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IN Published every Thursday afternoon of the academic year by the Board of Publications, under authorization of the Studentlp’ Council, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. Subscriptions $3.50 Member: canadian university press s Chairman, Board of Publications: Gordon L. Van Fleet. Editor: J. D. Grenkie Authorized as second class mail by the Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for paymentof, postage in cash.

’ \ At <Last....

. Well, ‘it’s th e 1ast issue and who would have ever thought that we would have made it. We started off disorganized and with a fairly large staff. We ended up organized, but with a very small staff. We did it together and we made it to, the end of the year. And We Are Proud. \ There are several people who we would like to thank for’their ‘extra-special’ contribution to the production of this. newspaper. Fred -Girodat worked hard every Monday as he came in to do the typing which none of us could muster too well. Marion Vale was the copy reader and it was a good thing that she could read our scribble because we usually couldn’t. Jim Peden did a fine job as managing editor and always included his dry wit in the Monday night sessions. Many thanks go to Dave Grafstein, Doug Gaukroger, Fred Brychta, Glenn Patterson, Wayne Tymm (who carried on his column on his work term), Hans Bauer, and Paul Berg. Dave Stephens was our only news reporter this term. In fact, the only group which ended up the year in grand, style is the Layout Department. And this year; they didn’t even get free(pizzas. Oh well, we didn’t get a trip out .West either. . Looking at next year, we cope that we will see a fine and creditable newspaper.-There is no reason why it should not be. There will definitely be a strong layout staff. All the paper will need will be writers. That is up to you students to come forward and offer your help on the paper next year. The experiences and education one can gain on a newspaper are inestimable. We can only assure you that its great. Its well worth the four to five hours that would be required of you. Plan now for next year. Give your time to the building up of a successful newspaper. Don’t let the misfortune which happened to the newspaper this year happen again. Why don’t you come into Annex 1 and the Coryphaeus office and sign up to be on the paper next year. Planning,must be done this summer.

/ Predictions

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No year would be complete until the Coryphaeus had attempted a few predictions: Student Council will not be acclaimed although twenty-five seats are to be filled. Waterloo Warriors will beat the Lutheran Hawks in the largest and most successful Homecoming Weekends ever. There will be over fifty students, some, of them this year’s graduates, wanting a Compendium which they forgot or didn’t bother to order. Annex 1 will be torn down and the Student Council office and our office will be moved. Students will complain that their timetable is late. John Diefenbaker will win the next federal election. Education Minister Davis will step in a mud hole when he opens the Chemistry-Biology Building. next week. The Student Union Building will go ahead on schedule and will be opened in September i966. The Moose will have the first beer.-

Ah, Fame Ubyssey

From The IWaterloo University proudly announced that it may change its name to Winston Churchill University. Just what the great Sir Winston and a muddy little campus in-eastern Canada have in common isn’t really too clear to us. Unless, of course, Waterloo had a long (and secret), association with Sir Winston. _ Bah. It’s the case of a small university vainly reaching for fame and fortune it has despaired of ever gaining through its own efforts. ,’ Editor’s Note Ah, how wonderful it is to be large and ignorant. The University of Waterloo has the largest Canadian university campus. We have gained considerable fame and fortune already without the need of adopting a famous name as the name of our university. It may interest people to know that we have the largest and most progressive engineering faculty in all Canada. The reason for a name change is to remove the existing confusion ‘with Waterloo Lutheran University. Not a jump on, the prestige and fortune band wagon. L

1 ,* SWAN CLEANERS LTD. SHIRT LAUNDERERS Corner King and. University lq% Student Discount

2

The CORYPHAEUS

Letters

should

be directed

OUR

Thanks Coryphieus

Off

of Waterloo,

Waterloo,

Ontario.

Unsigned

Dear Sir: Let me first express my pleasure at receiving the Coryphaeus each \ week in tue mail. Everyone likes to get a letter, but a letter this big is great - and ‘it helps me feel part of what is going-on. Now let me blow my lid. What’s with the mark sender-outers in this place. It has now been two and one half months since I wrote exams. Where the hell are the marks? I know I passed (thanks to the Coryphaeus) but still no official set of marks. Come on somebody, get with it. \

MAILBOX

to: The Editor, Coryphaeus, Annex I, University letters will not be accepted. \

D. J. BUSCH 2A Elect. Eng.

- Campus Voters

- Dave Stephens. . Columnists - Hans Bauer, Wayne Tymm, Fred Brychta, A. J. Kellingworth, III. . CUP

John Armstrong, land, Fred Girodatf Fred Watkinson.

John HolBillPetty, _

- Bob Warren.

by A. J. Kellingworth, III As you should all know since this is the last paper of According to a reliable is reported to have said “Hans Orchestra over my . . . ”

by now, I loathe morbid stories. However, the Year, a little morbidity seems excusable. source, Heinz Unger, just before he died, Bauer will conduct the Toronto Symphony

Dear Sir: In the recent student means survey, questionnaires were given to one fourteenth of the students’ at the University. Were the ballots in the recent student’s council election allocated on a similar basis? Of four off-campus engineers in Kingston to whom I have spoken, one did not receive a ballot for the election. Including me that makes ’ two. There are four other engineers working in Kingston who may or may not have received ballots. For all the fanfare that preceded the election and with the urgent pleas that were issued for co-operation in the election, I feel that someone should be rather red-faced about this. As I do not imagine I would get too far by attempting to demand a new election, I j would like to advocate strongly that in future elections someone should check his mailing lists more carefully. W. H. TYMM Coop. Maths.

Open Letter To Richard Van Veldhuisen Dear Sir: Amid all the paraphanalia attached to the noisy election campaign, I came across a letter from yourself and two others (one of which did not sign) concerning your obligation when yousigned the nomination list. Maybe there is no obligation to support the candidate, but then why did you not sign the. nomination list for Mr. Mueller also. If you did not know what kind of campaign the team was running when you signed you should not have signed. After all, would you,’ buy a pair of shoes without trying them on. I submit that if you feel no moral obligation towards Mr. Yoting’s campaign, then you were not worthy of our support as President of Student’s Council. Even Goldwater was not in the back like this. DAVID

stabbed

R. WEBER Science

How many of you are going to the Grad Ball tomorrow evening? (Please raise one paw to signify your intention.) Good; at least Studen’s Council will not lose too much on this affair. If you have any clever idea about finding me there, however, you have a surprise coming. Sorry, fans, but 1 will not be there. No regrets; I will simply not appear. I have, as it were, included myself out for the occasion. How will you feel, friend, if after blowing fifty dollars or so on-your last undergraduate fling, you find that you have also1 flung your year? Unlikely? Perhaps; but it could happen and, if it did, it would be rather embarrassing. It certainly does give one a sense of security to celebrate -in advance. And only three weeks before exams begin and two weeks before classes end-precisely the time when book-cracking should be a primary occupation. Do not bother about me; enjoy yourself, have fun. After all, you practically have your degree in your pocket. Practically. And you have almost completed arrangements for a good job. Practically. And .you have graduated. Practically. No, do not let my remarks spoil your evening. And, if you are one of the unfortunates who fail, you can spend all of next year convincing Students’ Council that a GraduationBall before graduation is like a hockey game in July: practically in season, but only practically and, therefore, impractical.

This is not only my last column for the year, but also my last column at Waterloo (especially if we are to be SWLSCU in the future). It is difficult to express what writing in the Coryphaeus has brought me. Nevertheless, I shall attempt to do so: headaches, enemies, an ulcer, and so on. However, aside from these minor disadvantages, I have been able to garner the knowledge that I cannot write. Either that or my typewriter is a phynque. Obviously, it has been this space which has carried the Coryphaeus for these past few months and, in a manner befitting its work in this respect, the column has become herniated. Fortunately, all good things come to an end (say the devout) and this is him. The greatest lesson, kidding aside, which I have learned during the past few months (and-which I now, for all it is worth, pass on to you) was admirably stated by the immortal philosopher, L. Allen Wise; I shall not easily forget it. It was he- who said ‘*Beware *of Registrars (Greek or otherwise) bearing (or baring) next year’s tuition fee schedule.” Thank you, L.

\ Before I get carried away with insanity (Insanity Smith, that is. The boys in the white professors’,suits are after him too), I would like to mention all the people who have made my stay at U of W a memorable one. Unfortunately, I do not have the space to thank them all. Thus, included below are the names of a few of the people who have provided me with moments which I can giggle at in my senility and which I will not relate to my grandchildren for fear that they may be corrupted. Merele and Marty; Margie and Russ; Bill and Jim; Paul and Fed; David and Warren; Yvonne and Ray; Mitch and Ted; Al and Ken; Barney and Muriel; Pete and Dave; Bruce and George; Tony and Harold; Judi and Al; Bob and Gord; Ruthie and Chris; Jim and John; ‘Marg and Elsie; Mike and Mark; Joan’ and Marjorie; Dick and Betty; Rollie and and Jackie; Mark and Barbara; Herman and Doug: For those of you whom I have inadvertently left off the list, my apologies. But to all who have helped keep me sane, Thank You.

As the Grad Ball Committee my pubmates sink slowly beneath a passing grade, I take typewriter “So long.”

sinks slowly beneath the horizon, the tables and I sink slowly under in hot, sweaty hand and bid you .


‘IsIt;Art? ’ Paintings, sculptures, and “objects” of the latest movements in contemporary Canadian art have been gathered from major Toronto galleries for ,“Canadian Art Today III” which is being gresented in the Gallery of the Theatre of the Arts, March 10 to April 7, 1965. Hand-selected to show , the full range of current art, the works will be presented in co-operation with the Dorothy Cameron Gallery, the Isaacs Gallery, \ the David Mirvish Gallery, Jerrold Morris I& ternational Gallery, Gallery ‘MOOS, the Roberts Gallery, and the ‘Sobot Gallery. “Enigma” by Harold Town; “Olym-pia” by Michael Snow; pop works by Greg Curnoe and Joyce Wieland; optical sculpture by Francoise Sullivan; colourist abstractions and other examples of the recent trends in Canadian- art will be exhibited side by side with a landscape by Carl Schaei fer and city scenes by A. J. Casson and Alb,ert J. Franck. Names well known in Canadian art such as Leon Bellefleur, Thomas Chatfield, Gershon Iskowitz, Krystyna Sadowska, will be seen side by side with such young artists as Roy Kiyooka. A high per, centage of sculpture is included to ’ increase the comprehensiveness of the show, including works of assemblage.

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painters equally popular will give immediate satisfaction. There is no community of intention among modern Canadian artists and the desire to shock exists side by side with the desire to give aesthetic pleasure. Many of the trends which the public has only began to accept are now almost * past and new works are being done which are scarcely known. Tre,nds which have been developing quietly have in some cases burst *forth into importance very recently. This is not a retrospective exhibition but a survey of * the more current works in Toronto. A groupof students, faculty and staff from the University went with me to visit the Galleries and chose works which thoroughly represent the range of modern Cana< dian paintings as exhibited there. It was an experience of real excitement . for us and we look forward to sharing this experience with those who attend the exhibition. This may well be the most comprehensive exhibition of current trends in Canadian art ever seen in Kitchener-Waterloo; its effect on persons wishing to become familiar with what is really going on these days should be considerable.“’

“Some of the pieces in this exhibition are sure to raise questions and eyebrows,” Nancy-Lou Patterson, Gallery, Director says. “Others by

be given by Mrs. Patterson, and will provide a background to the works exhibited. Full explication of the exi hibition itself will also be given. “The extraordinary generosity of the galleries and their artists in making works of such distinction (and in such demand) available to the University of Waterloo, is a tribute to ‘our efforts to advance education in the Fine Arts, and we hope that both students and the public will take advantage of this exceptional opportunity,” Mrs. Patterson states. “Canadian Art Today III” is a major effort on the part of the Gallery of the Theatre of the Arts comparable to its very well received exhibi,tion of “Liturgical Artists of Ontario,” held November 5 - 30, 1965. “The Gallery exists to make the finest in Canadian art available to its students and to the public,” Mrs. Patterson says. “This exhibition, the -finest assemblage of recent’ Canadian works ever to be shown on our campus will be a large contribution to this purpose.”

MIC -

A series of five lectures, “Origins and Directions of Modern Art” will be given through the Department of Extension of the University beginning March 10 and will run concurrently wtih “Canadian Art Today III.” The lectures, illustrated with slides, will

by Wayne t)cmm If nothing else, 1965 will be remembered as the Year of the Showers. Continuing Z+trend for establishing world records in odd sports during the sixties, a Sir George Williams University student took a 60-hour shower. This was soon beaten by Phil Calvert, of Acadia University, who boasts a record 101 hours in the wet. Mr. Calvert probably has the world’s record for the most wrinkled skin, too. The great attraction of these records is that they can be ’ set in any activity. In 1961, University College at the University of Toronto set the World’s Telephone Talkathon record after students spent a week on campus telephones. Conversations at first was mainly rcitals of “How to build a Better Vocabulary,” the works of Ann Landers, and excerpts from Canadian poetry. Students found as the week progressed that they could manage to keep the conversation going without artificial aids. In 1962’, the World’s Monopoly Playing record was claimed by students at McGill University. The players stopped playing after 100 hours, expecting there to be no contenders for the title. They should have known better one month later, having talkd themselves /hoarse the year before, U. of T. students decided to try a new pursuit and played monopoly for six days and six nights. The record still stands. ‘In 1962 also, students at l&Master University ’ skated around a frozen quarter mile track holding a hockey stick with a puck attached. A total of 250. miles in 20 hours was covered. The only truly challenging contest was mentioned in 1963 by the University-of Western Ontario Gazette. The ad asked for “handsome, virile sons of the sod” to carry’ Volkswagens. The results of this one are not known. Twenty-six members of the Administration and faculty of Sir George Williams University in Montreal signed a petition last week protesting United States policy in Vietnam and urg-

0001 by H. B.

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Theatre Comment> / d, A. J. Brychta

Last Sunday was the last in the current series “Jazz at the Theatre” sponsored by Circle K. While Trev Bennett was rather disappointing in comparison to Pat Ludwig’s Trio, his “African Waltz” was a great piece. The most remarkable tune of the afternoon. (with full improvisation) was Girl from Ipewana by Ludwig. Bennett also did this later but it sounded rather ‘Lawrence Welkie’ rather than ‘jazzie’. Gentlemen, I come from the olde schoole and don’t believe in playing jazz off music sheets. Both these groups are good dance bands ‘(I’ve heard them) and Ludwig in particular is an excellent light jazz group. * .*, * Last Sunday also closed off Ukrainian Week with, the Ukrainian Concert on Sunday eve. Insofar as talent is concerned there is no second but the technical. production proved to be amateurish. There was some superb singing exhibited by the U. of T. Ukrainian Choral Ensemble but the theatrical manners of some of the performers could be questioned. One soprano in particular, after her solo, pivoted about without a bow and marched back to her group shaking her head in disgust. If there is ever another concert of this type, it is also suggested that the opening speech could be cut down to a shorter length of time and not read in a monotone! The second half in particular, however, has to be commended because it was all ad-lib and gave the audience an’ insight ’ to Ukrainian folklore and traditions. The Ukrainian Club has a great potential with -this Ukrainian Week and I hope more effort is put into it next year.

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Tomorrow the Canadian Players are here to do their “All About Us” and as the title suggests, its about “a neglected country-Canada. On Friday it won’t have been neglected much longer - its- to be satirized, and the stuff high school history books leave out won’t be left out any longer as it’s finally to come ,out in the open.

ing the Canadian government to lead the way in initiating peace talks over this strife-torn South East Asian country. Expressing fear that further U.S. bombings in North Vietnam will provoke nuclear war, the petition called the U.S. action against North Vietnam “a public confession of the failure of American policies in South Vietnam.” The petition supported Prime Minister Pearson’s expression of concern over recent American strategy in Vietnam; and urged the Canadian government to use its membership in the International Control Commission in Vietnam to stimulate the organization of peace talks.

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* * * ) More names of people who got the Norwegian water puzzle are: Joseph Kaduc (SC. III), Bernard Poechwan (Pre-Arts), Crystal Toole (W.C.I.; b Gr. 13), and Michael R. Wise (Arts II). One more person who got it wrong was Jour Hinsberger (SC. I). A little error was noticed for me in last week’s column. The question to the answer (both of which were left out) was, “Who was the engineer?” and the answer (seeing as thii is the last Cory) to the question is Smith. *

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* *‘* In closing up this little tuck shop of criticism, I wish to thank evervone who has helped ‘me with this column, in particular, Mr. Paul Berg and Dr. Cummings. It was a great theatre season and next year promises more, so be here! *‘* Good bye, Bless you.

The new colleges would 20,000 population and would ing area. Each college would education under which the varied lengths depending on

good

* luck,

and

: God

be located in centres of at least draw students from the surround: be operated by the\ local board of institution would offer courses of the training included.

L t I

kc*

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One record which is safely secure - at least from students - is held by the University of British Columbia. Agnes Riverdale Magic, mother of Ubyssey Magic Sovereign, became the first Canadian cow to produce more than 30,000 pounds of Imilk in 305 days of twice daily milking. Agnes (we were not told whether she was an unmarried mother or not) produced 32,764 pounds of milk. Most cows stop producing after 3 15 days, but Agnes, faithful in the line of duty, continued the rest of the year, yielding a 365-day total of 37,406 pounds of milk. Agnes, who \weighs only 1575 pounds, is now awaiting birth of her sixth little bundle of sunshine.

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Thursday, March ll,l965 \

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A last word to both my readers! “Mom, Dad. I’ll be in Florida if you want me!. OK?”

The colleges would be patterned after Ontario’s five ins& tutes of technology - at Toronto, Hamilton, Windsor, Otta-. wa, and Kirkland Lake - but would offer a true alternative to university with courses in engineering, business, para:medical fields, and the creative and performing arts. The Committee of Presidents felt that the creation of junior colleges, as in the United States, would not be necessary as plans for expansion of the provincial universities should meet university s enrolment up to 1980 without crowding.

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The cool weather seemed to dampen the fervour of the demonstrators as they periodically went into the American embassy to get warm. They they mingled without any apparent Outside police’ kept the demonstrators moving antagonism. while onlookers gazed at the varied placards. One lady was heard to ask “Are they supporting anybody?” I

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The week following, our very own. ’ production of “A New Way to Pay ’ Old Debts” is to be played here. It’s a broad comedy and has a cast apI proximating that of Fass night. In other words, there’ll be someone in it you know. Dr. Dust of ‘our English Dept.’ is producing and directing it. Dr. Dust also produced and directed Moliere’s “The Miser” as some of the senior members on campus will ’ remember. Don Carter, Arts II, is the leading player with a host of supporting cast. This nlav is running Wedneiday, Thursday and Saturdai (Mar. , 17, 18 and 20) and is expected to break an attendance record or two. It’s about a man who has money but no class and wants his daughter in the highest echelons of society.

The latest proposal for updating Ontario higher education facilities concerns the establishment of more than 30 city colleges across the province. This proposal has been advocated by the Committee of Presidents of the Provincially-Assisted Universities and Colleges of Ontario in a report prepared for the provincial government’s Department of University Affairs. The city colleges would provide the specialized training facilities which universities are not designed to offer but which are required for students unsuited for university education.

A group of 60 frozen ‘Carleton University students demonstrated before the American embassy in Ottawa last month. ’ The demonstration concerned Vietnam, with the group divided into those supporting American policy in that country and those protesting against it. A third group of students demonstrated against the demonstration. About 40 students supported the U.S. and carried placards. (“We are the U.S.‘s friend”), American flags, and a confederate banner. A ‘spokesman for the group said the demonstration was held because some students, “were afraid people would think Carleton was antiAmerican.” The protesting students, who did not exceed 12 in number, sent three men, including a Carleton professor to present a letter to the American ambassador. The demonstrators who were demonstrating against the demonstration numbered 4. They carried signs reading, “No parking, snow removal” and “Slow, children at play.” Bill Dawes, one of the four, said that his group was representing apathy, “the most important element on campus?

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‘This play would be ‘banned at some universities if they tried to put it on there but not here. ’

the

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Coryphaeus Staff - (seated row left to right) Doug Seaborn, Jim Ball, l%ie Maussner,. Errol Semple, Dave Witty, Marion Hale, Jim Peden, DOUG GRENKIE, Dave Grafstein Ted Walsh Dick Mondoux, Bob Waren, J. W. 1. Armstrong, Dave Stephens, Terry Nelson. (back row left to right) Doug Weir, WaynelRamsay, Dave Youngs, Bill Petty, A. J. Brychta, Jim Crombie,’ Fred Watkinspn, Harm ’ Rombeek, Ron Sarto. Absent are Harold Dletrrch, Hazel Rawls, Russ Collms, Tex Houston, Terry Joyce, . Doug Gaukroger, Glenn Patterson. ’

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Student eetin In a rather long and hectic meeting last week, the Board of Student Activities passed three large budgets. Jo Stoody, chairman of Orientation, presented the committees budget for orientation ‘65. The exact total of expenses will depend on the Friday night entertainment of Sept. ‘24, as the committee must select two. of Ian and Sylvia, The Travellers, and The Raftsmen. However Miss Stoody pointed out that ticket sales to next years Frosh (Books of tickets for all events will be sold at $5.00 per book) would cover even the maximum ’ cost for between $5506 and $6306. The programme for next year includes 7 events: A charity Drive, a Torch Light Parade, Talent Concert, a Frosh Hop with Ronnie Hawkins providing the music), and a Freshette Tea. The debating club, now known as the University of Waterloo House of Debates, had its new constitution approved. The budget for 1965-66 was also approved. The. board agreed to grant $2406.00 of the $5106.00 budget, which includes the clubs general competition, and an international parliamentry debate tournament to be held at this University next year. The

Drama

Society

also had its

FASSNITE ‘66 - Producer,Acts, NEEDED

lnternati.onal

ectic budget and recommendations approved. The budget, which includes provisions for two major productions, a St. Ethelwald’s production, and a “studio night” came to an estimated cost of $3200. Anticipated receipts, which of course can only be approximate, should be about $29.00. The Folk festival presented only an informal report as no complete statement is yet available. There was an estimated loss on the festival of about $1100.00, and several reasons for this failure were suggested. One of the most important ones was that there was inadequate advertising for the programme. This was because the committee did not know what the entertainment was to be until shortly before the Festival, due to an uncooperative agency in Toronto. The Grad Ball committee gave a final report before the dance. Tickets are still available, and may be obtained from Helga Petz in annex I until the dance, but it is too late to rent a tux. Finally, the Circle K Club requested $71.42 out of a budgeted $150.00 for losses on the 1964 Christmas Banquet.

The International Students Association Music and Dance Evening held Sunday evening at the Arts Theatre was well received by over 300 gests. Miss Hilda Lightfoot from England was Master of Ceremonies. Miss Lightfoot gave explanations of each number with interpretations which enabled the Audience to understand the meanings of the dances and songs. The programme opened with the Chinese presenting the Lion Dance; the story of the Lion awakening, prowling across t,he bridge and greetings. Chinese music - supplied by the cast accompanied the dance. W. B. G. Cheng, A. J. A. Hsi, B. Weng, J. K. C. Wong and S. H. Chung were the performers. Dr. and Mrs. Duvvuri Thirumalesa from India presented Ganesha and Shiva Stuti, the prayer offered to the dancing god, Shiva before the actual dance begins. Dr. Thirumalesa explained the different movements and had them demonstrated by his wife which enabled us to understand their dancing. Rene Raul Drucker of Mexico accompanied by Ron Edari on guitar presented Mexican Folklore. Matanamadinar by Dr. and Mrs.

We have furnished our apartment in Early American style - that is, paid for it in cash.

FASS-nite is one of the major theatrical productions on this campus. To produce this high calibre show of satire, wit and (perverted) talent, the producer must be selected early. The producer’s job is to arrange for and direct acts, to enlist all necessary personnel, to direct publicity and all other aspects of the production. Applications are now being accepted for this imporatnt position. All those who wish to take advantage of this outlet for creativity and personal imagination are urged to apply. Staff and faculty as well as

st.udents are eligible. The candidate must be returning to the University in the fall of 1965. Applications must be submitted to: FASS Nite Selection Board, - Miss S. Forbes, Theatre Office, before noon, Friday March 19. List your name, address and telephone as well as a brief summary of experience and qualifications.

Duvuir, followed. This was the cosmic dance of Shiva, graphically described by the famous poet Gopalakrishna Bharathi. Miss Karen Konrad accompanied Yasuyuki Horiguchi and Shigeo Noda from Japan. They sang Sukiyoki, Dragon Fly and Song of The Beach. The African Dance group, Ron Edari, Toks Oshinowo, 0. A. Ajani, Dave Umeh and Jimmy Layode showed a typical scene from Africa; a Father celebrating the arranged marriage of his daughter and their dances to hope for a grandson. Dasavatharamula-This dance describes the ten incarnations of Lord Vishnu, as various eras to clear the earth of all

wicked people-by Mrs. Duvuir. Thirumalesa. Chinese Folksongs “In That Far Away Land,” Dew and The Orphans Song, by Miss S. W. L. Lo and Mr. J. K. C. Wang accompanied on the piano by Mr. T. Kay. Philippino Bamboo Dance by Arora Penerosa assisted by Miss Constantine and Mr. Mehkeri. A group of Students from the Waterloo Collegiate presented 2 Scandinavian Dances. Thillana by Dr. and Mrs. Duvvari Thirumalesa, a dance full of joy and ecstacy involying rhythmic nuances and characteristic poses, is always performed at the end of Bharat Natyam recital. Marion Hale representing Canada sang a group of Canadian Folk Songs, both English and French. The programme closed with all performers coming on stage and joining with the audience in singing 0 Canada accompanied by Miss K. Konrad.

Overheard : “My New Year’s Eve couldn’t have been duller if I were Adam.‘, 1

.

Any individuals or groups wishing to submit an act for FASS-Nite ‘66 may indicate their intention in writing to the above for referral to the new producer. .

N.D.P. Club Formed At a meeting of the University of Waterloo Socialist Club held on Wednesday, March 3, a motion was passed to change the name of this group to the University of Waterloo New Democratic Party Club. The new organization will be affiliated with the Ontario Youn,g New Democrats. The club’s const,itution will be changed where necessary. An election of officers for 1965-1966 was held, the results being: President, Bob Raphael ; Vice-President, Ron Edari ; Secretary, Dave Kelly; Publicity Director, David Youngs.

Book Store Sets New Record The University of Waterloo Book Store set a new record last week when they sold 250 packages of ‘Old Port Cigars.’ Officials said that they had ordered an extra carton to meet the demands of the students. Several students have threatened to picket ’ the Book Store if they do not have more ‘Old Port’ in stock.

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and 20 in the Theatre

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1 groce~~~~n~~~~~~z

Thursday, March II, 1965


’ HISTO’RY - DYNAMIC I

’ A New Way-

To Pay Old Debts -

On the nights of the 17,18 and 20 of M&h, the Student Drama Society of the University of Waterloo is presenting the 17 century English play ‘A New Way To Pay Old Debts’ under the direction of Dr. Dust. Phillip Ma‘ssanger’s play had its earliest performance before 1633 an4 concerns a certain Giles Overreach, a wealthy man who is served by two opportunistic individuals Greedy, Justice of the Peace, and Marral. Not having an inherited title, Giles’ sole iptere& in life is to have his daughter Margaret become ‘Right Honorable’ or to get some inherited title. Two of his victims in his headlong plunge of “great god of setting on” is Lady Allworth and Frank Wellborn. He is foiled in his attempts however, and his daughter finds her mate in Tom Allworth, stepson to Lady Allworth. Lady Allworth, contrary to Overreach’s plans marries Lord Love1 whom Overreach had intended for his Margaret. “This is reputed to be a comedy of which Shakespeare, himself, would have been proud,” said Dr. Dust.

The characters include Don Carter as Overreach; Peter Leschynski as Lord Lovel; John Turner as Wellborn; Steve Altstedter as Marral; Mindy Marshall as Froth; John Holland as Greedy; Marilyn, Heindmarch as Lady Allworth; Lynda Britton as Margaret Overreach; Sharon Whitney as the chambermaid; Dorothy Binder as the waiting woman; Ian Ferguson as Allworth; ‘Kerrie Fletcher as Parson Will Do; The servants are Gordon Johnstone, Don Steinhouse, Chr& Lawson, and John Silcox; the creditors are John Bowsteel, Jim Bakker, and Carl Davies. The play appears to be a real treat and I am sure that it will be a ‘sellout’ for all three performances. Tickets are available at the Theatre Box Office.

by Fred

Mr. Girodat’s ‘History is static.’

article

Girodat

to a statement

is in reply

CHANGlES

in the Coryphaeus

that

History has its modern developments much like other educational courses at university. One important advancement in history is the developmeit of new fields or areas of study. Europe was once regarded as the important historical region, and the pa& of any other part -of the world, was studied only in its relation with Europe. We studied how things took shape in Europe and how they then flourished in other parts of the world. We no longer retain this ego-centric way of studying the past arld we now recognize the significant views of other people. One challenging new fikld gaining importance is I Ethno-history. Ethnohistory is the reconstruction of the past of people who have no written accounts. Dr. Patterson of the University History department, is doing research in this field, on the North

American Indian. At present at the U. of W., there is already an African history course using the writings

of other historians who have applied enthno-historical techniques to the reconstruction of African history. Other new fields are concerned with the Far East and Russia. Until recently, the study of Russian history was neglected in Canada. It seemed alien to our western-European orientCo&d.

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HISTORY

ed view of what was significant.. The attitude had to be changed with the shift in the world’s balance of power. Mr. Davies of our History department, whose graduate training was subsidized by an American National Defence Fellowship, and who has spent. a year in Russia, is initiating our students into the history of this region. Not only are new fields opening tohistorians, but new material is available. Material, once ignored as insignificant because it was not from diplomatic or governmental sources, is now being studied. History is no longer ‘past politics.’ Examples of new material are missionary accounts and diaries. The amount of permissable information is greater and new facts are being discovered through the utilization of techniques developed by the social sciences. Anthropology, archeology, statistics, economics, sociology and psychology, all help in bringing more subject matter and facts to the researcher’s attention. Besides these new techniques and approaches to history, there are also new interpretations of old material. Old history is re-examined and questioned in the’ light of current problems, and new insights into old facts help to develop new theories and ideas \of the past. History has always been concerned with individuals. Whereas only the great and mighty used to be considered important enough to be the subject matter of history,‘the lives of representative common folk are now being studied. We take more democratic approaches and we study popular man’s art, literature, and language to determine more about these people who leave fewer personal records. History is ’ no longer dealing with

The Board of Publications is endeavouring to publish a booklet which would include officers and faculty advisors of the various clubs and activities on campus (for the 1965-66 term), a short resume (50 words) of the function of each club, officers to contact for joining the club, and time and place where the club expects to meet. This booklet will be published before the next school term or sooner if possible and shall be available to all students. It would be a valuable asset to the freshmen students who are enrolling at the University for 1965-66. Please turn this information into the Board of Publications Annex I before March 31, 1965. Information re’ceived after this date will not ,be published in the booklet. only events and political incidents and decisions of a nation, but an attempt to preesnt, as close as possible, a reconstructed ‘picture of what occurred at a given time, from all points of view, concerning all involved and the effect it had on the present period and the future. Increasing knowledge in the social sciences Bnd other subjects, and technological developments such as micro-film, and devices for determining an object’s age, etc., enable us to do better and more thorough research in any well-equipped library. As research becomes more advanced, history becomes more authentic. A changing world with changing world conditions has altered our views, our methods, and our interpretations. Far from being static, history is a dynamic academic discipline utilizing modern techniques and concepts as they are developed in the social sciences and the humanities.

TO THE

PENNYPINCHERS..

.

“It takes much art To choose a la carte For less than they quote For the table d’hote.” JUSTIN RICHARDSON

STUDENT during

WAGNER,

B.

For further information write: STUDENT CUBA TOUR ,165 Spadina Ave., Room 30, Toronto

2B

,

menus sert, in the Dixie Free

Parking

we with

and

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beverage student

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student Soup,

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Montreal ’ Become Champs The Queen’s Go.den Gae.s played a ‘rough and ready’ hockey game last Saturday afternoon, but thb University of Montreal Carabins managed to stay ahead and become the Senior Intercollegiate Hockey Champions as they posted a 4-3 victory. The game was an exciting one all the way as Queen’s tied the game three co&ecutive times after the Carabins opened the scoring at the ten minute mark in the first period. Lefort, Boucher, Delage, and Lefort again were the marksmen for the Montreal Carabins. Jones, Major, and Van Brunt scored for the Gaels. Four of the goals were scored on f poiver plays. Queen’s played a hard-hitting game throughout, but the fast and sure skaters on the Montreal team won out. Queen’s outplayed the Carabins in the first period but were outclassed in the remaining tyo periods. The game would not even have been close if it had not been for the spectacular goaltending of Gael’s goalie, Elwin Derbyshire. The Carabins scored the winning goal with one second remaining in the second period with Queen’s short two men.

CLAUDE BRODEUR LEAVING by David

Stephens

Mr. Claude Brodeur, a lecturer in Philosophy and an active member in Student Affairs, will begin to work full time on his Doctoral Thesis this September at the U of Toronto.

Brodeur

explained

that

He believes that there is a slow but definite growth in the intellectual standards at this’ University that will accelerate as graduate studies in all Faculties increase. The past few years were described by Mr. C. Brodeur as a perio$ of growth and stabilization for the University.

as a

Senior Intercollegiate All-Star Teams First Team GUARDS: Dave West, Toronto (32) Bob Horvath, Windsor (32) CENTRE: Ed Bordas, McMaster (28) FORWARDS: Ed Petryshyn, Waterloo, (30) Joe Green, Windsor (24)

philosopher he is interested in ideas and the ideals of people. He has studied psychology so that he &ay further understand people and because he feels that a philosopher should be well grounded in some other field.

Mr. Brodeur is well known to students here as a very capable member of the Administration. At present he holds’the following offices: Chairman of the Health Services Committee, Secretary of the University Residence Committee, ViceChairman of the Project Committee for the Campus Centre Building, and Chairman of the University Committee on Student Discipline. Mr.

Basketball 1964-65 Second Team

.

Vlad Baranowicz, Toronto (11) Peter Ewing, McMaster (6) Tom Henderson,

Witerloo

(20)

Jim Holowachuk, Larry Ferguson,

Toronto (20) Queen’s (10)

Are you a candidate for assistance under the

CANADA STUDENT LOANS ACT?

Elwin Derbyshire was awarded the outstanding player plaque for the playoff series. He stopped 46 Montreal shots. In the Carabins 6-4 victory over the Toronto Blues on Friday. Derbyshire turned back 51 drives.

WORK TOUR TO CUBA July and August 1965

Everyday

Tried

Award

LIFE INSURANCE IS A CRAFTY BUY BOB

Queen’s

Visitors On Friday, April 23rd, three distinguished visitors will come to the campus for a varied program of philosophical activities. They are Professor Kurt Bair of the University of Pittsburgh; Professor David Gauthier of the University of Toronto, and Professor Antony Flew of Keele University, England. All three of these men are eminent in contemporary philosophical analysis. Professors Baier and Gauthier will engage in a symposium in the afternoon on the subject, “Can Morality be Justified?” a question occasioned by the differences of opinion in their respective books on moral philosophy. In the evening, Professor Flew will offer a public lecture, “Again the Paradigm”, which concerns fundamental issues in the methodology of philosophy.

Under this Act, each qualifying student may present a Certificate of Eligibility to the bank branch of his (or her) choice. Royal Bank, with over 1000 branches across Canada, offers you convenient service combined with practical counsel. Visit your nearest branch.

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1964-65_v5,n30_Coryphaeus  

Thanks Coryphieus ’ As the Grad Ball Committee sinks slowly beneath the horizon, my pubmates sink slowly beneath the tables and I sink slowl...

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