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Impr int The university of Waterloo’s official student newspaper

Flesh-eating robots The Pentagon developes a robot that uses human flesh as a source of energy.

SCIENCE17

Friday, February 19, 2010

Vol 32, No

imprint . uwaterloo . ca

27

Women win OUA Gold In pursuit of glory

Men’s hockey starts battle for Queen’s Cup.

SPORTS25

InterWeb Feature

Extending Arts and Entertainment to the Internet.

ARTS

11 Courtesy of Chris Gilbert

UW student and women’s curling team skip Katherine Pringle throws a rock.

Warriors sweep by opponents to win gold at OUA championships Brent Golem Sports & Living editor

Feds election results

See the tabulation of the Feds election and read the comments of the winners.

Michelle Duklas Asst. Sports & Living

3 W

NEWS

arrior women’s curling team took part in the OUA championships at the KW Granite Club off of Seagram Road. The Warriors earned their birth in the championships by winning five of their first six including huge wins over Queen’s and Toronto, to clinch a spot in the OUA championships. After the wins they lost two close games to end the season at 5–3. They played third in the OUA, and gave themselves a berth to the very event they were hosting. The obvious favourite to win the women’s title was Brock, who posted a perfect 8–0 record going into the playoffs. However, the Badgers were not on their game, and they lost all three of the round-robin games, eliminating them from contention. The Western Mustangs were also favoured in the tournament, as defending champions and the second best team through the regular season with a record of 6–3. The Mustangs didn’t fair too much better in the tournament when then lost their first two games before finally winning a game to earn a place in the semi-finals.

Linux enlightens

A UW student declares the Linux operating system as an option that you should consider.

OPINION 7

Laurier was the fourth and final team who made the tournament, and they had the same 5–3 record as the Warriors. They had a successful start to the tournament as well, until they faced the Warriors in the round-robin. The Warriors came into the championship and immediately took advantage of the home-ice. They played a winning game against Western, in the early in the A.M. of the first day. Waterloo played a solid match and came out victorious against the Mustangs, winning 6–4. The Warriors then met the top-seeded Brock team for the afternoon match-up. Waterloo outplayed them and dominated the house to earn points on many ends. The Warriors managed a very satisfying 9–4 victory against the Badgers. In the final round robin game, Waterloo faced off against cross-town rival Laurier. The Warriors seemingly met their match against the defending CIS champions. The match was close and Waterloo was down by one going into the final end without the hammer. Somehow they stole a pair and found a way to win by a score of 6–5. The Warriors had slid their way past their competition to record an overall 3–0 win in the round-robin games. This game gave them a bye to the championship game the next day. In the semi-final, Laurier took on Western and repeated the victory they earned in the

round-robin. The Golden Hawks, led by skip Danielle Inglis, defeated the Mustangs 9–5 for the chance to meet the Warriors in the finals. The gold winning game was a nail-biter as both teams played exceptionally well. Laurier controlled much of the play, and in the sixth end the Golden Hawks had the Warriors up against the wall. Facing a possible 5 point end, the Warriors threw a clutch draw stone into the house to save themselves from an early exit. Laurier was able to score only two in that end thanks to skip Katie Pringle’s accurate throws. Down 5–2, the Warriors didn’t give up. They fought back and posted a deuce in the seventh end to close the gap. Giving up the hammer and down by one going into the eight end, the situation was dire for Waterloo. In the eighth, Laurier skip Danielle Inglis drew a heavier rock than intended, and Waterloo was able to steal a point and force an extra end. Tied at 5, the Hawks still had the edge with the hammer in the extra end. Both teams were playing very well and created a very challenging atmosphere. When it came down to the wire, Inglis was unable to deliver. She threw her final stone too lightly, and gave the Warriors a steal for the game winning point. The Warriors earned a 6–5 victory, and OUA championship gold. sports@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

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News

Imprint, Friday, February 19, 2010 news@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Feds Election results sees goldenrod Team yellow sweeps the competition

Michael L. Davenport editor-in-chief

Presidential results Babor Colphon Moggach van Amerom Declined

455 631 746 277 175

VPAF results Cook Waller Declined

1258 728 285

VPIN results Best Goodhand Declined

1300 641 324

Math Council Kasper Collins Tharmalingam Patel Declined

132 115 160 119 62

Senate — Arts Burke Dinghra Declined

269 223 153

Senate — Environment Das Gupta Jodoin Krysak Declined

73 13 216 20

Senate — Math Charlesworth Kasper Sun Qiao Declined

61 99 85 69 87

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hris Neal, Feds’ current vice president academic and finance, was jovial as he announced the results of the 2010 Feds election. At noon on February 12, the SLC multipurpose room was filled with candidates, media, and interested students, anxiously waiting for his announcement. “Hi, I’m Chris, they forced me to run this,” he started off. “If it weren’t for the full time staff, I probably wouldn’t have a brain right now, and these results would have been delayed by a week and a half. Having said that, there have been some errors, and the results won’t be out until after reading week. ...I’m kidding.” Neal went on to recite the results, which are summarized in the table below. The number of voters was much lower than the previous year’s election. With approximately 25,000 eligible voters, the turnout was only around 9 per cent, one of the lowest turnouts since 2001. Neal stated that the results for the senateat-large and arts councilor seats would not be available until after the weekend. The results are still not available as of press time. Neal later stated that the problem was not technical in nature, but would not comment further. Incumbent Feds President Allan Babor lost his bid for re-election. When asked why he thought this was the case, Babor said, “That’s tough question.” After a long pause, Babor added, “I think an election is an interesting beast. I’m proud to say I was against some strong leaders.” Babor added, “Very proud of all students who put their names forward in an effort to get out there and educate students.” Babor’s advice for the president-elect, Bradley Moggach, was, “Start learning now. It’s never too soon.” Moggach told Imprint that he felt relieved, and added, “Not as many people voted as I thought would. It was close.” He later added, “Personally, I am very excited to begin my term as President. I encourage all students to us with feedback as often as possible throughout our term. The low voter turnout was disappointing, however, moving forward I hope we can increase students’ interest in FedS and ensure

abisade dare

Feds president elect Brad Moggach, VPIN elect Nikki Best, VPAF elect Sarah Cook, and acclaimed VPED Nick Soave pose immediately after the result announcement. that they are aware about issues on campus.” Nikki Best, vice-president internal elect said she was “feeling overwhelmed, lucky, and grateful,” and later wrote, “Having the support of students, our friends, and volunteers over the campaign definitely helped our team succeed having the first team sweep since 2001. However, it was disappointing to see the low voter turnout, which only shows us the uphill battle we will all face in student apathy when our term starts in May. I am grateful for this opportunity, the support, and the team I am with. I excited to show you all what we can do! Bring on the good times UW, because we won’t let you down.” Sarah Cook, current vicepresident internal and vice president administration and finance elect said, “I was nervous into the days leading up to the election but I calmed down beforehand. We’re going to work together as a team and do some great things for FedS.” Cook later wrote, “I am so happy to see

that students connected with us and have put their faith in us for next year. I hope students continue to connect with us over the course of the next year, giving us feedback and ideas for making their student government better for them. Hopefully voter turnout can be improved next year.” Finally, Soave commented, “We are lucky that for the next year we will be able to work together as a team to make our platform a reality. The onlypart of the election results that were bothersome was the voter turnout was only 9 per cent.” Neal later stated in a press release, “All the candidates did an excellent job in these elections. It was encouraging to see so many students take part in the electoral process and this shows that the democratic process is thriving on our campus. I would like to congratulate all the candidates for their efforts and commitment to students at the University of Waterloo.” — With files from Erin Oldynski

world under seige Dyer warns about the effects of climate change Rosalind Gunn staff reporter

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hose sitting in Maureen Hall (down the road at Laurier) on Thursday, February 11, were under siege. A barrage of depressing statistics and facts were thrown at the crowd, which told of the doom that this world is headed for if fossil fuels aren’t replaced and people don’t start taking climate change seriously. Donning the old weather-beaten leather jacket that he’s known for, Canadian freelance journalist, syndicated columnist, and historian, Gwynne Dyer, spoke with sardonic wisdom, warning those watching of the detrimental effects of climate change. He foresees starvation; civil and international wars; “climate refugees,” as he termed them; and total state failure in some areas of the world — all resulting from the world’s reluctance to temporarily slow economies in order to replace the cheap and easy use of fossil fuels with alternative, cleaner, methods. “This thing is moving much faster than the public knows it is, and the military knows this. Governments know this,” Dyer said. Armies of Britain, US, China, Russia, and Japan are all acknowledging the danger of climate change. All are producing studies into the

graphic by nikoo shahabi

dangers posed to the state by climate change, and all are realizing that there is a “strategic component to this climate change,” Dyer said. The Hadley Centre in Britain, a research facility on climate change and its effects, released some numbers before the recent 2009 Copenhagen summit. While the Hadley Centre is under some scrutiny regarding the legitimacy of the research behind the numbers, they are nevertheless from an otherwise reputable centre for research. Hadley projects the possibility that the global temperature will rise four degrees by the end of the century. “This is very, very serious,” Dyer warns, “a great deal of the world’s population will be starving at four degrees.” As Canadians, “we’re looking now down the barrel of a much larger, nearer, shotgun.” This four degrees is a global average. Temperatures over the oceans are typically cooler, meaning the change will be much more significant on land, especially for landlocked regions. A four degree average, the Hadley Centre estimated, means a three degree rise for the island of Britain, and a severe seven degree rise for this part of Canada. “I don’t know if you’re still growing crops at seven degrees higher here,” Dyer said. See CLIMATE CHANGE, page 4


4 News CLIMATE CHANGE: Temperature increase and feedback

Imprint, Friday, February 19, 2010

- Gwynne Dyer

Continued from page 3

As Canadians, “we’re looking now down the barrel of a much larger, nearer, shotgun.”

Dyer talked about the two degree cap agreed upon at the 2009 Copenhagen Summit to which more than 150 countries were in attendance. They didn’t state why two was the key number, said Dyer. According to him, “two degrees is as high as you can go before you trigger feedbacks.” Feedbacks were previously deemed too difficult to measure and so were not included in scientific studies on the effects of humans on climate change. At two degrees, the warming begins to create more, natural, emissions, “so, in a sense, we can’t control it anymore,” according to Dyer. At this point, the warming will make other greenhouse gases come forth from the ground and oceans. An example Dyer gave was of the effects of the high latitude and altitude areas experiencing permafrost thawing, which is expected to worsen. Melting permafrost releases carbon dioxide which, in turn, triggers even more melting of the permafrost. In his somewhat disordered lecture, Dyer then began to talk about alternative methods of generating electricity. There are a variety of means to generate electricity such as wind (the use of which is becoming increasingly common in developed countries, namely the U.S. and Canada), geothermal, and nuclear. Dyer says optimistically, that “it shouldn’t be too hard in 30 years, say, to replace your fossil fuel burning plants with new plants that are not fossil fuel.” A feedback that Dyer cited was the effects of thawing permafrost. There’s enough vegetation frozen in the ground that, when the ground temperatures begin to rise, as much as double the amount of greenhouse gases as is in the atmosphere can be released should the entirety of the permafrost melted. Another feedback is the acidification of the ocean. Carbon dioxide and other emissions throw off the pH levels of the oceans, causing rising temperatures and the inability to contain

and dissolve higher quantities of carbon dioxide, which then is released back into the atmosphere. Once these feedbacks start, warned Dyer, they cannot be stopped. Dyer also delved into the topic of food supply. Food supply for the world is tight. It grew in the 40s and 50s by about three per cent, he said. There was enough grain on reserve that, had the world hit a catastrophe, its population could be sustained for 150 days. “We are now eating into our reserves,” he said. Today, the world could be sustained by the reserve for 56 days The population continues to grow while the issue of global warming worsens. Global warming will cut food production, Dyer told his listeners. He cited a study done in China — although, he admitted, this study cannot be found and is almost urban legend today. See CLIMATE CHANGE, page 5

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News

Imprint, Friday, February 19, 2010

5

CLIMATE CHANGE: Possible solutions Continued from page 4

He maintained that it exists and was available to the public for a brief period of time. This study projected that, if the global temperature were to rise two degrees (which is fairly certain at the rate we are going) China’s food production would be cut by 38 per cent. That’s tens of thousands of hungry people. “That’s famine, revolution, and civil war,” Dyer said. Dyer delved into the issue of the starvation that will result from climate change. The Russians, he said, are worried about what will happen if and when the 38 per cent of China’s food production is cut. “Forty-five million Russians in Siberia will be OK and there are 1.5 billion people in China who will be starving,” Dyer said. “Governments who can’t feed their people fail,” Dyer said, “full stop.” “We need to make an urgent and very large global agreement. We live in the ideal world with which to confront this issue of global warming,” Dyer said, beginning to sound less cynical. Among his reasons were that there are no great wars, we have the UN, and more than 150 countries agreed on the two per cent threshold. “The fundamental reason why it’s so hard... is the history. The history is the curse. Eighty per cent of the humancaused carbon dioxide was put there by the developed countries. China didn’t put it there. India didn’t put it there,” he said. “We are the problem. It is we who have to take responsibility for inadvertently [stealing] their chance at taking the easy path to development.” But how will we make amends for the trouble we’ve caused ourselves and the rest of the world? The rich countries have to accept large cuts: “I’m talking 30 to 40 per cent... you can’t tell China ‘you have to take deep cuts, too’,” when their per capita emissions are a quarter of what the U.S.’s are, Dyer said. He proposed that on top of developed countries taking large hits, they must also subsidize the developing countries in order for them to make a smoother transition to cleaner methods of power generation. He admitted that it’s “fiendishly hard to make that kind of deal,” but there’s little else that can be done. After stating this not-so-modest proposal, he aptly recalled — although

misquoted — Winston Churchill’s words: “The Americans will always do the right thing... after they have exhausted all the alternatives.” He closed on a semi-optimistic note, discussing the questionable scientific methods of deferring our death by climate change. These methods, he fully acknowledged, are mere speculations, mere ways of “cheating” and buying time. The first of three methods of staving off climate change comes from Professor Paul Crutzen, Nobel Prize winner. His idea is to mimic the effects of volcanic eruptions. When a volcano erupts, it injects megatonnes of ash and sulphur dioxide into the stratosphere that stays there for years. These tiny droplets of sulphur dioxide reflect the sunlight, keeping it from reaching and warming the earth’s surface. Dyer mentioned the example of the Year Without Summer in 1816, when an enormous volcanic eruption caused a frosty summer and a near food crisis due to abnormally cool weather. What Crutzen suggests is to use mid-air refuellers to inject enough sulphur dioxide into stratosphere to decrease heating by possible degrees. Dyer commented that the idea of fighting pollution with more pollution did seem somewhat counter-intuitive. The cost, a mere three billion. The second option Dyer provided was artificially expanding and thickening the stratocumulus cloud that lies about 100 metres above the oceans and already act as a cooling agent by reflecting the sun. The cloud already covers approximately a quarter of the surface of the planet’s oceans, appearing as a light fog. The proposal is to build fleets of wind-powered, satellite-directed vessels to spray fine mists of sea water into the air. The third and most interesting option, as proposed by chief scientist at NASA Langley Research, is estimated to cause one degree of cooling “virtually overnight,” said Dyer, and, “for a very small investment.” We must paint all of our roofs and roads white. Perhaps to lift his audience from their languid mood, or because he truly meant it, Dyer told them in closing, “I think we’ll probably make it, but we’ll take some losses along the way.” rgunn@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

covery channel. Discussions on the new findings will take place in the two day program.

Azra Premji reporter

Alim Khamisa reporter

Taliban’s top commander captured King Tut unwrapped

King Tutankhamun, the boy pharaoh, died at approximately age 19 in 1324 B.C. without a specific diagnosis. Now, after a two year investigation employing advanced radiological and genetics techniques, researchers have determined the likely cause of his death: a severe bout of malaria and a degenerative bone condition. Researchers believe that the king’s fractured leg may have failed to heal and caused him to become more susceptible to infection. Extracts of blood and DNA from his mummified remains reveal traces of the malaria parasite, plasmodium falciparum. This research was directed by Dr. Zahi Hawass, an egyptologist , along with medical scientists and anthropologists. Details can be found in the current issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association. “King Tut Unwrapped” will be aired on Sunday and Monday on the Dis-

The Agfhan Taliban’s most senior military leader, Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar, was captured in Karachi, Pakistan early this week by a CIA-Pakistan operation. The U.S. has attempted the capture of Baradar, a close associate of Osama bin Laden, for several years. The seizure of this leader represents the most significant Taliban capture since 9/11 according to a senior government official. According to CNN, the executive director of the Asia Pacific foundation said it was a “major success for the CIA” and “a major blow for the Taliban.” The New York Times, learned of Barader’s arrest last week. However, they were asked to withhold this information due to a request by the White House as it could “end a valuable intelligence-gathering effort by making Baradar’s associates aware of his capture.”

Fatal shooting at University of Alabama

University of Alabama biology professor Amy Bishop shot her colleagues during a faculty meeting on Friday February 12th. Ray Garner, the university spokesman, has indicated to BBC that the three killed were department heads while the other two were biology professors and are in critical condition. Bishop is being charged with murder and three counts of attempted murder. Her husband says that Bishop, a Harvard graduate, was denied tenure at the University of Alabama and was frustrated with “the process.” Following this arrest, another case from 1986, in which Bishop was not found guilty after allegedly shooting her brother, has re-surfaced. According to CNN, retired police chief Paul Frazier commented on the 1986 case and said, “It is a far different story, I believe, than what was reported back then. I cannot tell you what the thought process was behind our releasing her at the time.” — With files from BBC, CNN, The Star, and The New York Times

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Opinion

Imprint, Friday, February 19, 2010 opinion@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

IMPRINT The University of Waterloo’s official student newspaper

Unfulfilled ideals

Friday, February 19, 2010 Vol. 32, No. 27 Student Life Centre, Room 1116 University of Waterloo Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 P: 519.888.4048 F: 519.884.7800 http://imprint.uwaterloo.ca Editor-in-chief, Michael L. Davenport editor@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Advertising & Production Manager, Laurie Tigert-Dumas ads@imprint.uwaterloo.ca General Manager, Catherine Bolger cbolger@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Ad Assistant, Shirley Ma Sales Assisstant, Tony Tang Systems Admin., vacant Distribution, Sherif Soliman Distribution, Abdullah Asmat Volunteer co-ordinator, Angela Gaetano Board of Directors board@imprint.uwaterloo.ca President, Sherif Soliman president@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Vice-president, Anya Lomako vp@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Treasurer, Lu Jiang treasurer@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Secretary, Erin Thompson secretary@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Staff liaison, Caitlin McIntyre liaison@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Editorial Staff Assistant Editor, vacant Head Reporter, vacant Lead Proofreader, Katrina Massey Cover Editor, Rajul Saleh News Editor, Adrienne Raw News Assistant, Paula Trelinska Opinion Editor, Clara Shin Opinion Assistant, Mushfiqur Rahman Features Editor, Komal R. Lakhani Features Assistant, Parth Khanna Arts & Entertainment, Dinh Nguyen Arts & E. Assistant, Michael Chung Science & Tech Editor, Jordan Campbell Science & Tech Assistant, Erin Oldynski Sports & Living Editor, Brent Golem Sports & Living Assistant, Michelle Duklas Photo Editor, Ethan Oblak Photo Assistant, Abisade Dare Graphics Editor, Sonia Lee Graphics Assistant, Ian Cutajar Web Administrator, Paul Collier Web Assistant, Xiaobo Liu Systems Administrator, vacant System Administrator Assistant, vacant Production Staff Divyesh Mistry, Paul Collier, Alicia Mah, Keriece Harris, Alex Chortos, Jacob McLellan, E Aboyeji, Adrian Safati, Tejas Koshy, Bogdan Petrescu Graphics Team Alcina Wong, Nikoo Shahabi, Armel Chesnais Imprint is the official student newspaper of the University of Waterloo. It is an editorially independent newspaper published by Imprint Publications, Waterloo, a corporation without share capital. Imprint is a member of the Ontario Community Newspaper Association (OCNA). Editorial submissions may be considered for publication in any edition of Imprint. Imprint may also reproduce the material commercially in any format or medium as part of the newspaper database, Web site or any other product derived from the newspaper. Those submitting editorial content, including articles, letters, photos and graphics, will grant Imprint first publication rights of their submitted material, and as such, agree not to submit the same work to any other publication or group until such time as the material has been distributed in an issue of Imprint, or Imprint declares their intent not to publish the material. The full text of this agreement is available upon request. Imprint does not guarantee to publish articles, photographs, letters or advertising. Material may not be published, at the discretion of Imprint, if that material is deemed to be libelous or in contravention with Imprint’s policies with reference to our code of ethics and journalistic standards. Imprint is published every Friday during fall and winter terms, and every second Friday during the spring term. Imprint reserves the right to screen, edit and refuse advertising. One copy per customer. Imprint ISSN 0706-7380. Imprint CDN Pub Mail Product Sales Agreement no. 40065122. Next staff meeting: Monday, February 22, 12:30 p.m. Next board of directors meeting: AGM — Monday, February 22, 3:00 p.m. SLC multipurpose room

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he recent turnover of the Feds executive reminds me of a truth I learned some time ago: those at the top of bureaucracies actually have very limited power. Oh yes, on paper the people in charge are actually in charge. But in practice, any company of people is at the mercy of the people at the bottom. I'll give you an example of the sort of thing I mean. When I worked at a Subway (not on-campus), I learned that according to corporate directive, we were supposed to be baking

editor@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

fresh bread every four hours. Do you think we actually baked fresh bread every four hours? Uh, not quite. It would be a waste of time, a waste of the already-fresh bread in the bread cabinet (we really did bake fresh bread every day), and the store owner didn't want to add that logistical complexity. Still, some suit in a corporate office somewhere thought it was a good enough idea to write it down as an instruction. We just didn't do it. Instructions were similarly disregarded when I worked

quality control at RIM. Myself and my co-workers were supposed to look for manufacturing defects or physical damage. Me, I prided myself on my ability to distinguish between chrome and gunmetal greys, and being able to pick out when the wrong coloured part was used. But we were making near minimum wage, and not everyone can be assed to care for that little money. One of the guys often came in hung-over, and would miss some pretty serious gashes and scratches. If you bought

a "new" Blackberry Perl and it appeared damaged, it's possible he was supposed to check it. See what I mean? Ideals from the top aren't always implemented at the bottom. But it's not always the case of minimum-wage-slaves spiting their employers. There are famous cases of companies not being aware of the whole of themselves — and acting out. One famous example revolves around photographer Duane Kerzic who was arrested by Amtrak security in

December of 2008 for taking photos of Amtrak trains. He was taking photos as a part of Amtrak's annual "Picture our Trains" contest, in the hopes he would win $1000 of travel vouchers. You read that right. He was participating in a contest held by Amtrak...and got arrested by Amtrak. My point in all of this is that a change in management can only do so much, without also changing, motivating, or at least informing the people at the bottom. The best of luck to our new Feds executive.

love finishes last editor@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

(Drinking game inside: Drink every time, you see the word “love”) Fear not, friends, “E is for Error” is not about to morph into relationship column “E is for Emotion.” I am only considering the love this week because like a lot of you, I would rather not talk about student politics (particularly since I have lived and breathe it for much of the past month). Besides, isn’t February the love month? Let’s just pretend cupid never went away. In truth, I don’t have much of a love life. I have never had a serious relationship; and funnily enough, even if I was interested in one, I would not have the time for it. Seeing as few girls would actually appreciate my quick paced, jet setter life (even though most girls think they like it), I have had to learnt the ordinarily challenging art of reigning in, as my father noms it, my mortal passions. With me, it has always been head over heart. So sorry, you will find no scoops on my love life here. Thankfully, this is not the same for many of my friends. Infact, so many close friends of mine are in relationships that ironically, I, the single geek

who girls give the chills, often ends up the relationship counsellor. Of course, given my inexperience, my advice usually ends up being creative variations of the same thoughts; use your head; take it easy; stuff always works out. Loving vicariously through my hitched friends is an experience that has taught me a lot about relationships. It has also contributed a great deal to lessening the general appeal of relationships for me. This is because if there is anything my years as “the boy friend counsel” has taught me, it is that there is considerable truth in this statement: Nice guys finish last. Even Rihanna (who seems by the way, far more experienced as per relationships having gone full circle, from bed to battery) endorses this viewpoint. In a fairly recent interview, she was asked by Glamour, what she looks for in a man. You would think as a former battered woman, she would stick to the safe, you know. The reasonable, at the very least. Nope. According to her, she likes “high risk men.” The problem with this statement is not just that that the R in Rihanna is clearly for Risk and (not in

that adulating Waterloo way). Indeed the problem with her, the many women like her and nice guys like me, begin in her follow up to this “risky” (pun intended) opening. She goes, “ I don’t like creamy puff, corny guys [...]nice guys, the ones that won’t hurt you.” And there I was trying the usual “tricks from love flicks” (especially the bump into a girl in the hallway” one) and being generally goofy and cute (I think) not knowing a couple well aimed punches could do the trick... Fact is, even before I had heard Rihanna’s frankly imbecilic statement, I had always suspected that this might be in truth, the truth with a lot of women. Overwhelmingly, a lot of my friends (all of whom are like myself, gentlemen) have stories of “unrequited love” which follow the same format of the Tom and Jerry Episode, Spring time for Thomas. For the unfamiliar (who by the way must have also had a really sad childhood. Come on! You did not get to watch Tom and Jerry?), here is a quick sketch slightly altered for context. (Youtube should do the rest): Broke nice guy meets girl. Nice guy is love struck. Nice guy believes

girl is the centre of his world. He proceeds to gingerly woe her. Girl declines. Nice guy remains persistent. She accepts. They fall in love and live happily until. Douchebag with amazing ride comes along. Broke nice guy is thrust into material love duel with rich douchebag. Money talks. B r o k e nice guy loses. The End. (Of course, there is the other unmentioned part of the story is where rich douche bag dumps beautiful girl for some dumb reason and the cycle continues.) It was particularly heartbreaking for me to hear these stories especially because I knew nice guy really likes girl. But such is life. Stuff doesn’t always work out like in the movies. Anyhow, I hope for the rest of the year, good girls everywhere disregard “Risky Rihanna’s” R-Rated advice and fall in love with nice guys and not just guys that will hurt them. Because love finishes last when nice guys do. Just saying...

Community Editorial Electoral Reform—Needed Badly, Now Michelle Duklas

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aving just experienced my first Feds election period, I can confidently say that improvement needs to happen. Candidates always complain of apathy, and yet as far as I know nothing has been done to change this. It’s quite simple: university students simply don’t have time. And those that do have time would much rather spend it in a way that is enjoyable. I don’t think that meetings and debates are enjoyable, and I’m pretty sure everybody else agrees with me too. So what can be changed then? Well for starters, posters can be moved to places where students will actually see them—the doors. Walking up and down hallways, I’m not going to take the time to look at a poster; I have tunnel vision. But if it’s on or near a door, I’m much more likely to spot it. One thing that I think should be utilized

more is the internet. After all, university students spend more than half their waking hours online. Yes, I do know that Feds has a website, but what student is going to take the time to read each candidates platform thoroughly to come to their decision about who to vote for? Probably very few. A better idea would be for each candidate to tape a very short one to two minute video about their platform. This would give the voter a better idea of the public speaking skills each candidate possesses. Also, videos are much more appealing than text, at least in general. I also don’t think that the election was broadcast well enough. I only found out about it through one e-mail from Feds, and then through Imprint. But if people don’t check their inboxes or read the newspaper, they will not find out about the election. It might be more helpful to partner up with the tech people who run Quest and UW-ACE and convince them to post messages about the election on those web pages.

Students are much more likely to check their ACE accounts on are regular basis then they are their Waterloo e-mail accounts. Finally, I think that if the candidates want to have debates, they should do so in places that are much more accessible to students. A great place to have a debate is in the residences, or in the faculty lounges. This is because students will be more likely to come out if it is close by to where they normally hang out. Having debates in residences may increase the number of voters among first years, which would ultimately increase the voting rate as the years go by. Basically what I’m trying to say is that now that elections have come and gone, I haven’t really noticed anything out of the ordinary. When provincial or federal elections go on, everyone knows about it. Here, at Waterloo, I haven’t really felt the same way.


Opinion

Imprint, Friday, February 19, 2010

7

Community Editorials

Why we should not flock to huge organizations when we graduate

Erin Oldynski 4B Arts and business

W

hat academic programs come to mind when you think about the co-op program here at UW? When I think about the co-op program, I associate it with accounting, computer science, and engineering. What’s odd about this is that I am in co-op but I am not in any of these programs. In fact, my program isn’t even remotely related to any of these fields. I am currently completing my undergraduate degree in Peace and Conflict Studies, co-op. Strange combination, isn’t it? The most common responses I get when I tell people this is either, “What are you going to do with that degree?” or “Where have your co-opworktermsbeen?”Theseresponses are understandable. I didn’t choose to major in Peace and Conflict Studies because I had a specific careerinmind.Ichosetomajorinitbecause I wanted to have a broad range of knowledge about the socio-political structures of ourworldandtounderstandtheforcesthat gave rise to them. Not exactly the kind of goal that immediately translates into earning a lot of money upon graduating, is it? I come from a lower-middle class family and I’ve never felt particularly motivated by the prospect of earning a lot of money. Instead, my motivation to do well in school, land great co-op jobs, and participate in extracurricular

activities comes from a desire to engage in the world around me, develop an awareness of social inequalities, and ultimately, to figure out where it is that I fit into this picture. This is why, when I attended a talk recently held by well-known Economics instructor Larry Smith on “Getting your foot into the hidden job market,” a lot of things that I already knew about the job market were reaffirmed. Smith began his lecture by saying, “I am not giving you a recipe for job success. I am giving you observations from your predecessors here at the University of Waterloo on what works and what doesn’t work.” What followed for the next hour and a half was the type of engaging, informative, eccentric performance which Smith is notorious for among many UW students. Smith debunked a few myths which he says many UW students believe to be true when it comes to pursuing a career. “It is harder to get promoted than to get hired,”hesaid,“Justdrawapyramidandask yourself, ‘Is it easy to get promoted?’ No.” He explained how, once you get into an organization, particularly large corporations that have thousands of employees, it is nearly impossible to get promoted. “You get in and then you’re stuck,” he said, “Until you’re 35. And you’re old. And even then, age does not equal promotion.” From my own recent work experience, I have witnessed the depressing

accuracy of this statement. My last two co-op work terms were with the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade in Ottawa. Although Smith was mostly referring to corporations, it is not difficult to see how the federal government is very much like a large corporation. In fact, the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT) is for political science and history students what Google and Amazon are for computer science and engineering students. What I mean by this is that many students in the humanities would do just about anything to land a job with DFAIT. How do I know this? Countless students have told me. When I worked for DFAIT, I often received emails from students asking for advice about how to get in. They didn’t care about what division they would be working for once they were in, or if it would even relate to their field of study. They just wanted in. They figured that once they were in, they could easily move around the department, to other divisions and easily get promoted to positions where they would have power and influence. I was honest with these students and told them that, when I first started at DFAIT, I didn’t completely realize how rigidly hierarchical it is. Even within a division of eight people, there are strong hierarchies between the administrative assistants, officers, deputy director, and director, in which the former position plays a subservient role to the latter. The

administrative assistants have absolutely no control over their work, the officers have clearly defined projects which are assigned to them by the deputy directors, and the deputy directors oversee the division and report to the director. The director reports to the Director General, who reports to the Assistant Deputy Minister, who reports to the Deputy Minister, who reports to the Minister of International Trade, a man named Stockwell Day. Bored yet? The point I am trying to illustrate is that, even in an incredibly sexy organization such as the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, most employees have almost no freedom over the work they are assigned nor the ability to make important decisions regarding their work. Instead, important decisions are made much farther up the ladder by the big boys (and currently they are all boys at the very top). Just imagine the pyramid that Smith described. A second point I must make is that Smith was right about the fact that people often get stuck in large organizations. At DFAIT, most employees spend their entire lives working there and never get to positions where they have significant power or influence. It is very common for employees to move laterally, from one position to another, but very rare that people actually get promoted. When employees are promoted, it is an incredibly competitive, multi-level process of exam writing fol-

lowed by immersion into a massive pool of other recently-promoted employees, which they stagnate in until a higher-level position actually opens up. And then there are the interviews. What was most reaffirming about Smith’stalkisthat,if youwanttobesuccessful in today’s job market, you have to look for opportunities in small organizations. For me, this means non-governmental organizations. For the average UW co-op student, this means small, profitable privately owned companies. In either case, the following fact is indisputable; in a smaller organization, you will have more freedom, you will feel more useful and important, and you will move up the ladder much more quickly than you would in a large organization.Anaddedbenefitof working for a smaller organization (although this does not so much apply to me as it does for you mathies and engineers out there) is that you will earn just as much money, if not more, than you would by working for a huge, well-known organization. As Smith pointed out, there is absolutely no correlation between company size and salary. So what’ll it be? A prestigious job with a well-known organization in which you have no influence or power? Or, a job with a lesser-known organization, in which you are actually empowered as an employee to make important decisions and have freedom over the work that you do? I know what my answer is.

Linux, the third option Michael Shao 1B mathematics and computer science

I

n a Microsoft and Apple-dominated world, where does the trouble end? With Microsoft Windows, there are too many stupid bugs that users deal with, too many viruses users have to fend off, and too many applications to slow down user computers. With Apple Mac OS, there are too few programs, not enough compatibility with PC applications, and users basically subscribe to the Apple way of life (not that it’s necessarily a bad thing). Furthermore, Apple products cost almost twice as much as Microsoft products – a MacBook Pro could run a person up to $1300 CAD, whereas any laptop with Windows XP or Vista can cost a person as little as $500 CAD (both brand-new, both around the same specifications). When it comes down to it, which would you choose? Windows – for its market domination and overall control (over 75 percent of PC owners use a Microsoft Operating System), or Mac – for its reliability yet higher cost? Speaking purely as a Windows user, I choose neither. Apple products are way too expensive for my Asian tastes, and Microsoft Windows Vista contracts too many viruses to allow my computer to be useful. Speaking as a newfound “enlightened” computer user, I choose Linux – the third option. Wait – so you didn’t know that you don’t have to pick between just two? That’s right – there are three options for an operating system now! Linux is a licensed GNU open-source (that means it is free for home and commercial use applications) operating system that is based towards efficiency and reliability, as well as cost efficiency – something that neither Microsoft nor Apple can accomplish. Yes, it is a little daunting to get used to all of the new features and terminal syntax; but there are a lot of advantages to being able to choose your own Linux distribution to build for any of your desktops or laptops. First off, there are so many different types of Linux distributions. There’s Fedora, CentOS, Debian, Gentoo, Knoppix, Kubuntu, Mandriva, openSUSE, Red Hat, and Ubuntu, just to name

a few. If that seemed a little daunting, I haven’t even begun to get started on the names; I just named the popular distributions to give you a taste. There are so many more derivations of distributions and alternate Linux distributions – in fact, anyone who wants to can build their own distribution and release it for others to test and improve on (so long as you don’t try to sell it for profit). Where’s the disadvantage? I first bumped into Linux when I bought my Acer AspireOne netbook back in January of this year. What a change of pace – the boot time was less than four seconds, and I was up and running Mozilla Firefox (a lot of free applications come pre-bundled with distributions – yet another upside of Linux) in less than nine, checking my e-mail and doing my assignments. Instantly, I was addicted to learning the syntax of the famous “Terminal,” which is the shell command prompt that works sort of like the prompt in Windows, but with a few differences. With “root” access, users can do virtually anything from Terminal, from installing Firefox packages to applications to opening text editors and graphics programs. As of late, I’ve yet to find any major problems with Linux, but I’ve found a lot of problems in the netbook that I purchased (more on that in a later article). I switched to Ubuntu Netbook Remix (shortened to “UNR” for those who like acronyms) sometime in the last couple of weeks and loved it even more. UNR was especially designed for netbooks like mine, and not only did it increase speed, it let my network card search farther than my Fedora-based Linpus Lite Linux distribution would. In conclusion, if you are absolutely sick of the price of a MacBook and especially sick of the slow speeds of Windows and the amount of viruses you contract, look no further than Linux. Not only has a virus never been programmed for it, the only way a Linux OS can really crash is if you force it to (not that you could; the command prompt is pretty diligent at telling you what you should and shouldn’t do). I personally love this operating system, and if you’re even partially interested in technology, I’m pretty sure you would love Linux, too.

February 26th and February 27th Black History Month with Warrior Weekends SLC Great Hall

FREE FREE FREE FREE FREE FREE

Bring your Watcard

http://www.warriorweekends.uwaterloo.ca

FRIDAY:

9:00pm – 12:30am -

Activities: Dance Lessons, Karaoke, UW Gamers

-

Food: Cocktail patties, fruits

-

Crafts: T-shirt screening, Origami

-

Movies: Precious, The Taking of Pelham 123

SATURDAY: 9:00pm – 12:30am

Black History Month Gala at the Bomber for all ages! Starts @ 8pm -

Activities: Bingo

-

Food: Pizza and Pop

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Crafts: Treasure boxes

-

Movies: Where The Wild Things Are, Blind Side @9pm The Fantastic Mr. Fox, 9 @11pm


8

Opinion

Imprint, Friday, February 19, 2010

Community Editorials

A Response to Validimir Shulman on RE: Eyes in Gaza

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baby-eaters.” Spare us your antics of victimization and omission of simple facts, Mr Shulman. The truth is that ever since the Gaza siege, the city’s inhabitants have endured an “intolerable” and “full-blown humanitarian crisis,” according to official statements from the International Red Cross. The Emergency Relief Coordinator of the United Nations has stated that after the end of the Israeli operation, only 120 truckloads enter Gaza on a good day instead of the minimum daily requirement of 500 trucks worth of supplies. To this day, the municipality of Gaza can’t even acquire basic construction materials, water pipes, electrical wires, or power transformers in order to rebuild civilian infrastructure. More than 50,000 Gazans are still homeless more than a year after the conflict. Many more have little or no access to sanitation or clean water due to Israel’s targeted air strikes of city sewage facilities and water infrastructure during the winter of 2008-2009. As if to add insult to injury, the Israeli “Defence” Force has effectively laid siege to the broken city of Gaza and its people to this day. The result of all this Palestinian misery is that approximately 1.5 million innocent people are literally

The truth is that ever since the Gaza siege, the city’s inhabitants have endured an intolerable and full-blown humanitarian crisis,...

languishing within the close confines of their own city, with no chance of rebuilding their lives or providing their children with a future. Hopefully foreshadowing some form of justice, Mr. Shulman mentions that “when cries of foul sounded around the world and in Israel, where such things are openly voiced and reviewed, the suspects were investigated and the guilty punished even when the truth did not positively reflect on the country.” The writer conveniently omits the fact that Israel has not only dismissed the UN Human Rights Council findings in Richard Goldstone’s 575-page report on war crimes in Gaza as “biased,” but the government has done little more than publicly scold its senior military officers without any threat of prosecution or demotion. The reason for this is obvious:

the first to admit that you never even attended Dr Gilbert’s lecture, or taken any time to examine the abundant evidence ver since Dr. Mads Gilbert and references the lecturer provided delivered his riveting lecture for every claim he made, including “Eyes in Gaza” in the SLC, numerous allusions to the UN report a sudden madness has apparently on Israel’s war crimes in Gaza as well seized the journalists on campus and as photographic evidence of the injuries revealed the biased and shamelessly rendered to the doctor’s patients. In manipulative nature of certain writers your article, you claim that Dr. Gilbert “chooses strategically not to encumber on our campus. The latest Imprint response from the reader with such minute details as the Israeli apologist camp, penned by the cause of Israel’s war on Gaza,” and Vladimir Shulman, serves quite nicely as that the incursion was “meant to stop an example. Taking a stance in which he months of incessant shelling of Israeli repeatedly berates the admittedly exag- towns from the Gaza Strip.” In fact, Dr. gerated report of Adrian Safati’s negative Gilbert did mention Israel’s motives for portrayal of Israel, Mr. Shulman then Operation Cast Lead, which included hypocritically goes on to endlessly praise the four Israelis killed by Hamas rockets Israel for its fairness following the war in and mortars fired across the border. UnGaza. First, he began his tirade by stating like Mr Shulman, the good doctor did that, “It is difficult to tell whether Safati’s choose to mention Israel’s subsequent article is a deliberate falsification of Gil- response, which involved air and artillery bert’s talk or what is more likely, a potent strikes, Merkava tanks, Reaper drones, combination of his ‘journalism’ and the and munitions of every kind against the doctor’s extreme punditry, for which he resulting 1,417 Palestinian dead, 236 of is widely recognized,” Shulman wastes which were actually combatants. Mr. Shulman is not done, however, no time in happily assuming the latter before portraying Dr. Gilbert’s candid going on naively to write that “to accept that Israel required. allowed aid to come into experiences “propaganda” 6”winx Gaza 8”h as b/w, 170ppi PDF/X-1A the Gaza Strip daily would needlessly from his “fruitful mind.” Mr Shulman, perhaps you should be distract from the Israelis’ image as Bogdan Caradima 2A environmental Science

Operation Cast Lead was planned by the IDF for over two years and, according to President Shimon Peres, “had gone 90 percent according to plan” and dealt a “strong blow to the people of Gaza.” What punishment is the author possibly referring to, other than an episode of public wrist-slapping in an attempt to justify Israeli apologetics? Mr Shulman takes no time to present meaningful facts for his pathetic case for Israel because it would be a waste of time to do so, and this obfuscated truth shows in the superficial nature of his arguments. Unfortunately for you, Mr Shulman, statistics cannot lie and they are not at all in your favour. It is time that we called a spade a spade and admitted that the Israeli government and its military are guilty of war crimes, crimes against humanity and the use of illegal weapons.

Population Planning Ryan Mann 2B electrical engineering

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or a long time, pro-choicers and pro-lifers have been at great odds. But there is a position held by some organizations in Canada and worldwide that should be fought by people on both sides of this debate. They come under the title of “Population Planning” or “Population Management” (Ex: China’s population policy). If you have ever heard the idea that the Earth?s population is growing at an environmentally unsustainable pace, then you may have thought that a way to counteract that would be to not reproduce. There are groups, including the International Planned Parenthood

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Federation, that push to see abortion as the answer to this problem, no matter the choice of the woman. Not to try to create a controversy, but the fact is that abortion is a very good business, and organizations like IPPF receive millions of dollars every year in order to help women make the choice to abort the unsustainable piece of tissue in their womb. This is not about being pro-life or pro-choice, but about combating a force that would seek to kill off a future generation for the sake of its own gain. No matter which side of the issue you may be on, we must fight this industry’s power to convince and coerce women into ending their pregnancies, despite their own feelings about the situation.

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Features

Imprint, Friday, February 19, 2010 features@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Pledges from the campaign trail Michael L. Davenport editor-in-chief

O

n this page are promises and statements made by this year’s winning Feds candidates. This piece of paper might not be very useful now, on February 19, 2010. But it’ll be very useful six months from now, when you’re itching to check up on your elected representatives. Cut this page out of the newspaper, and save it — that is the first step of holding Feds to account.

Brad

MOGGACH Feds president elect

Nikki

BEST Feds VPIN elect

• “Work with University administration to commit to LEED Certification on new construction projects” — Team Yellow platform • “Ensure that all remaining green space on campus is preserved” — Team Yellow platform • “Obtaining public access to faculty meetings for students as an important accountability measure” — Team Yellow platform • “We can propose a new student services building by creating a student advisory board to oversee this process. By doing this we can differentiate between student needs and interests, and what should be provided by the university as an academic complement.” • “We can also promote sustainability on campus.” — Feds media forum • “The town halls are not as effective as they could be and that’s for a variety of reasons. We always host them in the SLC. So one avenue to explore is taking the town halls to the faculties themselves, hosting them in their buildings so they’re more accessible to students.” — Feds media forum • “I would rely on a communications co-ordinator to ensure that there’s effective communication lines open to students and that we’re actually communicating what we’re doing, how we’re doing it, and how students can be involved with Feds.” — Feds media forum

• “Senate meetings are scheduled a year in advance. I think that should be a priority for the president considering that they know throughout the year when these meetings will fall. They should be aware of the issues that are coming forward, especially through students and student senators.” — Feds media forum • “There are alternative options [for new buildings], and those don’t involve greenspace.” — Feds media forum • “The campus master plan, I feel like we need a push for a revision on it [...] that’s a strong way of making sure we can preserve all remaining greenspace.” — Feds media forum • “Moving a town hall forum shouldn’t be that difficult of a task to do. [...] it just comes down to booking a different room in a different building and ensuring that everything is available there. [...] Yes, I’m more than willing to book a room in a different building, and making sure that the stuff is there, so that students can hear what we’re doing, how we’re doing it, and making sure that they’re engaged with the Federation of students.” — Feds media forum • “We can utilize webcasts [...] so we can investigate those options ensuring that town hall forums are moved online, and potentially taking questions from online as well.” — Feds media forum

• “Implement an online feedback system for FedS businesses and services for comments and concerns toimproveaccountabilitytothestudentsandmedium for that dialogue.” — Team Yellow platform • “Your opportunities is approachability through the Feds office, holding regular office hours, being accountable to your actions, strategic planning, and online feedback systems for students who want to actually get their voices heard up to the top of Feds.” — Feds media forum • “Sharing online technology for voting through all of the societies is very important because right now paper ballots are very outdated.” — Feds media forum • “I think we should pursue the hiring of more counsellors for counselling services. We are desperately in need of more counselors ... students who are in need are not getting the help they deserve.” — Feds media forum • “I would like to put funding into getting better equipment [for PAC and CIF] that is more reliable.” — Feds media forum

• “We have contracts for [gym equipment], and so the companies that are actually leasing them out to us, they should be coming in and regularly making maintenance on those, to make sure if they’re not workingthey’refixedrightaway.Thatisn’thappening. So I would like to look at the contracts we have with those companies, and improve them, and demand that we have working equipment in those places. And also better hours.” — Feds media forum • “If you have a really good communications coordinator, the events will improve, the involvement will improve, business will be used more, and the money will come in, even though you’re spending money on the person.” — Feds media forum • “We do know there’s a problem here. To address the positive space [issue], I would like to form a committee on this, that way we’d work with GLOW, we’d work with the administration, and we’d actually look into the ways we can fix this problem. I don’t think lobbying against the university and saying that they’re wrong is going to work. I think we need to work together.” — Feds executive forum

photos by abisade dare

Sarah

COOK Feds VPAF elect

• “Work tuition and book rebate for students who • “There’s a couple of things we can do [to improve service at Bomber]. I think ensuring that new must withdraw due to medical reasons into Health staff have the training that they need to perform and Dental plan” — Team Yellow platform their duties as a server, as a bartender is really • “Ensure UW follows the contract for Tim important. I think we’ve been doing a good job Horton’s space and pays Feds what is owed of that. I think also having everyone understand so we can reinvest the money into you” their roles. Sometimes I’ve been in the bomber, — Team Yellow platform and it seems like everyone’s scurrying around, • “Ensure Aussies space is converted to office space doing a lot of different things. So maybe some to support our Marketing and Special Events of that service is lost. [...] As a person I will not departments so they can expand to serve you go to restaurants where I get poor service, so that better” — Team Yellow platform is a big issue. Definitely should be addressed.” • “I believe enhancing the student experience in the — Feds media forum Bomber will really help our businesses to claw their way out of debt. The first way I would do this [would • “I think it’s very important that students are eating properly if they’re going to continue to be]throughdiscountsforclubs,services,andsocieties. be successful. So one thing I’d do especially for We currently have them for clubs and services, we’ve those late nights when other things may be closed addedthemforsocieties.Sogettingthatwordoutthat is increase the amount of and variety of fresh they can use that discount, as well as increasing the options available at Federation Xpress. Because fundsforsubsidy,[...],gettingmoreoptions(fairtrade, we say open until 11 it’s a good chance for us to vegetarian, vegan options), diverse programming in offer freshly made sandwiches rather than the the bars [...], as well as dual licensing in the Bomber pre-packaged ones. As well as being able to lobby for inclusion of everyone.” — Feds media forum through the food advisory board on the amount • “I think I would like to include more vegan opand the choices of healthy foods that are availtions in addition to vegetarian [at the Bomber.] able to students out of food service operations.” — Feds media forum — Feds executive forum • “The one thing I’d like to do is really improve the student experience at our businesses.” — Feds executive forum


Features

10

Imprint, Friday, February 19, 2010

THE CULTURE MAKERS OF KITCHENER-WATERLOO eoldynski@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Local designers team up with the municipal government to attract the “creative class”

K

itchener and Waterloo are two very different cities. Imagine driving down King Street, starting from uptown Waterloo and ending in downtown Kitchener. At the beginning of the drive, we see a small but flourishing business district of upscale restaurants, pubs, and shops, and then the new Waterloo Town Square with its expensive boutiques. As we continue driving, King Street becomes narrower, the architecture of the storefronts seems older, and buildings are in a state of urban decay. There seem to be more pubs, tattoo and piercing shops in downtown Kitchener than in uptown Waterloo. The restaurants and shops in Kitchener are also more ethnically diverse and seem to attract working class consumers. Changes in the urban landscape of Kitchener But this is changing. The differences between Kitchener and Waterloo, at least on the surface, are becoming less apparent as the City of Kitchener joins together with local architects, designers, and urban planners, to reconstruct downtown King Street. Such reconstruction efforts include wider sidewalks, modern light posts decorated with colourful banners, more bike racks, trees, and planter beds, and speciallytreated sealant on everything from light posts and sidewalks to protect against graffiti. In addition to public spending, millions of dollars worth of new private sector developments are being invested in downtown Kitchener. Such developments include the Kaufman

Lofts, Civic Centre, the Tannery District, University of Waterloo’s Health Sciences Campus and Critical Media Lab, and Wilfrid Laurier University’s Faculty of Social Work. According to the City of Kitchener’s website on urban design (www.downtownkitchener.ca) these reconstruction efforts are transforming downtown Kitchener into a “vibrant, urban, modern, environment full of creative energy - where the entrepreneurs, innovators and creators of tomorrow will live, work, learn and play.” To find out why these recent reconstruction developments are occuring, I spoke with Brock Hart, Creative Leader at MFX Partners, a local brand design and communication agency. Since early 2009, MFX Partners has been teaming up with the City of Kitchener to put on a series of events known as Culture Camp, which was created by Hart as an open space style “un-conference” where there is no preplanned agenda and participants discuss topics of interest to them. Culture Camp takes place in the main lobby of Kitchener City Hall and typically attracts city planners, artists of various mediums, and municipal government staff and council, who are all brought together by their desire to identify needs in the community and to develop ways of meeting those needs. Richard Florida and the “creative class” When I asked Hart why he created Culture Camp, he responded by asking me how long I’ve been living in Waterloo. “Five years,” I said. To which he responded, “Clearly, you’re

engaged in the community, and so am I. The fact that we are both here right now [at Culture Camp] is evidence of that. And yet, you and I have never crossed paths, until now.” He then explained that the aim of Culture Camp is to figure out how to help people make these connections and how to self-organize. Culture Camp is part of a larger movement that aims to redesign urban centres to make them more appealing to artists and other creative types who fall under the category of the “creative class,” a phrase coined by Richard Florida, professor at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management. Florida’s creative class refers to his theory that cities with high concentrations of high-tech workers, artists, musicians, and lesbians and gays, correlate with a higher level of economic development. Although this idea has become popular only recently, it refers to a process that has been happening in North American cities since the 1970s. In New York City’s Soho district, for instance, artists reclaimed undervalued real estate such as warehouses and lofts, repurposed them, and made them appealing again to the real estate industry. While some call it redesigning the urban landscape, others call it gentrification. Either way, the process is nothing new. For Hart, redesigning the urban landscape of Kitchener begins with identifying people who want to self-organize, helping them to make their projects sustainable, and then giving them the tools to make it happen. Such projects include developing an art incubator space in which art-

ists can come together to collaborate. As Hart stated, “We want to get people involved in the doing of culture, not just consuming culture.” Holistic approaches toward creativity Although this approach to helping people to self organize seems well intentioned, it is important to ask: who is encouraged to get involved in the doing of culture? When I asked him this, he said that he wanted to get all kinds of people involved, “including Kitchener Rangers fans.” However, even though Culture Camp is intended to be an inclusive event, it struggles with actually being that. But why is this the case? I do not have enough space to explore that question in this article, but I do know that culture is neither something that can be definitively “done” nor can it be implemented in a top-down approach. In other words, culture is not the product of municipal government planning. Instead, it is something that emerges at the grassroots level and which develops spontaneously as a way to address community members’ needs. When our cities are redesigned for the purpose of attracting creative residents, it is our responsibility as citizens to ask: who really benefits from this? For more information on how local designers are working with the municipal government to shape Kitchener-Waterloo, visit the Culture Camp website at: www.ideastransform.ning.com

The Proposed Agenda for the Meeting is as Follows: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

PRESIDENT’S ADDRESS PRESENTATION OF FINANCIAL STATEMENTS, 2008/2009 APPOINTING THE 2009/2010 AUDITOR PRESENTATION OF THE 2010/2011 BUDGET POLICY AMENDMENT RATIFICATION ELECTION OF THE 2010/2011 BOARD OF DIRECTORS ADJOURNMENT

PROXY FORM

NOTICE OF MEETING – Imprint Publications, Waterloo is holding its ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING on Monday, February 22 at 3 p.m., Multi-Purpose Room, SLC, UW

Attendance is mandatory for all Imprint staff, staff who are unable to attend must inform the Editor-in-Chief and provide proof of important prior engagemenrts. Proxy forms are available in the Imprint office and are due by Friday, February 19 at 2:00 p.m. Letters of intent to run for Imprint’s Board of Directors should be submitted to Imprint’s president by Friday, February 19 at 4:30 p.m. The floor will also be open to in-person nominations during the meeting.

QUESTIONS?? Contact president Sherif Soliman at president@imprint.uwaterloo.ca or 519-888-4048

The undersigned member of Imprint Publications, Waterloo hereby appoints: NAME: _____________________________________ STUDENT I.D.: _______________________________ PHONE NUMBER: ____________________________ E-MAIL: _____________________________________ as the proxy of the undersigned to attend and act at the meeting of Imprint Publications, Waterloo to be held on Monday, February 22, 2010, and at any adjournment or adjournments thereof in the same manner, to the same extent, and with the same power as if the undersigned were present at said meeting or such adjournment or adjournments thereof. Dated the ______________ day of February, 2010 Witness Name (Print): _________________________ Witness Signature: ___________________________ Witness Phone Number: _______________________ Member Member Member Member

Name (Print): _________________________ Signature: ____________________________ Phone Number: _______________________ Student I.D.: __________________________

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Arts & Entertainment

Imprint, Friday, February 19, 2010 arts@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Interweb

Not for the weak of mind White Ninja Scott Bevan and Kent Earle National Lampoon Humor Network

W courtesy Waverly Films

YouTube channel review Waverly Films 46 000 + Subscribers www.waverlyfilms.com

“W

e are a group of filmmakers in Brooklyn, NY,” is all the information that is given about the individuals who make up Waverly Films on their Youtube channel. No further insight can be found on their website. While not much information can be found about these filmmakers, the group has nonetheless been a part of the Youtube community, uploading videos for nearly three years. Waverly Films is not your typical YouTube channel. For one, they use video cameras to record their skits instead of webcams. The videos end up coming off as much more professional as a result, but at the same time do not reflect the same professionalism that is seen in TV shows or movies. They also have a rather unique sense of humour for a comedy-based channel. Their skits are witty, quirky, and at times, a little dark. The videos range from 20 seconds to several minutes in length and on occasion, incorporate special effects that a viewer may be surprised to see in a YouTube channel. The channel also consists of individual skits as well as a couple of mini-series. Classics such as “Cowboy Sandstorm,” in which a cowboy stalks a man to the beat of the famous song by Darude, will make you say “Rock on!” The “Dinosaur” series will have you rofl-ing (hey, I hate txt tlk too – but this is a Youtube channel review after all). The series follows a young man’s adventures with a time-travelling dinosaur that can talk. Waverly Films is definitely worth a look if you’re looking for entertaining Youtube content that is somewhere between amateur webcam brandishers and fuzzy movie uploads. Their videos are numerous enough to keep you procrastinating for at least a few hours. To get you started, check out these titles by Waverly Films:

hite Ninja Comics, by Kent Earle and Scott Bevan, is slightly unhinged. Many over-thinking viewers will walk away baffled by the web-comic, only to find themselves suffering a fit of brainless laughter an hour later. As the comic’s creators so astutely put it: “White Ninja Comics are not for the weak of mind [...] Scholars, Philosophers, and the like, who possess the intellect to analyze and break down the comics to their hidden, and often devious, roots, will enjoy White Ninja to its fullest degree. Others, like you and I, however, can still enjoy the comics for their light-hearted surface humour and funny drawings.” White Ninja is a wonderful contradiction throughout the comics. He’s the stealthiest ninja in the world that often just meanders into a scene and stomps on someone’s head, chats them up, or feasts on their flesh. He’s a super hero who does some serious ass kicking, but he doesn’t do much hero-ing, nor much ass-kicking. So what is it about White Ninja that’s so awesome? It’s his disturbed personality that tickles the somewhat deranged visitor, and his simplistically drawn character, expressive faces, and childish nature that make us love him.

The comics often appear to be commenting on mainstream topics such as fast-food and ADD but quickly change direction and end up with an obtuse conclusion such as White Ninja claiming that he doesn’t want his meal super-sized because he’s “a pussy.” His superpowers, acquired by drinking ooze that he found on the ground, are rather mysterious. Sometimes he has fire vision and other times he has the ability to use both his hands equally well, but he always has an exceptional tolerance to pain (frequently drinking poison and ripping off his own limbs), an unwavering lack of comprehension of basic morals, and a helluva punch. White Ninja faces enemies in every comic, but the definition of enemies

is a little obscured. His enemies range from a mother turtle to a mouthy girlfriend to his poor lung capacity. He uses his quick-thinking, tact, and perseverance to slay each enemy. Despite his globulous body clad in a simplistic white ninja outfit (because colouring him in black would take too long, according to the creators), White Ninja never does anything ninja-related aside from occasionally sneaking an “I Smell” sign onto someone’s back or nailing his friend’s shoes to the ground. see White Ninja, page 14

“Master Prankers” “I knew you’d be prepared, that’s why this is a delicious candy bar.” Two pranksters try to outdo each other. Things get taken to an extreme. “Date Line” “Hi, I’m Dentist. I like candy, I love cavities, and I enjoy nitrous oxide.” This dateline mock video will make you glad you’re taken. “Magic Pants “ “Jake, do you believe the limits of reality are finite?” Life is breathed into a pair of pants, with disastrous results. — Katrina Massey Ian Cutajar


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Arts & Entertainment

Imprint, Friday, February 19, 2010

Movie Review

Dear John Lasse Hallström Relativity Media

D

ear John, a movie based on the novel of the same name by Nicholas Sparks, who brought us The Notebook and A Walk to Remember, had all the potential to become the next in a series of tear jerking love stories. It had all the key components, they found love, they were separated, they tried to hold on, and they failed. No one could have possibly expected the main characters to fall in love and stay that way; this is based on a novel by Nicholas Sparks after all. The movie, tells the story of a soldier, John Tyree (Channing

13

Tatum), on leave when he meets Savannah (Amanda Seyfried), a young idealistic girl on spring break. Only two weeks after they meet, John must return to his posting in Germany. He promises Savannah that they will be together in just 12 months. They go their separate ways, promising to write each other whenever possible, never expecting what the future will hold. Nearing the end of their year-long separation, September 11 came, bringing with it conflict. On one hand John wants so badly to return to Savannah, but on the other hand, he couldn’t abandon his comrades. In the end, he chooses to do what he saw as the right thing, and stay with the army, protecting his country.

photos courtesy Sony Pictures

The movie’s major downfall was Channing Tatum’s inability to do anything other than stand there and look pretty. He provided an unconvincing interpretation of the life and choices of a used to be bad boy and now soldier. Sure he looks the part of a strong and sensitive solider, but does nothing else. Amanda Seyfried, a woman who has demonstrated her acting talents, provided more of an insight into the young woman who deeply cares for both John and her young autistic neighbour. The other actors featured average performances, nothing particularly amazing, but nothing horrible either. The one complaint that I’ve heard from people who have read the book, is regarding the change made in the end. Originally the film was true to the novel. However the ending was unsettling to the test audience, and as such was changed.

Apparently the test audience did not feel that the ending of the novel was a satisfying ending to the tale of these two people who were very much in love. From what I’ve gathered this small change in the last 10 or so minutes of the film changed the tone and moral of the film and novel, such that it had lost its original message. Overall, Dear John doesn’t belong with the previous Nicholas Sparks films. Having extended battle scenes, as well as excessive amounts of time showing Channing Tatum either shirtless or in uniform, it did have traits that would please both women and the men who were dragged to the film. Other than that, Dear John was a disappointment to all Nicholas Sparks fans, who initially saw this film as the continuation of the success of his previous adaptations.

Left photo:

Lovers John Tyree (Channing Tatum) and Savannah Lynn Curtis (Amanda Seyfried) before they are separated by John’s army duties.

Above photo:

While away in the army, John and Savannah continue their relationship through letters.

— Deanna Ostafichuk

Improve your writing. Imprint.uwaterloo.ca

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Arts & Entertainment

Imprint, Friday, February 19, 2010

Digital Propaganda tkoshy@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

O

Ian Cutajar

White Ninja: Simple and disturbed Continued from page 11

His crime fighting rarely works out. Instead of using his superpowers to fend off a robber who wanted his money, he boasted that not even a hundred robbers could take away his money. So the robber stabbed him in the spleen but White Ninja insisted that the money was way too important to give up, holding the cash out of the robbers reach. With such a flaky personality, sometimes White Ninja attempts a good deed. Once, he heard someone calling for help from a locker. He delivered a power kick to the locker in an attempt to open it, but White Ninja’s kick ended up killing the person inside instead. Earle and Bevan have been drawing the comics since they were in grade eight, which makes this their 15th year. They decided to put the comics on the web because it made it easier for them to read their favourites. Carrying that box full of comics to school became a hassle, so using the convenience of the web was the best solution. Part of White Ninja’s success is from Earle and Bevan’s focus on making each other laugh. They often express that they didn’t think anyone would understand the comics and that the fans are a bonus. White Ninja Comics are a great way for any reader to unwind at the end of the day, helping people to forget stress, deadlines, and sensical logic and morality. The comics are updated Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays at www.whiteninjacomics.com. — Jacob McLellan

nce upon a time, nearly every single game produced was based on WWII. Thousands of franchises created their take on it. Now why was it that WWII was such a focus in videogames? For one, in history it’s a prime example of a clear division between two sides. It was when you could tell whom your allies were and who the enemy was. It was when countries simply said: “Enough!” and charged into war. It was quite simple. It was the Axis vs. Allies and that was it. World War II gave videogame developers the perfect enemy to plop into their products. To paraphrase Extra Punctuation, the Nazis managed to invade other countries, suppress their own people, and commit genocide, something very few regimes have ever attempted on such a scale. Hence, it’s pretty easy to place a Nazi in front of player and simply say that they are the villains. The latest fad is the rise of the “modern” shooter, and given world events, it is not surprising. The “War on Terror” and the “War on Drugs” have provided writers with ample fodder. With many people curious as to what the modern battlefield in all its deadly glory is like, these products serve to place the players as close to reality as possible without shooting them in the head. However, this trend might consist of a darker undertone. During World War II, both sides pumped out enough propaganda to indoctrinate entire populations. Movies, newspapers, and even comics, all played their role in demonizing the other side, envisioning Germans as ruthless brutes and Americans as impe-

rialists. Both sides transformed their entertainment industries into full time, propaganda-spouting machinery. Given the rise of videogames into becoming an established part of the entertainment industry, it’s not too surprising when videogames become trumpets of propaganda.

Blatant Propaganda Right off the bat lets there is the blatant ones: • America’s Army: A series of games designed and released by the United States Army, who clearly have gone all out to recruit armchair warriors into the army. But hey, it even has a tie-in graphic novel. • Quest for Bush: Published by the Global Islamic Media Front, the game takes players on a quest to go through a desert populated by U.S. soldiers and hanging portraits of G.W. Bush. The players are on quest to assassinate the afore mentioned former president. Of course you’re backed up with a score comprising of jihadist songs (its not Hans Zimmer, to say the least). • Left Behind: Eternal Forces: Developed and published by Inspired Media Entertainment, this game proves that even extremist religious propaganda can be make it onto videogames. Or that they have the money to hire someone who can. These are just a few examples of games which are solely propaganda mouthpieces.

Mainstream Propaganda There have been cases of “mainstream” products accused of having an alternative agenda. Take for example: • Mercenaries 2: World in Flames: “A power hungry tyrant uses Venezuela’s oil supply to overthrow the government and turn the country into a war zone.” No, that’s not me paraphrasing the plot, that sentence is actually a part of the introduction to Pandemic’s product. Therefore it is understandable why Hugo Chavez, the current President of Venezuela created a minor shit-storm about the game, complaining how the U.S. government was trying to drum up support for an invasion of Venezuela. However, the game did attempt to broadcast a somewhat partisan, if over used message: “The oil companies run the world…and there are no good guys.” Even the supposed good guys: The Allied Nation (the stand ins for the United Nations) were actually being orchestrated by a CIA agent with links to an oil company. Some have argued that this was a criticism at the level of influence oil companies have. Either way this game definitely was not a neutral take on a contentious issue.

• Call of Duty: Modern Warfare A key portion of the plot placed the players in Ira…I mean unnamed Arab country. It details U.S. Marines taking part in the invasion of the afore mentioned country. However the developers deliberately made no references to supposed weapons of mass destruction (except the end of course), with the only reasons

provided for the invasion was to “restore order” after the execution of the country’s president by nationalists. Some might argue that this was a bit of a swipe at the Bush administration’s supposed reason for invading Iraq. Other argued that this game served to demonize all Arabs. I would argue that it slammed players into the boots of soldiers, whom essentially were pawns in a bigger game. • Medal of Honour (The Series) Some might argue that using a yetto-be released game as an example is bad, but hear me out. According to the series, all Germans were avowed Nazis, who took to creating impenetrable fortresses that seem to be based off a cartoon villain’s fortress of doom, despair and even more doom. Also, apparently, the Americans were the only one’s fighting. The Medal of Honor series may be the ultimate example of propaganda being generated for a war that was already declared, fought, and ended. Given the history of the series and its tendency to go jingoistic, I can foresee sequences detailing the brutality of the Taliban in the latest iteration. Who knows, maybe we’ll see a set piece of the Taliban killing a basket full of puppies and kittens, just to prove a point. Maybe this game will be the prime example of a videogame being created to become the ultimate interactive propaganda. For the most part, very few mainstream games have been transformed into full time propaganda machines. But then again, we never know what 2010 might bring.

courtesy gameology

A segment of game play from Global Islamic Media Front’s Quest for Bush. The objective of the game to assassinate former President George W. Bush.


Arts & Entertainment

Imprint, Friday, February 19, 2010

F

Courtesy Blabbermouth and Reprise Records Repectivily

Mastodon Crack The Skye Reprise Records March 20, 2009

rom the first three notes of the album, you know Mastodon is going somewhere different — some place fresh and new, interesting and innovative. After an elaborate intro, the verse riff begins and drummer Brann Dailor starts singing. The vocals are clean. This is the first time Mastodon has not screamed constantly on an album. In fact, they don’t scream on this album at all. They employ three vocalists, and all get equal duty time. And the experimentation is fantastic. They have defied genre tags — they were sludge metal, then they were progressive sludge, and now we have no idea what they are. But whatever they do works so well it doesn’t matter. The riffs are precise, deadly pieces of machinery, and the vocals are haunting with elaborate melodies and soaring, almost frightening harmonies. The guitar solos scream and wail with powerful harmonies and impressive melodic interplay, but never sting. Dailor’s drumming has settled from a snare-beating frenzy into a constant, powerful rhythmic pulse. As a unit, the band has become far more effective. They’re not just tighter; they’ve finally written a cohesive, brilliant album, more so than anything they have released prior. It’s more than refreshing to hear a modern metal band finally embrace the power of melodic vocals, and still manage to be heavier than all of their peers. With this album, Mastodon takes an ambitious new direction and executes it to perfection. Crack The Skye is destined to become a classic metal album alongside Metallica’s Master Of Puppets, Black Sabbath’s Paranoid, and Pantera’s Vulgar Display Of Power.

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I

n his third album Black Noise, German producer Hendrick Weber, a.k.a. Pantha du Prince, explores the concept of black noise, a sound frequency that is inaudible to mankind, but animals perceive it as a “the calm before the storm.” Black Noise features the vocals of Noah Lennox (a.k.a. Panda Bear) from Animal Collective in the track “Stick To My Side.” It also features Tyler Pope from LCD Soundsystem and !!! on bass for “The Splendour.” Black Noise is a coherent album that begins with an ominous atmosphere, created by juxtaposing minimalist layers of clean, crisp sound against the tantalizing silence. As the album progresses, it climaxes through sprawling swirls of psychedelic pop similar to that of Animal Collective and it concludes with a satisfactory sense of optimism. Weber’s talent at crafting sounds is apparent in Black Noise, as it is a rich album that requires several listens to fully grasp its meaning. There is a compelling story to these sounds, and it is at the fringe of audibility.

Courtesy Trade Records and lastfm respectivly

Pantha du Prince Black Noise Rough Trade February 9, 2010

— Athena Ngai

Want your music reviewed? Send CD to: Student Life Centre, Room 1116 University of Waterloo 200 University Ave. West Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 Canada

— Nathan Snelgrove

Rude, Evil, and Real akaiyin@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

“I

made this record one day when I felt I wanted to start a cult,” said James Pants, the resident weirdo on hiphop label Stones Throw. The record in question, 2010’s Seven Seals, is a fierce departure from his 2008 LP, Welcome, which cheerfully goofs around with synthy major chords. While Seven Seals is experimental in the same way Welcome was, it’s decidedly less cheerful than Pants’ previous effort. It’s still weird, but it’s become more David Lynch creepy-weird than Miranda July playful-weird. Creepy-weird, by the way, may be the best way to describe this trend. We can notice traces of this in film and television as well as music. Latenight animation powerhouse Adult Swim has experienced a changing of the guard from relatively playful shows like Aqua Teen Hunger Force to occult pastiches like Metalocalypse, and straight-up-creepy endeavors like Tim and Eric Awesome Show, Great Job! Tim and Eric’s mainstream influence, from their central role in launching Zach Galifinakis’ career to their ubiquitous “Spagett!” meme, can’t be ignored. But their approach differs greatly from Adult Swim’s other flagship show, Metalocalypse. Metalocalypse chronicles the adventures of a fictional metal band, Dethklok, who partake in all sorts of occult pleasures, in a decidedly cheerful fashion. Meanwhile, Tim and Eric create gruesome parodies of wholesome subjects: best friends, office romances, old men. One of their most disturbing sketches features a friendly old Bluetoothsporting black man named David Liebe Hart, whose shtick is to en-

gage a ventriloquist’s doll in a duet about all the wonderful alien races in the galaxy. It is unbelievably creepy. The parallel trend of Metalocalypse­ -style “playful occult” remains more prominent in the mainstream. We’ve seen a lot of this in the past few years. Some of the biggest club DJs, including Dubfire, the Proxy, and Fake Blood, have dabbled in horror-movie motifs to create huge hits. Meanwhile, “black” and “ghost” have supplanted “wolf ” as bandname-elements-du-jour. Among others, there’s Black Lips, Black Kids, Black Keys, Black Dice, Black Feelings, then Ghost Bees, Ghost Hands, The Ghost Is Dancing, Glass Ghost, and the inevitable Black Ghosts. Few of these bands are genuinely creepy; by and large, they’re relatively pleasant, using the occult sparingly to add edge to their image. The occult in pop culture is predicated on two uses: playful and creepy. Perhaps it’s a sign of how hard it’s hit the mainstream that our new blockbusters use the occult in both playful and creepy ways. The recent strain of vampire flicks, “Revelationsploitation” bombs like Legion, and the new Wolfman movie are examples. Hollywood has identified a latent desire for the occult — in any form — and is desperately trying to carve out new occult niches. Imagine the board meeting The Wolfman came out of: studio executives furiously brainstorming as many occult symbols as they could think of, crossing most of them out (witches are so 1970s, guys) and settling on werewolves as the Next Big Thing. If he isn’t already, New Moon teen wolf Taylor Lauttner is going to be a hot commodity.

Notes from Underground:

A handful of evil, occult, and creepy new albums you haven’t heard yet

courtesy Alien8

Black Feelings Black Feelings Alien8

Black Feelings, the new release on influential Montreal label Alien8, is a departure from the playful-occult of 2008 Alien8 release Anthologie des 3 Perchoirs. Drawing heavily from Japanese psych and noise, Black Feelings crafts a droney, experimental trip into psychedelic realms. And everyone knows psychedelics are occult – just ask Jim Jones and his People’s Temple cult about their LSD experiments. Black Feelings channels this hallucinogenic shamanism into a cohesive mindfuck Cold Cave Love Comes Close Matador

This Philadelphia three-piece, featuring ex-members of Xiu Xiu and Prurient, delves into the darker realms of synthpop with Love Comes

Close. The music’s impressively versatile – ex-members of Xiu Xiu and Prurient keep their dissonant tendencies in check enough to crank out some serious hooks – but you can tell it’s in them to make some crazy experimental stuff. Meanwhile, their song titles are like a checklist of creepy, soulless themes. The dark afterlife? “Heaven Was Full.” Mystical occult sex? “The Laurels of Erotomania.” The entire world being dark and lifeless? “The Trees Grew Emotions and Died.” Why hasn’t this band blown up yet? Maybe they will in May, when they play the Matt Groening-curated All Tomorrow’s Parties festival in England.

2009 debut Psychic Psummer. Mirror Eye is similar stuff: drugged-out psych rock that heavily channels drone. Psychic Ills have their experimental game on lock. It’s hard to find another band out there that is as compellingly out-there and challenging as Psychic Ills.

courtesy Acephale

SALEM Water/Yes I Smoke Crack EPs Acephale

courtesy The social registry

Psychic Ills Mirror Eye The Social Registry

“Psychic” is a close third to “black” and “ghosts” for the Least Avoidable Music Word Award. “Cave” is fourth — but only because sludgy Chicago psych-rockers Cave named their great

SALEM gets immediate cred for their all-caps, old-school-occult band name, but they get lasting cred for having the sheer insanity to back up their rock-star image. Yes, lead singer John Holland does smoke crack — or at least he did, back in his days of prostituting himself to horny Michigan truckers. SALEM’s music is dark, brooding, and fresh — Holland cites the Chicago footwork/juke scene as an influence. Holland’s vision has been noticed by major tastemakers like Diplo, who featured a SALEM remix of Gucci Mane on his recent Free Gucci mixtape.


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Arts & Entertainment

Imprint, Friday, February 19, 2010

sweet n’ light

Questions, comments, want to get involved? arts@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

dyoon@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

S UPCOMING SHOWS mar

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JAY MALINOWSKI

(OF BEDOUIN SOUNDCLASH)

ELECTRIC 6

SPIRITS

WITH THE

HIPPY MAFIA

BOCCE CD RELEASE WITH DIAMOND RINGS

o here’s the thing: last Saturday night, at around 3 a.m. when many of you were stumbling home from the bar and others of you were fast asleep, I was in the kitchen. I had a craving for scones and nothing could stop me. I put the dough together, cut it into circles, put it in the fridge and went to bed knowing that in the morning I would have hot scones with my coffee. Hot and fresh from the oven, the scones were delicious, perfect for Sunday morning, but then I realized that it wasn’t really what I was craving. Scones are dry on the outside, kind of crumbly and need to be slathered in butter and jam. Again, delicious, but not what I wanted. What I wanted was something fluffy and light to accompany my morning coffee, but easy to grab and go on my way to class. What I wanted was muffins — blueberry muffins to be exact. I scoured the internet for a recipe that sounded like it would fulfill all my requirements, light, sweet and fluffy. I came across a recipe for blueberry cream muffins. I gathered up some frozen blueberries and sour cream and got to work. Sour cream in muffins and coffee cakes will function just as buttermilk does in pancakes. For those of you that missed the buttermilk tutorial in waking up fluffy, the acidity in buttermilk and likewise yogurt and sour cream, reacts with the baking powder in many recipes creating tiny gas pockets which provide a much fluffier texture. You will often find sour cream used in cake and muffin recipes, especially coffee cake, as opposed to buttermilk, to create a thicker batter allowing the batter

to rise higher. However, yogurt, sour cream, and buttermilk are generally interchangeable in these recipes. The higher the fat the better. I’ve been ingesting so much butter lately I will probably begin to smell like it in the coming weeks. The recipe I derived this from originally called for vegetable oil, which will provide a slightly more dense muffin overall, in contrast to the butter creamed with the sugar — the air pockets provided by the creaming of the butter and sugar together to provide more lift and create a fluffier muffin — in the end, it comes right down to personal preference. Do you like dense or light muffins? Vegetable oil may be used interchangeably in this circumstance. This recipe is fairly basic and versatile. Depending on what you have on hand you may replace the blueberries with cranberries and add some orange or lemon zest to the batter. One step that is important is tossing the fruit with some flour or dry mix, especially if frozen. If you were to fold the frozen blueberries in without first having coated them with the dry mix, two things would occur: first and most noticeably, you will find the batter stained blue/purple, which is more of an aesthetic observation but nonetheless bothersome, secondly, the fruit will tend to sink to the bottom of the muffin. These muffins freeze well in an airtight container. Microwave for one minute and you have hot, fresh baked breakfast on your way out the door. So the only question left to ponder is: is your muffin buttered? Would you like us to butter your muffin?

Blueberry Cream Muffins

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Ingredients • 4 eggs • 1 cup butter, room temperature • 4 cups all-purpose flour • 1 teaspoon baking soda • 2 cups sour cream

• 2 cups sugar • 1 teaspoon vanilla • 1 teaspoon salt • 2 teaspoons baking powder • 2  cups  blueberries, fresh or frozen

Directions

1 2 3 4 5

 

In a mixing bowl, cream butter. Gradually add sugar and beat until fluffy. While beating, slowly add eggs, followed by the vanilla. Combine dry ingredients, but reserve a few tablespoons. Add dry mixture alternately with the sour cream to the butter mixture. Toss blueberries with the reserved dry mix before gently folding into batter. Spoon into greased muffin tins. Bake at 380° F for 20 minutes, or until toothpick inserted comes out clean.


Science & Technology

Imprint, Friday, February 19, 2010 science@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Flesh-eating robots Payvand Zamanian reporter

Foveal Peripheral Camera

Arm RSTA cameras

L

ike something out of a science-fiction novel, the American military has developed a robot that “consumes” organic material to fuel itself. The Pentagon has named the robot EATR which stands for Energetically Autonomous Tactical Robot.

“The system obtains its energy by engaging in biologically-inspired, organism-like, energy-harvesting behaviour which is the equivalent of eating,” according to RoboticTechnologyInc. EATR can potentially go for weeks, even months, without having to return to base by scavenging for organic fuel. It has a wide range of potential energy sources, from grass to furniture wood. But the most striking feature is its ability to feast

Bin for combustiables MULE chassis Chainsaw

Turret

Gripper

on human corpses, which are often in good supply in war zones. This has sparked some ethical concerns amongst many people, including high ranking military officials, who believe that the remains of fallen soldiers should be treated with respect. This is further underlined by the fact that “desecration of the dead is a war crime” according to Article 15 of the Geneva Convention. However, the inventor EATR, Dr. Robert Finkelstein of Robotic Technology Inc., insists that it “will consume organic material but mostly vegetarian.” Dr. Finkelstein explained that the robot can be programmed to recognize signatures from different kinds of materials, from vegetation to animal tissue. EATR can also use conventional fuels such as gasoline, coal, diesel, and even solar energy. It is expected that in future warfare, robots will have a large role to play. The American military already employs about 8,000 robots tasked with supportive functions such as diffusing explosives. However, the Pentagon has pending plans to expand its robotic arsenal to include combat machines and to adopt the EATR technology. The fictitious idea of flesh-eating robots on the battlefield is turning into a reality faster than one might have imagined. science@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Alcina wong bogdan petrescu

Cyber wars, self powered prosthetics, armoured mini cars staff reporter

U.S. wraps up cyber wargames

Recently, the United States wrapped up a real time simulation of a cyber attack that crippled cellphone service, internet networks and electrical grids. The Aviation Week’s defense blog quoted The Bipartisan Policy, a think-tank which reported that the current system is not prepared to handle a cyber attack. The real time simulation represented a worst case scenario. However, many criticised the fact that the simulation ignored certain key factors. Former secretary of Homeland Security Michael Chertoff argued that many cyber attacks could be prevented if individual cellphones and computers follow best practices and use the right tools. An unnamed participant noted that private internet providers would not idly stand by while a cyber attack took place. The war game, according to Popular Science, highlighted the government’s reliance on communication systems that might go down during a real-life scenario. One question surrounds how the president would respond to such a situation or activate the National Guard if such communication systems were down. Another question would be the level of response to

such a situation if there is no identifiable adversary, for example, in situations such as the alleged Chinese cyber attacks on Google and other U.S. companies. Ares Defense Blog questioned a curious missing element from the simulation, in that there was no mention of what happened to phone or Internet service in the rest of the world. Surely a nation that decided to launch cyber attacks against the U.S. would take safeguards to protect its own crucial communication services, which would possibly help U.S. officials narrow down the list of suspects. Scientists develop self-powered prosthetic feet

According to ScienceDaily, researchers have found that prosthetic users expend more energy walking on artificial feet than people with normal feet. However, researchers have created prosthetic feet that can recapture energy which is then used towards the next step. Research has found that a conventional prosthetic foot spent 23 per cent more metabolic energy. One engineer likened it to walking with an extra 30 pounds weighing you down. However, a new prosthetic device manages to cut down energy usage to just 14 per cent more than normal. One should bear in mind that these devices are being designed for

Researchers have created prosthetic feet that can recapture energy which is then used towards the next step.

everyday usage, as opposed to athletic usage. According to Popular Science, the energyrecycling foot captures dissipated energy naturally as opposed to other devices that do not have this feature. A microcontroller then tells the foot precisely when to apply the energy so that it enhances the power of the ankle push-off for the next step. The saved energy means that the prosthetic device only uses less than 1 watt of electricity provided by a small portable battery. The University of Michigan team has already begun testing the foot on amputees at the Seattle Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and hopes to commercialize the device for more widespread use among military veterans. India unveils extremely tiny armoured car as a new anti-terror weapon

Indian manufactuer Melatech Motor Bodies Ltd, recently unveiled a golf cart-sized armoured car that can carry two fully armed soldiers, traverse narrow indoor corridors

Tejas Koshy

and ride service elevators, according to the Agence France-Presse. The vehicle is called the Anti-Terrorist Assault Cart (ATAC). According to Popular Science, the vehicle’s price tag is $45,000. It features grenade and bullet proof windows. The design of the vehicle was created in response to the Mumbai attacks that took place in 2008. Firing ports allow the armed driver and rider to fire their weapons from within the vehicle. One ATAC prototype on display at the DefExpo 2010 in New Delhi reportedly drew applause from visitors as well as Indian military scientists. Metaltech hopes to offer the prototypes on a trial basis to sponsors of the Commonwealth Games scheduled for November in Delhi, as well as to India’s National Security Guards. According to Popular Science, each car can run for six hours on a single charge and has a top speed of 25 km/hr. With files from Popular Science, PHYSORG, Aviation week, Science Daily and the Agence France-Presse.


18

Science & Technology

Imprint, Friday, February 19, 2010

PHOTO FEATURE:

Toronto International Auto Show

New Mazda 2 Evil Concept Car

photos by Paula Trelinska

Ferrari 599xx

A variety of cars, including the Mazda 2 Evil concept car, were displayed on Saturday, February 13, at the Toronto International Auto Show. These automobiles are on showcase and some will be available for test drives on February 21, 2010.

Hyundai Blue Drive System Battery

The new Maserati Granturismo S

Hyundai Nuvis


Science & Technology

Imprint, Friday, February 19, 2010

Moving climate change out of the spotlight

C

limate change has become the epitome of the environmental movement. When someone thinks environmentalism, they think of greenhouse gas emissions and a warming planet. Should this be the face of environmentalism? Should cutting emissions and capand-trade be our shtick? The climate change debate has become so politically charged and defined by backroom talks, ambiguous definitions, and limber plans to cut emissions by some amount by such a date. There have been countless amounts of time, money, and effort put into this issue. In the end, we are treating a symptom and treating it poorly, at that. The climate change debate is much like giving Advil to someone who has the flu, mono, and a hangover in order to get rid of the headache. Climate change should not be the main and in some cases only focus of the environmental movement because it is a symptom that is difficult to provide hard, distinct proof of. It isn’t easy to prove that climate change is happening to those who are ignorant or lacking in knowledge about the science behind it. As well, focusing on climate change results in weak policies to reduce carbon emissions by some amount by some date. This doesn’t have any profound effect and only takes attention away from other issues and reasons why we need to get away from our addiction to oil and fossil fuels. These issues span across not only environmental, but social and economic planes. Environmentally, climate change is part of a much larger problem. Destruction of wilderness and habitat, out of control populations, loss of species, urban sprawl, and water and air pollution are just a few general examples. Socially, fossil fuels and the complete control they have over our energy production leaves us dependent and utterly defenseless to the corporate plans of oil companies. They

19

Diabetics, ancient mariners, genetic testing

thelferty@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

exploit developing nations and our remaining wilderness for their gain. Economically, there is peak oil and rising gas prices, as well as causing severe polarization of rich and poor among developing and developed countries. By focusing our energy on climate change, we leave all of these other issues on the sidelines to be ignored while we feel good about ourselves with minor reductions in carbon emissions. Sure, there are efforts towards solving these other issues, but they are mostly run by NGOs with a few small nudges by governments. They don’t get nearly the attention climate change does. It’s about time the climate change debate took to the sidelines and became just another reason to slow our dependence on fossil fuels. It should still be a part of the debate against fossil fuel dependence and environmental awareness, but not the only thing you ever see in the media whenever environmental issues come up. Madagascar is almost completely without trees, the Aral Sea is a puddle, and the people of developing nations are still starving while we argue and name-call over the snow in Washington, D.C. and whether it is proof for or against climate change. I do believe climate change is a problem, and that it is still reason to re-work our global infrastructure; but I do not believe it should be the only argument and the focus of the environmental movement. Cutting carbon emissions and introducing cap-and-trade policies will get rid of some chemicals in the air, but it won’t produce better agricultural practices, energy independence, and economic, food, and water security. There are ways to solve all of these problems at once, and they should be the focus of the next global environmental meeting. If we fix the rest of the world, the climate will solve itself.

Sarah Rogalla staff reporter

Nicholas Randall reporter

New hope for diabetics

An artificial pancreas developed by researchers at Cambridge University has shown to greatly reduce the risk of dangerously low blood sugar levels in young children and teenagers. The device is a combination of a real time sensor and insulin pump, which people with Type 1 diabetes cannot normally produce. To gauge the effectiveness of the device, a study was conducted over a period of 54 nights with 17 children and teenagers. The tests were conducted under various circumstances, for example, when children went to sleep after a large meal or after exercising in the early evening. Both situations are dangerous to diabetics as they increase the risk of low blood sugar episodes. The results of the tests were positive overall, with the artificial pancreas maintaining blood glucose levels in the normal range 60 per cent of the time. This is a significant improvement from the unregulated continuous pump, which maintained normal levels 40 per cent of the time. The pump also prevented significant hypoglycaemia, which occurs when blood glucose levels fall below 3.0mmol/L, and halved the time that blood sugar levels dropped below 3.9mmol/L, which is classified as mild hypoglycaemia. These results are an important step towards increasing the quality of life for those suffering from Type 1 diabetes, which will also reduce the risk of associated complications. It is expected that once the device has been perfected it will be moved out of the laboratory and into the household.

Rise in genetic testing mirrors drop in inherited diseases

With genetic testing becoming more available to the general public, people are testing themselves to determine if they are carriers of various mutations and rare genetic diseases. If a person discovers that they are in fact a carrier, they tend to either not risk having children or to screen their embryos. Many who knowingly carry a disease see it as being unconscionable to procreate without taking preventative steps. If there are any signs of their children having these diseases, they will tend to end the pregnancies. However, specific numbers for abortions after testings are not kept. As a result of such abortions, there has been a decrease in genetically inherited diseases such as Tay-Sachs, familial dysautonomia, cystic fibrosis, thalassemia, and spinal muscle atrophy. In 2001, the American College of Obsttricians and Gynecologists began to recommend that pregnant women be offered testings for mutations. In Massachusetts, where they tested for cystic fibrosis in babies, in 2000 the count was at 29 and went down to only 10 in 2003. Studies in Canada, Europe, Australia and Italy has also seen drops in severe genetic diseases. Dr. Wendy Chung, a clinical genetics chief from Columbia University said, “We’re definitely seeing decreased rates of certain genetic disorders as a result of carrier screening.” Some diseases — sickle cell, cystic fibrosis, Tay-Sachs, thalassemia, spinal muscle atrophy — occur when people inherit two bad genes, one from each parent. The genes can pass quietly for generations until two carriers mate; then children have a one-in-four chance of getting the disease. -With files from BBC

Recent Evidence of Ancient Mariners on Crete

Ian Cutajar

Recently on the southwest shore of Crete, stone tools were found and dated to be over 130,000 years old. This suggests Crete being populated as far back as 100,000 years. Before this discovery the earliest tools were dated to be between ten to twelve thousand years ago. The team that discovered the ancient tools was led by Thomas F. Strasser and Eleni Panagopoulou. What is particularly intriguing about this discovery is that previously, our conceptions of anatomically modern Homo Sapiens was that they were not sea bearing until they went to Australia 60,000 years ago. This discovery brings the sea bearing date of Homo Sapiens back another 40,000 years, making them much more advanced than previously thought. The style of found hand axes is also intriguing as they can be found in Africa over 700,000 years ago where they were made by preHomo Sapiens. However, the dates for these hand axes, cleavers and scrapers are not yet certain. Experts in the field are nonetheless excited by Strasser and Panagopoulou’s find.

science@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

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Campus Bulletin

Classified HELP WANTED

Weekend counsellors and relief staff to work in homes for individuals with developmental challenges. Minimum eight-month commitment. Paid positions. Send resume to Don Mader, K-W Habilitation Services, 108 Sydney Street, Kitchener, ON, N2G 3V2. Imprint has a work study position available – Systems Administrator – up to 15 hours/week at $11/hour. Candidates will have Webmail server administration experience, be familiar with medium scale Linux network administration, SAMBA file management, Windows XP workstations, LDAP authentication and Apache admin. Duties include maintaining and strengthening our office’s network system. Applicants must be full-time students and eligible for OSAP. Please send resume to editor@imprint.uwaterloo.ca.

SERVICES

Does your thesis or major paper need a fresh pair of eyes to catch English spelling and grammar errors? Thesis English editing. Five business day turnaround. Neal Moogk-Soulis, ncmoogks@uwaterloo.ca.

HOUSING

Houses for rent – Hoffaco Property Management presents a new release of student rental properties located close to UW. Clean, new or upgraded detached houses, townhouses, apartments and true loft space rentals available on many nearby streets including Ezra, Marshall, Hazel and Lester. Rentals to suit all group size from 1 to 13. Many start dates available. Please email uw@hoffaco.com (preferred) or phone 519-885-7910.

CLOSING SALE EVERYTHING MUST GO!

80%

UP TO

J. Lindeberg 60 Regina St. N., Waterloo

OFF

Casual & Golf Wear

Store Hours: Tues-Sat 1 to 5 p.m. 519885-6868

Volunteer required to rebuild website for Kitchener International Children’s Games Chapter. Call 519-886-6918 and leave message or respond to icgkitchener@hotmail.com.

Emergency loan applications are available on our web site and the deadline to apply is the last day of each term. Visit safa.uwaterloo.ca for a full listing of scholarships and awards.

VOLUNTEERING

UW RECREATION COMMITTEE

CAREER SERVICES WORKSHOPS

Volunteers needed for UpTown Waterloo Ice Dogs Festival on Saturday, February 20 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. A fun day with an after party. Contact Sheila McConnell at smcconne@ uwaterloo.ca or 519-888-4567, ext 33203 or DC 3113. Study participants needed! Healthy weight and over weight young adults needed to participate in a study on the effect of body weight on the knee joint. For more information, contact Kathleen, k4maclea@uwaterloo.ca. Shadow needed to be paired with international students for spring and fall 2010. Show them around, help them resolve cultural shock and make their stay in Waterloo more enjoyable. Make great friends and learn things from another country. Visit www.iso.uwaterloo.ca. Volunteer with a child at their school and help improve their self-esteem and confidence. One to three hours a week commitment. Call Canadian Mental Health at 519-744-7645, ext 229. City of Waterloo has volunteer opportunities. For info call 519-8886478 or www.waterloo.ca/volunteer. The Distress Centre needs volunteers to provide confidential, supportive listening on our crisis and distress lines. Complete training provided. Call 519-744-7645, ext 300. Volunteer Action Centre, 519-7428610 / volunteer@volunteerkw.ca, for all your volunteering needs! Deliver or befriend through Community Support Connections. Deliver meals, drive seniors to appointments or visit one for a few hours each week. Contact Kate Lavender at 519-772-8787 or katel@communitysupportconnections.org. Hey Hot Stuff! Volunteering at Imprint is fun, easy, helps you meet people and boosts resumes and grad school applications. All welcome, regardless of experience. volunteer@ imprint.uwaterloo.ca. Volunteers needed – The English Tutor program is in constant need of volunters to tutor international students. Volunteering is an essential part of student life at UW. Apply online at www.iso.uwaterloo.ca. Speak Croatian or Polish? Volunteer visitor required for a woman with Alzheimer’s disease. Two hours per week. Training/support provided by Alzheimer Society. Jill jmercier@alzheimerkw. com. Resume builder.

Teach English Abroad

UW Recreation Committee events are open to all employees of the University of Waterloo. Register by emailing UWRC@uwaterloo.ca. Would you like to assist with the planning of UWRC events for 2010?? Email UWRC@admmail.uwaterloo. ca with your interest. Exchange Board – looking to rent, buy or sell? UWRC.uwaterloo.ca/exchange_board. More info email Margaret at mulbrick@uwaterloo.ca. Lots of discounts available for UW employees – CN Tower, Ontario place, Empire Theatre, Galaxy Theatre, Kitchener Auditorium, Princess Cinema, VIA rail and more ... email Shirley at schatten@uwaterloo.ca. UPCOMING EVENTS: Monday, February 22, 2010 Free talk: Healthy Sight for a Lifetime – presented by UW School of Optometry at Waterloo Public Library. Saturday, February 27, 2010 XIIR – Xtreme International Ice Racing at the Kitchener Auditorium, Kitchener at 7:30 p.m.

ONGOING

MONDAYS Gambling can ruin your life. Gamblers Anonymous, 7 p.m. at St Marks, 825 King Street, W, basement.

STUDENT AWARD & FINANCIAL AID For all in-person inquiries, including OSAP funding pickup, your SIN card and government issued, valid photo ID are required. BYID card can now be accepted as photo ID. OSAP and out of province funding can now be claimed in the Student Awards & Financial Aid Office. February 18 – OSAP application deadline (full funding) for winter and spring term. February 26 – deadline for OSAP reviews (appeals) for winter only and fall and winter terms. Last day to submit full-time bursary/award application for winter only term.

Monday, February 22, 2010 Understanding the Multiple-Mini Interview—6:00 to 7:00 p.m., TC1208. Tuesday, February 23, 2010 Business Etiquette and Professionalism—3:30 to 4:30 p.m., TC1208. Wednesday, February 24, 2010 Exploring Your Personality Type (Part I)—2:30 to 4:00 p.m., TC1112. Multiple-Mini interview Practice Session—4:30 to 7:00 p.m., TC1214. Thursday, February 25, 2010 Success on the Job—3:30 to 5:00 p.m., TC1208. Saturday, February 27, 2010 Medical School Interviews (Standard Interviews)—12:30 to 3:00 p.m., TC2218.

NEED A PART-TIME JOB? The following positions are available at

IMPRINT The University of Waterloo’s official student newspaper

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ANNOUNCEMENTS

Exchanges for undergraduates and graduates – 2010/11 academic years: MICEFA, Paris, France, IPO application deadline: March 17, 2010. For more info and application forms please contact Maria Lango, International Programs, Waterloo International, Needles Hall 1101, room 1113, ext 33999 or by email: mlango@uwaterloo.ca. Nominations are requested for two graduate students of the university to be elected by/from the full and part-time graduate students of the university, terms May 1, 2010 to April 30, 2012. Nomination forms are available from the Secretariat, ext 36125 and from the Secretariat webpage; see www.adm.uwaterloo.ca/infosec/elections/nomelections.htm. At least five nominators are required in each case. Nominations should be sent to the Secretariat, Needles Hall, room 3060, no later than 3 p.m., Wednesday, March 3, 2010. Elections will follow if necessary. Waterloo Wolf Pack – Waterloo boys under 13A rep soccer team will be conducting bottle drives/pickups to raise funds for registration and tournament fees. To donate call 519-578-9394 or 519-746-4568 or nevrdy@sympatico. ca or hadley7073@hotmail.com. Story writers wanted for free paranormal magazine. Short stories, articles accepted. Free for free exposure. Submit your scariest stories true or fictional. Distributed locally to ghost tours and online. www.kwparamag.com.

Appointed the Dean of the Faculty of Mathematics, Professor Ian Goulden commencing July 1, 2010. Professor Goulden will succeed Tom Coleman, who completes his term on June 30, 2010.

The University of Waterloo’s official student newspaper

Saturday, February 20, 2010 UpTown Waterloo Ice Dogs Festival from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Waterloo Public Square, UpTown Waterloo. For more info 519-885-1921. Sunday, February 21, 2010 Contemporary Canadian Large-format Photography – a lecture by Stefan Rose, at Kitchener City Hall, Conestoga Room, ground floor at 2 p.m. For more info grandconversations@live.ca. Wednesday, February 24, 2010 Learning Disabilities Association of K-W is hosting a workshop on “The Good, The Bad and The Ugly about ADHD” from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. For cost, location and reservation call 519-7439091. CIHR Cafe Scientifique presents “Teen Grief: Everything You Never Wanted to Know” at Victoria Park Pavillion, 80 Schneider Avenue, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Refreshments provided. For info pfreymond@ wlu.ca. Thursday, February 25, 2010 “Walkability in Waterloo Region: The Next Steps” presented by the Pedestrian Charter Steering Committee at Schneider Room, Kitchener Public Library, Main Branch downtown Kitchener at 7 p.m. RSVP to pedestriancharter@together4health.ca. Monday, March 1, 2010 Need help with your tax return? K-W Access-Ability is hosting free income tax clinics for persons with low incomes beginning March 1 on Monday and Tuesday evenings at 105 University Ave., E., Suite 2, Waterloo. To book an appointment 519-885-6640 Monday or Wednesday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday, March 4, 2010 2010 Global /Skills Conference: Insight into Opportunity – Bingeman’s Conference Centre, 424 Bingeman’s Centre Drive, Kitchener. A one-day, free conference, with limited space, first come, first served. For info/register online at www. globalskillsconference.com. Thursday, March 11, 2010 “Critical Thinking on 9/11 and the War on Terror” with speaker Michael Keefer from 7 to 9 p.m. at Arts Lecture Hall,

room 113. uwaterloo911.wordpress.com. Friday, March 26, 2010 Annual commemoration of the U.N. International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination starting at 8:15 a.m., Kitcheneer City Hall Rotunda. For more info crosscultures@bellnet.ca. Friday, April 23, 2010 CFUW book sale today and Saturday, April 24 at First United Church, King and William Streets, Waterloo. Donations can be dropped off April 21 and 22 at back door of church. For more info 519-740-5249. No textbooks, please.

VOLUNTEER AT

UPCOMING

Imprint, Friday, February 19, 2010 ads@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Up to 15 hours/week at $11/hour. Candidates will have Webmail server administration experience, be familiar with medium scale Linux network administration, SAMBA file management, Windows XP workstations, LDAP authentication and Apache admin. Duties include maintaining and strengthening our office’s network system. Applicants must be full-time students and eligible for OSAP. Please send resume to editor@imprint.uwaterloo.ca.


Sports & Living

Imprint, Friday, February 19, 2010 sports@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Warriors lose first game

THIS WEEK IN SPORTS

Vancouver Nights... It was an auspicious start to the winter Olympics for Canada with Jennifer Heil coming up just short of becoming the first Canadian to win gold at home. This prompted much discussion of there being too much pressure on Canadian athletes to win, and the curiosity of if it would be a repeat of the ’88 games in Calgary. Thankfully this pointless chatter was put to bed soon after as Alexandre Bilodeau did us all a favour and captured gold in the men’s moguls. Bilodeau is now in Canadian lore and has really taken the pressure off of the rest of Team Canada. Expectations were unrealistically high in anticipation of our first gold at home and every time an athlete failed to win it was deemed a failure, regardless of whether they were favoured in the event or not. Newsflash: winning an Olympic event is ridiculously difficult. It must have been discouraging for the athletes who were achieving high above expectations in their respective events, only to hear about how the “drought continues.” A lot of fine performances were overlooked while Canadians searched for a hero. The irony is that the more people focused on winning our first gold, the less they were able to enjoy the actual events. That’s the reason winning a gold early was so critical to the success of the games. It wasn’t the question of would we win one — that was never in doubt — but rather how the the athletes and fans react to each performance. It wasn’t easy watching Jennifer Heil accept her silver medal, even though it was an outstanding performance by her. Thankfully that is behind us and Canada can move forward and celebrate any success, whether that means a personal best or a silver medal. First Down... Fantastic choice of theme music by the Canadian Olympic committee — it doesn’t matter if Canada just lost the finals or if they’re interviewing our medalists, once that theme music starts playing you can’t help but feel overwhelmingly patriotic. It’s the perfect combination of the Olympic spirit and Canadian personality. It is painful to watch the American coverage of the games. NBC has managed to find a way to edit the footage of the events so that it appears only American athletes are participating. It’s forgivable for them to be narrow-minded during the Summer Olympics when the Americans dominate, but now they’re focusing their efforts on athletes who aren’t even the best. It makes you really appreciate the Canadian coverage where you can see the top athletes perform, regardless of nationality. Speaking of media coverage: a giant hat tip to the Canadian television stations (CTV, TSN, Sportsnet) for working together to ensure that they give Canadians the best possible coverage of the games. It’s not often that you hear broadcasters from one station let you know what is happening on a rival station but that’s the type of camaraderie that the Olympics has brought out. See RUNDOWN, page 24

courtesy uw athletics

Women’s hockey finishes their season

See PAGE 23

courtesy steve brooks

Goalie Keaton Hartigan (#30) pulled off a win against the Windsor Lancers last weekend, but was unable to help his team win against Windsor on Wednesday. It was not for a lack of effort, as Hartigan saved 19 of the 23 shots fired at his net.

Warriors win against Windsor in regular season but can’t hold them off in the first game of the playoffs Michelle Duklas asst. sports & living

T

his past weekend saw the Warrior men host the Windsor Lancers on Friday night and then travel to UOIT to play the Ridgebacks on Saturday, before starting their playoff series against the Lancers at home. Waterloo started out strong against the Lancers, scoring two in the first period. Kyle Schwende opened up the score, with assists from Jarrett Schnurr and Aaron Lewicki. Mike Veysey and Kyle Sonnenburg assisted their teammate Ben Pasha in scoring the second goal of the game. The score would remain 2–0 going into the first intermission, despite the four minute powerplay opportunity that Windsor had, after Shane Hart received a high sticking penalty. It seemed as though a win would be inevitable, as the Warriors went up 3–0 after a goal by Jarrett Schnurr; however, Windsor seemed to find their game late in the second as Lancer forward Kyle Nishizaki beat Keaton Hartigan to close the gap to two. The goal came just as the interference penalty to Kyle Sonnenburg expired.

Goals

1st

2nd 3rd

Ttl

Windsor

0

1

3

4

Waterloo

1

1

0

2

The third period was dominated by Windsor. Halfway through the period, Danny Anger snuck a goal by Hartigan, bring the Lancers within one. Despite the Warriors’ determination, Windsor was able to gather some momentum from their powerplay and score in the minutes following, in even strength. The third period ended in a gridlock 3–3 tie, sending the game into overtime. Waterloo finished off the game less than a minute into overtime, with their fourth goal coming from an unassisted Shane Hart. Warrior goaltender Keaton Hartigan saved 35 of 38 shots for the win. The Warriors had 34 shots on goal, in a game that they needed to win in order to stay on top of the OUA West division leaderboard. Coming off a close win, the Warriors played Saturday against the low ranked UOIT team. This game resembled the previous, with the Warriors going up 3–0 by the end of the first. Goals came from Jarrett Schnurr, Cory Fraser, and Kirt Hill, with Kyle Schwende, Chris Ray, Kyle Pellerin, Mike Veysey and Kyle Sonnenburg picking up assists. See HOCKEY, page 22

Games of the week:

rocky choi

Season comes down to final game: Battle of Waterloo

See PAGE 24

courtesy steve brooks

Men break even on the weekend

See PAGE 26

the best games in town

Saturday February 20 Men’s Basketball vs Laurier at 4:00 p.m. on the War Court (PAC)

Sunday February 21 Men’s Hockey vs Windsor at 2:00 p.m. at the Columbia Barn (CIF)

brent golem

Warriors to play McMaster in first round of playoffs

See PAGE 26


22

Sports & Living

Imprint, Friday, February 19, 2010

Team

GP

W

L

Western

28

21

7

0

Waterloo

28

20

7

1

Team

GP

W

L

PTS

Team

GP

W

L

PTS

Team

GP

W

L

PTS

42

Lakehead

20

16

4

32

McMaster

18

15

3

30

McMaster

19

16

3

32

41

Windsor

20

15

5

30

Queen’s

18

14

4

28

Western

18

14

4

28

Western

19

14

5

28

Windsor

18

12

6

24

Guelph

19

13

6

26

Guelph

19

11

8

22

Waterloo

19

13

6

26

Waterloo

20

11

9

22

Toronto

18

9

9

18

Brock

19

12

7

24

Laurier

19

9

10

18

Laurier

19

6

13

12

Windsor

19

1

18

2

OTL PTS

Lakehead

28

19

7

2

40

Laurier

28

17

7

4

38

Guelph

28

14

10

4

32

York

28

12

13

3

27

Windsor

28

10

13

5

25

Brock

28

11

28

9

15

2

17

2

Women’s Volleyball West Division

West Division

West Division

UOIT

Men’s Volleyball

Men’s Basketball

Men’s Hockey

McMaster

20

13

7

26

Western

20

11

9

22

Waterloo

20

9

11

18

Brock

20

8

12

16

24

Laurier

20

8

12

16

Ryerson

19

5

14

10

20

Guelph

20

5

15

10

York

19

3

16

6

RMC

20

0

20

0

Feb. 12: Windsor 4 at Waterloo 5 (OT) Feb. 13 : UOIT 6 at Waterloo 4 Playoffs: Game 2 - Feb. 19: Waterloo at Windsor

Feb. 10: Windsor 76 vs Waterloo 64 Feb. 13: Western 64 vs Waterloo 82 Feb. 17: McMaster vs Waterloo Feb. 20: Laurier at Waterloo

Feb. 12: Toronto 3 vs Waterloo 2 Feb. 13: Western 2 vs Waterloo 3

Women’s Basketball

Women’s Hockey West Division

Main Division Team

GP

W

L

OTL

PTS

Team

GP

W

L

PTS

Laurier

27

26

0

1

53

Windsor

21

20

1

40

Queen’s

27

19

5

3

41

York

27

17

9

1

35

Western

20

16

4

32

Guelph

27

14

10

3

31

McMaster

21

13

8

26

Toronto

27

14

11

2

30

Lakehead

20

12

8

24

Windsor

27

13

14

0

26

Brock

21

12

9

24

Brock

27

11

13

3

25

Western

27

10

12

5

25

Laurier

21

9

12

18

Waterloo

27

7

17

3

17

Waterloo

21

4

17

8

UOIT

27

4

18

5

13

Guelph

21

2

19

4

Feb. 13: UOIT 3 vs Waterloo 4 Feb. 14: Queen’s 4 vs Waterloo 1

Feb. 13: Western 76 vs Waterloo 66 Feb. 17: McMaster 68 vs Waterloo 37 Feb. 20: Laurier at Waterloo

Feb. 13: Western 3 vs. Waterloo 1 OUA Quarter-Finals: Feb. 20: McMaster vs Waterloo

Warriors defeated in same style as their loss to UOIT Continued from page 21

The Ridgebacks grew a backbone in the second, scoring two goals early on. The Warriors pulled their lead back up to two, after a mid-period goal by Thomas Cardiff. After that, it was UOIT’s time to shine. They scored four minutes later, to come within one. After a slashing penalty by Kyle Schwende, the Ridgebacks tied the game on the powerplay. That was the way it would remain as the teams went into the second intermission. In the third, both teams fought hard. But with five minutes to go, disaster struck for the Warriors. They were unable to kill off the penalty taken by Aaron Lewicki for hooking. Ridgeback Josh Vatri managed to capitalize on the powerplay, and give UOIT the lead. With about a minute to go in the final period, Hartigan was pulled, and an extra attacker added to the play. Unfortunately, the Warriors were unable to score, and UOIT took the puck away from them, potting the empty-netter, for a final score of 6–4. This is the first loss since that to Windsor on January 9. With their eight game winning streak coming to an end, the Warriors looked to take on the Windsor Lancers in the quarterfinals of the OUA West division. The first game of the playoff series took place on Wednesday February 17 at 7:30 pm at the CIF. Both teams were pumped and ready to snap up the win. The Warriors came out strong

in the first period, with Warrior superstar Chris Ray getting one past Lancer goalie Jim Watt. The game would stay in Waterloo’s favour heading into the second period. The Lancers tied it up halfway through the second on the powerplay, after Mike Veysey took a penalty for goalie interference. However, Waterloo quickly pulled into the lead again, when Kyle Sonnenburg scored only three minutes later. For the second time, the teams headed to intermission with Waterloo up by a goal. Waterloo’s lead was destroyed only a minute into the third period, after Lancer Brent Oliphant got the puck past Hartigan. With the game tied, now was not the time to take penalties. But unfortunately, Kirt Hill got called for hooking, and the Lancers went to the powerplay looking for the lead. The lead was exactly what they got as Kyle Tront scored to make it 3–2 with eight minutes to go. The Warriors tried desperately to even the score, but were unable to. With a minute to go in the final period, they pulled Hartigan, and put an extra attacker on the ice. Not only were they unable to score, Windsor superstar Mike Thornburn stole the puck away and earned himself an empty-netter. The final score of the game was 4–2. On Friday night, the Warriors will travel to Windsor for game two, and if need be, a third game will take place at Waterloo on February 21 at 2:00 pm. mduklas@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

athletes of the week

presents...

THIS WEEK IN

ATHLETICS & RECREATION

KATIE PRINGLE Curling 2nd year, Psychology Orillia, ON

JESSE TIPPING Basketball

vs WLU Golden Hawks

vs Windsor Lancers

(W) 2:00 pm, (M) 4:00 pm UW PAC Gym

2:00 pm, UW CIF Arena

SGO.CA OR

OWARR I

Sunday, February 21, 2010*

I AM A warrior

EO C

Saturday, February 20, 2010

VID

[M] Hockey

EG

LI S T CA

GOWAR

RSGO. RIO

IMPRINT | Feb 12

Basketball

L AST I V

LI V EN E

5th year, Honours Arts Orangeville, ON

OUA WEST 1/4 Finals Game 3

*If Necessary. Check www.gowarriorsgo.ca for more info.

Registered trademarks of Boston Pizza Royalties Limited Partnership, used under license. © Boston Pizza International Inc. 2005


Sports & Living

Imprint, Friday, February 19, 2010

Seniors closing out season strong

Warriors close out season with home split Randy Luciano reporter

T

rocky choi

Pointguard Reanne Holden (#5) posted a double-double by scoring 15 points and grabbing 10 rebounds against Western.

Warriors 66, Mustangs 76 Brent Golem sports & living editor

T

he womens basketball team took to the court last Saturday at home, searching for just their fifth win of the season. They were matched up against the Western Mustangs, who are one of the team’s leading the OUA’s Western division. Although the Warriors are only one spot out of a playoff spot, with only three games left in the season, Waterloo’s playoffs hopes had been dashed long ago. The Warriors could only play for glory and, with quite a few seniors playing in their final games of their basketball careers, giving it their all for as long as possible. The Warriors were looking to avenge a loss against Western that occurred just two and a half weeks ago. They lost by 16 points when the teams met in London and Waterloo was hoping to reverse that trend with a home court advantage. The Warriors started off well as they worked up a four point lead after the first quarter. Waterloo was firing on all cylinders as they tallied 22 points in the first frame while Western put down 18 points. The Warrior offence cooled dramatically in the second quarter, and they were only able to put in half as many points. The poor offensive outing allowed Western to climb back into the game and take the lead. Going into half-time the Warriors were still in the game, only down by two points. The third quarter was a little stronger offensively for Waterloo, but they weren’t able to stop a consistent Mustang offense. The Warriors kept slipping further behind and that persisted into the fourth quarter as Western played strong down the stretch to close out the game. Western outscored Waterloo by four in the fourth as their offense was on fire. Their offence was the reason that the Mustangs earned the win with a 10 point lead. Western had a terrific game, shooting 42 per cent from the floor and an incredible 46 per cent from the 3-point arc. Waterloo also had a terrific game but they couldn’t quite match the skill level of the Mustangs. The Warriors shot 44 per cent from within the arc and only 13 per cent from beyond it. Waterloo played well and it showed, as they fought for rebounds and managed to outrebound Western 34–33. Point guard Reanne Holden has really found her game lately, as she earned a double-double by hitting 15 points and grabbing 10 rebounds. Center Laura Becotte was also a force on the court, leading the team with 18 points and grabbing eight boards. Shooting guard Stephanie Shea added 13 points, and was the only Waterloo shooter to hit her 3-point shots.

Warriors 37, Marauders 68 Waterloo tried to rebound from their tough loss against Western as they headed to Hamilton on Wednesday February 17 to face McMaster. The Marauders were another team on top of the West division, but the Warriors had been able to pull out a win against them just two and a half weeks prior when McMaster faced them in Waterloo. Having played at a high calibre just a few days before, things were looking good for Waterloo. Unfortunately, th e game started and things did not start well and never improved. The Warriors were only down by three after the first quarter, but the score was a dismal 10–7. The rest of the game wasn’t any better as the second quarter was the only time the Warriors scored over 10 points. Waterloo shot a dismal 33 per cent from the floor, and missed all 12 shots from beyond the 3-point line. Erin Button was the only Warrior to score in the double digits as she had 10 points. Even though playoffs are out the question, the seniors will be able to close out their careers with an exciting Battle of Waterloo when they host their rival Laurier Golden Hawks Saturday February 20 at 2:00 p.m.. sports@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

23

he Waterloo Warriors women’s hockey team closed out their season this past weekend with afternoon home games against the University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT) Ridgebacks and the Queen’s Golden Gaels. The women snapped a season-high ten game losing streak on Saturday by defeating UOIT 4–3 but fell 4–1 to Queen’s in Sunday’s season finale. Despite both teams occupying the bottom two spots in the OUA standings and forced to play for pride, Saturday’s game against the Ridgebacks featured an intensity normally reserved only for playoff contests as both teams came out flying in a fast-paced, evenly matched and sometimes chippy affair. Waterloo got on the board first as second-year right-winger Liana Tennant scored her fourth goal of the season at 5:53 of the opening period on a wrist shot from just inside the slot. Two graduating Warriors combined to increase the home team’s lead to 2–0 as Melissa Quinn assisted on captain RandiLynn Wilson’s power play goal at the 11:14 mark. With the Ridgebacks enjoying a power play of their own, defenseman Jordan Whately fired a slap shot home for her first career OUA goal to bring UOIT to within one. Third-year Warrior Mandy Harrop restored Waterloo’s two-goal lead with her sixth of the season as she buried home a loose puck with just under two minutes remaining in the first period. Despite carrying the play for most of the period, Waterloo was outshot 12–9. The second period was a battle of goaltenders, as Waterloo’s Erica Bridgewater stopped 15 of 16 shots and counterpart Jessica Larabie turned aside all 10 shots fired her

way. Following a strong penalty kill, UOIT scored early on a power play of their own as Sarah Matthews scored just seconds after a hooking penalty was assessed to Wilson. Waterloo ran into penalty trouble midway through the period but managed to kill off a long 5-on-3 to keep the score at 3–2 heading into the third. Caitlin Brydges, a third-year right-winger, scored what turned out to be the game-winner 4:47 into the third period as she rocketed a slap shot just under the crossbar. As the game neared a close, both sides started getting physical as emotions began to boil over. At one point late in the third period there were a total of seven players in the penalty box, creating confusion that left the referee and timekeepers struggling to sort through all the different penalties. The Ridgebacks pulled their goalie with just over two minutes remaining to give themselves a 6-on-4 power play and they connected as Rikki Palmateer scored with 1:29 remaining to give UOIT new life. Clinging to a 4–3 lead, the Warriors gutted out a frantic final 89 seconds and hung on for their first win since January 5 in Toronto. Waterloo was outshot 11–9 in the third period and 39–28 overall. Bridgewater finished her season with a 2–8 record while UOIT’s Larabie fell to a miserable 1–12 on the season. The Ridgebacks placed last in the ten-team OUA with a 4-18-5 record, punctuated by a sixteen consecutive losses to end the season. On Sunday, the Warriors played their final game of the 2009-2010 season against second-place Queen’s, a team already assured of a first-round playoff bye. Prior to the game, three graduating Warriors were honoured by their coaches in an on-ice ceremony for the leadership, commitment and hard work they exhibited over their UW

careers. Defenseman Laura Higgins will graduate with a degree in Chemical Engineering, while forwards Quinn and Wilson are set to receive degrees in Arts and Therapeutic Recreation, respectively. Queen’s scored the game’s first goal just 2:12 into the opening period as Becky Conroy got her 17th of the season. Brittany McHaffie increased the visiting team’s lead to 2–0 late in the first period as the Gaels doubled the Warriors in shots 10–5. Brittany’s twin sister Morgan McHaffie put Queen’s up 3–0 with an early second period power play goal as the Gaels started to pull away. Midway through the second period rookie defenseman Amanda Schwindt of the Warriors had an early end to her season as she was given a 5-minute major and a game misconduct for slashing. Schwindt’s teammates did manage to kill off the long power play but Queen’s would stretch their lead to 4–0 with a late goal by Kristin Smith. Shots were 13–6 in favour of the Gaels. With one period left to play in their season, the Warriors came out flying in the third period. Waterloo controlled the play for much of the period, desperately trying to ensure they did not get shut out on home ice in their final game of the season. Their tenacity was rewarded as first-line right-winger Emma McMillan scored her third goal of the season, tipping home a loose puck at the side of the net on a delayed penalty. Waterloo outshot Queen’s 12–5 in the final period but were edged 28–23 in total. Waterloo netminder Kahla Stern dropped her record to 5-9-3 and Queen’s Karissa Savage remained unbeaten on the season with a 6-01 record. The Gaels finished with a strong record of 19-5-3 on the season while the Warriors finished with a disappointing 7-17-3 record and ninth in the ten-team league.

CFL double-dealing by allowing double-owner?

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here are certain things in life that just shouldn’t happen. For example: you shouldn’t use your buddy’s deodorant stick or get really drunk the first time you meet your new girlfriend’s parents. One might say that in a professional sports league, the most important quality is competitive fairness. For your league to be taken seriously, fans must be able to look at the structuring of the league, the league’s rules and the way the league does business and think it’s legitimate, that there are no shady areas., no rulebending, no favoritism. Look at how quickly the NBA acted when the Donaghy-cheating allegations came out, or even the recent backlash from the MLB steroids scandal. It’s like when a girl is looking for a boyfriend, she wants a man who doesn’t cheat, who’s real, not a shady character who’s morals seem a bit loose. So what was the CFL thinking when they let David Braley, owner of the B.C Lions, go out and buy the Toronto Argonauts too? This was a perfect blend of a ‘no-no’ scenario in sports, a way of creating disquiet about the competitive balance in a league that certainly doesn’t need bad publicity (who does really?).

jtoporowski@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Don’t think it’s a big deal? Consider a couple of these scenarios. The Lop-sided Trade: Let’s say, for instance, that the B.C Lions are gearing up for an extended run in the playoffs whereby ownership thinks they have a pretty decent shot at winning it all. Meanwhile, the Argos aren’t having a great season, injuries have plagued their team and they are out of the playoff race. Then, the Lions’ top cornerback goes down with a tragic injury and suddenly the Lion’s championship hopes are looking not so hot. Braley, owning both teams, takes a look at the Argos cornerback and decides the two teams should make a deal so the Lions can continue on their championship quest. Even if this deal seems fair, the scrutiny will be intense and other teams will cry foul play. The Purposeful Loss: The Lions are headed to the playoffs for sure and one of their last games comes against an Argo’s squad that is battling for a final playoff spot. Ownership, seeing that the Lions have little to lose and the Argos, everything to gain, decides that the Lions should “rest” their key starters and the Argos go onto thrash B.C, making the playoffs by just one crucial game.

The Owner’s Seat: Think of just the simple dilemma of whereabouts does David Braley sit when the Argos come into B.C to play the Lions, or vise versa. Does he sit in the owner’s box? Or the visitor’s box? If he wants to come down to the field level, whose side does he visit? Does he favor one team’s victory over the other? After all, humans aren’t impartial, no matter what they claim. It just confuses me why the CFL would let this sort of obvious conflict of interest happen—it makes absolutely no sense to me. This is a league that, while nowhere near the size or breadth of the NFL, is an entertaining league with a reasonably solid fan base, not exactly a league in trouble. Why would it take such a risk by allowing the doubts of unfair competition to creep in? Previous owners David Cynamon and Howard Sokolowski are on record saying they didn’t want to sell the team. They presented a three-year proposal to the league for how they would effectively run the Argos going forward, but it appears it wasn’t enough. And it’s not like these guys were huge slackers, after all, they won a Grey Cup in their first year as owners. Is comparing the CFL’s decision to Britney Spears’ decision to shave her head too harsh? I’m not so sure.


24

Sports & Living

Imprint, Friday, February 19, 2010

Warriors hang on to final playoff spot with win over western This season boils down to Battle of Waterloo against rival Laurier Golden Hawks for fifth place in West Warriors 82, Mustangs 64 Brent Golem sports & living editor

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he Waterloo Warriors met the Western Mustangs for a Saturday matinee game at 2 p.m., February 13. Waterloo had narrowly lost to the middle of the pack Mustangs during a game in London almost two weeks prior. The Warriors lost by only seven in a back and forth match-up that could’ve went either way. The Warriors, who have posted strong results at home, were hoping that the bounces would come their way so that they could strengthen their position heading into the post-season. Waterloo came to play and found their offense exploding as they led for almost the entire game on their way to defeating the Mustangs 82–64. The Warriors built leads in every quarter on their way to a rout. During the first quarter, the teams were well-matched and neither team could find an edge. Both sides made baskets and Western found themselves ahead for their first lead of game, with the score at 15–14. Soon after Waterloo put together a 13–0 run with contributions from many different Warriors. This run built up the 10 point lead that they carried into the second quarter. The next quarter was a much calmer game, with neither team shooting very well. It was a quarter of runs as Western hit the first four points of the quarter, with Waterloo answering back with 10 points, and Western then scoring seven unanswered baskets heading into the half. Waterloo found themselves with a strong lead at halftime with a score of 37–28. The Warriors found their stroke once again in the third quarter. They put down a solid 26 points, which

Western was unable to match. With a strong 16 point lead heading into the final frame, Waterloo never took their foot off the gas. The Warriors remained in complete control of the game during the fourth quarter. They managed to build up their lead to as much as 23 points, but ended up winning the game by only 18 points. Waterloo had a very strong offensive game, the kind of game Warriorfaithful had known the Warriors are capable of. They shot an incredible 49 per cent from the 2-point zone and an amazing 52 per cent from 3-point land. Waterloo was strong under the baskets as they outrebounded Western 39–23. Guard Jesse Tipping was an offensive force as he hit shots all over the court. He lead the game with 20 points and added five rebounds. Shooting guard Cam McIntyre was unstoppable as he hit nine of his 13 shots for 16 points. Small forward Ben Frisbey also had a solid game with 10 points and eight rebounds. Center Matt Hayes was the only other Warrior to score in the double-digits with 10 points. Waterloo was in good position to reach the playoffs again as Laurier lost and was now one game behind the Warriors. With two games remaining in the season, the Warriors would need to win both to earn themselves the all-important home court advantage. On Wednesday February 17, the Warriors travelled down to Hamilton to Warriors 54, Marauders 69 face the McMaster Marauders. In their only previous meeting of this season, the Marauders had dominated Waterloo, holding them to just 57 points with a 30 point lead. The Warriors were looking to avoid such a brutal result. The first quarter started out well for Waterloo, as they continued their

rocky choi

Guard Jesse Tipping (#24/6) had a terrific game and was a key component to the Warrior offensive explosion. Tipping scored a game-high 20 points almost 50 per cent during the game. scoring ways, as they dropped 16 points in the opening frame, while McMaster only scored 15. The second quarter was also strong for the Warriors as they maintained their scoring touch, and held McMaster to only 9 points. Waterloo was able to had a seven point lead going into the half. In the third quarter, the wheels fell off for the Warriors. Although they were able to build their lead up to a comfortable 10 points, the Warriors offense sputtered and McMaster came together as they took a four point lead heading into the final quarter. Waterloo wasn’t able to find their game and the punishment continued as McMaster scored 23 points with Waterloo scoring only 13, winning the game by a solid 15 points. Waterloo was lead by shooting guard Cam McIntyre who tallied 13 points. Forward Tim Rossey was the only other Warrior to manage a double-digit game with 11 rebounds. Waterloo now faces Laurier in their final game of the regular season. The Battle of Waterloo will be fighting for fifth place in the West, with the winner facing Western instead of McMaster. sports@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Laurier (9–12) Away (2–7) Last Six (2–4)

PPG: 71.7 (31st) RPG: 37.9 (14th) TO: 13.7 (37th)

Waterloo (9–12)

A

Home (7–2) Last Six (1–5)

Leading Scorer: Jesse MacDonald - 15.7 PPG Leading Defender: Max Allin - 8.0 RPG

T

PPG: 70.2 (34th) RPG: 37.1 (17th) TO: 14.5 (32th) Leading Scorer: Cam McIntyre - 15.8 PPG Leading Defender: Ben Frisbey - 6.6 RPG

The Rundown: Olympic competition scarce Continued from page 21

It’s also nice to see that each station is (usually) covering a different event than the others. It shows that it’s not a battle for ratings but it’s about what’s best for the fans, which is what the games are all about. Regardless of whether their athletes are competing or not, it would be nice to see all professional sports leagues take these two weeks off from competition (looking at you, NBA). It would show a great amount of respect to these athletes who, aside from the NHL players, aren’t making millions of dollars a year but still put in as many, or more, hours into their respective sports. Besides, has anyone been paying attention to anything but the Olympics for the past week? Seventh Inning Stretch... Surprisingly quiet exit for “The Big Hurt,” otherwise known as Frank

Thomas who retired this past week after 19 big league seasons, most recently with the Oakland Athletics and Toronto Blue Jays in 2008. The minimal press is probably due to the fact that he didn’t play in 2009 and he has zero rings on his resume. That doesn’t change the fact that he is one of the top players of the past 20 years and was one of the first players to actively advocate for drug testing. In addition he was the only player to assist George Mitchell in the now infamous Mitchell Report. Back to the Olympics: a sarcastic tip of the hat to the Canadian Olympic networks who feel the need to fill downtime with non-stop talk about the men’s hockey team. While it’s true that a lot of people are interested in the team, there is such a thing as too much coverage. As intriguing as the updates on Ryan Getzlaf are, it wouldn’t kill them to fill the time with actual events.

Jamie Campbell has found his calling as an Olympic broadcaster. Not only has he called four of Canada’s five medals to date, but his commentary is enjoyable to listen to as well. The former Blue Jays play-by-play man appears to have made the transition from the ballpark to the slopes seamlessly, and here’s to hoping that he’ll find work that comes up more often than once every four years. Overtime... Where has the talent gone in figure skating? The performances over the past week have been sloppy and amateurish. Some of the mistakes can be chalked up to nerves, but the overall quality has gone down by a considerable margin. You don’t have to be a critic to realize the difference that has occurred since Turin. Words being tossed about to describe the skating have ranged from “painful” to “embarrassing”.

How about we let Canada and the U.S. play for gold in women’s hockey and the rest can have a tournament for bronze? Instead of a minimum number of teams, there should be a minimum skill level to enter. If you end up with a three or four team tournament then maybe it shouldn’t be an Olympic sport. At least wait until the other countries have somewhat caught up in terms of talent. The Olympics aren’t about steamrolling developing hockey countries. This has to be as deep of a curling draw as there has ever been in any international event on both the women’s and men’s sides. While Kevin Martin’s rink has to be favoured for at least a bronze medal, it’s not a given that Sheryl Bernard and her rink will find the podium. The stacked women’s field includes Anette Norberg of Sweden who has historically given Canadian teams problems. The one

factor that will work in both Canadian teams favour is that they’re playing on home ice, which tends to be much higher quality ice than in European countries. However, don’t hold your breath for a double gold for Canada in curling. Shout Out of the Week: It’s hard not to shout out to an Olympian this week, so I’ll give in and send some accolades to Maëlle Ricker, the second Canadian to win gold on home soil. The women’s snowboard cross champion had the unfortunate luck of her event coming after the men’s moguls and because of that her gold will not go down in history. Nobody remembers who came second and even though she came first in her event, she came second where it counts, and for that reason she gets a well-deserved shout out. jsmith@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


Sports & Living

Imprint, Friday, February 19, 2010

25

Men’s hockey OUA championship Best-of-three series

Western 1

1

UQTR

UOIT

8

8 Concordia

Laurier

4

4 Carleton

Guelph

5

Queen’s Cup

Lakehead 3 York

5 Queen’s 3 Toronto

6

6 Ryerson

Waterloo 2

2

Windsor 7

7 Nipissing

McGill

armel chesnais

West Division As usual, the top four seeds are Western, Waterloo, Lakehead, and Laurier. Luckily the divisions have rearranged this year so that the best four teams no longer face each other in the first round. It would be against all odds if the top four seeds don’t meet up in the next round. 1. Western vs. 8. UOIT While this may appear as a mismatch on paper, the Mustangs have struggled in their last 10 games with a 5-5-0 record, including a 6–4 home loss to the Ridgebacks. Western recently defeated UOIT 3–2 on Feb. 12, but required a shootout. UOIT is asurprising darkhorse as the eighthseed. UOIT snapped Western’s 15 game winning streak in January, and has knocked off two top 10 teams, recently, Waterloo and Lakehead. 3. Lakehead vs. 6. York Nationally-ranked #7 Lakehead Thunderwolves will face the York Lions, who did not fare well against the Wolves when the met at the start of the season. York was dominated 4–1 and then 9–2 when they went to Thunder Bay to kick off the season. These might be two totally different teams that meet, but Lakehead has been playing well as of late and is on a three game winning streak. York, on the other hand, has struggled as of late. They only have one win in their last seven games. 4. Laurier vs. 5. Guelph Laurier and Guelph have been a solid rivalry this season. All of their games against each other were close. Neither team has a real edge: Laurier has home ice advantage but haven’t been playing great lately, while Guelph is on a five game winning streak. Should be a tough series.

East Division

Windsor leads series (1-0) #7 Waterloo (20-9)

Windsor (11-18)

GPG: 3.53 (17th) GAA: 2.86 (8th) Shots: 31.3 (16th)

GPG: 3.14 (23rd) GAA: 3.59 (18th) Shots: 35.4 (4th)

PP%: 10.6% (26th) PIM: 590 (12th) SV%: 90.6% (5th)

PP%: 13.5% (16th) PIM: 397 (30th) SV%: 89.9% (13th)

Home (12-3) Away (8-6)

Leading scorers: Chris Ray - 42 points Shane Hart - 31 points Mark Hartman - 25 points Steve Whitely - 24 points

Home (6-8) Away (5-10)

VS

Leading scorers: Mark Thorburn - 22 points Kyle Nishizaki - 20 points

Game 1 - Wed. Feb. 17: Windsor 4 at Waterloo 2 Game 2 - Fri. Feb. 19: Waterloo at Windsor Game 3 - Sun. Feb. 21: Windsor at Waterloo (if necessary)

Series Outlook:

Q

uarter-finals against Windsor will prove to be an interesting battle. On paper, Waterloo looks to be the superior team. In the regular season, Waterloo won three of the four games they played against Windsor. As well, Windsor’s top scorer, Mark Thornburn, is ranked 64th in the OUA standings. Waterloo has four players that rank higher than Thornburn: Chris Ray, Shane Hart, Mark Hartman, and Steve Whitely. Chris Ray, in particular, is the superstar of the Warrior team. He finished ninth in the OUA rankings for points, with 18 goals, 23 assists and 41 points. He is also a clean player, only recording 18 penalty minutes in the season. But, just because the Warriors posted a better record doesn’t mean that they will win against Windsor in the playoffs.

Jim Watt is the superstar on the Windsor Lancers. He was an OUA First Team All-Star last year, and this year ranked 16th on the OUA list of top goalies. He has let in an average 3.66 goals per game, and posted a 0.897 per cent save percentage. He has helped his team win 10 games, and has lost 15, along with two shootout losses. In contrast, Waterloo netminder Keaton Hartigan is ranked seventh in the OUA. He has a 2.84 average goals let in per game, and a 0.907 per cent save percentage. He has 18 wins under his belt this season, and only six losses, as well as one shootout loss. He is a solid player in net, and will hold his team up if needed. But considering the fact that the Warriors have won ten of their last twelve games, he will simply need to keep doing what he is doing.

1. UQTR vs. 8. Concordia This series, although an exciting Battle of Quebec, should have a pretty clear outcome. With a goalie leading the OUA with the best goals against average, the Stingers will have trouble creating enough offense to create an upset. 2. McGill vs. 7. Nipissing McGill will be facing a team in its inaugural season, but that doesn’t mean it will be a cakewalk. This series will see a battle between two leading OUA scorers in McGill’s Francis Verreault-Paul, who lead the league with 25 goals. and Nipissing’s Andrew Marcoux, who only scored two less. 3. Toronto vs. 6. Ryerson Toronto and Ryerson will be a Battle of Toronto, how tough it will be is yet to be seen. Ryerson lost three of their four meetings, but two of them went to overtime. 4. Carleton vs. 5. Queen’s Queen’s and Carleton will be an interesting battle. Early in the season at home, Queen’s dominated Carleton 5–3, but then Carleton obliterated Queen’s 8–-0 in Ottawa. Home ice could be a big advantage.

CIS Top Ten 1. UNB

6. McGill

2. Alberta

7. Waterloo

3. UQTR

8. Lakehead

4. Acadia

9. Manitoba

5. Western

10. St. Mary’s


26

Sports & Living

Imprint, Friday, February 19, 2010

Wo m e n ’s v o l l e y b a l l loses home court advantage

Warriors have huge comeback win against Western

Waterloo 2, Western 3 creating a whole new set of diffi-

Warriors 2, Blues 3

Ron Kielstra reporter

Going into the final weekend of OUA women’s volleyball action, the Waterloo Warriors had clinched a playoff spot but were tied with the Western Mustangs for second in the OUA West Division. As recently as two weeks earlier the Warriors had been in contention for the top spot in their division, but after losing three of their last five matches, the Warriors needed to beat the Mustangs in their last game of the season to secure a home playoff match. Failing that, the OUA rulebook would be required to sort out who Waterloo’s first round playoff opponent would be. The head-to-head record between teams is used first to break any ties in the OUA, but if the teams split their season series, the OUA General Tie-Breaking Procedures then rely on the point difference in head-to-head competition. This meant that the Brock Badgers held the tie-break against Guelph going into the weekend, and the Gryphons needed to win against York on Friday night to secure a playoff spot. With the pressure on, the Gryphons roared out of the gate and never looked back, winning their match against York in four sets. The win moved Guelph into a tie with Waterloo and Western,

culties. Unfortunately for both the Mustangs and the Warriors, while they had both split their season series with Guelph, the Gryphons had the advantage over both teams in point difference, meaning Guelph had guaranteed themselves the third seed in the OUA West. The loser of Saturday’s game between the Warriors and Mustangs would finish fourth and have to travel to Hamilton to face the nationally-ranked McMaster Marauders in their first playoff game. With a couple of players on the Waterloo roster playing in what might be their final home game of their university careers, the Warriors kept the game close during the first two sets, dropping the first game by a score of 25–21 and winning the second game 25–22. Waterloo’s wheels seemed to come off after that, however, as a Western attack led by Sarah Lowry, Elaine Screaton and Caleigh Whitaker — each with least 10 pts – proved to be too much for the Warriors to handle. Three-time OUA all-star Bojana Josipovic played well in her final home game, leading the team with 12 kills and adding 11 digs. Laura Klein helped the team with 13 points, while Katie Spack continued her strong defensive play, contributing 31 digs to the effort. The Warriors will open the playoffs on Saturday against McMaster in Hamilton.

brent golem

Bojana Josipovic (#13) was impressive during her final game at home. The senior lead the team with 12 kills and 11 digs.

Joel Smith staff reporter

F

riday night in Waterloo featured a match-up between two teams both fighting for the sixth and seventh playoff spots in the highly competitive OUA. The Toronto Varsity Blues came into the game sporting a respectable 8–8 record and needing a win to stay ahead of Laurier in the standings. The Blues had won three of their last four matches and were looking to avenge their November 1st loss at the hands of the Warriors. With a win the Warriors could officially lock up a playoff berth. The match was a back and forth affair with Waterloo taking the first set 25–23 in what was a very entertaining opening set. Each team was desperate to take the early lead knowing that their last match went to five sets and this was likely going to be the case again. Momentum shifted in the second when Toronto overcame several deficits to pull out a 25–23 win. Had Waterloo been able to capitalize on a few mistakes late in the set the match likely would have been over, but Toronto hung tough and evened the match. The third set was all Toronto as they found their rhythm early and often. Attacking from all areas of the court and relentlessly pounding the Warriors. Waterloo struggled to find their bearings and seemed confused throughout the set. Toronto rolled to a sizzling 25–12 third set win and embarrassed the home team. After getting dominated in the third set the Warriors found their second wind and began to play some inspired volleyball. Taking advantage of a lax Toronto team, who appeared to think the match was over, they pounded their way through the Toronto defense and coasted to a 25–17 win. The fifth set was over before it started. The Warriors played as if they were just happy to be in the match and didn’t do enough to play with Toronto. The aggressive play that enabled them to win the fourth set wasn’t present in the fifth and the Varsity Blues took home the fifth set 15–11 and captured the match.

Courtesy steve brooks

Middle blocker Aaron Dam (#7) was a huge factor in the Western comeback. He scored a team-high 19 points. The win sent the Blues to 9–8 on the season and the Warriors fell to 10–9 and failed to clinch a playoff with just one game remaining on the season.

Waterloo 3, Western 2 The last game of the regular season for the Warriors saw them playing host to the Western Mustangs who sit second in the OUA at 14–3. This was a must-win situation for the Warriors; a loss would put their playoff fate in the hands of Toronto and Laurier. The Mustangs had lost two of their last three games after opening the season 13–1. The last meeting between these two teams saw a clean 3–0 sweep by Western, although the sets were tightly contested. In the opening set Western jumped out of the gate, as they usually do, and posted an impressive 25–21 win. The Warriors played some marginal volleyball but the Mustangs looked like they were on a different level than Waterloo. The second set went much like the first, although the score appeared to be close, the outcome of the set was never in doubt. The Mustangs were too much for the Warriors and it looked as though Waterloo was going to go away quietly. However, the losing karma that has plagued Western over the past few weeks hit at exactly the right time for Waterloo. The third set saw some inspired play by the Warriors as they

began to click on all cylinders. Some uncharacteristic errors by Western at crucial junctures coupled with some clutch hitting from the Warrior offense saw Waterloo take their first set off of Western this season, by a score of 25–21. Western bounced right back in the fourth set and fought Waterloo for every point. This set saw some of the highest quality volleyball you’ll see in the OUA, with neither team giving in. It came right down to the wire but some veteran plays by Waterloo right near the end of the set saw the good guys take the set 26–24 in a nail-biter. Fifth sets are where legends are made and where ice water flows through the veins of champions. The Warriors lived up to their name on this night and played some inspired volleyball. The entire gym was breathless as the action increased in intensity as the teams battled past the finish line. Finally Waterloo finished off the Mustangs and took the match with a 19–17 fifth set victory. The win pushed Waterloo to a final regular season record of 11–9 and dropped Western to 14–4. This guarantees Waterloo at worst a seventh place finish which is good enough for the final playoff spot. As the playoff matchups stand at this moment, Waterloo would play Western in the first round of playoffs and if that scenario plays out this win would be a huge confidence boost for the Warriors going into that series. jsmith@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Asking about exercise and cancer Michelle Duklas asst. sports and living

This week’s Health Professional is Sandra Gibson. Sandra Gibson is the Health Educator at the University of Waterloo and has five teams of students that do Peer Health Education on various topics: Sexual Health, Alcohol & Drugs, Nutrition, Mental Wellness and Tobacco Awareness. In addition, Sandra has an integral role with the popular Orientation Week play “Single & Sexy”. How much exercise should a person be getting every day? Is walking around campus going to fulfill that requirement? Health Canada recommends we accumulate at least 60 minutes of

physical activity every day to stay healthy or improve health. And walking is one of the best exercises to do — but when you are walking for health and fitness, it has to be at a brisk pace. No lollygagging. Walking around campus is a great way to build up to the 60 minute a day recommendation. You can walk to school and around campus. You can also plan to walk Ring Road during a break. One lap around ring road is about 2.5 km and will take about 30 minutes. When you are ready to “step it up” a notch, take the stairs instead of the elevator. The Math building and the DP Library provide you a great opportunity to take the stairs and build exercise in to your day. Finally Campus Recreation has something for everyone: recreational sports, fitness classes, swimming,

racquet ball, rock climbing, karate, cycling…you name it. Now get up, get moving and get fit. Which types of cancers mainly affect young adults? (ie. 20-30 yrs)? Cervical cancer is the most common cancer in Canadian women aged 20 to 44. The Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is linked to genital warts and cervical cancer. A routine Pap test is an important screening tool that can detect abnormal cells in the cervix that could lead to cervical cancer. Once you become sexually active it is important to have a routine Pap test once a year. In addition, limit your number of sexual partners, always use a condom, and get the vaccine to protect against HPV and cervical cancer. Testicular cancer is the most common type of cancer in young

men. In the last three decades testicular cancer rates have increased by 60 per cent especially in young men aged 15-29. Testicular cancer can almost always be treated and cured if caught early. A simple, regular, testicular self-exam (TSE)

is the first line of defence and the best way to find out if your ‘boys’ are in good shape. The best time to do the TSE is during or right after a shower. This helps your scrotum to relax, making it easier to feel any lumps, growths or tenderness.


Comics & Distractions

Imprint, Friday, February 19, 2010

crossword

READING WEEK

1

By Michael L. Davenport

6

It’s reading week and Tim Hortons is closed. How are you staying awake?

2 3

5

27

4

By Bogdan Petrescu & Abisade Dare

7 8

9

10 11

12

13

14 15

16

17

Alex Hardie

18 19

Brent Harris

Kerry Smith

UW kinesiology grad

4th year classical studies

1st year Master’s planning

“Lots of YouTube videos and caffeine injections.”

“I don’t need Tim Hortons.”

“I’m not.”

20 21

22

23

24

25 26

Sam Eyles

Every single answer to this crossword is related in some way to reading week.

Across

1. watching this while at home (8) 3. campus felt this way (5) 7. food location open during the week (6) 8. your profs might do this when you return (5) 9. also a food location open during the week (9) 11. hope you got a lot of this (5) 12. probably no reading week on this UW campus (3) 13. can finally stay away from campus _____free (5) 16. what reading week is intended to be (8) 18. spring _____ (5) 20. Manatoba equivalent of 14 down (4) 21. unfortunately, it’s this outside (3) 23. think “reading week” for high school; a break (5) 25. the sound of lecture halls (5) 26. long lines for this yet again (9) Down

2. Have none of this (5) 4. Going places for reading week (6) 5. month of reading week (8) 6. Reading week puts the profs on _____ (5) 8. gone home for a ____ (4) 10. until recently, had “reading days” (11) 14. These stop in addition to lectures (4) 15. New holiday: _______ day. (6) 17. can get away with this behaviour (4)

Guest comic

3

Allan Babor

Brian Houser

3A independent studies Feds president

4th year kinesiology

3A mechatronics engineering

“I go to Tim Hortons at DC.”

“I don’t drink caffeine.”

8 6

3 9 2 8 6 4 2 5 3 2 4 3 5 2 3 9 1 1 7 9 7 2 19. describes Tim Hortons (6) 22. irresponsible drinking (4) 23. also had recently had “reading days” (4) 24. best place to spend reading week (4)

Katrina Massey

“I am running on adrenaline.”

Solutions: Solution 1

2

3

4

A S S

14

B E

17

18

A G E

6

21

T

30

31

25

26

27

E T C

32

R A N

C O N C

33

L E

50

R

41

L E D 45

I R E S

48

T A D

49

T O N R A S H

51

H A D

I

42

O P E R A T E

44 47

38

I

I S E

A D D O N

52

E A T

56

13

L A

D O G M A N

C D S

40

S K E

12

I B L Y

24

37

46

I

I N G C O U G H 29

E V E

43

E D

11

L U G E H E A D A C H E

36

39

10

19

I N O

K E N O 28

9

M A N

16

22

C U R L

35

8

I R A N

23

34

7

Z E R G

15

T

20

5

February 12, 2010

57

53

54

55

O V A L

58

59

60

H O C K E Y S N E E Z E

61

62

63

B R O A C H

66

B A N Z A

I

69

C H E E S E

3 8 7 2 5 1 9 6 4

5 6 9 8 4 3 7 2 1

2 4 1 7 9 6 8 5 3

7 9 2 1 6 5 4 3 8

64

65

67

68

R O P E I R

I S

70

M E N S

6 1 3 4 8 7 5 9 2

8 5 4 9 3 2 6 1 7

9 3 8 6 1 4 2 7 5

R U M B R O

71

S E N

1 2 6 5 7 8 3 4 9

4 7 5 3 2 9 1 8 6


28

Comics & Distractions

Imprint, Friday, February 19, 2010

(postscript@imprint.uwaterloo.ca)

JORDAN CAMPBELL (faculties@imprint.uwaterloo.ca)

MICHAEL TO (irresponsiblyoptomistic@imprint.uwaterloo.ca)

“J.T.” (geese@imprint.uwaterloo.ca)


Imprint_2010-02-19_v32_i27  

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