/job-vacancies Applications for these positions should be sent to Jackie Buckley, HR Manager, SWDC, PO Box 6, Martinborough 5741 or jackie.buckley@swdc.govt.nz Closing date for applications: 26 August 2019 F O R M O R E I N F O R M AT I O N C O N TA C T: jackie.buckley@swdc.govt.nz 0R 06 306 9611 w w w. s w d c . g o v t . n z

Public Notices

MISSED YOUR

Farrington Park, Miramar. The home team’s first two goals, to Finn Moore and Ollie Bassett, came from defensive blunders. Wan Gatkek scored their third goal. Mark Hemi found the back of the net for United while they also had another goal disallowed. Although United are still winless in the Central League, there have been some promising signs from the young side in the latter part of the season. That is evident in the significant improvement shown in results against teams that thrashed them in the first round. United lost 10-0 to Olympic and then 5-3 in the second round, 9-0 to Miramar and then 3-1, and maybe the potential relegation saving result a 1-1 draw with Napier City Rovers after losing 9-0 in the first round. United will host Lower Hutt City in the final match of the season next Saturday.

DARTS

Chris Cogdale

06 378 9999 option 4

YOUR LOCALLY

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If you’re out and having a few drinks, make sure you’ve got a sober driver to get you home safely.

Barring a massive upset in the final round, the Tumu ITM Wairarapa United Women look destined to finish second in the W-League. United went into Saturday’s penultimate round needing a win over Western Suburbs and hoping that leaders Wellington United Diamonds drew with or lost to Palmerston North Marist. United did what they had to and beat Wests 3-1, but Diamonds came from a goal down at halftime to beat Marist 2-1. That leaves Diamonds and United together at the head of the points’ table, with Diamonds having a superior goal difference. With Diamonds to play alsorans Seatoun and United to play fourth-placed Waterside-Karori next Saturday, it would require a massive upset by Seatoun or a goal-fest by United for the

Wairarapa side to lift the trophy. United coach Paul Ifill admitted that winning the league could be a step too far now. “We’re seven goals behind and we need a favour, but I just can’t see it. Wellington should be a bit too strong for Wests, and I can’t see them losing that. “We’ll go out there and try and score as many as we can, but we also have to beware of Waterside, who have a game in hand and can nab us for second place.” United had to work hard to beat Wests at Endeavour Park, Whitby. Goals to veteran Meisha Boone and standout centre back Amber Phillips and an own goal wrapped up United’ s tenth victory of the season. Meanwhile Jaycar Wairarapa United’s encouraging late season form continued with a 3-1 loss to a Miramar Rangers side stacked with National League players. Again, defensive errors let United down at crucial times in the game played at Dave

Ranger scores big at nationals comp

This week? or had a Late Delivery? Call Operating Hours: 9.00am - 5pm Monday - Friday

FOOTBALL

Chris Cogdale

Wairarapa’s Reinga Ranger is the number one junior girl in New Zealand after her victory in the junior girls’ singles’ championships at the national junior and youth darts championships held in Hastings in July. The 12-year old Te Kura Kaupapa Maori o Wairarapa student beat K Rawiri 2-0 in the final. She backed that up with a strong performance with Darius Kahu in the junior mixed pairs. They made the final where they were beaten by Gisborne’s Renata Leach and Shannan Eyles. Ranger wasn’t the only Wairarapa player to gain national representation. Paikea Rogers-Te Whare 13, was selected for the national junior boys’ team. He progressed to the semifinals of the singles where he lost to Leach. Kahu and Charlie Casha also performed with distinction, finishing runners-up in the junior boys’ pairs consolation final. The 12-strong Wairarapa team comprised of players from the Wairarapa and Maungaraki Darts Associations.

Reinga Ranger … national junior singles champion. PHOTO/SUPPLIED


54 Wairarapa Midweek Sport Wednesday, August 14, 2019

Catch-up not enough for win RUGBY

Sport

Chris Cogdale A strong second half saw Farriers WairarapaBush finish with an encouraging 29-21 loss to the Wellington Development team at the Hutt Recreation Ground on Saturday. Wairarapa-Bush spent much of the first half on defence as the home team ran in four tries for a 24-0 halftime lead. Whatever coach Joe Harwood told his troops during the interval worked a treat as they came out firing in the second stanza. Hooker Bruce KauikaPetersen was the first to cross the line within a minute of the restart. Big Fijian No.8 Joe Tako had a massive impact off the bench and crossed for the team’s second try after 64 minutes, while replacement second-five Brock Price wrapped up the scoring with time almost up on the clock. Harwood was pleased with the overall effort but was disappointed with the first 40 minutes. “We were outmuscled in the contact areas and that was disappointing,”

Joe Tako impressed coming off the bench.

he said. “Our focus was to hold the ball in hand for ten plus phases, but the most we managed in the first half was four. There was a big difference in the second half. Overall, we were pleased with the direction and energy.” However, Harwood rued a lack of finishing at vital times. “We had at least three chances where we dropped the ball with the line open; we literally just had to catch it and score.” Wairarapa-Bush will play their final pre-season game, against Wellington Samoans on Saturday, and Harwood said he’ll be

PHOTO/FILE

using the game to test out more combinations. “There are a couple of guys who are light on game time. It’s our last hit out so we have to get them on the field. “We’ve yet to get our strongest XV on the field, so we’re pretty pleased with where we’re at.” Wairarapa-Bush will kick off their Heartland Championship against perennial favourites Whanganui at Memorial Park on August 24.

SCORE

Wellington Development Team 29, Farriers Wairarapa-Bush 21 [Bruce Kauika-Petersen, Joseva Tako, Brock Price tries; Tipene Haira 3 cons] HT 24-0

Scooter’s darts report DARTS

Mark Clement In the latest round of the Wairarapa District Darts Competition, Panthers remain unbeaten after a 13-3 win over Spellbound, second-placed Leopards lost ground on the competition leaders with a shock loss to third-placed Barney’s Boys 9-8. With just two rounds left to play, Panthers has all but sown up the aggerate trophy for 2019. It’s still a tight race to decide to top six and bottom six teams to play for the Premier and First Division Championship. 1st Division results Panthers bt Spellbound (13-3), Barney’s Boys bt Leopards (9-8), Rebels bt Ynots (11-5), Pioneer Black bt Blazers (9-8), Pumas bt Over 60-1 (13-3), Pioneer Red bt SWWMC Gold (12-4). Draw for August 15 Panthers V Pioneer Red Blazers V SWWMC Gold Pumas V Pioneer Black Ynots V Leopards Over 60-1 V Barney’s Boys.

Over the past week, a few of the Wairarapa District Darts players made the trip across the Cook Strait to take part in the New Zealand Darts Council Senior Nationals held in Motoueka. Greg Moss, Dale Hemi, Chase Shaw, Tony

Whale, Phil Archibald, and Dave Shenton were part of the Region 11 Men’s Team that took out the men’s Second Division title. Claire Apiata and Sha Hohipa were part of the Region 11 Women’s Team, which finished eighth equal in the First Division. In the mixed pairs, Chase Shaw and Claire Apiata made the last 64, and Greg Moss and Sha Hohipa made the semifinals In the NZ Women’s Open Singles, Sha Hohopa made the last 32. In the NZ Men’s Open Singles, Tony Whale made the last 64, and Greg Moss made the last 32. In the NZ Women’s Pairs, Claire Apiata and Pam McEntee made the 32. In the NZ Men’s Singles, Greg Moss made the last 32, and Chase Shaw made the last 16. In the NZ Women’s Singles, Claire Apiata made the last 64 In the NZ Men’s Pairs, Greg Moss and Phil Archibald made the last 16, and Chase Shaw and Dale Hemi made the last 16. Greg Moss was selected for the Southern A Tournament Team, and Chase Shaw was selected for the Southern B Tournament Team.

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Dalefield make fifth final HOCKEY

Chris Cogdale Dalefield are through to the final of the Wellington Premier Men’s Hockey Championship for the fifth straight year. Dalefield’s 7-3 win over Naenae at the National Hockey Stadium on Saturday will see them play Hutt United for the fourth consecutive year in the championship decider. Dalefield started the brighter of the two teams in the sudden death playoff and took an early 2-0 lead with goals to Benedict van Woerkom, after two minutes, and Dylan Price after nine minutes. Naenae then took advantage of some sloppy play by Dalefield, with goals either side of quarter time to level the scores. Player-coach Dane Lett restored the lead in the sixth minute of the second quarter to make the halftime score 3-2. A more focused Dalefield dominated the second half. Dane Lett scored his second goal to extend their lead to 4-2 at three quarter time. Price added to his goal tally early in the final quarter. Zac Hardie put the game out of reach to make it 6-2 with seven minutes

Alex Sumenko-Bucknell scored for Dalefield.

to play. Naenae did pinch a goal back when Dalefield captain Rowan Yeo was in

the sin bin for a collision the umpires deemed as dangerous. Alex Sumenko-Bucknell

PHOTO/JADE CVETKOV

rounded off the scoring when he rolled the ball into the net with 20 seconds left on the clock.

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In the end, the 7-3 scoreline was a convincing result, however comanager Bernie Lett said they made it hard on themselves and allowed Naenae to fight back. “We started well and had them under pressure, but we got sloppy and let them back into the game,” he said. “Naenae like to counterattack and our lapses in concentration allowed them to score a couple of goals. “We controlled the second half of the game and in the end, it was a convincing win.” If Dalefield are to lift their third championship trophy in five years, they will have to do so without Dane Lett. The inspirational player-coach left on Tuesday for a four-nation series in Japan. The internationals against Japan, India and Malaysia are warm up games for the Black Sticks before their Olympic qualifiers against Australia in Rockhampton in early September. With the Tokyo Games predicted to be the hottest ever, the four-nation series will also give the Black Sticks an important gauge of what to expect should they qualify for the Olympics.

55

Sport

Wednesday, August 14, 2019 Sport Wairarapa Midweek


56 Wairarapa Midweek

Wednesday, August 14, 2019

Profile for Wairarapa Times-Age

Wairarapa Midweek Wed 14th August  

Wairarapa Midweek Wed 14th August  

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