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radius® Restaurant: Honouring Hamilton’s Past and Future Imagine you’re out with friends on a Friday night, chatting over charcuterie and sharing Chardonnay at one of Hamilton’s most popular restaurants, which sits prominently at the cozy corner of James South and Augusta Street. As you toss back the last sip of wine in your glass, your eyes climb the restaurant’s height, eventually catching original 1800s tin ceilings divided by a sturdy, aged wooden beam that meets towering walls of light-splashed exposed brick. ‘How long has this building stood in this spot? What came before?’ you wonder. As you may have guessed by now, you’re at radius®; a restaurant and event space – with the best outdoor patio in the city, to boot – that marries decadent bistro fare with a sleek modern aesthetic paying homage to the building’s historical roots. “Our vibe is unique. It’s a contemporary feel, combined with historical charm,” says Lisa Mercanti-Ladd, co-owner of radius®. The building’s roots are fascinating ones. The large space was once home to Hamilton historical icon Isaac Buchanan, a local political figure and businessman who had previously lived in the famous Auchmar Estate mansion continues on page 13

CRAFTINESS BRINGS HAPPINESS THIS HOLIDAY SEASON FIND GREAT LOCAL PRODUCTS IN OUR GIFT GUIDE

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P U B L I S H E R + E D I TO R Robert Cekan robert@urbanicity.com

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Urbanicity magazine is wholly owned and published by Urbanicity Canada Inc. All content copyright © 2019 and all rights to distribution are reserved by Urbanicity Canada As a forum for ideas, issues, and experiences, the views expressed in the magazine are not necessarily those of the Publisher, Editor, other contributors, advertisers, or distributors unless otherwise stated.

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TRIVIA 1. A dam was built in 1971 by the Binbrook Conservation Authority which created a reservoir known as Lake Niapenco. The name Niapenco is an abbreviation of three words. What are they? 2. What year was Stelco founded? 1890, 1910, or 1930? 3. Hamilton used to manufacture cars for this now defunct automobile brand at a plant on Victoria Avenue North. Which company was it — Studebaker, Oldsmobile, or Plymouth? 4. Hamilton ranks what number for ‘fastest growing mid-sized city for tech talent in Canada’? Answers on page 19

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DECEMBER 2019 | THE HOLIDAY ISSUE

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Craftiness brings happiness this holiday season!

While Christmas shopping can feel overwhelming, it’s infinitely more pleasurable when it involves perusing artisanal products at Craftadian®’s Christmas Market. On Saturday, December 7th, head over to McMaster Innovation Park to find the perfect indie crafts and foodie gifts for your loved ones. Set to host more than 90 local vendors, including artists, chefs, wares, and more, Craftadian® offers the best in Canadian-made, smallbatch treats from talented makers, along with soulful tunes by DJ Aerlie Wilde, a local art exhibit, photos with Santa, and delicious edible treats. Here are some Canadian-made gifts for everyone on your list.

Impress your loved ones with Burlington-made leather goods from designer Keegan Lodder’s Gusset Leather. Keegan uses reclaimed leather to produce unique, durable, hand-crafted leather items.

Card Wallet (black bridle) $50

Foodie friends will be thrilled to find their stockings stuffed with artisanal ingredients such as honeys, oils, sauces, and spices – all available from a variety of speciality makers like Kinsip House of Fine Spirit’s Whisky Barrel Aged Maple Syrup or The Barton General’s in-house jams, mustards and more!

Ageing in Kinsip whisky barrels gives this Prince Edward County maple syrup its robust, smoky flavour. Perfect on pancakes and ice cream, in cooking, and in cocktails! $25 for 375ml

Artisanal pickled vegetables and sea salt from The Barton General. Prices vary.


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Locally made presents are always unique and double as an easy way to support independent makers in Ontario. The province is home to an overwhelming number of talented jewellers, including Fabiana Papaleothe behind Mimo (Meaningful Ideas for Meaningful Objects). Fabiana’s one-of-a-kind fish skin & leather jewellery line is designed and produced in Toronto.

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For the proud Hamiltonians in your life, pop into Craftadian for ultra-local gifts including hand knitted toques by Rough Bark Knits and gorgeously scented soy wax candles, hand-poured by Ellingwood Soap Company.

3 in 1 fish stud earring with 14K Gold Plated fan earring jacket $75

Rough Bark Knits with faux fur pom poms, $20 each Ellingwood Amber & Sandalwood soy candle, range from $18 - $50

Inspired by nature, Love at First Blush creates a new approach to jewellery, shaping natural textures into feminine forms and delicate pieces of wearable art, designed and handmade in Toronto.

Leather feather necklace by Love at First Blush $100

Handmade in London by Boosh. 25K Gold Lip Gloss, $25 and Sparkle Balm, $15 For the sensitive types, Iremia Skincare’s luxurious natural product range is made especially for sensitive and reactive skin, while Boosh’s clean beauty range of lipsticks and lip glosses are sure to delight that special woman in your life.

This award-winning multivitamin restorative facial oil helps strengthen your skin and improves skin tone, elasticity, and overall hydration, $62

Pre-sale tickets are on sale on Eventbrite now, including special $3 tickets with code: URBNCITY. Tickets will be $5 day of the event at the door, capacity allowing. Doors open at 10 am with free swag for the first 50 families in line. For details, visit craftadian.ca


DECEMBER 2019 | THE HOLIDAY ISSUE

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Hamilton December race guide With that in mind, here’s a list of the most prominent races taking place in Hamilton and the surrounding area over the winter months.

SHAWN SMITH

Shawn is a writer from Hamilton. He enjoys sports, music, and reading. His work has appeared in The Globe and Mail and on Bleacher Report, Vice Sports, and Sportsnet.ca.

With the cold weather coming early, it can be a difficult time of year for runners and outdoor enthusiasts alike to stay in shape and keep up the training regimen that has been built up throughout the warm summer and fall months.

The four-mile course sees runners leave from the Hamilton Downtown Family YMCA, make their way up Bay Street and through Bayfront Part before working their way back up Hughson Street towards the finish.

SA NTA BURLING TON 5K – DE C E M BE R 7TH If you’re looking to mix a little holiday spirit into your running, there’s no better way to do so than to try out a Santa run. While Hamilton holds its Santa run in November, Burlington’s version of the Santa 5k is just two weeks before Christmas and provides a perfect opportunity to have a little fun with friends.

If you’re like me, you need a race coming up to stay motivated; it gives us a reason to keep moving even when the thermometer dips into the negatives.

The route takes runners along Brant Street and Lakeshore Road in Burlington before making their way up Maple Avenue and Hammond Street. Runners will finish on Brant Street.

Hamilton has long been one of Canada’s finest running cities. With incredible trails that take runners past scenic waterfalls and, of course, the famous Around the Bay race, Hamilton is a worthy destination for runners to test their merit.

If you’re looking for something to do with your children, lining up along the route to cheer on the hard-working runners is always appreciated. Seeing thousands of people in Santa suits is a spectacle that must be seen to be believed.

The 10-mile course also takes runners through Bayfront Park but extends the run towards the west end of the city before finishing at the same point as the fourmile runners and walkers.

99TH ANNUA L YMCA BOXING DAY 10-MI L E AND 4- M ILE R ACE – DE C E M B E R 2 6TH If you’re looking to shake off that big holiday dinner, there’s no better way to do so than to sign up for the 99th annual YMCA Boxing Day 10-mile and 4-mile run. It has long been part of Hamilton’s running history and this year will be no different as the legendary race continues its trek towards the century mark.

The reasonable sign-up fee is perfect for the frugal runner and the medal, which resembles a snowman, is perfect for any runner’s collection. The 10-mile run is also a perfect precursor for those looking to test their running abilities at the Around the Bay Road Race, which takes place on March 29th, 2020. Around the Bay is famous for being the oldest road race in North America, with a history that goes back to 1894. The race established Hamilton as a home for long-distance runners, which it continues to be.

Ancaster Memorial Arts Centre breaks ground

BEYOND JAMES

Launched in 2019, Beyond James is an independent blog focusing on news and reviews of the Hamilton arts community. Passionate about the power of the arts and culture to unite communities, Beyond James recognizes that great art isn’t confined to one space or one street in Hamilton: it’s everywhere.

Following five years of planning, the Ancaster Memorial Arts Centre finally began to take shape on Wednesday, November 14th, at the official groundbreaking ceremony. Despite the cold and snow, community members gathered in their winter gear against a backdrop of blue construction fencing to hear dignitaries speak words of support before shoveling up the first mounds of dirt among many as construction began. According to the Centre’s website, the new building is slated to open in late 2021 or early 2022, and once complete, will include a 450-seat theatre, studio theatre, dance studios, and visual arts spaces.

The project was conceived when a group of Ancaster business owners and volunteers realized there was a need for an arts centre in the community. The city identified and purchased Ancaster Memorial School as a potential site, which had been declared surplus by the Hamilton Wentworth District School Board. As part of its commitment to the building, the community who had initially advocated for the project were charged with raising an initial $3 million; they succeeded in relatively short order and momentum grew as all levels of government committed funding. Local architects from Invizij Architects designed the space with the intention of providing affordable space for the community’s artists to collaborate and expand their creativity.

often happen with major construction projects.

Yesterday’s groundbreaking comes after an uncertain year that could have derailed the project.

This shortfall will be contributed by Ancaster residents, who will contribute roughly $2.7 million through property taxes (approximately $18 per year) over the next 10 years

The Ontario government pulled a $3 million investment into the Centre in the spring, leaving its future uncertain. However, City Council met in August to review the project and voted unanimously to approve a funding model for the Arts Centre to cover the shortfall and increases in cost that so

The Federal government committed an additional $1.1 million shortly before calling the 2019 election to help fill this gap. This amount is in addition to their initial investment of $1.5 million. The City of Hamilton has also committed to over $6 million in funding through a combination of land sales, gas tax

income and reserves, with more funding expected to come through these sources. The local community fundraising goal has increased to $5 million; as of time of publication, they have raised $3.6 million. Paypal is setup on the website for additional donations, with Theatre Ancaster managing the campaign. The total cost of the centre is currently estimated to be $24 million.

For more local Hamilton theatre news, be sure to check out beyondjames.com


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Must-see holiday performances in Hamilton

BEYOND JAMES

Launched in 2019, Beyond James is an independent blog focusing on news and reviews of the Hamilton arts community. Passionate about the power of the arts and culture to unite communities, Beyond James recognizes that great art isn’t confined to one space or one street in Hamilton: it’s everywhere.

The early November snowstorm in Hamilton sent out a clear signal that winter is upon us. As we move into December, so too does the holiday season. With it, an abundance of themed productions and events are coming to Hamilton. Whether you want to hum or sing along to some cheery holiday music, or are looking to start a holiday tradition, there is no shortage of festive performances to attend in the coming weeks. Here are a few of our top picks for where to go and what to see.

F O R THE YO U N G ( O R YO U NG AT H EA RT ) The Hamilton Philharmonic Orchestra will perform music alongside a screening of the animated classic The Snowman on December 21st at 7:30 pm.

Based on a picture book by Raymond Briggs, the heartwarming story is about a young boy who builds a snowman, which subsequently comes to life and the adventures the two of them share on one magical evening. The story is wonderfully creative, but the visuals and music make it absolutely incredible — it’s no surprise that the film was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film, and has established a prominent place in British pop culture. Although this is the main piece on the program, expect the HPO to perform some holiday favourites as well. For more information, or to buy tickets (which start at $19), visit hpo.org

FOR TRADITIONALISTS Handel’s Messiah is a quintessential Christmas classic. The music and lyrics share the universal messages of charity, peace, goodwill, and sacrifice. And there’s no better group to see perform the Messiah this year than the Brott Music Festival. With two performances (one on December 2nd at the West Highland Church in Hamilton and one on December 3rd at St. Thomas the Apostle in Waterdown), and a spectacular cast including soprano Elizabeth Polese, mezzo Lauren Segal, and local talents Bud Roach (tenor) and Jeremy Ludwig (bass), there’s no excuse to not

make this part of your holiday tradition. For tickets and more information, visit brottmusic.com

you’re interested, make sure to get your tickets for $20 as soon as possible at bachelgar.com/handelsmessiah

The Nutcracker is another holiday staple, and this year, Ballet Jörgen will once again be touring their production to Hamilton on December 7th at the FirstOntario Concert Hall. Ballet Jörgen has added a twist to this classic by setting the traditional story of a girl who befriends a nutcracker that comes to life on Christmas Eve to twentieth century landscapes of Canada, which make up the 30-foot backdrops of the performance.

F OR SOMETHI N G A L I TTL E DI F F ER EN T

For those seeking something with local artists, Hamilton Ballet Company’s Nutcracker performs on December 6th & 7th at the McIntyre Performing Arts Centre (Mohawk College).

FOR TH OSE WHO WAN T TO PARTICI PATE If you don’t just want to watch the Messiah, but also want to be a part of it, the Bach Elgar Choir will host their biannual Messiah Sing-a-long on Sunday, December 8th at 3 pm. Led by the Bach Elgar Choir, this performance invites every audience member to join in song to create a thrilling, massive choral experience. There's only one opportunity to be a part of this Messiah, so if

Hamilton blues music staple Steve Strongman is returning with his annual Christmas show. The 10th Anniversary edition will take place on December 14th at 8 pm at the Leander Boat Club (50 Leander Dr, Hamilton). With special guests Spencer MacKenzie, Jesse O’Brien, Darcy Hepner, The Stinkbugs (and anyone else that may get invited at the spur of the moment), this fun show is an easy way to get into the holiday spirit. Additionally, $5 from every ticket sold goes to An Instrument for Every Child, so it’s easy to feel good by just buying a ticket. If Sinatra is a little more your style, the Westdale Theatre is presenting Canadian crooner Andrew Martin and his three piece band on December 8th at 3 pm. Part of the singer’s southern Ontario tour, the show promises crooner classics dating back to the 50s as well as modern Christmas tunes. Tickets can be purchased directly through the thewestdale.ca

Check out beyondjames.com for more local theatre news!


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DECEMBER 2019 | THE HOLIDAY ISSUE

Erin Dunham makes female leadership a more palatable concept

KARA SAVAS

Kara Savas is a born and raised Hamiltonian; an English and Social Sciences teacher, freelance writer, and sun chaser. Kara is a passionate supporter of local businesses, fresh perspectives, and lifelong learning.

If you frequent the downtown core, chances are you’ve dined at some of the restaurants that have been at the forefront of the Hamilton restaurant renaissance that we all hear about so much. The Mule, Odds Bar, and Rapscallion (RIP…for now…) are among some of Hamilton’ most beloved spots. Behind those names is Erin Dunham, who is the CEO and one half of The Other Bird hospitality group, along with business partner and Executive Chef Matt Kershaw. When meeting Erin for the first time, reactions can be mixed. Many of the less progressive types in her business dealings view her as a triple threat; she’s young, she’s blonde, and she’s (gasp!) a woman. In an industry that can be ruthless to say the least, Erin has used her role to affect positive change — with a side of wry humor.


URBANICITY.COM Erin’s industry experience goes back to the age of 13, when she took her first job in a kitchen. At this time, she was growing up on the Hamilton mountain, taking 3 city buses to get to Cathedral high school before switching to Sir Allan McNab for the latter part of high school. Hospitality was not a lifelong dream — it was instead a means to get her through Western University, where she was studying English and Literature. She worked three restaurant jobs, like so many university students do, and aspired to be a writer. After graduation, she successfully published two novels, a talent of which she is proud of, yet refreshingly honest about (“my first two novels were garbage, I am halfway done writing my third though and it’s definitely the best”). However, after her first publisher cheque came in a little (a LOT) lower than hoped, she realized she needed to further her education and switch gears. She completed her MBA and it was around this time that she would meet Chef Matt; this would set her on a path that would begin with being hired by him to help open The Alex. Through that experience, she could see how well they complemented each other and the potential to affect positive change in the industry. Their partnership, and The Other Bird, was born. The hospitality industry hasn’t historically had the healthiest reputation in terms of how women are viewed and treated. Many who have worked in a kitchen, as a server, or behind a bar will attest to this. Since Erin is now on the business end of things, it’s interesting to hear her perspective on how women in leadership positions in an industry like hospitality are treated. Things are improving, but it wasn’t always this way. “We would go into meetings about renting a place or an investment, and they would directly talk to Matt every time. They wouldn’t even look at me. Matt would be like ‘Why are you talking to me? She’s the CEO, talk to her!’” Erin laughs, “I was even mistaken for his secretary recently.” Cringe. Erin does assure that change is coming. For those working for The Other Bird and many other establishments in the city, it’s already here. Erin loves sharing the tangible evidence of this: hearing men that she works with talk about things like how to effectively instill confidence to a female in a management role, or watching female chefs coming through the ranks and not being pigeonholed in a position that restricts their potential. There’s a good chance this positive change occurring around her is due to her effective yet humble example. When I ask her about the best compliment she’s received, Erin replies that the ultimate is when someone asks her to mentor them or for advice. “It means they’re looking at what I’m doing and they admire it to the point of wanting

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we hire people who are hospitalitar- Club Chasse et Pêche, also in Montreal. ians. They’re in the industry because Again - ambience, vibe, ingenuity. they want to be, they’re passionate about it.” When asked about the ele- Beyond work, Erin makes a conscienments that make tious effort to carve out time for the Of course I had to up the ideal dining other loves in her life, which include ask about the bigexperience, Erin’s her beloved dogs, and traveling. She gest criticism she answer is simple: still writes, and also paints. In fact, ever received. For "WE TRY TO CREATE all the senses are a personal goal of hers for 2020 is to this one, Erin gives AN ENVIRONMENT hit. The quality of have an art show, something that will an example that’s THAT PEOPLE WANT fare is a given, but be both exciting and a challenge. pretty relatable to beyond that; the most business ownTO BE A PART OF, tables are clean, Her favourite book is Jitterbug Perers: harsh, unconTHAT WE WOULD lighting is right, fume, by Tom Robbins. Her descripstructive criticism. WANT TO BE IN,” the music selec- tion of Modern Love on Amazon Prime The kind that is tion and volume are was the deciding factor in me bingeoften cruel, and properly adjusted. watching it this weekend. Her favouusually about things “When people rite places that she has traveled to are that can’t be fixed. When I comment on how review-crazy leave and they love it, but they can’t Florence (she spent 3 weeks there in we have become in a technological age put their finger on why. They love the March), and Ireland (“the people are (giving birth to the ‘troll’ era), Erin food and service obviously, but the lit- just amazing”). Her cocktail of choice readily agrees. “These people don’t tle things that colour the experience is a French 75, and for Christmas this realize that as a small business owner beyond the actual dining and make it year she is asking for Chef Matt to put caviar on the new Rapscallion menu. or entrepreneur, when you work so an experience.” hard to create something that’s very personal, how deeply hurtful some of We discuss dining beyond Hamilton; When asked what advice she has for these comments can be. People can be for Erin, Montreal is a top culinary young people, particularly females, pretty ruthless.” Luckily, these are few destination. When asked what or who aspiring to be in a position of leaderand far between, and it’s only because inspires her most, Erin names Martin ship, Erin pauses thoughtfully. “Know she cares that much about the things Picard’s Au Pied de Cochon in Mon- what your boundaries are because she has worked hard on and is proud of treal. “Matt is obviously so inspired by you’re going to be tested all the time… the menu, which is amazing, but for me work within them, and be proud to that she takes these things to heart. it’s beyond that. It’s the most creative, work within them. Be who you are, but Many will remember when Rapscal- interesting, quirky dining.” When asked don’t be an asshole.” Coming from Chef lion opened, on the corner of John St. to share her favourite dining experi- Matt’s secretary, I’d say that’s some and Young St. back in 2012 — it created ence ever in the world, Erin names Le darn good advice! a ripple in the downtown core with its unique take on food and drink, and a cozy, offbeat atmosphere. It became a favourite with diners seeking something a little different, with items like pig ear poutine, and halloumi tikka DECEMBER 11TH masala on the menu. Little did I know that it was Erin’s first kick at opening a LIVE AT MILLS HARDWARE | 8PM restaurant. “We opened it with $5000, (95 KING STREET EAST, HAMILTON) did all the grunt work themselves, from the ground up. It was definitely our labour of love.” While the restauS A M A N T H A M A R T I N & D E LTA S U G A R rant did close earlier this year, two good things came from it – one being the recently opened Bon Temps (one of Erin’s favourite Hamilton restaurants, and not because of location sentiment), and the other being that Rapscallion is spreading its wings to a bigger and better location on James Street North in the new year. This time, with a bigger budget and a few years more experience under their belts. me to help in the direction of whatever they’re working… that they trust me and my opinion, my direction.”

Speaking of pride, I comment on the staying power of their restaurants despite the restaurant industry being a notoriously fickle one. Erin credits it to the culture established within each workplace. Each restaurant is personable, fun, unpretentious — much like herself. It’s no surprise, then, to learn that she is the person responsible for the creative design and execution of the restaurants that she and Chef Matt open (as well as the future focus and growth of the company - NBD). “We try to create an environment that people want to be a part of, that we would want to be in,” Erin explains. “We create this culture with our staff;

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DECEMBER 2019 | THE HOLIDAY ISSUE

12

Keep Hamilton talent in the city through co-working

20

KEVIN BROWNE

Kevin is a Professor at Mohawk College and Lecturer at McMaster University teaching computer science. Kevin has been involved in various community building initiatives in the local tech sector such as news site SoftwareHamilton.com and Hamilton Code Clubs.

Every year we learn more about how unhealthy commutes can be for people. Evidence shows that commutes may lead to higher obesity rates, lower cardiorespiratory fitness, and higher blood pressure. Mentally, commutes may lead to increased anxiety, chronic stress and depression, and socially commutes are associated with social isolation and higher divorce rates. Not everyone experiences these negative repercussions, but given that so many do, isn’t it a problem that we’re building communities around increasingly longer commute distances? Don’t get me wrong, these new GO Stations are great infrastructure; they move people efficiently across the region, which in a knowledge economy is especially important for equality of opportunity, as well as spreading social capital and business opportunities to regions that need them. When

someone from Hamilton can access a better job in Mississauga that they couldn’t otherwise that’s a win for them, and it’s also a win when a Hamilton business can get to a morning meeting in downtown Toronto with a big client. But given the negative repercussions of commuting that many people experience, we should be thinking more about how we can increase the number and quality of local jobs. In the early years of this decade it was more common to talk about Hamilton having a “jobs problem”. As the economy recovered from the recession and residential housing took off, that talk seemed to fade. There’s so many cranes in the sky now, and a new restaurant seems to open every week. I think that talk faded prematurely though, because I still hear from so many people that they wish they could get a better quality job closer to home. We still have a jobs problem that should be solved, especially when it comes to particular industries. I’ve been involved in the tech and startup community in Hamilton in various capacities over the last decade, and as part of this I’ve been keen to try to sell Hamilton to companies. Hamilton was named the fastest growing Canadian mid-sized city for tech talent by CBRE in 2018 — the talent is here. And you would think that relatively cheaper housing, beautiful nature, and having the Hamilton Tiger-Cats would

be enough to do the trick. But the reality is if you’re opening, say, a software development company in the region, every GO Station has trains pointing towards downtown Toronto in the morning. You’re getting access to a talent pool of millions of people if you’re located in downtown Toronto. If you open in downtown Hamilton, you’ve still got access to a large pool of talent, but the radius just isn’t as big given that the trains aren’t headed this direction in the morning and the highways are jammed at rush hour. And on top of that, because of the way the infrastructure has been setup to be Toronto-bound, the talent you’re trying to hire is often headed in the opposite direction, and you’re competing against companies for that talent who have the competitive advantage of superior access to talent. Investing in local startup companies has been a big focus of the last decade, and that’s something that should continue. But one model that I’m seeing work lately in Hamilton is the satellite office. At CoMotion on King there are two companies that have software development focused satellite offices in downtown Hamilton: machine learning startup Preteckt and software consultancy Vehikl. They’re both growing and doing very well in terms of finding talent, and there’s other similar examples across the city.

The model seems to work because satellite offices don’t need to hire for and focus on every possible position (e.g. sales, HR, etc.), and instead focus on a niche. Satellite offices also don’t need to worry about filling hundreds of positions with top candidates in a short period of time as they generally only need a few talented workers to start and can grow as needed. Because satellite offices are attached to resources and capital from outside the community, they can offer a quality and type of career opportunity that differentiates them in the local market and allows them to hire strong talent looking for career growth without the commute. Toronto is literally bursting at the seams, with the lowest office vacancy rate in North America. Instead of trying to convince these companies to move their entire office here, which is going to be a rare event, we should collectively figure out a strategy to sell them on moving smaller, focused satellite offices to Hamilton to help solve our jobs problem. No matter what size of company you’re a part of – even if you’re just freelancing – make it a goal for 2020 to experience what it’s like to work in a collaborative environment and maximize all the perks of running your business in the heart of downtown Hamilton instead of losing precious time commuting to another city.


URBANICITY.COM

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CONTI NU E D F RO M FRO N T PAG E

"BUT WE CONTINUE TO STAY TRUE TO OUR VALUES, AND SIMPLY FOLLOW THE GOLDEN RULE OF TAKING CARE OF GUESTS."

The increasing focus on event booking, Mercanti-Ladd says, happened pretty organically and is largely due to the attractive qualities of the restaurant’s stunning space. “It’s a classy venue with a big city-like casual feel, and a strong brand in the community. We’ve always done events for businesses or private clients and realized that it’s an area our team really enjoys,” she explains.

Photography: Peter Sirisko. Models & Fashion Show Production: Vogue Models & Talent.

one of Hamilton’s finest modern restaurants and nightlife spots today; one that puts exceptional hospitality at the forefront and always has innovation on its mind. “We’re always researching the latest trends and innovations in cuisines, wines, cocktails, beers, and entertainment,” Mercanti-Ladd explains. “But we continue to stay true to our values, and simply follow the golden rule of taking care of guests.”

on the mountain before downsizing to the current spot radius® operates out of. Much of the historical radius® building since Buchanan’s time has been lovingly restored, maintaining key pieces of the centuries-old history and the building’s legacy while functioning as

With the assured handson support of the hospitality staff and the restaurant’s General Manager and Managing Partner, Dan Trevisani, radius® achieves a solid balance of these elements in crafting their optimal ‘urban casual’ dining experience. It’s the harmonious marriage of old and new that makes the restaurant stand out. The efforts have noticeably paid off. Passing by radius® on a weekend, you’re pretty much guaranteed to see a packed house through the window and a line of eager patrons waiting outside for their turn at a table. The restaurant

has cemented itself as an indispensable Hamilton staple. The local aspects of radius® are as important as anything else, according to Mercanti-Ladd. “Our Executive Chef, Gordon Goss, is as fine as they come, and he accepts nothing but the best. Our tagline is ‘love local™’ and we source only the finest products and ingredients.” One such example is the restaurant’s recent partnership with Dundas-based butcher shop Cumbrae’s; a partnership which allows radius® to set themselves apart by offering exquisite locally sourced products such as 45-day dryaged cuts of Canadian Prime steak. But that’s hardly the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the extensive brunch, lunch, and dinner offerings radius® provides; sandwiches, tasting boards, pastas, seafood dishes, and salads are vessels for a variety of curated ingredients that showcase the best of the region’s farmers and food purveyors. The popularity of radius® doesn’t stop at the food, though. Recently, the restaurant’s sizeable space and sleek-yethip atmosphere has become increasingly in-demand as a high-end event venue in Hamilton, attracting the attention of everything from smaller private parties to complete bookings of the entire radius® space, including its famous multi-level patio.

With its versatility and considerable size, radius® has seen everything from private corporate events to fashion shows, from work parties to special celebrations. The restaurant and its offerings only continue to grow, and after years of established Hamilton presence, Mercanti-Ladd says that radius® has its sights on plenty of exciting opportunities in the future; including early plans to open a second location somewhere else in Hamilton. “We have amazing service and kitchen teams that are always focused on raising the bar,” she says, adding that radius® is also expanding their offerings by working with Ontario’s top wine sommelier, José Luis Fernández, on intensifying the restaurant’s wine selections. A thriving local staple with ambitious plans forthcoming and no signs of slowing down, it seems that radius® will stick around in Hamilton for years to come, continuing to honour our city’s past while helping to drive its culinary identity into the future.

MICHAEL KRAS

Michael is an award-winning writer, theatre artist, actor, producer, and craft beer lover addicted to all things Hamilton. Most recently, his acclaimed Voaden Prizewinning play The Team premiered to sold-out houses with Essential Collective Theatre and Theatre Aquarius.


DECEMBER 2019 | THE HOLIDAY ISSUE

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From Hamilton, to Santa.

AYOLT DE ROOS

Recently moved to Hamilton from Amsterdam, Ayolt is a huge fan of sports, craft beer, and good food. Currently loving The Hammer as his new home.

To make sure that Santa has everyone’s holiday wishes well documented, it’s advised that you write him a letter. Writing it down helps make it real — without it, he won’t know what wishes to make come true!

But most Hamiltonians have wishes for the city as well; something they’d love to see changed, improved, or introduced to their hometown.

To make sure that Santa doesn’t overlook these wishes either, some of them have Everyone, of course, has their own personal been documented on the opposite page and will be delivered to the North Pole wishlist. A new set of headphones, a slow promptly! cooker, the latest John Grisham novel.

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CONTI NU E D F RO M FRO N T PAG E “My wish for the city of Hamilton is that we find a way to keep many of the existing things that make this community so amazing, while making room for progress. A lot of the problems I see are because so many people want things to stay the same as they've always been. But that's an impossible dream. Everything changes, including us. What we need is to be open-minded and accepting of positive change, plus willing to contribute with solutions if we feel that the change can be done in a better way.”

“If I had one Christmas wish for Hamilton, it would be that no child in our city would have to go hungry. This sounds extremely daunting, but we can all make a difference by working with wonderful organizations such as City Kidz, Hamilton Food Share and Food 4 Kids Hamilton. If we all spent a fraction of our holiday gift budget to donate to one of these charities, it would have a massive impact on the kids in our city who are going without food every week.”

M A X FRA N C IS

LINDSE Y M RAV

Founder of True Hamiltonian apparel who has immensely helped Hamilton shed its negative image

Owner of Grain & Grit Beer Co., giving the city awesome brews since 2017

“This year for Christmas I'd like to see my hometown learn to love itself a little more. While we have work to do, Hamilton is a great place to live, work and play. The world should come by and have a pint or two with me at any of our 6 breweries and then we can have dinner at one of the amazing restaurants this city has. Arts, science and industry are colliding in the most beautiful way and I wish Hamiltonians would let themselves feel good about how far this city has come. Let's raise a glass together and celebrate The Hammer!”

“All that the Hammer City Paws Rescue dogs want for Christmas is YOU! Only as many dogs can be saved as there are foster families, so open your home to a dog in need. We take care of the food and vetcare, but you provide the most important things: unconditional love and training. We have the tools to help you make a success story out of each dog. Are you unable to foster? You can always volunteer or donate, since every little bit counts. It takes a village to find a home for as many homeless dogs as possible, please become part of ours.”

POLK

H AM M E R C ITY PAW S RE SC UE

Has lived in Hamilton for nearly all of his 46 years and could not imagine living anywhere else

Finding loving families for homeless dogs since 2016

“My wish - and that of my team - actually encompasses a large variety of things: more affordable housing options in the city, safe injection sites for those who need them, safe bike lanes. Also, I personally love green spaces in urban environments, so I am excited about the new city park being built across from the community health center at John and Rebecca. Even more of those would be very welcome!”

R ACHEL HOF I N G

Owner of Relay Coffee Roasters, serving Hamilton some of its finest coffee since 2008

“If I could wish for one thing for the city, it would be for a Hamilton wide tour company, which encourages Hamiltonians to explore parts of the city they aren’t familiar with. Amazing parts of the city that are not regularly featured on online listicles would receive a boost. Entities like 541 on Barton, the Erland Lee Museum and McMaster Museum of Art would grow in popularity. New perspectives on unique parts of our city would unfold while sharing the love of this Ambitious City. The people that live and work Hamilton are what make this city sustainable, and the more we understand the different parts of our city and the people who live there the better this city will be.”

JAMES HU TTON

“I’d really like to see King St. East from Wentworth, to Sherman and on to Gage - to have a bit more life to it. There are currently a lot of places boarded up. I know it is a difficult time to get small businesses to invest in the area, with the LRT construction coming up, but the real estate would now be a lot cheaper than when that’s completed. They could get in on the ground floor and grow with the area. Ultimately, it would be great to see King East become a thriving community, like many other streets and areas have seen to become in recent years.”

CHLOE MOSS

Lifelong Hamiltonian and recent resident of the King East area

“My wish for Hamilton is continued support for beautification. We have a lot to work on as a city, but we also live here everyday, and public art installations like the James St. S mural, the electrical box wraps, sculptures like those added to Gore Park and the Waterfront, the graffiti murals and even the street flower beds all impact people's daily experience. Pops of colours, putting a smile on people's faces as they walk, bike and drive through the city.”

J E ANNIE C RAW FORD

Moved to Hamilton in October 2011 and now helps others make the move through Move To HamOnt

Account Manager at Hamilton’s own Forge FC, the first ever Canadian Premier League champions

“Collaboration! I would love to see collaboration both within the walls of city departments and council working together to solve the big problems and externally seeing the city staff engaging the community to move the city forward to be the number one place to live and work in Canada.”

TI M POTOCI C

Founder of Supercrawl and Sonic Unyon Records, 2013 Citizen of the Year and much, much more

Do you also have a wish for Hamilton and do you want to make sure Santa Claus gets it? Simply post your wish on Twitter, include the hashtag #mywishforHamOnt, tag @urbanicityHAM and we’ll make sure he gets them all.


DECEMBER 2019 | THE HOLIDAY ISSUE

16

The

Best

spots to buy pie in Hamilton ZA RK Y ' S

264 Dundurn St S, Hamilton (905) 525-6664

Zarky’s has been a Hamilton staple for over 30 years. Known for creating comfort foods at amazing prices, Zarky’s offers their customers fresh baked bread, pizza, baked goods, ready-to-go meals, and an incredible assortment of day-to-day groceries. No matter the season, Zarky’s is home to a great selection of pies ready to be picked up and enjoyed. While pumpkin is a seasonal favourite, they also offer cherry, triple berry, pecan, apple, and other delectable flavours. Depending on the season, Zarky’s will incorporate other fillings such as rhubarb and peach.

B E N N ET T ' S A P P L ES 944 Garner Rd E, Ancaster (905) 648-6878

For over 100 years, Bennett's Apples has been a top spot when it comes to picking up delicious, fresh apples that are handpicked off the trees. But, they also have a small market where you can pick up baked goods including some amazing pies and cider donuts! This family farm also produces some of Hamilton's finest ciders that'll make you a hero this holiday season.

LINA'S PASTRIE S 35 York Blvd, Hamilton (905) 645-5678

If you’ve ever visited the Hamilton Farmer’s Market, there’s no way you’ve missed Lina’s European Pastries. Located on the bottom level of the market, Lina’s offers an incredible selection of inexpensive and delicious treats. During and fall months, the shop begins to carry delicious homemade pies (we typically go for apple or pumpkin). They appear simple but don’t be fooled — they’re packed full of flavour!

SW E E T PARADISE

630 Stone Church Rd W, Hamilton (905) 389-3487

Sweet Paradise is an authentic Italian bakery that offers a wide variety of bread, pastries, specialty cakes, and so much more. While Sweet Paradise is known for their undeniably delicious fresh bread and unforgettable pastries (seriously, try the cannolis!), they also make some incredible pies. Steve – who's been with the bakery for 34 years – is the one behind the 'Sweet Steve's pumpkin pie'. It's based on a 200-year-old recipe that's a definite crowd pleaser.

WEI L 'S BA K ERY 981 King St W, Hamilton (905) 527-6751

A trip to Westdale isn’t complete without visiting Weil’s Bakery. This Hamilton staple creates breads and pastries from scratch, focusing on the recipes that their customers love and keep coming back for. While Weil’s is known for their specialty cakes and pastries, every holiday season they bring back their ever-delicious pies. Apple, pumpkin, cherry — if it’s classic, they sell it.

DYMEN TS MA R K ET 416 Fallsview Rd E, Dundas (905) 628-5270

Dyments Market & Bakery is famous for their homemade, country pies. From the dough being hand rolled by their bakers to the pie cooling off in the country air, Dyments makes sure their pies are made with plenty of love. Dyments' pies are the marriage of their passion and sweet-tooth coming together. The bakery uses a combination of different fruits, crusts and their famous “crumble top” to make their perfect pies.


URBANICITY.COM

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No dessert around the holidays seem to bring people together the way a delicious pie does. We've put together a list of new and old favourites, all of which will be sure to please family and friends this holiday season. Here’s our 2019 list for Hamilton’s 10 best places to buy pie. THE T IN Y S H O P B A K ERY 969-1001 ON-5, Dundas (905) 628-5280

Known for being pie specialists, the Tiny Shop Bakery has been in business for over 30 years. All of their pies and baked goods are made from scratch using the best quality ingredients. The variety at Tiny Shop is unparalleled. They offer 36 flavours of pie — that’s right, 36! While they carry all of the traditional flavours and fall favourites, a visit to Tiny Shop is the perfect time to step outside your comfort zone and try something new.

CAKE AND LOAF

PU N CH BOWL MA R K ET

321 Dundurn St S, Hamilton (289) 389-6581

136 Ridge Rd, Stoney Creek (905) 662-1665

No matter the season, Cake and Loaf delivers some of the best baked goods in Hamilton. Their pie selection features an assortment of whimsical, classic, and vegan treats. Looking for pumpkin or apple? They’ve got it. Want to step outside your comfort zone? Why not try their cookie dough or sweet potato marshmallow pie? The bakery also features three different options for those who follow a vegan lifestyle.

Located in a 150-year-old barn, this Hamilton favourite is neighbours with the Devil’s Punchbowl Conservation Area. The bakery takes great pride in their delicious, home-style pies. Each pie is made from the finest ingredients, including locally grown fruit and even some of their very own home-grown rhubarb. They offer 15 different varieties of pie, including apple crisp, raspberry cream, pumpkin, and their famous peninsula pie.

CA RL U K E O RC H A RD S 2194 Shaver Rd, Ancaster (905) 648-2775

HANDMADE FOR

THE HOLIDAYS Coming in at number one on our list is Carluke Orchards, a family business that has been in operation since 1965. Originally a pick-your-own apple operation, the orchard has grown to include one of the best bakeries across Hamilton. What sets Carluke apart from other bakeries is their quality and dedication to creating the best pie in the city. Carluke’s proudly offers locally-sourced and Canadian-made products. All of their baking is made in house from scratch, offering customers optimal quality and incredible taste. Carluke offers 14 different kinds of pie, including three different varieties of apple, blueberry, raspberry, pumpkin, and eight others. Every pie is equally a showstopper and a crowd pleaser; each piece is flavourful and well balanced, insuring each bite is as good as the last. Trust us: once you try your first pie from Carluke’s, you’ll find every excuse to go back and buy another.

Unique Canadian handmade gifts and home decor items for the animal lover. Find it here. Come to Nest. 171 Locke St S, Unit 2 nesthamilton.com


DECEMBER 2019 | THE HOLIDAY ISSUE

18

An ode to the Ticats Photos provided by Hamilton Tiger-Cats

Fans were left shell-shocked. After 20 years without a Grey Cup victory, it finally felt like we had the team to take our city back to the promised land.

SHAWN SMITH

Shawn is a writer from Hamilton. He enjoys sports, music, and reading. His work has appeared in The Globe and Mail and on Bleacher Report, Vice Sports, and Sportsnet.ca.

If you were at any of the establishments around Hamilton playing the 106h Grey Cup, you got an intimate look at what disappointment looks and feels like. There’s no way to sugarcoat it: the 15-3 Hamilton Tiger-Cats, the heavy favourite to win the CFL’s most prestigious trophy, put up their worst performance of the season in the biggest game of the year, getting decimated by a Winnipeg Blue Bombers team that simply appeared to want it more. With the loss went the team’s opportunity to establish themselves as the greatest incarnation of the Tiger-Cats in the team’s lengthy history.

They looked every bit the part during the CFL Eastern Final, just one week before, when they dominated a dangerous Edmonton team 36-16. They played with the swagger and confidence of a team that was ready to make history for a city that desperately wanted it. And yet, when it came time to perform on the big stage, they fumbled (sometimes literally) the opportunity. As we reflect on this season, it’s hard not to feel bitter disappointment. This should have been our year to bring the biggest prize in Canadian football back to Hamilton. But football, like life, isn’t about what should have been. At some point we must look at what was accomplished and be grateful for that. We can be angry and disappointed, but we should also be proud. A 15-3 season, especially in the CFL’s East Division, is not an east feat. The last time Hamilton won the east, in 2014, they finished 9-9. And let’s not forget that the Ottawa Redblacks won the east in 2016 with a record of 8-9-1. Of course, Ottawa went on to win the Grey Cup and that’s what will be remembered. The East division of the CFL is often laughed for producing poor teams, and too often Hamilton has been amongst them.

But this year was different. Hamilton established itself as the best team in the league early in the season and even with losing quarterback Jeremiah Masoli, put together the best regular season in the team’s history. First year coach Orland Steinauer won coach of the year by using each player’s skills to the best of their abilities, building off the foundation that June Jones left behind and leaning on the team’s best players to make big plays when they needed them. If we’re looking for silver linings in a time of despair, here’s one: Steinauer will be back. Most of this team will return, hungrier than ever before to take what they believe is rightfully

theirs. We have two of the finest quarterbacks in the league with Dane Evans and Jeremiah Masoli, and while it’s likely that one of them won’t wear the black and yellow next season, having to choose between them is a good problem to have. This is a city that has felt heartbreak too many times on the football field, but there’s no reason to believe the team won’t be competitive again next season. And besides, if we haven’t given up hope in the 150 years of football that have taken place in this city, what are the odds we’re going to start now? Oskee Wee Wee.


URBANICITY.COM

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Where and how can we volunteer this Christmas?

CYNTHIA CARPENTER

Cynthia is a freelance writer and poeticminded writing mentor who works at The Hamilton Public Library. Reading, writing, and music are her passions along with yoga and lake swimming.

There are plenty of opportunities for those of us who would like to give our time, services, and donations to organizations and individuals during the coming holiday period. Whether it be in Hamilton or abroad, the benefits that volunteering can bring are truly inspiring — especially at this time of year. Despite how busy we get with our own families, there’s always a little bit of time you can spare to help others less fortunate. Not to mention how amazing it is to be part of a team effort during the holidays! CHA R IT IES Charities you may want to research online, by telephone, or approach in person are: Angel Tree, whom provide gifts for the children of prison inmates, Toys for Tots, whom donate gifts to children in low-income neighbourhoods, and My Two Front Teeth, whom post children’s wish lists online that individuals may fulfill. These charities may enlist you to wrap gifts that they distribute, or employ your help with distribution. Getting in touch is the way forward concerning helping these organizations out.

a child who is in need of a gift. Contributors remove one or more tags from the tree and purchase appropriate gifts for the child or children described on the tags. It’s a shopping adventure where you know the items you’re purchasing are exactly what that child is looking for — a perfect match!

SI N G YOU R HEAR T OU T

MISSION SE RVIC E S The Mission on Hamilton’s James St North is a hub for the provision of food and shelter for those in need. This would be an opportune place to volunteer your time, particularly with their soup kitchen. Our family puts together personal hygiene and self-care packages that we drop off at the Mission for ‘first come first served’ hand outs to attendees. We also keep pre-prepared packages in the car for when we encounter people who may need them. When building packages, it’s a good idea to keep a few geared for women’s needs and some for men. I usually pack feminine hygiene products such as a lady’s razor, hypoallergenic soap, small shampoo bottles, a few new pairs of underwear, and socks. The socks are especially important for both men and women as those whom are without homes are on their feet almost constantly. Noteworthy too is that if you include toothpaste and/ or mouthwash, that these should be alcohol-free.

RONALD M CDON AL D H OUSE The Ronald McDonald House near McMaster Hospital on Main Street West in Hamilton has a program that takes place in January, whereby teams of individuals are organized to cook and bake for families whom are staying in residence while their loved ones are in hospital. This is a wonderful giving and team building opportunity for all involved. Anyone wishing to donate to the cost of the provision of food stuff are encouraged to contact the Dundas Hamilton Public Library branch with donations. You may reach them at 905-627-3507 or drop into 18 Ogilvie Street, Dundas.

TH E SALVATI ON AR MY The Salvation Army's Angel Tree program provides new clothing and/or toys for children of needy families. The organization’s special Christmas trees, known as Angel Trees, are decked out with numbered paper angel tags that have the first name, age, and gender of

If you can play an instrument or sing with others, then this is certainly a fun way to liven spirits. Church or local community choirs may be able to indicate opportunities for people to get together and choral sing in hospitals, seniors centres, door-to-door, and in schools. It’s not just our voices that are joined as one when we engage in singing as a group, but the mental health benefits of singing are well documented, too. Choral singing is something that can bring people of all ages and singing abilities together in a joyous, healthy group activity.

MAK E A DI F F ER EN CE Concentrating on what others need at this time of year makes us all aware of our community and how we can and very much need to support each other at Christmas as well as throughout the year. Bear this in mind and let these opportunities flood you with inspiration for what you can do as an individual within your community. Then get out there and act on your ideas! It will benefit your own sense of fulfilment as well as aid others with their needs. As we approach this Christmas season lets open our hearts, wallets, and schedule for charity.

1. Niagara Peninsula Conservation 2. 1910 3. Hamilton was the Canadian arm of the American car brand Studebaker. The company closed their Indiana factory in 1963 and three years later, in 1966, the last car rolled off the line in Hamilton. Studebaker was Hamilton's 10th largest employer at the time, with 700 workers losing their job upon the plant’s closure. 4. According to 2019 study by CBRE, Hamilton ranks #1 in highest 5-year growth of all mid-sized Canadian cities at 52.9%. Waterloo was second at 39.7% and Edmonton was third at 25.7%.


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Profile for UrbanicityHamOnt

December 2019 | Urbanicity Hamilton  

The December 2019 issue of Urbanicity for the Hamilton-Burlington region

December 2019 | Urbanicity Hamilton  

The December 2019 issue of Urbanicity for the Hamilton-Burlington region

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