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Impr int The university of Waterloo’s official student newspaper

vol 30, no 4

Friday, June 15, 2007

imprint . uwaterloo . ca

Digging for local produce A paranoid’s approach to sustainable food on campus

What’s Inside News UW collaborates with the Waterloo Regional Children’s Museum to introduce a new media centre. ► page

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North X North East ► page 9

six degrees of

CONVOCATION ► page

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Arts Canadian Clay and Glass Gallery shines in exhibit opening.

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Opinion Ashley Csanady explores the ins and outs of porn. ► page

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Science Getting to the root of the genetically modified plants and the politics behind them. ► page

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Sports Squash lessons to fundraise for UWIDHA mission work in Bolivia. ► page

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Features Shayna Sparling shares shaving secrets. ► page

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Michael L. Davenport

Greek groups seek equal footing Michael L. Davenport imprint staff

This fight could become bigger and messier than the last. Just as the universal bus pass issue (which had years of contention behind it) has finally come to a close, another debate looms over the official status of fraternities and sororities on our campus. As it stands, fraternities and sororities (colloquially referred to as “Greek life”) exist in proximity — but not on — our campus because neither the University of Waterloo nor the Federation of Students recognize their existence. Feds only recognizes the Fraternity and Sorority Awareness Club (FSA). Engineering Councillor Jeffrey Aho (who is a member of Sigma Chi) is trying to change all that; at the next Student Council meeting he will introduce a motion to have Feds officially recognize the existence of Greek life on campus. In order for something substantial regarding fraternities and sororities to change, both Feds and UW admin would have to strike an agreement. While the attitude of Feds changes with each passing year’s election, UW has maintained a consistent anti-fraternity stance. If Feds were to pass this motion to recognize fraternities and sororities, they would have to make massive policy changes. Such changes would move at the speed of bureaucracy; Feds’ Bylaws, Policies and Procedures (BPP) committee would recommend specific changes in policy, which may or may not be approved by Student Council, and which may or may not be passed right back to the BPP committee to try again. The recent bus pass referendum was years in the making. Students last term just happened to see the fireworks. For now, all sides of the debate are arming themselves with rhetoric. See GREEKS, page 3


News

news@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Imprint, Friday, June 15, 2007

Greeks: Will Feds support recognition? continued from cover

In an interview with Imprint, Councillor Aho said, “The motion is [...] to gain equality with other groups on campus.” Unlike other groups on campus such as clubs or student societies which are officially recognized, fraternities and sororities cannot put up posters or book rooms. Catharine Scott, Associate Provost of HR and Student Services for UW, reiterated the university’s firm stance. “They’re antithetical to the concept of inclusivity and acceptance of all people, without that kind of barrier of people being able to select who gets in or out of a club on their campus.” In their interviews with Imprint, Aho and Scott didn’t agree on anything — including facts. Aho maintains Greek organizations are on the grow, stating “It’s a trend throughout North America that more and more universities are beginning to accept Greek organizations; it’s an increasing trend.” Contrary to this, Scott said, “Although they talk about Wilfrid Laurier and UBC, almost all other universities in Ontario do not in any way accept fraternities and sororities.” In his motion, Aho points out that there already exist groups on campus with selective membership, some of which operate with the blessing of the university and even get funding — namely, varsity athletics. Said Aho, “In terms of sports teams...not every individual is let in. They are organizations that are recognized by the university, supported, funded through the student services fee.” When asked whether this comparison is apt, Scott replied simply, “I don’t think [the comparison] is valid. I’m not even going to bother to discuss that.” Aho made another sort of comparison. “There are some clubs which are, in their sense, exclusive not by their policies, but by their actual actions. So, some of our clubs, such as the Chinese Christian Fellowship, do things entirely in Mandarin or Cantonese. It excludes individuals.” Feds Vice President Internal Darcy Higgins didn’t think the comparison was apt, saying “the language somebody speaks can be a barrier, but if an international student doesn’t quite know English,

they might also have a barrier to some clubs. But it’s different than restricting the group based on gender, or based on financial ability.” Higgins also raised the question of whether a transgendered individual would be able to join a fraternity or sorority. Even though Aho points out that fraternities are allowed to practise exclusive membership under section 18 of the Ontario Human Rights Code, Scott said, “The Ontario Human Rights Code may well allow fraternal organizations to discriminate against others ... that certainly doesn’t mean that we have to. And we’re certainly not going to.” Both Higgins and Aho agree that the recognition of Greek organizations by Feds alone would change little — the university controls most campus resources, including room booking — something the fraternities and sororities want. If the motion passes, Aho plans to use it as a springboard to lobby the university. He pointed out a similar example in the Positive Space Initiative, a policy which Feds has accepted and Higgins is lobbying the university to duplicate. But according to Scott, any such efforts on behalf of Greeks would be futile. “We have absolutely no interest; we will not recognize these groups no matter what the Feds choose to do, they will not use university facilities, and they may not use the University of Waterloo logo, or present themselves as a University of Waterloo fraternity or sorority.” Aho points out that Wilfrid Laurier University Students’ Union (WLUSU) officially recognizes the existence of fraternities and sororities. They even have a “dean of Greek life.” However this person is not appointed by the Laurier administration, but is rather chosen by the Greek Council (a group similar to, but not the same as, our FSA.) The office is currently vacant but the most recent Dean of Greek Life and Psi Upsilon member, Barry Gough, made a statement to Imprint. “Many fraternity men have become presidents and prime ministers. In the latter case are Lester Pearson (Delta Upsilon) and Paul Martin (Psi

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University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT) Greek organizations are not officially recognized. However, according to Student Association President Fraser McArthur, Greek groups hold one or two events on campus per year. There’s no official policy to handle this arrangement, but each event must receive the blessing of both UOIT and the Student Association to proceed. York University York Federation of Students President Hamid Osman told Imprint, “The university has a regulation not allowing Fraternities and Sororities on York Campus” They are not recognized by YFS and they are not allowed to book rooms or hold events.

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c to say, “The major problem of fraternities and sororities is their own failure to self-police. In instances I can name the local chapters fail to abide by the national and international standards as set by the parent organizations. There are cases in Waterloo in which this is the case. The dean of Greek life has no power over these matters and has no policing capabilities. His/her job is really advisory and to keep the various local chapters of fraternities and sororities talking to one another. All my attempts to get chapters to observe a ‘no booze’ policy for rush functions and other events came to naught. I could not get them to adopt a self-denying ordinance. To repeat, all that I was suggesting would be for them to observe the rules, charters and regulations of their parent organizations. There were one or two exceptions to this, in fact, and sororities in Waterloo are

Greek life at other universities University of Western Ontario (UWO) Fraternities and sororities are able to book space like other clubs. University Students’ Council Communications Officer, Amy Bi, added that they “do a lot of good work for charity and raise a lot of money.”

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Queen’s University There haven’t been any fraternities on the Queen’s campus since 1933, when a strong anti-fraternity sentiment expressed itself in the Alma Mater Society elections. That year fraternities were officially banned. There have never been any sororities on the Queens campus. University of Windsor University of Windsor Students’ Alliance does officially recognize fraternities and sororities, though they must find their own insurance. They may hold events and book rooms. As for whether the administration recognizes them, UWSA Vice-President University Affairs Zach Cranny said, “The administration knows they’re there, I don’t know if they officially recognize them though. But they definitely have a presence.” Brock University James O’Brian, president of Brock University Student Union isn’t aware of any Greek activity on campus.

of the parent codes. There is one chapter of a fraternity in Waterloo that has defied its parent rules and regulations — to its cost (in my opinion) — and it discredited the whole movement.” Fraternities and sororities are officially recognized by WLUSU. Said WLUSU President Dan Allison, “We have a Greek week where they do promotions on campus, advertise when their rush periods are. Of the past presidents of the student union, a number have been Greek based. A large number, actually.” However, according to David McMurray, WLU’s assistant vice-president student services and dean of students, “WLU has no formal recognition policy on fraternities and sororities. WLU does formally recognize the WLUSU which recognizes Greek Council as a campus club.” Aho is quick to point out that many on-campus volunteers are members of Greek organizations. “We have Greek organization members who are Dons, who are frosh leaders, student councillors, board members, senators, governors, executive on societies; they all contribute to different varieties of student life on campus.” He believes that the official presence of Greek life on campus will have philanthropic benefits and hopes the university will eventually see that. “There are other international organizations with local chapters. An example which comes to mind is EWB, which has their own local chapter of an international organization that the university recognizes. There’s other organizations, it’s not unprecedented.” Scott is hoping the motion is defeated. “Forty years ago, Federation of Students came out very clearly, if I understand it from past Federation presidents and past members of the Feds, and clearly

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Not everyone involved with Greek life is in support of Aho’s motion. The FSA itself is divided. Vice-President Publicity Levi R. McCulloch stated, “FSA as an organization has not yet come to a conclusion on whether or not it supports Councillor Aho’s motion to Feds council.” Another point was raised by an anonymous source close to the issue, “Despite the involvement of hundreds of student leaders on campus, Greek life at UW lacks the propriety of being ‘above-ground’ and that’s the immediate issue. It might take months or years, but what frats and sororities at UW need to focus their sole attention on right now is to be allowed to openly interact and contribute to UW’s community — even under the FSA banner. Once they convince the campus of their value and legitimacy, then the university can consider approving them.” The motion will be discussed and voted on at the next Student Council meeting. It will take place on Saturday, June 23 at 1:30 in the multipurpose room, SLC. As always, the meetings are open to the public. In the end, perhaps the difference in opinion boils down to perspective. Words like “fraternity” and “sorority” are like “Christian,” “feminist” or “conservative,” in that everyone, both within and without these groups of people, has a different idea of what they represent. To some, fraternities are a philanthropic organizations, while to others, they’re cliques. Local Greek organizations Sigma Chi and Kappa Kappa Gamma lead fundraising efforts after hurricane Katrina. At DePauw University in Indiana, the national office of Delta Zeta kicked 23 girls out of their Sorority for essentially not being thin and pretty enough. The question is, will the Federation of Students judge Greek life on its virtues or vices? mdavenport@imprint.uwaterloo.ca




News

Imprint, Friday, June 15, 2007

Honourary degrees and hockey teams Balsillie talks about our community, UW and the Nashville Predators Adam McGuire editor-in-chief

By the time this issue of Imprint hits newsstands, spring convocation exercises will be nearly concluded. And while thousands of freshly graduated UW students use the time to say their last goodbyes and claim their degrees, the ceremonies are also a time for acknowledging UW supporters and people within the Waterloo community via honourary degrees. Perhaps the most noteworthy recipient this term is Research in Motion (RIM) Co-CEO Jim Balsillie. The 46-year-old Balsillie, already the recipient of an MBA from Harvard, received an honourary degree of laws during the Thursday, June 14 convocation session. But before he attended the events and addressed the graduates, Balsillie took time to talk to Imprint about everything Waterloo — from his connections to UW to his involvement in the community and the hot-button topic of his impending ownership of an NHL franchise. Imprint: What does it mean to you to get a degree from this university? Jim Balsillie: It’s obviously a great honour, so I’m thrilled and honoured. That’s the first thing. And then, clearly, what’s an especially big honour is that Waterloo has got such a great global reputation, and, it’s the leading university of which RIM is closely aligned with and associated with. It’s a special honour to be recognized that way. So yeah, it’s just an enormous honour. It means so much both because of the reputation

of Waterloo and also the long and mutually beneficial relationship that RIM and the University of Waterloo have had together. I: What was your first reaction when you found out you were going to be awarded an honourary degree? J.B.: [Laughs]. Well, I was delighted! I mean, I deal with Dave Johnston a fair bit on a certain number of things. So, I was figuring, you know, there was a letter [I received from the university], and I said, “oh, Dave’s got some sort of a project,” and they decided to award a degree. I was just like, “Oh! Fantastic!” I: Excellent. Well you already touched on what impact the school has had on you professionally from the perspective of your company. What impact has the school had on you personally? J.B.: Well, I mean, talk about personally, when you do what I do, it’s not easy to separate work and personal. I mean, they’re so intertwined, and for me, the impact it’s had on me is tremendous. Obviously its been an enormously positive experience for RIM and obviously the relationships I’ve had with the past and current presidents like Doug Wright and Dave Johnston have been wonderful. And the relationship I have with Mike [Lazaridis, RIM’s co-CEO.] So, you know so many of my friends and so many people I work with and people in town are Waterloo grads and Waterloo faculty and Waterloo administrators, so it’s been a wonderful relationship. I: You’re receiving a doctor of laws. Your background is in business, and that’s something UW hasn’t really focused on. Do you

“...I think Waterloo has got some amazing specialties, and Waterloo has got tremendous applied and pure research credibility.” ‑ Jim Ballsillie RIM co-CEO

michael l. davenport

RIM co-CEO Jim Balsillie (right) is awarded an honourary doctorate of law, as RIM co-CEO and UW Chancellor Mike Lazaridis looks on. Balsillie then addressed the convocating arts class. see any programs like that in this university’s future? J.B.: I don’t know, I think Waterloo has got some amazing specialties, and Waterloo has got tremendous applied and pure research credibility. So whether or not they are going to manifest it in more business training, that’s obviously the decision of the administration. But Waterloo has been a great school; they’re doing fantastic things, you know, if they’re going to go into business schools and that, I don’t know. That’s theit decision. I: Your community involvement has been well documented, especially with the project at the Centre for International Global Innovation (CIGI). Now, is that your ongoing project? What’s your biggest involvement in the community, and what do you see in the future? J.B.: Well, I’ve got lots of things

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I’m involved in, with RIM and lots of community things[...] And CIGI is an important part of that, and, there are many other things I’m involved in. I was involved in [the] Perimeter [Institute]. It’s a great honour and a pleasure, what we do in this community. With it comes a lot of responsibility. I: You weren’t born here. You weren’t raised here. But is this home now for you? J.B.: Yeah, it definitely is home. It’s where our house is, our family, our friends. It’s where our children were born. Yeah, this is home now for sure! I: Do you have anything on the horizon next, similar to the big splashes Mike [Lazaridis] made with Perimeter and you made with CIGI? Is there anything your company or yourself is working on specifically right now? J.B.: Yes.

I: Are there any details of that that you can share with us? J.B.: No. [Laughs]. Not quite yet. It will be out soon enough. I: Now, last question, I’d be remiss if I didn’t ask you about your agreement in principle to purchase the Nashville Predators… J.B.: Well, I can’t say anything about that right now! [Laughs]. I: Well, obviously you can’t comment on a franchise’s location before you own it. But what do you think of the response from the region as far as just having a local as an NHL owner? J.B.: People love hockey in this neck of the woods, no doubt. It will be very exciting. Whatever happens, wherever it happens, people are big hockey fans in this neck of the woods, no doubt. Me included! amcguire@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


News  Children’s museum and UW unite to form state-of-the art sandbox Imprint, Friday, June 15, 2007

Angelo Florendo staff reporter

As executive director at the Waterloo Regional Children’s Museum (WRCM), David Marskell makes his way through the fluorescent atriums and living walls of his institution, continually thinking of new ways to educate and inspire his young visitors. Though the installations within the museum include the simple pleasures of dress-up and crayon stations, his latest project, aimed at bringing in more curious tots, is centred around a concept that even university students may struggle to comprehend: new media. “It’s just ever-changing and I don’t think anybody can define it — I think new media is moving too quickly,” explained Marskell. In an attempt to provide more clarity, UW Dean of Arts Ken Coates adds, “New media is everything and nothing in particular.” Vague, certainly, but their responses clearly demonstrate a mutual understanding — a fact that helped to initiate the museum’s latest and arguably its biggest undertaking. In a joint effort between the WRCM and the Canadian Centre for Arts and Technology (CCAT), plans have now been initiated to introduce a state-of-the-art centre for new media. The 5000-square-foot centre will be located on the fourth level of the museum and will potentially extend the to lower levels. The downtown Kitchener institution will not only serve as an exhibition site, it will also double as a research centre for professors and students from UW to experiment and create new media for themselves. The centre’s extensive installations are to include a broadcast centre with television station equipment, a video conferencing classroom allowing students across the country to interact, and gallery areas showcasing the latest digital works from both the K-W region and around the world. Visions for exhibits in the gallery are as wide

Angelo Florendo

A unique exhibit at the children’s museum transmits custom messages. ranging as the topic of new media itself. Marskell recounts recent examples of chairs with “personality” or art pieces using sensors hooked up to brain cells of fish to output organic images. Coates imagines videos and other art pieces being displayed on the museum’s outer walls that were created in the museum itself. Anyone who said that children are easy to please certainly didn’t have this in mind. “Imagine not a research centre, imagine a sandbox,” said CCAT manager Scott Spidell. “We’ll bring some of our toys into the sandbox and the kids get to play in our sandbox.” Though their plans are big, the groups found that their ideas came together naturally. “It was almost by osmosis rather than design,” said Coates.

“I don’t want to say that it was a no-brainer because there’s a lot of work that’s happened since that day,” added Marskell, “but the creation of the partnership came naturally.” CCAT is a small group of 15 core researchers that operate from the UW Faculty of Arts. Their projects focus on the interaction between humans and digital technology. Talks between the CCAT, the WRCM, various corporations, community groups and politicians on the general topic of digital arts sparked the initial plans for the new media centre. “There’s a real sense in this community that the digital arts has a real role to play in the future of this place,” said Coates. “It [the centre for new media] is AB_GENER06_imprint.qxd a way of bringing the community’s technology 3/29/06 8:48 focus and its artistic communities together.”

The synergy between the research behind, and the exhibition of, digital art is a unique interaction that both CCAT and the WRCM are excited about. But researchers sharing a space reserved primarily for children poses equally unique concerns. Though the student and professor presence could be viewed as another example of technological advancement infiltrating areas directed at the public, Marskell doesn’t think of it that way. “It’s not our space, it’s a shared space,” explained Marskell. Coates agreed, adding, “The children’s museum folks truly believe that having our groups associated with them will be a real attraction for the young people who go to the museum and the ones they want to attract.” Subject matter is also a concern as the new media created within the centre may not be entirely appropriate for a younger audience — not because of mature subject matter, but more so in terms of complexity or good old entertainment value. Marskell thinks it’s just a matter of simple scheduling, where children rule the grounds in the day while students and professors have free reign during the later hours. “We’ll close the blinds,” said Marskell, half-jokingly. “I don’t think it’s an issue per se. I think that the younger children will be a stimulus for the 23 year olds.” Currently entitled the New Media Experience, the name, like the centre itself, is a work in progress and one that seems to be on an accelerated schedule. “There’s no shotgun, but it’s working that way,” said Spidell of the short time left until the expected September opening. “I mean, it could honestly still fail.” But the prospect of a cutting-edge new media centre outweighs the risk for Marskell and company. “What will happen up there [in the centre] is the students will have a chance to explore and expand what they’re doing and learn from 12 year olds,” said Marskell. “I mean, how cool is that?” PM

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Keystone extended indefinitely Karina Graf reporter

Campaign Waterloo, the fundraising campaign which comprises the entire university’s fundraising efforts, has been extended indefinitely. The official decision to extend the campaign, which was set to conclude later this year, was decided by the university’s board of governors on Tuesday, June 5. Linda Kieswetter, director for Campaign Waterloo, said that, for the revised campaign “we deliberately didn’t set a new goal.” However, campaign organizers would like to double the amount of money raised annually from $50 million, which they have raised for the past three years, to $100 million by the year 2017. Prior to Campaign Waterloo’s launch, the university was raising anywhere from 8 to 12 million per year. Kieswetter said that the decision to extend the campaign was made in order to roll with the high momentum and success of the current campaign. Kieswetter states that it would be difficult to start an entirely new campaign because of the huge amount of infrastructure involved. The original goal of Campaign Waterloo was to raise $260 million by the year 2007 with the intent of creating a talent trust and attracting and retaining students and professors. This monetary goal was met in 2005 and so the bar was raised to $350 million by this year. With this already 97 per cent complete, Kieswetter is confident that they will reach this goal by the end of the year. The money raised goes to specific priority projects for UW which line up with the university’s sixth decade plan and have been identified by the deans of each faculty, among others. Kieswetter relates that increasing graduate scholarships, so as to enhance UW’s research profile, is of utmost importance in addition to expanding UW’s international profile. Amit Chakma, UW vice-president, academic and provost, reiterates the importance of these contributions. He said. “We want to achieve certain goals by 2017. For example, one of our goals is to reduce our student-faculty ratio from 26-1, roughly, to about 20-1, which means that we have to add more faculty members without

adding new programs or new students.” Chakma believes that these goals can only be met through increased funding. Although much of the money raised comes from large one-time donations, both Kieswetter and Chakma emphasize the importance of annual giving. Chakma says that they “want to create a culture where all of our faculty, staff, friends, will automatically write a cheque because we want this institution to continue beyond our own time whether our children and grandchildren […] continue to enjoy the benefit of high quality education that the University of Waterloo brings to the table.” To ensure the campaign’s continued success, the organizers will regularly review the opportunities they’re presenting to donors, the success the campaign is having, and if Campaign Waterloo is positioned in the market to be successful. Kieswetter declares that “they’ll certainly be a time when you’ll decide that it’s been enormously successful and the campaign has done its job and it’s time to stop this particular campaign and celebrate, and then move on to another.” When asked if some people who have already donated might be upset with the campaign extension and the goal of $350 million no longer relevant, both Kieswetter and Chakma had similar rebuttals. Chakma says, “Nobody donates money, to the best of my knowledge, to any campaign just […] to help the campaign reach their goal. People give money to support initiatives or specific projects. So they don’t really worry much about whether the goal has been reached or not.” Kieswetter reiterates this sentiment, saying, “the majority of people who give to us realize that the university will be here forever, that we will always have needs every year, and that we’re always striving every year to do a better job than we did the year before.” Kieswetter sums up her enthusiasm and confidence in the success of Campaign Waterloo, saying, “This university is blessed with outstanding leaders [and] the university is outstanding, it’s innovative, it’s got a strong work ethic, we have the best and brightest students and faculty around the world and we are capable of doing whatever we set our minds to.”

aflorendo@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

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E

T

59

63

53

51

N

W

E

A

N

A

N

N

S

8 9 6 5 1 7 2 3 4

4 5 3 8 6 2 1 9 7

R O

L

E

U

39

B 34

A

L I

O

A

R

S

A

T

S

55

O

Shir Passi

Veronic Diaz

3B honours speech communication

“Go to a psychiatrist, or rehab.”

“Burn every text book I own.”

2A arts and business

W

U

E

N

U

T

S

N

E

S

T

1 8 4 6 9 3 7 2 5

2 math and business

56

Q

67

“Party I guess.”

Jen Brunet

E

I

64

“Travel the world and parachute!”

Robert Graham

40

R

54

“Travel as much as I can.”

35

B

61

5 7 9 1 2 4 3 8 6

O

D

B

N

E

T

E

O

13

A

A

U

T

L

T

N

12

I

R

M

C

D

A

M

60

B

2 1 7 3 4 9 6 5 8

X

A

A

A

43

11

L

33

46

O

66

6 3 1 9 5 8 4 7 2

O

T

I

B

45

I

19 22

E

N

O

O

B

E

M

16

R S

G

K

I

S

R

C

27

E

N

58

U

A

E

C

R

R

I

L

26

E

38

O

25

T

R

7 4 5 2 3 1 8 6 9

O 42

S

E

A

9 2 8 4 7 6 5 1 3

D

N

I

65

E

T

T

62

N

30

10

M

I

A

B

9

A

A

E

57

E

R

18 21

E

50

8

I

D

D

L

K

I

49

7

A

N

N

A H

O

48

52

24

6

K

V

41

I

S

15

N

29

31

23

5

R

“First I’d have to become a student.”

3 6 2 7 8 5 9 4 1

Chandni Luthi Ozair Hussain

Tanya Muzaffar 2A arts

4 speech communication

“I don’t plan that far ahead.”

“Find a job.”

Carolyn Augusta

Lina Ruiz

1B mathematical sciences

1 math and business


Arts

arts@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Imprint, Friday, June 15, 2007

Paradise from the webcomicist’s mind

The Paradise Toronto Comicon — hosted by Toronto-based Paradise Comics — was slightly different from other expos I’ve been to. There was a lot to see and buy, but this was the first time I’d seen so many webcomicists. I was so excited to go, and I was able to talk with tons of inspiring webcomic authors. Ryan North, the author of Dinosaur Comics, produces a webcomic where “the pictures don’t change but the words do.” He writes each comic which discusses a random topic using snappy wit and clever dialogue, and it’s even printed in newspapers across the country. Regarding the dialogue North explains, “I’ll just research a topic I want to know about for a few hours and make a comic out of it, which kind of makes me feel like a fraud [...] I read about it for three hours and compressed it to six panels.”

Dr. McNinja by Chris Hastings and Kent Archer has spanned out to seven chapters. It originated from an alias that Hastings had on an online bulletin board. The comic developed into a tale of a doctor who comes from a long ancestry of ninjas from Scotland, alongside his gorilla receptionist Judy, his Mexican sidekick Gordito, and their trusty velociraptor Yoshi. Hastings did have a set plan in his head: “Once you have the name, it’s just natural to have [the comic...] I gave it a lot of thought before I actually started to draw it.” The two indie-rock comicists, Jeph Jacques (Questionable Content) and Liz Greenfield (Stuff Sucks) take a lot from pop culture as a backdrop, but there’s a big difference in approach between the two. Greenfield’s comic flows like a stylish romantic comedy film, although Greenfield mentions that the details are simpler than it looks, saying, “that’s out of laziness. [...] I just realised how much time [full colouring] took [to make],” which led to her quick duotone, grainy colour scheme. Jacques’ comic is more like a sitcom, with crazy love triangles, indie rock references and lines that should be followed by a laughtrack. One of Jacques’ methods of capturing personality in each

character is by letting them wear funny or clever T-shirts. This led to tons of fans asking him to print and sell actual designs on T-shirts. “We have [...] 20 designs,” Jacques explains, “Since [the first T-shirt], it’s just been about coming out with good designs and hoping that people buy them. I’ve been lucky so far.” Sam Logan of Sam & Fuzzy has a habit of spoofing pop culture in his comic, but one imitation that stands out is Noosehead, a parody on the band Slipknot. What’s clever about this take is that the creation of Noosehead has morphed from a simple joke to a complex chapter that has moved the main plot even further. “I had all these little hints and references to the band, like in my earlier comics,” said Logan, “and it took like four years for me to actually make [Noosehead] significant, anyways.” Lady Yates of Earthsong makes a fantasy/mythology comic based on different characters living a new life on the same planet while war is brewing. Her comic developed from a hobby during university, as she’s a big fan of mythology: “It took off on the internet, it got popular, I was seen by a publisher, and they asked me if I

wouldn’t mind them publishing me.” Danielle Corsetto (Girls with Slingshots) and Raina Telgemeier (The Baby-Sitters Club comics) make tales with a more slice-oflife approach and a fluid cartoon style. Corsetto’s comic stars Hazel and Jamie, post-graduate slackers living life at bars and a coffee shop run by their friend, Jameson. “Hazel’s kind of me typically during the day,” Corsetto explains, “a bit cranky and a little boring. Jamie’s basically me being social and...drunk.” Corsetto’s work, apart from BSC comics, comes from stories about her past. One of these concerns a comic she read about the Hiroshima bomb called Barefoot Gen which tells about how she started to look at comics differently. “I was nine when I read Barefoot Gen,” Corsetto says. “It was my first indication that comics can be serious.” This was just a taste of who was at the Paradise Toronto Comicon. There were tons of artists I would’ve loved to see and talk to, but a Comicon’s like a candy shop: there’s some good candy and some bad candy, but there’s always too much to have before closing time. ptrinh@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

graphic: peter trinh comics courtesy: www.stuffsucks.com, www.samandfuzzy.com, www.goraina.com, www.questionablecontent.net, www.drmcninja.com, www.qwantz.com, www.earthsongsaga.com, www.girlswithslingshots.com

Peace for land mined farm land

courtesy of homunculus productions

Scenes from documentary Bare Hands and Wooden Limbs.

From 1975 to 1979, the Khmer Rouge regime in Cambodia caused the death of approximately 1.7 million people. Lead by Pol Pot, the Khmer Rouge extremist ideology controlled the pacific country with guerrilla warfare and disregard for human life. The end result was atrocious: mass repression and mass murder, mainly due to careless execution, starvation and forced labour. Because of widespread deployment of land mines, many Cambodian people have lost their limbs due to unexpected detonation. Sadly, despite many relief efforts, 10 million land mines still remain in the ground of Cambodia. Khmer Rouge regime members were often victims of crippling war injury as well. Many hard-working Cambodians as well as the controllers themselves are now having difficulty

surviving in war-torn Cambodia. Not all people require the use of both arms and legs to live a meaningful life, though. A documentary entitled Bare Hands and Wooden Limbs explores a special, peaceful effort to aid some of the victims of the Khmer Rouge regime. A farm village known as Veal Thom in western Cambodia was created in 2000 with one sole mission: to provide a place to live and work for some of the amputees of Cambodia — many of whom are shunned outcasts of society. Nearly 400 disabled people and their families live in Veal Thom on a sustainable allotment of five acres each. Everything is literally built with their “bare hands and wooden limbs,” to quote Chhêm Sip, a man who was captured and tortured at 14 during the dark war-torn period in Cambodia. Chhêm admits that he can “forgive but not forget” the cruelty he and many others lived, yet still he puts aside his personal past of pain to improve the lives of others. In the interest of helping the victims of the Khmer Rouge regime, Chhêm made the honourable decision to work with the Chief of Veal Thom, Touj Souerly, a former

Khmer Rouge commander. Although Chhêm and Touj have set aside their differences to work on Veal Thom, their relationship is still very far from the standard coworker dynamic according to director Alison McMahan,. “because of cultural values and obvious political reasons, these are men that are unable to even break bread and share a meal.” Bare Hands and Wooden Limbs is ultimately a documentary about humanity and the sad reality that those who have suffered most are often overlooked by society or even the world at large. Despite the gravity and magnitude of the Cambodian genocide and the lengthy list of consequences that it has had on a group of innocent people, this documentary has not yet been released on a large scale. The amputee citizens of Veal Thom are all victims in their own personal right. They all work hard each day and live together in meager, yet bountiful western Cambodia. As McMahan puts it, “with my car, central heating and opportunities, I can’t help but feel so lucky for everything that I have in North America.” aabela@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Low Finance Rates by Volkswagen Finance

O.A.C.




Arts

Imprint, Friday, June 15, 2007

Pottery with a side of politics

photos by Yang Liu

Beginning clockwise from bottom is “Displaced Value,” “Money, Form, Time, Space” and “American Triptych” by John Hubburd at the Canadian Clay & Glass Gallery. Ashley Csanady staff reporter

The words “Canadian,” “clay” and “glass” may not typically conjure images of contemporary and unique art, but the Canadian Clay and Glass Gallery’s four new exhibitions promise more than your stereotypical folksy Canadian pottery. Each exhibit is unique and features a starkly different style, medium and motivation. John Hubbard’s 25 Years of Provocative Questions easily eclipsed the other exhibits. Featuring pieces from his early career in the 1970s to the present, the political commentary is still just as relevant and his work still as captivating as it would have been 20 years ago. His “American Triptych” may be one of his earliest pieces, but the Alice in Wonderland meets the White House depiction of Uncle Sam, The Statue of Liberty and the U.S. Army are just as fitting now as they would have been when a different “joker” was President.

“Besides the abstract dreamscapes, folk art influences and childlike outlook, Hubbard adds satirical wit and political commentary to his surrealist work. His “Glut: Afluenza” is a sharp critique of North American eating habits, while his “Sex Files: Version 2” is a provocative commentary on the damage we both inflict and receive in relationships. “Toucan and Unicycle (for Duchamp and the Demise of Modernism)” is brilliantly funny and poignant. The sheer absurdity of the piece and the blatant allusion to Duchamp’s “The Fountain” make the piece visually interesting and intellectually stimulating. It raises the ageold question, “What makes ‘good’ art, beauty or meaning?” In this case, meaning clearly wins out, as the piece may be anything but beautiful, but it’s still captivating and memorable. In Implements and Objects, Lou Lynn’s minimalist glass and bronze pieces are striking. Her larger-than-life, abstract household utensils are a striking reinterpretation of the concept of found art; however, instead of using actual

household objects, Lynn forces the viewer to find everyday objects in her unconventional forms. Her elegant combination of glass and bronze makes you wish all corkscrews looked liker her “Auger.” Deduction by Anong Migwans Beam and Susan Collett provides the more typical ceramics you many expect to find. Collett’s coral like sculptures made me feel more like I was in a bad production of The Little Mermaid than entice my sense of sensibility. Although I may not have enjoyed her work, Collett was awarded the first Winifred Shantz Award for Ceramics, so you may see what they did. Beam’s ceramics were intriguing, but reminded me of the Victorian Orientalism-inspired china my grandmother used to collect with a mildly modern twist. Recently having exhibited in Santa Fe, New Mexico, at the Gallery of the American Indian and the Gary Farmer Gallery, Beam shares more than the exhibition with Collett: while I may not have appreciated her work, others seem to.

Kai Chan’s exhibition From Sea to Sea, moves away from “traditional” mediums to use pop or wine bottles, string or even garbage bags. Toying with the notion of art, Chan uses simple materials to construct complex sculptures. The installation piece on the floor entitled “The Bitter Sea” features pop bottles tied together so that if one should fall, they all fall. The fragile appearance of Chan’s work juxtaposed against the hardy building materials seems to be a comment both on consumerism and the inescapable interdependency of the human condition. His use of natural and unnatural mediums — i.e. mixing wood and pop bottles — also adds an environmental commentary to his work. The show runs until August 26, so if your hanging around UpTown one day feeling like soaking in a little culture or looking for something to do on a rainy day, these exhibits promise to at least intrigue if not inspire.

Everybody Hurts: An Essential Guide to Emo Culture Leslie Simon and Trevor Kelley

John Hughes’ films of brooding outcasts. Predictably, it ends with emo adulthood, something that shouldn’t crop up for at least another ten years or so. The chapters in between cover topics like the often-questionable hair and clothing styles and the proper ways to write a blog. Each section gives pointers on how aspiring “emos” can adopt the proper attitudes and habits, as well as what movies, TV shows and books they must watch or read — all of which deal with outcast characters and lots of melodrama. Most sections also have a “do’s and don’ts” and a “how to” section. These are by far the most entertaining parts of the book. The fashion section includes such gems as “Don’t wear girls’ jeans if you can’t fit into girls’ jeans” and “Don’t put on a band’s T-shirt immediately after you buy it at the merch table.” The “how to” sections include instructions to make the perfect mix tape and “The Art of Taking the

Perfect Myspace Picture,” which tells readers to either take a picture at arms length and turn away from the camera or to take the picture by facing a bathroom mirror. Like many books surrounding a pop culture phenomenon. Everybody Hurts has an expiration date. In all honesty, I’d recommend reading this before the summer is over or there is a very good chance that it will no longer hold any relevance to the scene that is oh so emotional. If you are emo or have ever met someone who is, this book will come as no surprise. Crying alone, becoming vegetarian while still sporting leather shoes, and more are all featured in this great and humorous read. All jokes aside, though, Everybody Hurts confirms the idea that wearing your heart on your sleeve is a lot more work than it seems.

acsanady@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

How to “emo” handbook HarperCollins Canada

Every time you visit a mall you’re bound to see a group of 14-year-old teens with black eyeliner and bangs swooped to the side, covering one eye. Yes, emo kids are all around: moping and dressing exactly like the next. Everybody Hurts is basically a tongue-in-cheek guide book to this phenomenon, and some might even say the emo life style. Broken down into nine simple sections, this book tells you everything you would ever want to know about the emo culture. Everybody Hurts begins with emo “fore fathers,” including the likes of William Shakespeare for his feminine attire, and Molly Ringwald for beginning as both the muse and star of

— Emma Tarswell


Arts

Imprint, Friday, June 15, 2007



Music takes over at NXNE festival

Phil Isard

Suzanne Gardner staff reporter

This year’s North by Northeast (NXNE) festival’s tagline “Music Takes Over” couldn’t have been more appropriate. With over 450 bands and 25 music-related films scattered across the streets of Toronto for four straight days, music was something NXNE wristband holders seemed to eat, sleep and breathe last weekend. I, on the other hand, merely attempted to immerse myself into as much of the indie music scene as was humanly possible during my Saturday night attendance of the festival. The first hour and a half of my experience was spent between the years 1975 and 1980, courtesy of the film Nightclubbing, a collection of live videotaped performances from that era documenting the budding punk scene in New York City nightclubs. Pat Ivers and Emily Armstrong, the camera-armed female incarnations of Lewis and Clark, assembled this greatest hits collection from their archive of almost 100 bands (including the likes of Blondie, Talking Heads and Iggy Pop) to create a film which really made me wish I had been born about 30 years earlier and an American. Well, okay, maybe scratch the American part. “I feel like I’m bringing my favourite records to someone’s house,”

Ivers replied when asked how it feels to show this movie to audiences. “It was so obvious to me that this was a moment to remember…so that’s why I did it.” Hidden amongst the musical performances was a speech by poet Max Blagg, read at a benefit event in 1980 for Ivers and Armstrong after the women were robbed of their filming equipment and some of their footage. Simultaneously hilarious and poignant, Blagg illustrated the horrors of drug addiction, concluding with repeated rearrangements of the sentence “Baby, junk is no good” to “Junk is no good, baby” and so on. Lurching forward into the modern era of rock, my photographer and I ventured up and down Queen Street in an effort to see a wide variety of bands over the course of the night. Despite the festival’s claims of having a diverse musical selection this year, however, the majority of the acts we managed to catch on Saturday night were merely slight variations on the guitar-based rock genre. This trend began with our first musical act of the evening, a Michigan alt-country rock band called the Northern Whiskey Syndicate who completely took over local pub The Black Bull. However, the group’s command of the bar was not primarily due to their awesome rock caliber — it was mostly because they were

...the majority of the acts we managed to catch on Saturday night were merely slight variations on the guitar-based rock genre.

Mohammad Jangda

Kitchener’s Saigon Hookers bring the noise to a packed crowd at the Bovine Sex Club for NXNE. fucking loud. Any dinner-eating, beerdrinking patrons who only came to the bar to eat and drink that night had no choice but to pay due attention to the three loud guys in the corner. Fortunately, those three guys were worth paying attention to. Our designated “local content” of the night came from Kitchener’s Saigon Hookers — a band whose roles are described on the CBC Radio 3 website as “rocker” (guitarist Tommy Smokes), “heavy rocker” (bassist Carm Dynasty) and “thunder and lightning” (drummer Feeney

Super Six). These three rockstars truly brought the noise to the packed crowd at the Bovine Sex Club which, despite the name, is a music club and not a strip joint. Although their music continually rocked hard throughout their set, the strangest element of the Saigon Hookers was the extremely disparate physical appearances of the band’s members. Smokes and Dynasty seemed to fit into their musical genre just fine, with Smokes looking like the twin brother of Scott Weiland from the Stone Temple Pilots. Mr.

Super Six, however, looked like he just walked out of high school gym class with his basketball jersey top and shorts. Despite the fact that I was only able to attend one night of the annual indie festival, by the end of the night I felt so exhausted and saturated with musical brilliance that I’m not even sure that I could have handled four full days. This one night of rock with its multitude of performances was truly satisfying enough. sgardner@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

We said party! They said die! Andrew Abela arts editor

Until last Saturday, I never truly appreciated the concept known as “power of the press.” As it was the third and final night of the North by Northeast music festival (NXNE), many people were anxiously lined up down Queen St. outside the Legendary Horseshoe Tavern. Thanks to whatever “power” the bouncers saw in me that night, I was easily let in to the well-known venue which was reportedly “well above capacity.” I entered, but still wondered how much my pass would have scored me from some desperate scenester kid with a fake I.D. waiting despondently in line. That night, the miserable-looking concert-goers outside would be missing acts like hometown hero Sebastien Grainger — half of the deceased punk duo Death From Above 1979 — and B.C. band You Say Party! We Say Die!, who are described as punk/new wave on their MySpace website. Just before 11 p.m., with U.S. flag suspenders, white pants and all DFA79 fading glory, an obviously

nervous Sebastien Grainger set up his equipment meticulously with backup band Les Montagnes. He appeared much more business-like than the Grainger of old, who used to drum and sing with disorganized passion and fury. Sadly, the business personality carried over to his new songs. They were pop music at its best — or worst — whichever way you want to look at it. Though very catchy, they gave me absolutely no desire to check out his new album coming out sometime in the near future. Overall, there was a lot of hidden potential; they managed to drive the closing song straight to raw dance-synth heaven. It was clear that Sebastien had some kind of ace up his sleeve, as this final song left the crowd in awe. Perhaps his new album was worthy of attention after all. He was going in a new direction, maybe in an attempt to distance himself from his past musical endeavors. Unfortunately for him, though, the deathly duo the world once buzzed about isn’t so easily forgotten, especially for Grainger himself, who sports a

permanent tattoo of the year 1979 on his left forearm. After some unenthused head-bobbing to Grainger’s new songs, once midnight struck everyone was finally ready to dance. YSP! WSD! were quick to provide, and began their set with no delay. The sound hit the audience like a brick wall of wild rhythm, as it was not long before everyone was dancing their own version of what I call “the punk jig.” The YSP! WSD! sound had just the right proportions of heaviness and danceable catchiness. All one had to hear was the beat to keep your feet in time, yet still their music was interesting enough to actually make you want to pay closer attention to it. YSP! WSD! played through an amazing set featuring a lot of material from their latest album Lose All Time released this past March on Paper Bag records. Being one small part of the great NXNE festival, their show ended abruptly, leaving the entire audience wanting more. Regrettably, there was to be no encore. Some time after 1 a.m., the lineup outside the venue was even longer than

Mohammad Jangda

You Say Party! We Say Die! play to a sweaty, dancing crowd. before. Without any pressing power — or whatever it is the journalist pompous types like to call it — they never had the chance to see Sebastien explode in pop music wonder, or to see YSP! WSD! make a whole room of people dance the largely infamous “punk jig.” The sheer power of the press is definitely worthy of my appreciation, but I was thankful just to have been able to experience NXNE’s dance-punk climax.

Next year, all disappointed members of the long lineup outside the Horseshoe Tavern that night should consider volunteering at some lowly univerwsity newspaper. Failing that, the NXNE festival is always seeking volunteers. Moping around outside full concerts can be fun, but without power, it just plain sucks. aabela@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


Opinion

opinion@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Imprint, Friday, June 15, 2007

Porn isn’t the problem Friday, June 15, 2007 — Vol. 30, No. 4 Student Life Centre, Room 1116 University of Waterloo Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 P: 519.888.4048 F: 519.884.7800 imprint.uwaterloo.ca Editor-in-chief, Adam McGuire editor@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Advertising & Production Manager, Laurie Tigert-Dumas ads@imprint.uwaterloo.ca General Manager, Catherine Bolger cbolger@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Sales Assistant, Andrea Hession Co-op Student, Amanda Henhoeffer Board of Directors board@imprint.uwaterloo.ca President, Adam Gardiner president@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Vice-president, Jacqueline McKoy vp@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Treasurer, Lu Jiang treasurer@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Secretary, vacant Staff liaison, Rob Blom liaison@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Editorial Staff Assistant Editor, Ashley Csanady Cover Editor, vacant News Editor, Emma Tarswell News Assistant, Adrienne Raw Opinion Editor, Mohammad Jangda Features Editor, Scott Houston Arts Editor, Andrew Abela Science Editor, Brendan Pinto Sports Editor, vacant Photo Editor, Michael L. Davenport Graphics Co-editor, Peter Trinh Graphics Co-editor, Christine Ogley Web Editor, Gunjan Chopra Systems Administrator, Dan Agar Sys. Admin. Assistant, vacant Lead Proofreader, Kinga Jakab Production Staff Rob Blom, Kirsten Marincic, Ernest Velesquez, Shivaun Hoad, Paul Collier, Adrienne Raw, Steven R. McEvoy, Tim Foster, Phil Isard Imprint is the official student newspaper of the University of Waterloo. It is an editorially independent newspaper published by Imprint Publications, Waterloo, a corporation without share capital. Imprint is a member of the Ontario Community Newspaper Association (OCNA). Editorial submissions may be considered for publication in any edition of Imprint. Imprint may also reproduce the material commercially in any format or medium as part of the newspaper database, Web site or any other product derived from the newspaper. Those submitting editorial content, including articles, letters, photos and graphics, will grant Imprint first publication rights of their submitted material, and as such, agree not to submit the same work to any other publication or group until such time as the material has been distributed in an issue of Imprint, or Imprint declares their intent not to publish the material. The full text of this agreement is available upon request. Imprint does not guarantee to publish articles, photographs, letters or advertising. Material may not be published, at the discretion of Imprint, if that material is deemed to be libelous or in contravention with Imprint’s policies with reference to our code of ethics and journalistic standards. Imprint is published every Friday during fall and winter terms, and every second Friday during the spring term. Imprint reserves the right to screen, edit and refuse advertising. One copy per customer. Imprint ISSN 07067380. Imprint CDN Pub Mail Product Sales Agreement no. 40065122. Next staff meeting: Monday, June 18, 2007 12:30 p.m. Next board meeting: Friday, June 22, 2007 10:30 a.m.

...it has always been assumed that young men are sexual whereas young women aren’t, or at least shouldn’t be. It used to be the stuff of back-alley movie theatres and dimly lit stores, but since the rise of the internet, pornography is everywhere and readily accessible. The role that pornography plays — or doesn’t — in the ongoing misogyny of our society is a raging debate in feminist circles always prompting the question, “Does pornography degrade women?” The easy answer is “yes,” but the more balanced one is, “It doesn’t have to.” While most porn these days is inarguably chauvinistic — featuring buxom blondes who relish being coated in cum from head to toe — not all of it is, and it doesn’t have to be. The detrimental effects of porn are debatable, but an article recently published by the Associated Press raises interesting questions regarding the role of the internet in the rise of pornography, the sexualized nature of our society, its effect on young women and porn’s potential to be empowering. The article, entitled “Experts: Porn Conflates Sexual Behaviour with Power,” by Martha Irving, argues that, with the rise of reality television and the internet, young women ­— now more than ever — are being encouraged to take their clothes off to gain some kind of notoriety. It argues that homemade porn has become a standard of modern sexuality and that it has a detrimental effect on the young girls performing in it. “It doesn’t have anything to do with their sexual pleasure … It has to do with pleasing somebody else — the grasping for attention,” said Michael Simon, a high school counsellor and therapist in the article. If they aren’t, in fact, performing these acts out of an actual desire to do so, but to please someone else or fill some kind of social requirement, then that is wrong. If they are, however, viewing or performing in pornography for their own pleasure then the detrimental effects are diminished. “It’s a big topic among researchers. A 2007 report from the American Psychological Association compiled the findings of myriad studies, showing that the sexualization of young women and girls, in particular, can hurt them in many ways. Problems can include anything from low self-esteem and eating disorders to depression and anxiety,” states Irvine. The problem with this statement is that it focuses on the sexualization of young women as the negative effect of this phenomena — they don’t discuss the increased sexuality of young men, because it has always been assumed that young men are sexual whereas young women aren’t, or at least shouldn’t be. It’s not the sexuality of the material that is causing young girls to develop eating disorders, but the depictions of women they see in porn. Porn stars are “perfect:” hairless, cellulite-less, perfectly coiffed, painted and styled — even while engaged in a Chinese finger trap. The thing is, the aspects of pornography that are demeaning to women are not the cause of the problem, but a symptom. “Anti-pornography feminism fails to address the elementary point that the role of commercial pornography in depicting a crude, imperious and promiscuous male sexuality, alongside female receptivity and vulnerability, is completely overshadowed by, and entirely dependent upon, the official discourses and imagery of science, medicine, religion and mainstream cultural

productions (high or low), prevalent all around us,” writes Segal in her article “Contradiction of Anti-pornography Feminism.” Porn just isn’t the problem. The attitudes and depictions that antipornography feminists find offensive are merely a manifestation of deep-rooted cultural beliefs, and they won’t magically disappear if porn is prohibited. Until female sexuality is equated with male sexuality, the “problem of porn” will continue. acsanady@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Have you ever faked it? I’m soliciting “faking it” stories, motivations and downsides for my next column. So, if you feel so inclined, drop me an e-mail with your tale of lovin’ gone wrong — no need to worry, all responses will be kept anonymous.

Christine Ogley

Terror rhymes with orange Lock the horses, we’ve got terrorists on the loose Opinion editor’s note: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/satire

WATERLOO, ON — The University of Waterloo has been upgraded to terror alert “orange” after a “kamikaze” automobile driver recklessly rammed into a campus residence on Sunday, June 10. The 22-year-old, who is unidentified — and likely to maintain some sort of ethnic immunity throughout the endless legal proceedings of the crash — smashed his Lexus SUV into the side of St. Paul’s College residence at about 6:30 p.m. Sunday evening. Apparently, the young man became distraught after a fight with his girlfriend. However, always common-sense Toronto Sun-style journalists immediately — and accurately — dubbed the incident a terrorist attack. The assailant bore down on the brick building with clear intentions of initiating a holy war, said an onlooker who may or may not have been guessing, and who may or may not have been an onlooker. In fact, the car struck the building with such force that the front fender and hood were severely damaged. Body shop workers, notorious for being

inherently shallow, were noted to have salivated at the revenue opportunities presented by the wreck. In fact, one garage owner purportedly had his pupils replaced with dollar signs complete with accompanying cash register sound effects. Allegedly, the air bag of the luxury utility vehicle did not deploy, a claim that — again — may or may not be fictional. However, speculation is rampant that the protective bag’s explosive device — used primarily for life-saving purposes during motor vehicle accidents — could have been detonated as an attempt to ignite the fuel tank and create a flaming, leather-detailed missile. The air bag will also likely be inspected for traces of anthrax. The coloured alert system, first introduced in a post-9/11 act by the U.S.’s department of Homeland Security, is new to UW. In fact, this column is the first mention of such a system at Waterloo. According to the introducer, Waterloo has been elevated to an “orange” alert level, meaning “heightened possibility of the chance of dangerous activity in the near-to-close vicinity.” Once the danger has

lapsed, Waterloo’s campus will be demoted to a “magenta” security level, cautioning citizens to “act with ambiguous concern despite apparent lack of anything harmful.” Sources also say that the domestic incident that triggered the attack has been added to Dalton McGuinty’s upcoming provincial political campaign. Apparently, Ontario Liberals are keeping a close eye on the subject, and wish to adapt the “beware of the terrorists everywhere” attitude that has become the predominant in 21st century Western psyche. In response to the growing sentiment that this was just some misdirected kid intentionally hitting a building at speeds barely great enough to injure the grass beneath the tires, an unnamed source had this to say: “Sure, it looks that way. But anyone who doesn’t see this as a serious international security gaffe is gullible; just like those people who will believe anything they see or read in that sensationalistic, paparazzi-laden CNNstyle news coverage.” editor@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


Opinion

Imprint, Friday, June 15, 2007

11

Quote of the week

” “ I think biology profs make the best mace-bearers.

— Anonymous science prof. overheard at Convocation

The following is a comment thread posted on the “U-Passed” article page (published May 4, 2007). Comments have been left unedited. [untitled]

“It was obviously a close vote and an issue that students on both sides felt very strongly about,” says Adams, “but I think this is a fair representation of what the student population wants...” About it being a fair representation of what the student population wants, what about UW’s large number of CO-OP students away on work term? How were they notified of this referendum? I’m in CO-OP myself and had one of my friends not told me about it I would never have known. This referendum seemed very rushed. — Thien

[untitled]

The same way you keep up to date with everything else happening...by reading the news and keeping your eyes and ears open. If you don’t care enough to look and find out for yourself, then you don’t deserveto have much of a voice. — Mike

[untitled]

There should be no excuse for “not knowing” about the referendum or being unable to vote. Online voting and email means you can be almost anywhere in the world and still vote. My case illustrates this. I was also on CO-OP in a small community in the Ecuadorian Amazon with electricity and one communal phone. Internet was available by taking a bus for 30-45 minutes, if the bridge on the road wasn’t washed out. I got an email from my ES rep and so with some planning and luck, was able vote. I can understand how in some cases people off campus might have felt out of the loop. Still, if in my situation I could vote, anyone who didn’t should have either kept themselves informed, or taken more initiative; especially if they were still in Canada. — Matt

[untitled]

...but if you hadn’t gotten that email, you’d still be here arguing that it’s not the schools responsibility to keep students informed, right? — Anonymous

Rant me a 100 (or so) Whine about anything. And we mean anything. 100 words (or so). Go. opinion@imprint.uwaterloo.ca I can’t stand sloppy eaters. Barbarians, I tell ya. Now before you start saying, “Oh, no problem, I’m not a slob” — don’t. Yes you are. I meet a rare few people who manage to eat in such a way that doesn’t make my skin crawl.

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There are the gob smackers. The finger-lickers. The loud-swallowers. The openmouthed crunchers. The afterwards sighers. They inhabit cafes, restaurants, cafeterias, and yes, even bistros. To my utter exasperation, when I run to the library to study in peace, and have forgotten my iPod to drown out the coughs, they are there too. In the corner, munching biscuits, cracking carrots with gaping jaws, eating slippy sloppy drippy salad covered in noisy sauce.

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Science $13.4 million spent to accommodate expanding enrolment David Yip reporter

The university’s building spree continues with the expansion of the School of Optometry. On June 8, the school, one of two in Canada, and the only English-speaking school — the other being French-speaking — held a groundbreaking ceremony for the $13.4 million dollar expansion to accommodate increasing enrolment. The increasing undergraduate enrolment, from 60 to 90 students each year, is in response to demand for vision care professionals in Canada. The expansion, at 38, 000 square feet, will feature an expanded library, study rooms, computer areas and lecture space, as well as new space for the Museum of Vision Science. Costs for the project should mostly be covered by fundraising efforts. To date, $6.5 million has been raised from alumni and corporate partners, including a $5 million gift from philanthropists Dr. Marta Witer and Ian Ihnatowycz. Dr. Witer is an optometry alumnus from the class of 1979. Dr. Witer’s gift will be recognized in the naming of the Witer Learning Resource Centre. “By giving back to my alma mater, I am acknowledging the meaningful educational experience I had here as a student, but am also investing in the education of Canada’s future optometrists,” said Witer. Corporate fundraising partners include those from the contact lens industry, such as Alcon, Johnson & Johnson and CIBAVision, according to optometry administrator Gary Marx. Marx also notes any shortfall in fundraising should be made up by increased revenues through “increased enrolment,” and that the expansion should “address our needs for the immediate future.” The original $7.2 million fundraising target has been raised to $12.4 million by 2011. This new target will also “support the expansion and renovation of current facilities” while ensuring funding to the clinical portion of the optometry program. Construction on the expansion itself is expected to begin September of this year, with occupancy of the building beginning in January 2009. This year also celebrates the 40th anniversary of the School of Optometry.

science@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Terminator gene: judgment day Michael L. Davenport staff reporter

These days, nobody is surprised when political contention arises over biotechnology. Though stem cell research and human cloning get a lot of the attention, they are far from the only issues. For instance, there’s an area of research devoted to preventing plants from reproducing. As with drugs and the pharmaceutical industry, genetically modified plants represent an investment on the part of the company that created them, and such companies want to enact technical and legal measures to ensure they recoup their research costs. Such technologies are referred to as Genetic Use Restriction Technologies (GURT). One developed implementation of this technology is a special gene called the “terminator gene.” When farmers buy seeds that contain the terminator gene, the plant will grow as usual and the farmer will be able to harvest the crop. However, the next generation of seeds — the ones generated by the crop — will be infertile. If the farmer tries to save those seeds and replant them in order to get the benefit of the bioengineered crop, the seeds just won’t germinate. In order to continue growing the crop the farmer has to purchase new seeds year after year. Think of it as copy protection for biology. While this technology has been developed and tested, it is not available for commercial sale. The Canadian patent for the technology was held by Delta & Pine Land. However, on June 1 the United States Justice Department gave the green light for biotech giant Monsanto to purchase the company; as such, it will inherit the patent. Monsanto has repeatedly stated they do not intend to commercialize the technology. In a move that would pre-empt the technology from ever being commercialized, Canadian MP and agriculture critic Alex Atamanenko introduced a bill on May 31 that would ban the deployment of terminator technology in Canada. Atamanenko did not have the time to interview with Imprint before press time, but he supplied a copy of the proposed law. Interestingly enough, not only would this bill ban import or sale of seeds with the

—With files from the Daily Bulletin

“By giving back to my alma mater, I am acknowledging the meaningful educational experience I had here as a student” — Dr. Marta Witer Optometry alumnus, 1979

Imprint, Friday, June 15, 2007

Yolanie Hettiarachchi staff reporter

Biblical parchment displayed at Israel Museum

After traveling from a Cairo synagogue to an American collector, a 1,300 year-old Old Testament manuscript is now on display at the

terminator gene in Canada, but would also prohibit companies from obtaining patents on the technology in Canada. This caveat would be put on the same footing as the clause that prohibits patents for “any mere scientific principle or abstract theorem.” In a written statement Atamanenko said, “This bill would protect the right of farmers to save seeds. The right of farmers to save seed should not be threatened by this technology that offers no benefits to farmers. The right to save seeds must be protected, even for those farmers in Canada who do not currently practice seed saving.” It’s not widely expected this bill will pass, given that Minister of Agriculture Chuck Strahl is against it. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has also taken an adverse stance. On the group’s website, they state, “The unfortunately named ‘terminator gene’ has received much negative press because it has been portrayed as a vehicle for large multi-national seed companies to suppress the freedom of farmers. However, the terminator approach provides an excellent method to protect against

transference of novel traits to other crops and plant species.” What CFIA means is the terminator gene could prevent modified genes from becoming expressed in natural plants which could happen through cross-pollination. It would also prevent such modified crops from spreading on their own, which would prevent legal cases such as Monsanto vs. Schmeiser. (The famous lawsuit where chemical giant Monsanto sued farmer Percy Schmeiser for growing Monsanto’s patented canola variety on his land — despite the fact that the seeds blew over from a neighbouring farm and the crop was growing without his knowledge.) The flip side of the coin is that the terminator gene itself could be spread to naturally occurring plants through cross pollination — potentially resulting in loss of yield for farmers who are opting not to grow patented plants. Two other national governments — those of India and Brazil — have already banned this technology.

Israel Museum in Jerusalem to the public for the first time. According to Stephen Pfann at the University of the Holy Land in Jerusalem, the discovered parchment “comes from a period of almost darkness in terms of Hebrew manuscripts.” Scholars have observed the lack of original biblical documents written between the time of the Dead Sea Scrolls and the time of texts written in the 9th and 10th centuries. In the late 1970s, the subsequent owner of the manuscripts turned it over to the Rare Books, Manuscripts and Special Collections Library at Duke University. Currently, the manuscript is on display in the Israel Museum’s Shrine of the Book, which also houses the Dead Sea Scrolls.

ing countries that encourages the illegal trade industry to flourish. The World Conservation Union placed the pygmies in its “vulnerable” category. As the animals face a high risk of extinction.

Kangaroos returned to Indonesian wild

Indonesian officials have stated that they are returning 17 rare pygmy kangaroos to the Papuan rain forest after recent rescue from illegal traders and private zoos. The mammals — known as dusky pademelons or Thylogale brunii — can grow up to three-feet long and weigh 25 pounds; it is unknown how many of them still survive in the wild. They were born to six males and females cared for by the Cikananga Animal Rescue Centre on West Java, where they have been brought up to survive in their natural habitat. Trade in rare and exotic animals from various areas in Indonesia is prevalent due in part to poor law enforcement. According to Adi Susmianto, a senior official at the Forest Ministry, it is the co-operation of buyers in neighbour-

mdavenport@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Cure for eye disease found in stem cells

After successfully repairing the vision of patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) using cells taken from the patients’ own eyes, a UK team of scientists are hoping to accomplish the same task using retinal cells grown from stem cells in the lab. There are two types of AMD — dry, which is untreatable, and wet, which is treatable. The condition onsets when retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells — a layer of support cells which process light — break down, causing generation of the retina’s macula, and eventually resulting in loss of central vision. The procedures — though largely successful — have complications, take more than two hours and require two operations. In order to overcome these obstacles, University of Sheffield researchers have grown RPE cells from embryonic stem cell lines, hoping to inject a layer of these cells into the patient’s eye. In rats, this procedure has proved to be successful in restoring vision. With the help of a 4 million pound anonymous donation, it is hoped that the first patients will be treated within five years. — With files from National Geographic, Examiner and the BBC News yhettiarachchi@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


Sports

sports@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Imprint, Friday, June 15, 2007

Squash captain on a mission Warriors ace provides lessons in exchange for donations Adam McGuire editor-in-chief

UW’s Adam Rauf has spent years perfecting his craft on the squash court. Now, he hopes to turn his love of the game into an opportunity of a lifetime. Rauf, the Warriors squash team captain from 2004 to 2007, has been offering squash lessons at a popular gym north of campus in exchange for donations towards his planned trip to Bolivia on a goodwill mission. Rauf and six of his fellow members of the University of Waterloo International Health Development Association (UWIHDA) will embark on a three-week journey to Bolivia as part of the Hands Across the Nations initiative to provide healthcare and facilities to the developing nation. While paying for the trip could prove difficult, Rauf is using his athletic prowess to his advantage and raising funds the only way he knows how. “The only thing I’m good at is squash,” said Rauf with a laugh when asked about his motivation for the fundraising campaign. “This way, people give whatever they can, and I’m helping people try something new.” The lessons, which Rauf hosts at Goodlife Fitness on Columbia St., last 30-40 minutes per session. In return for the varsity athlete’s expertise, students are asked to donate anything they have towards Rauf ’s trip. However, the fundraising lessons have not been without its troubles. Rauf originally set out to host the lessons on campus, but UW Athletics and Campus Recreation wouldn’t allow it. Rauf said he was told the donations-only lessons would be a “conflict of interest” with squash lessons Campus Recreation charges for. “I understand their position,” Rauf said of UW athletics’ decision to deny him court space for his lessons. “They have to say no to a lot of things. But I’ve been fortunate that Goodlife Fitness has been gracious enough to host the lessons.” UW Athletic Director Judy McCrae, head of Athletics and Campus Recreation, was unable to be reached for comment on Rauf ’s lessons. But regardless of the lessons’ location, WIHDA Executive Director Krysta Williams said Rauf ’s imitative is necessary for the cost of a safe mission to the South American Nation. “It’s $3,100 for each [student],” said Williams. “It’s mostly airfare and living costs. It costs a lot to live safely in Bolivia.” Williams said the idea of squash lessons came naturally for Rauf when the group discussed possible methods for fundraising. “We just try to bring out everyone’s strengths,” said Williams. “It

Mohammad Jangda

Warriors squash captain Adam Rauf is hosting squash lessons to raise money for a trip to Bolivia with UWIHDA, an organization of UW students focused on global health promotion. Rauf hopes the lessons will help offset the $3,100 cost of the trip. was just kind of a really cool opportunity [for fundraising].” Williams said that she has been involved with Hands Across the Nations for about five years now, making the affiliation with UWIHDA annual trip a natural connection. According to Williams, the main purpose of this particular mission is threefold: first, the UWIHDA members will aid and assist at a dental clinic that was launched in 2005. Second, the students and other missionaries will help construct a new addition to the existing facility: an adult learning and education centre. Finally, in line with the wishes of a village elder, an orphanage will be established and the ground will be broken on construction during the UWIHDA visit. “We’ll be putting up the walls,” Williams said of the orphanage. “It will house about 80 orphans. For the first three to five years, it will be serving the general population. After that, it will be catering to youth sex trade issues.” Rauf added his lessons have been rather well-attended thus far, as he has been able to teach to a few undergrads as well as graduate students. He said he would teach anyone of any skill level, including children and beginners. According to UWIHDA’s website, they are a completely studentgoverned, non-profit organization that cites the World Health Organization’s definition of ‘health” as part of their mission statement. The group was co-founded in 2003 by Rohit Ramchandani and Jonathan Chow. Each lesson has an estimated value of $35. Rauf, who started the lessons in early June, will hold three more blocks of sessions at Goodlife before his trip. Lessons are available from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on June 23 and 24 as well as July 7, 8, 14 and 15. editor@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


Features

features@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Imprint, Friday, June 15, 2007

Revolutionizing the campus food supply Brendan Pinto staff reporter

I’ve often been called paranoid, but I’m surprisingly at ease about it. There is some truth in it, however, and it manifests itself in some of the questions I ask. A recent one was rather simple: “what would happen if the delivery system for all the food I ate was somehow disrupted?” I knew that most of what I ate couldn’t possibly come from anywhere near me and as it turns out, the food most of us eat comes from on average 1000 km from where we live. My thoughts first turned to the fact that even the closest farms were not relatively accessible given my poverty of transportation, nor did they provide the kinds of food I normally eat. Large scale monoculture has become so “efficient” that it is actually cheaper to pay the added transport costs than to produce the same amount on a local “inefficient” farm just a few kilometers away (to say nothing of government subsidies). My initial fear of this apocalyptic hypothetical, though obviously very unlikely, turned from fear to consideration. In addition to

my paranoia, I am also prone to be overly deliberative and decided that is was my responsibility to take some rudimentary level of action instead of thinking about it all day. My goal was to simplify the situation. To have the university provide food to students that was grown nearer to campus. My experience with the produce my roommates had bought from St. Jacobs has always impressed me and their tastiness inspired me to effect some change. Not so small as to be a purely symbolic act — this seems to be the trend in some of the environmental literature I’ve been reading lately. I, on the other hand, was hoping for a more palpable change, but small enough that the ambition of the project wouldn’t swallow itself whole. As an Aquarius, I am supposedly a big-picture thinker — a dreamer to some extent. Going into this blind bred an anxiety that this idea would die on the vine. I decided to press forward and at least see what I’d learn. I figured

learning a bit more would be sufficiently un-ambitious, but in identifying where the resistances to this kind of change existed I would be engaging in an operation worth pursuing. UW Food services handles the vast majority of the food consumed by students on campus. It was with

Christie Ogley

them that I figured the biggest gains in my own local food revolution could be established. My first try was disheartening as it took me nearly half an hour to find a phone number and locate the administrative offices for Food Services. This fact was illuminating as I discovered how hopelessly dependant I have become on the internet for information. Maybe one day I’ll start to think about what the world without the internet would be like. I felt the idea was simple enough. Find out where UW Food Services gets their food and figure out where it would be possible — easy or not — to replace the far off food producers with local providers even if it was only on a seasonal basis (which in the Canadian climate is absolutely necessary). The current food provision paradigm had an inertia that I didn’t want to take lightly. However, a raindrop can wear down a mountain if it brings some friends, so maybe its possible for UW students to move some mountains of our own.

The main point of resistance comes from what I imagine to be the problem inherent in most attempts to get large institutions to switch to local produce. At the beginning of each school year, Food Services needs to be able to set a fixed price for the thousands of frosh who get the mandatory meal plan. To set this price before the school year begins, Food Services requires a reliable source for a full 12 months. This means that they must establish contracts for the entire year that tends to preclude the seasonal nature of Canadian produce. Fortunately, I was not the first to have this idea. A group of much more intelligent and driven people at Local Flavour Plus (LFP), a Toronto based organization, is working to build this kind of relationship between producers and consumers. To ensure greater social and environmental advantages, both growers and processors are “LFP certified,” with strict standards of practice. Perusing the website shows just how dedicated they are to not just local, but sustainable food production. See FOOD, Page 16

Hymen mythbusting: It doesn’t really hurt

“My girlfriend and I are ready to have sex, since it is both of our first times, I was wondering, what positions would you recommend? I’ve heard it can be painful for girls the first time they have sex. Any advice on how to stop or lessen the pain? Is there anything we should do beforehand?” Many people believe that the reason sex can be painful for some young women the first time, is because their

partner is breaking their hymen — or “popping their cherry.” But I don’t buy into that, as we discussed in a previous issue, hymens don’t usually live up to their hype. I think it is much more likely that the reason why sex can be painful the first few times is a combination of factors: you’re nervous, you might be rushing it and neither of you really knows what you’re doing. For vaginal sex to be its most fun, the vagina needs to be excited — wet and elastic. The more turned on a female partner is, the less pain and the more fun she’ll experience. So, to answer your question: yes. There are a few things you should be doing beforehand; you should be doing your “usual” fooling around — making out, petting, rubbing, licking. Well, do

all that until it flows gradually into sex. This way you can ensure that both of you are physically ready, willing and excited. Sex doesn’t have to be a big production number. As for positions, do whatever comes naturally for you. It could be her on top, where she can control how fast and deep things go, it could be you kneeling on the floor and her on the edge of the couch on her back, or it could even be missionary. The position is less important than comfort — you don’t want to be trying any tricky positions the first time, because tension and nervousness are enemies of happy vaginas being ready for sex. “I have a question for you regarding pubic hair. I am a 19 year old boy, who has had very little experience in terms of a sexual relationship and has found little need to spend any time or focus on my pubic hair. However, I’m

starting to feel it may be time to start giving my neglected area a little attention. People seem to skim over the actual trimming step quite fast, and as I’ve never tried anything like this before, I’m feeling a little nervous. Are there certain things I should do to cut it properly? Like wet it, or comb it straight? Just wanting to know if you have any tips for this first time trimmer. Thanks!” You’re right, trimming isn’t a topic that we spend much time on, but that doesn’t mean that it’s not important — I would consider (and many would agree) that trimming is even more important than shaving/waxing — so, I will do my best to answer your question. The half-inch guideline still applies when you’re just giving yourself a nice trim, but don’t worry about getting out a ruler or anything, just trim it until you’re happy with how it looks; the half inch isn’t really a strict rule.

I recommend using a small pair of scissors, like nail or beard trimming scissors, rather than your usual paper scissors or kitchen shears. You’ll be able to be more precise, the cuts will be cleaner, and you wont’ risk accidentally snipping something you didn’t mean to. Electric hair trimmers also work great. You could try using a little comb, if you like, to help deal with longer curlies, but I wouldn’t recommend wetting your pubes before you trim — the hair will just end up sticking everywhere and making a mess.I would, however, recommend standing over the toilet with the seat up, or in the tub before you shower, while you trim with your little scissors/trimmer; you’ll be able to see everything clearly and most if not all of the hair will fall into the bowl, making clean-up a snap. ssparling@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


Features

Imprint, Friday, June 15, 2007

15

The Father’s Day meal that’s made to impress

Impress your dad this Father’s Day by making him a dish of succulent coconut shrimp. Rather than fighting the brunch mob for a dining spot, you can wow him with your culinary skills. This recipe is so simple that you may

want to include it in your own dining repertoire. Frozen is just as good as raw shrimp. However, when selecting raw shrimp, choose those that smell of the sea. If they smell like ammonia, it is an indication that the shrimp have spoiled and are probably not fresh. When they are cooked, shelled shrimp should look juicy and plump. Before you store or use fresh, uncooked shrimp rinse them under cold, running water and drain thoroughly. You can pat excess water with a paper towel. Tightly cover with plastic wrap or a resealable bag and refrigerate for two

days. If cooked, the leftovers can be refrigerated for up to three days. You can store frozen shrimp in the freezer for up to three months. To thaw frozen shrimp, defrost overnight in the refrigerator. If pressed for time, place frozen package in cold water until defrosted.

Ingredients 24 uncooked jumbo shrimp (about 1 1/2 pounds), peeled, deveined, tails left intact 1/3 cup cornstarch 3/4 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper 2 cups sweetened shredded coconut 3 large egg whites 4 cups vegetable oil, approximately (for deep-frying) Method Use a small, sharp knife and starting at top of inward curve just below tail, butterfly the shrimp by cutting each more than halfway through toward outward curve (do not cut shrimp in two). Open each shrimp (like a book) and press slightly

HOUSING

Premium three-bedroom townhouse unit in a professionally managed student complex. Perfect for students, close to UW campus. Now renting May or September 2007. Call Perry now at 519-746-1411 for all the details and to set up a showing. Attention Cambridge School of Architecture students! Live conveniently and comfortably right across the street from school in this beautifully renovated apartment. 4, 8 and 12-month leases available with excellent signing bonuses and rental incentives! Call Perry at 519-746-1411 for more details. Five bedroom house available September 1. Walking distance to both universities. Free parking, laundry, central heating, air conditioning, newly renovated, hardwood floors. A must see – call 519-575-1973. A perfect four bedroom apartment to live in comfortably within a short walking distance to both campuses. Enjoy the convenience of living in a great location close to many shopping amenities and the life of Uptown Waterloo. Call Perry now at 519-7461411 to set up a viewing today. Three bedroom apartment Hazel Street $400 includes utilities and parking. Also two bedroom apartment $900 and five bedroom $350. Also eight rooms at 120 Columbia $400 plus. Call 519-746-6327 or 519501-1486. Only one bedroom left – fall 2007 – very clean house located on Quite Street, 15 minute walk or two minute car ride to UW. Newly renovated, free parking and laundry, 12 month lease. E-mail tollgate295@hotmail.com or call 416-266-3351. Room for rent for a quiet individual in a detached home near both universities. Please call 519-725-5348.

HELP WANTED Weekend counsellors and relief staff to work in homes for individuals with developmental challenges. Minimum eight-month commitment. Paid positions. Send resume to Don Mader, KW Habilitation Services, 108 Sydney Street, Kitchener, ON, N2G 3V2.

Campus Bulletin UPCOMING

Friday, June 15, 2007 Project READ’s third annual Ladies Links for Literacy, Women’s “Best Ball” Golf Tournament at Grand Valley Golf and Country Club. To register or donations e-mail jane@projectread.ca or 519-570-3054. Saturday, June 16, 2007 Alzheimer Society is introducing the annual Metal For Memories campaign for the fight against Alzheimer’s disease. There are two ways to participate, for detailed information, call Mary Kienapple-Longpre at (519)742-1422 ext. 15.

CAREER SERVICES For more information on 2007 workshops, please visit the Career Services website at www.careerservices. uwaterloo.ca. June 19 – Working Effectively in Another Culture – TC1208, 4:30 to 6 p.m. June 20 – Exploring Your Personality Type – TC1112, 2:30 to 4 p.m.

low in fat and calories, a very good source of vitamin D (which helps maintain strong bones) and vitamin B12 (which aids in the formation of red blood cells and maintains a healthy nervous system). tli@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Coconut shrimp with orange mustard sauce Coconut Shrimp

Classifieds

While they may be small in size, shrimp pack a powerful nutrient punch. Shrimp are an excellent source of selenium (which induces DNA repair as well as synthesizing damaged cells), a rich source of protein (a four ounce servings meets 48 per cent of your daily protein needs),

June 26 – Special Session for International Students – TC1208, 4:30 to 6 p.m. June 27 – Explorig Your Personality Type (part 2) – TC1112, 2 to 4 pm. June 27 – Career Exploration and Decision Making – TC1208, 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

ANNOUNCEMENTS Hey students! Tune in weekly to “Morning Drive” with DJ Cool at CKMS 100.3FM for important info on what is happening locally, on campus and in your area. Music, fun and more — morningdrive1@yahoo.ca. Turnkey Desk Recycles Batteries. Drop your old batteries to the blue bin at Turnkey. Row for Heart – learn to row. Register a crew of five or as an individual. Nine week lessons start the week of June 18. Call 519-571-9600 for more information.

to flatten. This method helps ensure the item will cook evenly throughout. Next make your breading station. In a medium bowl, mix cornstarch, salt and cayenne together. Beside that, in another medium bowl, beat egg whites until frothy. Finally, place coconut in a large flat dish next to egg whites. Dredge shrimp in cornstarch mixture, shake off excess. Dip shrimp into egg whites, then press shrimp into coconut; turn shrimp over and press into coconut again to coat both sides. Get out a large plate and put a few paper towels on it. Place it close by. Pour oil into heavy large pot to reach depth of 2 inches on medium high. Test oil to determine if it’s ready when surface is shimmering. Sprinkle

a pinch of the cornstarch into the oil. If it starts to bubble, it’s ready. Working in batches, add shrimp to hot oil; deep-fry until cooked through, about 1 minute. Using tongs or slotted spoon, transfer shrimp to paper towels to drain. Arrange shrimp on platter. Pair it with a refreshing salad. Serve with orange mustard sauce. Orange mustard sauce 1/2 cup balsamic vinegar 2/3 cup olive oil 1 orange, juiced 2 tbsp orange juice 2 tbsp coarse grained mustard In a medium bowl, whisk together the balsamic vinegar, olive oil, orange juice, orange zest and mustard. Use immediately, or store in the refrigerator for up to one week.

Resurrection College HOUSING Single rooms available for Fall and Winter or Fall and Spring terms in Resurrection College residence. Five minute walk to Student Life Centre. Quiet co-ed residence, meal plan, large common areas, high speed wireless internet, local phone service, parking included.

ptusch@resurrectioncollege.ca or visit: www.resurrectioncollege.ca

E-mail:

CHURCH SERVICE St. Bede’s chapel at Renison College offers worship on Sundays at 10:30 a.m. or take a break mid-week with a brief silence followed by Celtic noon prayers on Wednesdays. Beginning Janaury 21 there will also be a 4 p.m. worship. For more info call 519-8844404, ext 28604 or mcolling@renison.uwaterloo.ca.

has a Board position vacant ....

SECRETARY For more information e-mail

FINANCIAL AID

June, 2007 Some grant cheques are available for pick-up. Stop by the Student Awards Office to see if yours is here! June 15, 2007 - Last day to submit Undergraduate Bursary Application for spring term. Recommended submission date for 2007/2008 OSAP application for fall term. June 20, 2007 - Deadline for OSAP reviews for spring term. Start applying for fall 2007 now on the OSAP website. Check out http:// safa.uwaterloo.ca for a full listing of all our scholarships and bursaries.

president@imprint.uwaterloo.ca or agardiner@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


16

Features

Imprint, Friday, June 15, 2007

There’s more than blood in you to give An Imprint volunteer chronicles his experience donating bone marrow in the first of a three part series

continued from page 14

Steven R. McEvoy staff reporter

Many people have never heard of the Unrelated Bone Marrow Donor Registry (UBMDR). ‘What is it’, ‘how does it work’ and ‘how do you get on it’ are all questions I have been answering a lot lately. In this first article of three I will try to answer these and some of the other questions concerning the process of finding a match on the UBMDR. In Canada, the UBMDR is run by Canadian Blood Services (CBS), but it is also part of an international registry. Every year, hundreds of Canadian patients seek a match on the UBMDR, which for many of these patients is their only hope for recovery from illness. You might be able to help! What does it take? A bit of your time, a simple blood test and a willingness to donate either bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cells. Currently there are about 220,000 Canadians who have made this commitment. How does it work? Your blood, regardless of blood type, — A, B, AB, or O — has certain characteristics that they must match. The characteristics are called Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA) — DNA markers. These antigens are found on the surface of white blood cells. Some antigens are more common in specific ethnic groups, so it is important to have as many diverse groups of people in the registry as possible. The registry is also eager to attract young donors because they are generally in good health and produce better long-term survival rates in recipients. After reading the information on the CBS website — www.blood.ca — and filling out a questionnaire, you can perform an online health survey and, if all goes well, CBS will contact you to gather a sample of blood for typing. If you are between the ages of 17 and 50 and in general good health, you can join the registry. Your blood has 12 of these DNA markers, and initial testing will get your top six markers. If you have a match with a recipient, further testing may

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Food: include the community

Grant Carioni

Steven R. McEvoy gives a blood sample to prepare for bone marrow extraction. be required to match the remaining six markers. Currently, there are over 10 million people on donor registries around the world. For the purposes of the UBMDR, stem cells are not the controversial cells often in the media spotlight these days. They are immature cells that can become either red or white blood cells or platelets. Bone marrow is a rich source of stem cells, but stem cells can also be found in peripheral blood. Bone marrow is the soft tissue found in the centre of your bones. It produces stem cells, that develop into the cells. When bone marrow becomes diseased, one of the options is to kill off bone marrow of the recipient and replace it with bone marrow of a donor. A newer procedure is to transplant stem cells — peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC). In this procedure, a donor is injected with granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), which dramatically increases the number of stem cells available for transplant. Once you have joined the registry, there is not a lot you have to do. There is only a 30 per cent chance of finding a match in a patient’s family and it is even smaller from someone unrelated. That is one of the reasons it is so important to get the message out to as many people as possible and have the registry grow: so that as many patients as possible can be helped. Once you are on the registry you must also notify CBS of changes in your health status that would prohibit you from donating and also let them know when you move.

Donors are matched through computer databases. When a transplant physician contacts CBS requesting a volunteer donor, the database is searched for a match on the UBMDR and then through the other registries around the world. If a viable match is found, confirmation is sought before proceeding to the next step. Now onto the how. If donating bone marrow, you are admitted to the hospital and — while under a general anesthesia — a needle is inserted into the pelvic bones on both sides of your lower back. About three to five per cent of your total bone marrow is removed, which your body will replace in a few weeks. This procedure takes about two hours and the donor is usually discharged the same day. If PBSC donation is requested by the transplant doctor, the stem cells are collected through the process of apheresis, where blood is drawn from one part of your body, run through a centrifuge that separates stem cells from blood and is returned through another needle. Donating bone marrow has a few short-term side effects, which sometimes include fatigue and soreness. To donate stem cells, because of the G-CSF, a donor may experience mild bone pain, muscle pain or flu-like symptoms, which usually dissipate within 24 to 48 hours of donating. After cells are extracted, they are transported by medical courier to the patient — who may be anywhere in the world. The patient would have undergone intensive chemotherapy and/or radiation to eliminate all

diseased cells. The harvested cells are then transfused to the recipient and — if all goes well — they will start producing healthy blood cells after a few weeks. This transplant is used to treat a variety of diseases, such as leukemia and other cancers. It replaces bone marrow destroyed by radiation or chemotherapy. In aplastic anemia, it replaces abnormal or absent bone marrow. For some immunodeficiency diseases, it gives patients a brand new immune system. For some enzyme deficiencies, the transplant can help provide the missing enzymes or replaces defective ones. Yet even with all that, you are only providing the possibility — but that possibility is worth it. A donation is, in some cases, the last chance to save someone’s life. Many people out there need help and it costs you little in time and discomfort, so why not consider joining? For more information, check out the CBS website: http://blood. ca/centreapps/internet/uw_v502_ mainengine.nsf/page/CBS%20Bone %20Marrow%20Registry. A number of years ago, when a friend’s sister was sick with leukemia, I went through the process of finding out about the registry and joined. Then, one day, the phone rang. smcevoy@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

(Part two of Steven R. McEvoy’s story will appear in the June 29 issue of Imprint. Part three will appear in the July 13 issue of Imprint.)

Last September, with the help of LFP, the University of Toronto made their first steps towards serving their students with local produce. It wasn’t by the efforts of concerned (or paranoid) students, but was championed by the university administration. The organization of their Food Services is slightly different from the situation in Waterloo as part of the service is outsourced to private companies. Last year, their contract with Sodexho came to an end. The new request for proposal required a certain undisclosed percentage of the food provided be LFP certified with a promise to increment this percentage over time. The Aramark Corporation won the contract. This wasn’t just an opportunity for one business to supplant another. Jaco Lokker is the head chef for the 89 Chestnut student residence in the Toronto campus. More than anyone else, he has embraced LFP with tremendous zeal. While Aramark, UofT and LFP have signed a confidentiality agreement preventing me from gaining any knowledge of the percentage of LFP certified food they use, Jaco openly brags about his use of the service. LFP certified produce accounts for 10 per cent of the food he cooks with, and is venturing to up the ante to 15 per cent in the coming year. It seems that this really has to do with commitment. Jaco started with foodstuffs that can be reliably provided in the Canadian climate. Dairy products and apples were the first to enter into the student’s new local diet. LFP works hard to help institutions overcome the problems associated with establishing a reliable food source for the year. Of course, with more stringent restrictions on the production of food, costs tend to be a little bit higher. On the Toronto campus, around 442 pounds of food get thrown out as waste. Through a campaign to reduce these numbers, they have likewise reduced their operating costs. This hasn’t put it on exactly even keel with the previous food provision situation, but the extra money spent by students does pay dividends in moral capital, as students become more responsible members of the community. So this becomes a matter of resolve. Last September, a joint coalition between Food Services, UW Greens and active students ran a small market selling produce from local farmers. It was an unequivocal success. Unfortunately, due to a dearth of resources on the part of the organizers, they were only able to run this for a little over a month. It was an incredible feat, and I applaud their efforts. I only advocate that this university community take the next obvious step and look towards a more comprehensive inclusion of the local community. My other solution to the apocalyptic was to start a vegetable garden of my own in my backyard. The zucchini is doing fine, I’m on my way to salad bowls full of lettuce, and the leeks are holding their own. It’s not enough to feed me, but it’s a start. We may not be able to get all the food we need in a 50 km radius, but with some effort, and the help of organizations like LFP, Waterloo can make some initial steps of its own. bpinto@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Imprint_2007-06-15_v30_i04  

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