Page 1

TERP

CONNECTING

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND COMMUNITY

FIRST YEAR BOOK 2

VOL. 2, NO. 1 FALL 2004

I

THE (SEX) TALK 13

I

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS AT UM 18


TERP PUBLISHER

Brodie Remington Vice President, University Relations ADVISORY BOARD

J. Paul Carey ’82 M.B.A. CEO, Enumerate Terry Flannery ’83, ’87 M.Ed., ’95 Ph.D. Assistant Vice President, University Marketing and Communications John Girouard ’81 President and CEO, Capital Asset Management Group Anil Gupta Ralph J. Tyser Professor of Strategy and Organization, Robert H. Smith School of Business Danita D. Nias ’81 Executive Director, Alumni Relations Vicki Rymer ’61, ’66 M.B.A., ’83 Ph.D. Teaching Professor, Robert H. Smith School of Business Keith Scroggins ’79 Bureau Head of General Services, City of Baltimore, Dept. of Public Works Lee Thornton Professor and Eaton Chair, Philip Merrill College of Journalism MAGAZINE STAFF

Dianne Burch Executive Editor Beth A. Morgen Managing Editor John T. Consoli ’86 Creative Director Jason Quick Art Director Monette A. Bailey ’89 Tom Ventsias Writers Dave Ottalini Pamela Stone ’95 M.A. Ellen Ternes ’68 Neil Tickner Lee Tune Mark Walden ’96 Contributing Writers Mike D’Angelo Stacy L. Kaper Greg Smith ’04 Magazine Interns E-mail terp_alum@umail.umd.edu Terp magazine is published by the Division of University Relations. Letters to the editor are welcomed. Send correspondence to Beth Morgen, Managing Editor, Terp magazine, Alumni Association, Rossborough Inn, College Park, MD 20742. Or, send an email to terp_alum@umail.umd.edu. The University of Maryland, College Park, is an equal opportunity institution with respect to both education and employment. University policies, programs and activities are in conformance with pertinent federal and state laws and regulations on non-discrimination regarding race, color, religion, age, national origin, political affiliation, gender, sexual orientation or disability.

Dear Alumni and Friends, THERE WAS MAJOR drama in the alumni association office a couple of years ago.The talk was of conspiracy, scandal. How could they have done this to Tamyra? Getting rid of her before Justin … before the redhead? Tamyra? “Tamyra Gray,” I was told by one of my staff. “Of American Idol.” I could not believe this person (who doesn’t even have cable and is known for her addiction to NPR) watched what I thought was just a talent show. Little did I know that the voting off of Tamyra Gray from American Idol was the talk around water coolers nationwide, that the reality TV show was making ratings records that summer. Since then, American Idol has had two more successful seasons, and reality TV is everywhere. In this issue of Terp we turn the dial to this new genre—to ponder its popularity and to lament the loss of the sit-com. (See page 26.) Even the alumni association has gotten into the act. Borrowing from reality TV, last spring we invited betrothed alumni to enter our Dream Wedding contest and compete for a complimentary wedding and reception to be held on campus. On page 8, we are happy to introduce the winners, Remy Shaeffer ’00 and Casey Gomes ’02. Very much in love and full of Terrapin Spirit, Remy and Casey are the real thing.They are the perfect couple to walk down the aisle of Memorial Chapel next June and to inaugurate the Samuel Riggs IV Alumni Center, where

the reception will be held. We won’t televise this event, but we do invite you to help plan it.Throughout the fall, visit www.alumni.umd.edu to vote for flowers, cake, music and more. While online, check out the progress of the Samuel Riggs IV Alumni Center. Even better, see the center’s development firsthand on your next visit to campus.We hope you will return to Maryland on Homecoming, October 16, to celebrate with fellow Terp fans at the alumni association Homecoming Festival before heading into Byrd to watch the Terps take on the Wolfpack of N.C. State.Their last two matches were nail biters right down to the final seconds with the Terps winning. A great team rivalry, thousands of cheering fans and a down-to-the-buzzer victory … Now, that’s what I call reality.

Danita D. Nias ’81 Executive Director, Alumni Relations

P.S.:The alumni association Web site has a new link! Check it out at www.alumni.umd.edu. Shop at our new online store, activate your membership and more.


2 BIG PICTURE Sadat Chair’s The Stakes is First Year Book; Terp bragging rights; Your Words; Dining venues for every appetite; Campus is setting for Under Armour ad; Weather center in the forecast for research park 6 THE SOURCE Clinic offers speech therapy and hearing aids 7 ASK ANNE Haunted campus, archival advice and more 8 CLASS ACT Meet the wedding winners, new alumni board president and class reunion chairs; Tune in to TerpTV; Party under the members-only tent 12 M-FILE Blackouts mean blue skies; How to have “the talk” with your kids; Politics are choreographed; Persian Studies puts Maryland on the map; African American history in public schools; UM sensors probe Saturn 16 MARYLAND LIVE Homecoming 2004; Chinese opera and more 29 IN THE LOOP Maryland’s top tier 30 PLAY-BY-PLAY UM’s coaching couple 31 SPOTLGHT Fantasy art and sci-fi books 32 INTERPRETATIONS Securing U.S. scientific innovation a must

departments

features

18 AN INTELLECTUAL EXCHANGE 22 A large international student population coincides with Maryland’s rankings among the top public research universities, but these students add more than academic talent—with them comes a cultural education. BY TOM VENTSIAS

CALCULATING SUCCESS

Meet Ruth Davis ’52, ’55 Ph.D. and Tasha Inniss ’00 Ph.D.—two Maryland mathematicians who have helped pave the way for females in the field. BY MONETTE A. BAILEY

26

WHOSE REALITY IS IT?

Have sitcoms been voted off the island of TVLand? Maryland experts weigh in on why Americans can’t seem to get enough of reality shows. BY DIANNE BURCH

COVER ILLUSTRATION BY ED SCHNURR; PHOTOS THESE PAGES BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

TERP FALL

2004


bigpicture

YOURwords TERPbragging

rights

Terp Takes the Gold Launching a new magazine is never easy, but winning gold your first time out makes it all worth it. Terp magazine recently won a gold medal for best magazine publishing improvement in the 2004 CASE (Council for Advancement and Support of Education) Circle of Excellence national competition. The university took home a total of five gold medals in the categories of video production, print design and magazine publishing, and won the coveted grand gold medal for its Fear the Turtle advertising campaign. No other university came close in the medals count. And, beginning with this issue of Terp look for an online version at www.terp.umd.edu.

Record-breaking Fund Raising Year!

UM’s Telhami Pens First Year Book FOR MORE THAN a decade, the First Year Book Program has encouraged members of the university community to question and clarify their beliefs on a variety of topics. This year, the program’s selection committee has chosen The Stakes: America and the Middle East by Maryland’s own Sadat Chair for Peace and Development, Shibley Telhami, as the foundation for a year-long discussion on the implications of American foreign policy decisions. A special Maryland edition of the book—including a reading guide by the author—will be available free of charge to students. It will be used in class lessons, speeches, colloquia and other campus-wide events. “I was flattered [by the selection],” says Telhami, whose work has received numerous national and international awards. “I have always believed that the nicest recognition is closest to home.” The Stakes germinated in Telhami’s countless writings and interviews following the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. Drawing on his expertise as a Middle East scholar at the Brookings Institution and member of the Council on Foreign Relations, he asks and answers a series of questions on the relationship between the United States and the world community. In this way, Telhami offers his opinions on the root causes and long-term solutions to America’s conflicts with Arab and Muslim nations. By beginning this cross-disciplinary conversation—seeking dialogue, not controversy— the university is living up to one of its highest callings, according to Telhami: creating a “vibrant place to discuss some of the most urgent issues facing America today.” —MW

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A Backward Glance at the First Year Book

T

he First Year Book Program, previously the Terrapin Reading Society, was the brainchild of John Pease, professor of sociology. Launched in 1994 in coordination with the Student Government Association, the program has developed an eclectic bibliography—one that balances the provocative and the contemplative.

Thanks to you, and you, and you, and you—we exceeded our previous fund raising record, bested our number of donors and topped our top alumni association membership. The numbers speak for themselves, but the credit goes to you.

Total Dollars Raised

$85.7M

Total Donors

42,037

Alumni Association Members

32,504

Alumni Donors

26,155

Fear the Turtle.

Previous readings include: ◗ 2003 Dead Man Walking by Sister Helen Prejean, CSJ ◗ 2002 The Laramie Project by Moises Kaufman ◗ 2001 Blessing the Boats by Lucille Clifton ◗ 2000 Snow Falling on Cedars by David Guterson ◗ 1999 The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien ◗ 1998 The Control of Nature by John McPhee and Frankenstein by Mary Shelley ◗ 1997 The War of the Worlds by H. G. Wells ◗ 1996 Einstein’s Dreams by Alan P. Lightman ◗ 1995 The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank ◗ 1994 The Gettysburg Address by Abraham Lincoln

POSTER ART BY MIRA AZARM; BOTTOM LEFT PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

PHOTOS BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

There’s Power in our Numbers When called upon to become advocates for higher education, Terps took action by joining the UM Grassroots Network. More than 15,000 alumni, students, parents, employees and friends signed an electronic petition or emailed their legislators to voice support for the university as our budget was being threatened. Legislators listened, and the university was spared serious budget cuts this year. We also received accelerated full funding from the state for the new biosciences research building—one of the university’s top priorities. Your continued support of higher education is imperative. Join the UM Grassroots Network at www.grassroots.umd.edu

I take exception to the presumptive and inaccurate nature of Shirin Ebadi’s words [Terp, spring 2004]. She is quoted from her May 12 [campus] address: “You who live in America cannot remain indifferent to violations of human rights in Afghanistan, Iraq, in Palestine, Iran or in other parts of the world. …” To make such a statement is telling enough but to include Afghanistan and Iraq is astonishing. Is she not aware that the people of both of those countries have been liberated by the United States from repressive governments which promulgated some of the worse human rights abuses since the Third Reich? I appreciate diversity in viewpoints but recognition of reality ought to be a part of the mix. —Michael Reid, M.Ed. 1997 I am not a Maryland alum (I went to— should I say it?—the University of Virginia), but my husband is a 1983 graduate, so we receive Terp magazine. When we got the first issue, we were surprised that there had not been such a thing before. The article, “What Do You Love About Maryland?” in your last issue was great! The way you presented the alumni awards recipients was very classy, and I really am enjoying your magazine! —Wendy Jaccard I was reading “Ask Anne” [Terp, spring 2004], and I saw a question from Rich Mannion ’72 regarding his serving in the National Guard, when [it] was placed on the campus for riot duty. Having been governor of Maryland from 1969 to 1979, I had to call up the National Guard. I must tell you that having to take that action was one of the most difficult decisions that I had to make during my years as governor. As a lifelong supporter of the University of Maryland … I can never forget being on Route 1 and watching the guard marching up the campus! —Gov. Marvin Mandel ’39

TERP FALL

2004

3


bigpicture

YOURwords TERPbragging

rights

Terp Takes the Gold Launching a new magazine is never easy, but winning gold your first time out makes it all worth it. Terp magazine recently won a gold medal for best magazine publishing improvement in the 2004 CASE (Council for Advancement and Support of Education) Circle of Excellence national competition. The university took home a total of five gold medals in the categories of video production, print design and magazine publishing, and won the coveted grand gold medal for its Fear the Turtle advertising campaign. No other university came close in the medals count. And, beginning with this issue of Terp look for an online version at www.terp.umd.edu.

Record-breaking Fund Raising Year!

UM’s Telhami Pens First Year Book FOR MORE THAN a decade, the First Year Book Program has encouraged members of the university community to question and clarify their beliefs on a variety of topics. This year, the program’s selection committee has chosen The Stakes: America and the Middle East by Maryland’s own Sadat Chair for Peace and Development, Shibley Telhami, as the foundation for a year-long discussion on the implications of American foreign policy decisions. A special Maryland edition of the book—including a reading guide by the author—will be available free of charge to students. It will be used in class lessons, speeches, colloquia and other campus-wide events. “I was flattered [by the selection],” says Telhami, whose work has received numerous national and international awards. “I have always believed that the nicest recognition is closest to home.” The Stakes germinated in Telhami’s countless writings and interviews following the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. Drawing on his expertise as a Middle East scholar at the Brookings Institution and member of the Council on Foreign Relations, he asks and answers a series of questions on the relationship between the United States and the world community. In this way, Telhami offers his opinions on the root causes and long-term solutions to America’s conflicts with Arab and Muslim nations. By beginning this cross-disciplinary conversation—seeking dialogue, not controversy— the university is living up to one of its highest callings, according to Telhami: creating a “vibrant place to discuss some of the most urgent issues facing America today.” —MW

2

TERP FALL

2004

A Backward Glance at the First Year Book

T

he First Year Book Program, previously the Terrapin Reading Society, was the brainchild of John Pease, professor of sociology. Launched in 1994 in coordination with the Student Government Association, the program has developed an eclectic bibliography—one that balances the provocative and the contemplative.

Thanks to you, and you, and you, and you—we exceeded our previous fund raising record, bested our number of donors and topped our top alumni association membership. The numbers speak for themselves, but the credit goes to you.

Total Dollars Raised

$85.7M

Total Donors

42,037

Alumni Association Members

32,504

Alumni Donors

26,155

Fear the Turtle.

Previous readings include: ◗ 2003 Dead Man Walking by Sister Helen Prejean, CSJ ◗ 2002 The Laramie Project by Moises Kaufman ◗ 2001 Blessing the Boats by Lucille Clifton ◗ 2000 Snow Falling on Cedars by David Guterson ◗ 1999 The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien ◗ 1998 The Control of Nature by John McPhee and Frankenstein by Mary Shelley ◗ 1997 The War of the Worlds by H. G. Wells ◗ 1996 Einstein’s Dreams by Alan P. Lightman ◗ 1995 The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank ◗ 1994 The Gettysburg Address by Abraham Lincoln

POSTER ART BY MIRA AZARM; BOTTOM LEFT PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

PHOTOS BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

There’s Power in our Numbers When called upon to become advocates for higher education, Terps took action by joining the UM Grassroots Network. More than 15,000 alumni, students, parents, employees and friends signed an electronic petition or emailed their legislators to voice support for the university as our budget was being threatened. Legislators listened, and the university was spared serious budget cuts this year. We also received accelerated full funding from the state for the new biosciences research building—one of the university’s top priorities. Your continued support of higher education is imperative. Join the UM Grassroots Network at www.grassroots.umd.edu

I take exception to the presumptive and inaccurate nature of Shirin Ebadi’s words [Terp, spring 2004]. She is quoted from her May 12 [campus] address: “You who live in America cannot remain indifferent to violations of human rights in Afghanistan, Iraq, in Palestine, Iran or in other parts of the world. …” To make such a statement is telling enough but to include Afghanistan and Iraq is astonishing. Is she not aware that the people of both of those countries have been liberated by the United States from repressive governments which promulgated some of the worse human rights abuses since the Third Reich? I appreciate diversity in viewpoints but recognition of reality ought to be a part of the mix. —Michael Reid, M.Ed. 1997 I am not a Maryland alum (I went to— should I say it?—the University of Virginia), but my husband is a 1983 graduate, so we receive Terp magazine. When we got the first issue, we were surprised that there had not been such a thing before. The article, “What Do You Love About Maryland?” in your last issue was great! The way you presented the alumni awards recipients was very classy, and I really am enjoying your magazine! —Wendy Jaccard I was reading “Ask Anne” [Terp, spring 2004], and I saw a question from Rich Mannion ’72 regarding his serving in the National Guard, when [it] was placed on the campus for riot duty. Having been governor of Maryland from 1969 to 1979, I had to call up the National Guard. I must tell you that having to take that action was one of the most difficult decisions that I had to make during my years as governor. As a lifelong supporter of the University of Maryland … I can never forget being on Route 1 and watching the guard marching up the campus! —Gov. Marvin Mandel ’39

TERP FALL

2004

3


bigpicture

GROWTH spurt

M

aryland’s food options are much more robust than standard cafeteria fare. Whether you crave your morning Starbucks, an afternoon chow mein in the food court or a swanky sit-down dinner, Maryland’s Dining Services* continues to expand, offering food to fit your appetite and schedule.

Footnotes Café

Souffle Glace a l’Orange

Status: Opened January 2004. What: Newest café

on campus, featuring a Starbucks coffee menu complete with Frappucinos and “no whipped” mochas. Footnotes also offers bakery fare, prepared sandwiches and salads, snacks and bottled beverages. Where: McKeldin Library, first floor at the eat-in study lounge. Special Feature: Borrow a book, on your honor, from the bookshelf at Footnotes and return it when you are finished, without ever having to check it out. Seating Capacity: Seating is limited (about 50) in the study lounge since many tables are elbow height for standing and don’t have chairs.

Stamp Student Union Food Court Status: First phase completed fall 2003, second phase just completed this fall. What: New food court in the renovated Stamp Student Union. Where: Ground floor. Special Feature: Doubled in size, now offering eight restaurants: Chick-fil-A, Freshens, Taco Bell, Panda Express, Steak Escape, Sbarro, Marketplace Delicatessen and McDonald’s. Seating Capacity: 900

Recipe provided by head pastry chef Jeff Russo, who administers bakery and ice cream production. Before coming to Maryland, Russo was the pastry chef at the Plaza and Waldorf Astoria hotels in New York City. Ingredients:

IT LOOKED LIKE a typical day on the

8 egg yolks 1 1/4 cup granulated sugar 2 envelopes unflavored gelatin (dissolved in hot water) 1 1/4 cup fresh squeezed orange juice 2 Tbs. Cointreau 4 egg whites 1 1/2 cup heavy cream 2 Tbs. Dutch cocoa powder 5-cup freezer-proof soufflé dish with a fourinch high paper collar wrapped around the side. (This will extend the lip of the dish by three inches.)

Terp’s football practice field.The team, in red and white, ran drills. Coaches shouted directions. Sweat ran from under helmets in the unseasonably warm May weather. But something was a little off.The head man on the field was more interested in how the action was choreographed than whether the defense hit hard. As if it weren’t hot enough, a movable sun beamed an extra 12,000 watts of light and heat down on the players, and the young women with the water spritzer bottles were a little more skimpily clad than the usual

• Transfer to another bowl and chill for 30-40 minutes.

Adele’s What: Full-service fine-dining restaurant offering

lunch service Monday through Friday and dinner service Monday through Thursday Where: North side of Stamp Student Union on the first floor. Special Feature: Adele’s was named in honor of Adele Hagner Stamp ’24 M.A., the first appointed dean of women at the University of Maryland. The restaurant has a grand view of Shipley Field and the menu includes gastronomic delicacies such as coconut-crusted shrimp and Maryland crab cakes. Seating Capacity: 160

• Beat egg whites and slowly add granulated sugar to make a simple meringue (soft peak). • Whip the heavy cream also to a medium soft peak. • Fold the meringue into the egg yolk mixture, then fold in the whipped heavy cream. Pour into container and place in the freezer for five to eight hours. Remove paper collar, dust top with cocoa powder. • Serves 10 to 12.

*For hours and menus contact www.dining.umd.edu

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Maryland trainers. And when the team finally played a game that night, the crowd saw the same play over and over and over. The Terp football look-alike scene was actually the filming of a commercial for Under Armour, the Baltimore athletic apparel company started by Maryland alumnus Kevin Plank ’97, and creator of the actual Terp football team’s new uniforms. The ad debuted in July on the ESPY awards and will run during NFL games this fall. The “players” on Team Under Armour were a collection of pro, semi-pro and for-

Lights. Camera. Action! Maryland’s practice field was the setting for the filming of a commercial for Under Armour, the sports apparel company founded by alumnus Kevin Plank.

mer college players who may be hard to identify under their helmets, but some of the coaches should look familiar. Look for Dave Sollazo, in real life the Terps defensive line coach. James Franklin,Terps wide receiver coach, and Tom Deahn, usually Maryland’s director of football operations, were on the field. Even the Fridge (head coach, Ralph Friedgen ’70, ’72) makes an appearance. —ET

Method:

• In a stainless steel bowl, beat yolks with 1/2 cup sugar, add in dissolved gelatin. Place bowl over a double boiler, stir constantly. When the mixture is thick enough to lightly coat a spoon, remove from heat, stir in strained orange juice and Cointreau.

Status: Opened in new location April 2002.

Who Were Those Guys?

PHOTOS BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

National Weather and Climate Prediction Center Joins M-Square THE NATIONAL OCEANIC and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is one of the newest tenants to sign on with the University of Maryland Enterprise Campus, also known as M Square, a 128-acre research park adjacent to the university near the College Park-University of Maryland Metro station. NOAA plans to build a new multi-million dollar state-of-theart facility that is specifically designed for climate and weather operational forecasts and related research. “We are excited about the potential in front of us and are expecting great things to happen with the participation of the academic community, specifically the University of Maryland, to improve all weather and climate forecasts,” says Louis W. Uccellini, director of the new NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction.

TOP PHOTOS COURTESY OF UNIVERSITY MARKETING; BOTTOM PHOTO COURTESY OF NASA

Brian Darmody, the university’s assistant vice president for research and economic development, says that M Square offers the opportunity for the University of Maryland to effectively connect the intellectual capacity of its faculty and graduate students with large and small companies, government laboratories and other specialized centers. The research park already has 128,000 sq. ft. leased, Darmody says, including the new Center for the Advanced Study of Language, a joint university-Department of Defense project that conducts research in support of the nation’s critical need for increased capabilities to understand and translate languages. At full build-out, it is expected that more than 2.5 million sq. ft. of research space and 6,500 workers will occupy the M Square site. —TV TERP FALL

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5


the Source

ask Anne Questions for Anne Turkos, University Archivist, may be sent to terp_alum@umail.umd.edu.

WHILE THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND’S HEARING AND SPEECH CLINIC MAY NOT BE EASILY RECOGNIZABLE — IT’S TUCKED AWAY IN THE BOTTOM OF LEFRAK HALL — IT HAS BEEN A MAINSTAY AT MARYLAND FOR MORE THAN 50 YEARS, HELPING PATIENTS OF ALL AGES DIAGNOSE AND TREAT SPEECH, LANGUAGE AND HEARING DISORDERS.

history, does the University of Maryland have any stories about ghosts haunting the campus? Q. With such a long

Voice It Service: Speech Treatment.

Education Starts Early Service: LEAP (LanguageLearning Early Advantage Program).

Don’t Stress; Assess Service: Diagnostic Testing. How It Helps: The clinic’s team of licensed speech-language pathologists and audiologists stress proper assessment as the first step toward effective intervention. According to Margaret McCabe, director of audiological services, there are procedures to identify the presence and severity of hearing loss and/or speech/language impairment. Targets: Anyone who is experiencing difficulty with hearing or speech/language development or function—from newborn to the most senior of citizens.

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How It Helps: LEAP offers a small student-to-teacher ratio with an emphasis on early literacy acquisition. All children receive individual therapy sessions as part of their enrollment. Targets: Three-to-five-year-olds with primary speech/language impairment.

Hearing Aids Service: Hearing Aid Dispensing program. How It Helps: The clinic fits patients with state-of-the-art instrumentation, including digital and programmable hearing aids with directional microphone and noise reduction features. Patients learn to adjust to their hearing aids, ensuring that they are functioning properly and meeting their needs.

How It Helps: The clinic treats impairments in articulation, fluency (stuttering), voice and learning disabilities; assists with language development; helps with aphasia and can work with non-native speakers on accent modification, says Colleen Worthington, the clinic’s speech-language director Targets: Patients of all ages.

A. Indeed, faculty, staff and students have reported ghostly encounters in several places around campus.The ghost of Marie Mount allegedly plays the piano on stormy nights in the hall named for her, and members of the Maryland Ghosts and Spirits Association detected the presence of several other spirits in Marie Mount Hall during an investigation in October 2002. Larry Donnelly, a former Dining Services employee, spotted a female ghost in the Rossborough Inn in 1981, during renovations to the building. Several weeks later, a waiter at the inn saw the same woman, dressed in yellow as Donnelly had described. Spirits have also been detected in Morrill Hall, and ghosts are rumored to inhabit Easton Hall, the Stamp Student Union, H. J. Patterson Hall, and the Alpha Omicron Pi and Kappa Delta sorority houses.

Q. My wife and I have recently discovered volumes of letters, ledgers and pictures that date as early as 1832. They had been stored in a steamer trunk since the late 1940s and have never been touched. How do I best preserve them? —Robert A. Byrd and Ann Miller ’68 Byrd

Q. I remember during my orientation in 1995 that I was told of Maryland’s first mascot (before the Terrapin). I can’t remember what it was and I was hoping you could help me. —Joshua Bird ’99 A. The University of Maryland did not

A. It is difficult to give you precise answers

Targets: Patients of all ages.

H OT L I N E THE HEARING AND SPEECH CLINIC OFFERS ITS DIAGNOSTIC, THERAPEUTIC AND EDUCATIONAL SERVICES FOR REASONABLE FEES. Phone: 301.405.4218 Fax: 301.314.2023 Web: www.bsos.umd.edu/hesp/clinic.html Hours: Audiology: 9:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Speech-Language Pathology: 9:00 a.m. – 6:30 p.m.

PHOTOS BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

without seeing the documents in person, so I offer this general advice: First, remove the documents from the steamer trunk and store them in acid-free folders and boxes and inert plastic sleeves. (We use the brand name Mylar™ to protect our documents here at the university.) Avoid handling the photos with your bare hands, since the oils on your hands, if left on the photos, will ultimately damage them. Instead, handle the pictures wearing white cotton gloves.All the documents should be unfolded and flattened very gently before they are rehoused in the acid-free containers.

TOP LEFT PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

have a mascot until 1933, when the statue of Testudo was unveiled.We did have various nicknames for our sports teams before that time, such as Old Liners and Aggies.The Old Liners nickname was around off and on for

quite a long time, and sometimes you would see our teams referred to by both nicknames in the same yearbook. Both “Aggies” and “Old Liners” have a very historical feel to them, for the history of our state and our campus, but “Terps” is a much more appealing term in my book, so I am very grateful to the Class of 1933 for its role in creating our mascot. Before there were Terps, the Old Liners made the plays on Maryland’s football field.

TERP FALL

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bigpicture

GROWTH spurt

M

aryland’s food options are much more robust than standard cafeteria fare. Whether you crave your morning Starbucks, an afternoon chow mein in the food court or a swanky sit-down dinner, Maryland’s Dining Services* continues to expand, offering food to fit your appetite and schedule.

Footnotes Café

Souffle Glace a l’Orange

Status: Opened January 2004. What: Newest café

on campus, featuring a Starbucks coffee menu complete with Frappucinos and “no whipped” mochas. Footnotes also offers bakery fare, prepared sandwiches and salads, snacks and bottled beverages. Where: McKeldin Library, first floor at the eat-in study lounge. Special Feature: Borrow a book, on your honor, from the bookshelf at Footnotes and return it when you are finished, without ever having to check it out. Seating Capacity: Seating is limited (about 50) in the study lounge since many tables are elbow height for standing and don’t have chairs.

Stamp Student Union Food Court Status: First phase completed fall 2003, second phase just completed this fall. What: New food court in the renovated Stamp Student Union. Where: Ground floor. Special Feature: Doubled in size, now offering eight restaurants: Chick-fil-A, Freshens, Taco Bell, Panda Express, Steak Escape, Sbarro, Marketplace Delicatessen and McDonald’s. Seating Capacity: 900

Recipe provided by head pastry chef Jeff Russo, who administers bakery and ice cream production. Before coming to Maryland, Russo was the pastry chef at the Plaza and Waldorf Astoria hotels in New York City. Ingredients:

IT LOOKED LIKE a typical day on the

8 egg yolks 1 1/4 cup granulated sugar 2 envelopes unflavored gelatin (dissolved in hot water) 1 1/4 cup fresh squeezed orange juice 2 Tbs. Cointreau 4 egg whites 1 1/2 cup heavy cream 2 Tbs. Dutch cocoa powder 5-cup freezer-proof soufflé dish with a fourinch high paper collar wrapped around the side. (This will extend the lip of the dish by three inches.)

Terp’s football practice field.The team, in red and white, ran drills. Coaches shouted directions. Sweat ran from under helmets in the unseasonably warm May weather. But something was a little off.The head man on the field was more interested in how the action was choreographed than whether the defense hit hard. As if it weren’t hot enough, a movable sun beamed an extra 12,000 watts of light and heat down on the players, and the young women with the water spritzer bottles were a little more skimpily clad than the usual

• Transfer to another bowl and chill for 30-40 minutes.

Adele’s What: Full-service fine-dining restaurant offering

lunch service Monday through Friday and dinner service Monday through Thursday Where: North side of Stamp Student Union on the first floor. Special Feature: Adele’s was named in honor of Adele Hagner Stamp ’24 M.A., the first appointed dean of women at the University of Maryland. The restaurant has a grand view of Shipley Field and the menu includes gastronomic delicacies such as coconut-crusted shrimp and Maryland crab cakes. Seating Capacity: 160

• Beat egg whites and slowly add granulated sugar to make a simple meringue (soft peak). • Whip the heavy cream also to a medium soft peak. • Fold the meringue into the egg yolk mixture, then fold in the whipped heavy cream. Pour into container and place in the freezer for five to eight hours. Remove paper collar, dust top with cocoa powder. • Serves 10 to 12.

*For hours and menus contact www.dining.umd.edu

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Maryland trainers. And when the team finally played a game that night, the crowd saw the same play over and over and over. The Terp football look-alike scene was actually the filming of a commercial for Under Armour, the Baltimore athletic apparel company started by Maryland alumnus Kevin Plank ’97, and creator of the actual Terp football team’s new uniforms. The ad debuted in July on the ESPY awards and will run during NFL games this fall. The “players” on Team Under Armour were a collection of pro, semi-pro and for-

Lights. Camera. Action! Maryland’s practice field was the setting for the filming of a commercial for Under Armour, the sports apparel company founded by alumnus Kevin Plank.

mer college players who may be hard to identify under their helmets, but some of the coaches should look familiar. Look for Dave Sollazo, in real life the Terps defensive line coach. James Franklin,Terps wide receiver coach, and Tom Deahn, usually Maryland’s director of football operations, were on the field. Even the Fridge (head coach, Ralph Friedgen ’70, ’72) makes an appearance. —ET

Method:

• In a stainless steel bowl, beat yolks with 1/2 cup sugar, add in dissolved gelatin. Place bowl over a double boiler, stir constantly. When the mixture is thick enough to lightly coat a spoon, remove from heat, stir in strained orange juice and Cointreau.

Status: Opened in new location April 2002.

Who Were Those Guys?

PHOTOS BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

National Weather and Climate Prediction Center Joins M-Square THE NATIONAL OCEANIC and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is one of the newest tenants to sign on with the University of Maryland Enterprise Campus, also known as M Square, a 128-acre research park adjacent to the university near the College Park-University of Maryland Metro station. NOAA plans to build a new multi-million dollar state-of-theart facility that is specifically designed for climate and weather operational forecasts and related research. “We are excited about the potential in front of us and are expecting great things to happen with the participation of the academic community, specifically the University of Maryland, to improve all weather and climate forecasts,” says Louis W. Uccellini, director of the new NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction.

TOP PHOTOS COURTESY OF UNIVERSITY MARKETING; BOTTOM PHOTO COURTESY OF NASA

Brian Darmody, the university’s assistant vice president for research and economic development, says that M Square offers the opportunity for the University of Maryland to effectively connect the intellectual capacity of its faculty and graduate students with large and small companies, government laboratories and other specialized centers. The research park already has 128,000 sq. ft. leased, Darmody says, including the new Center for the Advanced Study of Language, a joint university-Department of Defense project that conducts research in support of the nation’s critical need for increased capabilities to understand and translate languages. At full build-out, it is expected that more than 2.5 million sq. ft. of research space and 6,500 workers will occupy the M Square site. —TV TERP FALL

2004

5


the Source

ask Anne Questions for Anne Turkos, University Archivist, may be sent to terp_alum@umail.umd.edu.

WHILE THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND’S HEARING AND SPEECH CLINIC MAY NOT BE EASILY RECOGNIZABLE — IT’S TUCKED AWAY IN THE BOTTOM OF LEFRAK HALL — IT HAS BEEN A MAINSTAY AT MARYLAND FOR MORE THAN 50 YEARS, HELPING PATIENTS OF ALL AGES DIAGNOSE AND TREAT SPEECH, LANGUAGE AND HEARING DISORDERS.

history, does the University of Maryland have any stories about ghosts haunting the campus? Q. With such a long

Voice It Service: Speech Treatment.

Education Starts Early Service: LEAP (LanguageLearning Early Advantage Program).

Don’t Stress; Assess Service: Diagnostic Testing. How It Helps: The clinic’s team of licensed speech-language pathologists and audiologists stress proper assessment as the first step toward effective intervention. According to Margaret McCabe, director of audiological services, there are procedures to identify the presence and severity of hearing loss and/or speech/language impairment. Targets: Anyone who is experiencing difficulty with hearing or speech/language development or function—from newborn to the most senior of citizens.

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How It Helps: LEAP offers a small student-to-teacher ratio with an emphasis on early literacy acquisition. All children receive individual therapy sessions as part of their enrollment. Targets: Three-to-five-year-olds with primary speech/language impairment.

Hearing Aids Service: Hearing Aid Dispensing program. How It Helps: The clinic fits patients with state-of-the-art instrumentation, including digital and programmable hearing aids with directional microphone and noise reduction features. Patients learn to adjust to their hearing aids, ensuring that they are functioning properly and meeting their needs.

How It Helps: The clinic treats impairments in articulation, fluency (stuttering), voice and learning disabilities; assists with language development; helps with aphasia and can work with non-native speakers on accent modification, says Colleen Worthington, the clinic’s speech-language director Targets: Patients of all ages.

A. Indeed, faculty, staff and students have reported ghostly encounters in several places around campus.The ghost of Marie Mount allegedly plays the piano on stormy nights in the hall named for her, and members of the Maryland Ghosts and Spirits Association detected the presence of several other spirits in Marie Mount Hall during an investigation in October 2002. Larry Donnelly, a former Dining Services employee, spotted a female ghost in the Rossborough Inn in 1981, during renovations to the building. Several weeks later, a waiter at the inn saw the same woman, dressed in yellow as Donnelly had described. Spirits have also been detected in Morrill Hall, and ghosts are rumored to inhabit Easton Hall, the Stamp Student Union, H. J. Patterson Hall, and the Alpha Omicron Pi and Kappa Delta sorority houses.

Q. My wife and I have recently discovered volumes of letters, ledgers and pictures that date as early as 1832. They had been stored in a steamer trunk since the late 1940s and have never been touched. How do I best preserve them? —Robert A. Byrd and Ann Miller ’68 Byrd

Q. I remember during my orientation in 1995 that I was told of Maryland’s first mascot (before the Terrapin). I can’t remember what it was and I was hoping you could help me. —Joshua Bird ’99 A. The University of Maryland did not

A. It is difficult to give you precise answers

Targets: Patients of all ages.

H OT L I N E THE HEARING AND SPEECH CLINIC OFFERS ITS DIAGNOSTIC, THERAPEUTIC AND EDUCATIONAL SERVICES FOR REASONABLE FEES. Phone: 301.405.4218 Fax: 301.314.2023 Web: www.bsos.umd.edu/hesp/clinic.html Hours: Audiology: 9:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Speech-Language Pathology: 9:00 a.m. – 6:30 p.m.

PHOTOS BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

without seeing the documents in person, so I offer this general advice: First, remove the documents from the steamer trunk and store them in acid-free folders and boxes and inert plastic sleeves. (We use the brand name Mylar™ to protect our documents here at the university.) Avoid handling the photos with your bare hands, since the oils on your hands, if left on the photos, will ultimately damage them. Instead, handle the pictures wearing white cotton gloves.All the documents should be unfolded and flattened very gently before they are rehoused in the acid-free containers.

TOP LEFT PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

have a mascot until 1933, when the statue of Testudo was unveiled.We did have various nicknames for our sports teams before that time, such as Old Liners and Aggies.The Old Liners nickname was around off and on for

quite a long time, and sometimes you would see our teams referred to by both nicknames in the same yearbook. Both “Aggies” and “Old Liners” have a very historical feel to them, for the history of our state and our campus, but “Terps” is a much more appealing term in my book, so I am very grateful to the Class of 1933 for its role in creating our mascot. Before there were Terps, the Old Liners made the plays on Maryland’s football field.

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classact

Maryland grads Remy Shaffer (pictured left in first photo from left) and Casey Gomes will come full circle when they marry on campus—the place where it all began—next June.

Terps Head to the South Pole

travel 2004 India’s Golden Triangle February 3–17 Explore the classic Golden Triangle: Delhi, the bustling capital; Agra,

SOME TERRAPINS DON’T hibernate in the winter,

especially if those Terps are Brian ’69 and Susan Bayly. In January the Baylys traveled to Antarctica where Brian displayed his school spirit sensibly in a cozy Terps sweater. A rookery of penguins gathered for an icy welcome—perhaps their first encounter with Terrapins?

home of the sublime Taj Mahal; and Jaipur, one of the great cities of the Rajput. Alumni College in the Yucatán February 24–March 2

Dream Wedding Winners to Say “I Do” in College Park Remy Shaffer ’00 was visiting Casey Gomes ’02, her fiancé, when she received a very important phone call. “We are calling to congratulate you … ,” said the voice on the line. “Oh, my God!” Shaffer responded. They had won. The caller was Linda Roth ’84, director of corporate and community events for the Maryland Alumni Association, letting the couple know that they won the alumni association’s Dream Wedding contest. On June 25, 2005, Shaffer and Gomes will walk down the aisle of Memorial Chapel and then celebrate with friends and family at a reception in the new Samuel Riggs IV Alumni Center—compliments of the Maryland Alumni Association and many participating sponsors. As the couple says in their winning essay, “Our journeys have taken us to many places, but we can’t imagine a better way to come full circle and celebrate our Terp union than a red tie affair!” Their courtship began in the fall of 1999 when they were students at Maryland. Gomes asked Shaffer to a Halloween Hayride (their first

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date). Their relationship grew, even when Shaffer graduated and moved to work in Boston, and Gomes completed his last two years at the university. In 2002, they reunited in Ohio where he was working for General Fraternity Headquarters of Beta Theta Pi (his fraternity) and she was pursuing a master’s at Miami of Ohio. This past year, they began making plans to get married. They knew they wanted to be married in 2005; the problem was where. Home for Shaffer is Baltimore, and for Gomes, it is Rhode Island’s coastline. When they saw the announcement about the Dream Wedding contest in the winter issue of Terp magazine, a solution presented itself: “College Park is us,” says Shaffer. “It’s the only place that we both share, and we both love, love, College Park. We’re really proud to be alumni. It felt right.” It felt right, too, for the committee judging the contestants. In May, Gomes and Shaffer were selected the winners out of 24 couples. Contestants wrote a 500-word essay and were interviewed by the committee. Today, Shaffer and Gomes are back in

Maryland. She works for the College of Notre Dame in Baltimore, and he is in his first semester of graduate school at Johns Hopkins University. Next June, they will return to College Park, where it all began, to marry in Memorial Chapel, a favorite stop on tours they led as campus tour guides; to inaugurate a new landmark on campus, the Samuel Riggs IV Alumni Center; and most of all, to start a new chapter in their lives. “We are humbled, excited and honored,” says Gomes. “There’s a reason this happened to us, and we need to make the most of this.”—BAM

Travel to Mexico’s Yucatán peninsula and the ancient cities of Uxmal and Chichén Itzá. The “Gateway to the Mayan Heartland,” is abundant with anthropological treasures and

Village Life on the Dutch Waterways April 8–16 Experience everyday life in perfectly preserved Bruges, the porcelain the Sea Beggars’ haunt of Middelburg and Holland’s beautiful Keukenhof Gardens. Alumni College in Cortona May 4–12

Cast Your Vote

Visit Italy’s Tuscany region, including, Siena, Florence and Assisi.

Be a part of planning Remy Shaffer and Casey Gomes’ Dream Wedding! Over the next few months, visit www.alumni.umd.edu to help them choose their caterer, wedding cake, band and flowers.

TOP PHOTOS COURTESY OF REMY SHAFFER AND CASEY GOMES; BOTTOM LEFT PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

alumniprofile

pristine natural wonders.

town of Delft,

Read the couple’s entire essay and learn more about the Samuel Riggs IV Alumni Center at www.alumni.umd.edu. For information about Memorial Chapel, visit www.weddings.umd.edu.

How do you show your Terp pride? Send us your samples of Terp pride so that we can share them with fellow Maryland fans. Simply mail a photo and description to TERP magazine, Alumni Association, Rossborough Inn, College Park, MD 20742. Include your full name, class year and how we can reach you.

Delight in a presentation of Tuscan cooking by an award-winning chef.

Explore the Travel 2005 catalog at www.alumni.umd.edu. Or contact 301.403.2728 ext. 14 or 800.336.8627.

Carr Urges Alumni to Connect Chuck Carr graduated from Maryland in 1985, but he has never really left his alma mater. Since graduation, the Robert H. Smith School of Business alumnus has served on the advisory boards of the school’s Dingman Center and Department of Accounting and led the school’s alumni board as its president.Today he is a member of the Dean’s Advisory Board. In July, Carr added president of the Alumni Association Board of Governors to his Maryland résumé. As president, he aims to increase membership in the alumni association, ensure the successful opening of the Samuel Riggs IV Alumni Center and generate a greater level of activism among alumni. “When you look at the strengths of the best schools in this country, including the Ivy Leagues, one of those strengths is the activity of the alumni network,” he says. “Alumni have the responsibility to make this a better university. They need to be proud, they need The alumni association welcomes these new members to be vocal and they need to be active.” to the board of governors. For a list of the entire board’s Carr says there are many ways for alumni membership, visit www.alumni.umd.edu. to reconnect with the university: mentoring students, assisting fellow and future alumni Ellen Chiogioji ’72, ’81 Ph.D. Steven Rotter ’82 with job leads, giving money to the extent David Eisner ’90 Keith Scroggins ’79 Ronald Paul ’78 Chip Sollins ’82 they can and joining the alumni association. When not volunteering for Maryland, Carr is working as an audit partner with Deloitte & Touche (he has worked for the firm for 19 years). Back at home, he is busy building the Terrapin spirit in his four children (ages 2 to 8) with his wife, Stacy, an “adopted Terp fan” who graduated from James Madison University. —BAM

LEFT PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION; CARR PHOTO BY MIKE MORGAN

TERP FALL

2004

9


classact

Maryland grads Remy Shaffer (pictured left in first photo from left) and Casey Gomes will come full circle when they marry on campus—the place where it all began—next June.

Terps Head to the South Pole

travel 2004 India’s Golden Triangle February 3–17 Explore the classic Golden Triangle: Delhi, the bustling capital; Agra,

SOME TERRAPINS DON’T hibernate in the winter,

especially if those Terps are Brian ’69 and Susan Bayly. In January the Baylys traveled to Antarctica where Brian displayed his school spirit sensibly in a cozy Terps sweater. A rookery of penguins gathered for an icy welcome—perhaps their first encounter with Terrapins?

home of the sublime Taj Mahal; and Jaipur, one of the great cities of the Rajput. Alumni College in the Yucatán February 24–March 2

Dream Wedding Winners to Say “I Do” in College Park Remy Shaffer ’00 was visiting Casey Gomes ’02, her fiancé, when she received a very important phone call. “We are calling to congratulate you … ,” said the voice on the line. “Oh, my God!” Shaffer responded. They had won. The caller was Linda Roth ’84, director of corporate and community events for the Maryland Alumni Association, letting the couple know that they won the alumni association’s Dream Wedding contest. On June 25, 2005, Shaffer and Gomes will walk down the aisle of Memorial Chapel and then celebrate with friends and family at a reception in the new Samuel Riggs IV Alumni Center—compliments of the Maryland Alumni Association and many participating sponsors. As the couple says in their winning essay, “Our journeys have taken us to many places, but we can’t imagine a better way to come full circle and celebrate our Terp union than a red tie affair!” Their courtship began in the fall of 1999 when they were students at Maryland. Gomes asked Shaffer to a Halloween Hayride (their first

8

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2004

date). Their relationship grew, even when Shaffer graduated and moved to work in Boston, and Gomes completed his last two years at the university. In 2002, they reunited in Ohio where he was working for General Fraternity Headquarters of Beta Theta Pi (his fraternity) and she was pursuing a master’s at Miami of Ohio. This past year, they began making plans to get married. They knew they wanted to be married in 2005; the problem was where. Home for Shaffer is Baltimore, and for Gomes, it is Rhode Island’s coastline. When they saw the announcement about the Dream Wedding contest in the winter issue of Terp magazine, a solution presented itself: “College Park is us,” says Shaffer. “It’s the only place that we both share, and we both love, love, College Park. We’re really proud to be alumni. It felt right.” It felt right, too, for the committee judging the contestants. In May, Gomes and Shaffer were selected the winners out of 24 couples. Contestants wrote a 500-word essay and were interviewed by the committee. Today, Shaffer and Gomes are back in

Maryland. She works for the College of Notre Dame in Baltimore, and he is in his first semester of graduate school at Johns Hopkins University. Next June, they will return to College Park, where it all began, to marry in Memorial Chapel, a favorite stop on tours they led as campus tour guides; to inaugurate a new landmark on campus, the Samuel Riggs IV Alumni Center; and most of all, to start a new chapter in their lives. “We are humbled, excited and honored,” says Gomes. “There’s a reason this happened to us, and we need to make the most of this.”—BAM

Travel to Mexico’s Yucatán peninsula and the ancient cities of Uxmal and Chichén Itzá. The “Gateway to the Mayan Heartland,” is abundant with anthropological treasures and

Village Life on the Dutch Waterways April 8–16 Experience everyday life in perfectly preserved Bruges, the porcelain the Sea Beggars’ haunt of Middelburg and Holland’s beautiful Keukenhof Gardens. Alumni College in Cortona May 4–12

Cast Your Vote

Visit Italy’s Tuscany region, including, Siena, Florence and Assisi.

Be a part of planning Remy Shaffer and Casey Gomes’ Dream Wedding! Over the next few months, visit www.alumni.umd.edu to help them choose their caterer, wedding cake, band and flowers.

TOP PHOTOS COURTESY OF REMY SHAFFER AND CASEY GOMES; BOTTOM LEFT PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

alumniprofile

pristine natural wonders.

town of Delft,

Read the couple’s entire essay and learn more about the Samuel Riggs IV Alumni Center at www.alumni.umd.edu. For information about Memorial Chapel, visit www.weddings.umd.edu.

How do you show your Terp pride? Send us your samples of Terp pride so that we can share them with fellow Maryland fans. Simply mail a photo and description to TERP magazine, Alumni Association, Rossborough Inn, College Park, MD 20742. Include your full name, class year and how we can reach you.

Delight in a presentation of Tuscan cooking by an award-winning chef.

Explore the Travel 2005 catalog at www.alumni.umd.edu. Or contact 301.403.2728 ext. 14 or 800.336.8627.

Carr Urges Alumni to Connect Chuck Carr graduated from Maryland in 1985, but he has never really left his alma mater. Since graduation, the Robert H. Smith School of Business alumnus has served on the advisory boards of the school’s Dingman Center and Department of Accounting and led the school’s alumni board as its president.Today he is a member of the Dean’s Advisory Board. In July, Carr added president of the Alumni Association Board of Governors to his Maryland résumé. As president, he aims to increase membership in the alumni association, ensure the successful opening of the Samuel Riggs IV Alumni Center and generate a greater level of activism among alumni. “When you look at the strengths of the best schools in this country, including the Ivy Leagues, one of those strengths is the activity of the alumni network,” he says. “Alumni have the responsibility to make this a better university. They need to be proud, they need The alumni association welcomes these new members to be vocal and they need to be active.” to the board of governors. For a list of the entire board’s Carr says there are many ways for alumni membership, visit www.alumni.umd.edu. to reconnect with the university: mentoring students, assisting fellow and future alumni Ellen Chiogioji ’72, ’81 Ph.D. Steven Rotter ’82 with job leads, giving money to the extent David Eisner ’90 Keith Scroggins ’79 Ronald Paul ’78 Chip Sollins ’82 they can and joining the alumni association. When not volunteering for Maryland, Carr is working as an audit partner with Deloitte & Touche (he has worked for the firm for 19 years). Back at home, he is busy building the Terrapin spirit in his four children (ages 2 to 8) with his wife, Stacy, an “adopted Terp fan” who graduated from James Madison University. —BAM

LEFT PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION; CARR PHOTO BY MIKE MORGAN

TERP FALL

2004

9


classact

BYalumni

Class Members Return to Lead Reunions Love for the Black and Gold, deep in their hearts they hold—love that has brought these five loyal alumni back to Maryland to coordinate their classes’ reunion activities. Here, then and now, are the 1954, 1964 and 1979 Reunion Committee Chairs. —MW Class Reunions will be held over Homecoming Weekend, October 15–16. For more information contact 301.405.4678, 800.336.8627 or visit www.alumni.umd.edu

For Association Members, It’s the “Big Tent Party” Donald M. Goldstein ’54, ’63 M.A. The alumni association’s members-only tent is located on Ludwig Field, next to Lot 1. Not a member? You can sign up today by visiting www.alumni.umd.edu.

Then: “Glip” Goldstein

College of Arts and Humanities, B.A., M.A. History; Omicron Delta Kappa; “M” Club, Secretary; Men’s League, President. Now: Donald M. Goldstein, Ph.D.

Lt. Colonel (Ret.), United States Air Force; professor of public and international affairs, University of Pittsburgh; co-author of more than 21 books; consultant to ABC, NBC, The History Channel and more. IT’S GAME DAY and you’re

Woodrow Wilson Hancock ’64 Then: “Woody” Hancock

College of Business and Management, B.S., Accounting; Omicron Delta Kappa; Senior Class, President; SGA, Treasurer. Now: Woodrow Hancock

Sales representative, IBM; sales and sales management for Memorex, PacificCorp Capital and Hitachi Data Systems; outdoor enthusiast; owner of H&R Block Franchise in Evergreen, Colo.

Leah Dawson Thayer ’64 Then: Leah Dawson

College of Arts and Humanities, B.A., Spanish; SGA Cultural Committee; Central Student Court Justice. Now: Leah Dawson Thayer

Former Defense Department linguist; former assistant dean of students, Chatham College, Pittsburgh; promotions director for Marilyn Dover Advertising; commercial real estate developer.

Dr. Philip and Mrs. Joyce Hendler Schneider ’79 Then: Phil Schneider

College of Life Sciences, B.S., Biochemistry; SGA, Treasurer; Omicron Delta Kappa; undergraduate teaching assistant and tutor, Department of English.

rushing out of the house. No time for a meal—you’ve got to make it to campus early if you’re going to find that elusive parking space.

Once here, safely parked in Lot 1, you’re wishing you had grabbed a Twinkie.The smell wafting from tailgaters’ barbecues is driving you crazy and it sounds like a capacity crowd is roaring in your stomach. Thankfully, you are carrying your Maryland Alumni Association membership card. In the past, it has brought you discounts on services and merchandise. Today, it is your free pass into the association’s exclusive members-only tent, where

Then: Joyce Hendler

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences, B.A., Criminology; HELP Center phone counselor; St. Mary’s Hall Residence Assistant; Campus Police loss-prevention educator.

My TerpTV TERPTV IS ON the air! Maryland is the first university in the nation to take the concept of streaming video to the next level. TerpTV is an Internet TV channel devoted solely to the people, traditions and spirit of University of Maryland alumni. TerpTV is a joint venture produced by TV Worldwide and former NFL and Maryland kicker Jess Atkinson ’85 of Atkinson and Co.—the team that also produces FridgeTV.com. “We’re excited about the TerpTV pilot. This innovative Web site streams Terp pride right onto the screens of Maryland alumni,” says Danita D. Nias ’81, executive director of alumni relations. Get to know our most accomplished alumni, journey with well-known graduates to the places on campus that were meaningful to their lives, reminisce with couples who met as students in College Park, and stay up-to-date on the development of the new alumni center. The alumni association is bringing the vibrancy of your alma mater to you, no matter where you live. Tune in today at www.TerpTV.com. —GS

Now: Philip Schneider, M.D.

Orthopedic surgeon; president, Montgomery Orthopedics; hospital chief of staff and director of the Spine Center, Holy Cross Hospital, Silver Spring, Md.; Colonnade Society Council member, and Gridiron Network member, University of Maryland.

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you’ll find a full buffet, beverages and a place to relax with fellow university graduates. “It’s our way of bringing alumni together for some Terrapin spirit—and buffalo wings—before kickoff,” says Sonia Huntley, the association’s director of membership. Visit the tent on Homecoming (October 16) for even more fun, including an open bar and live entertainment. If you have family or friends with you on game day, bring them in with you for a nominal fee. So relax, enjoy, then cheer the Terps to victory. —MW

Now: Joyce Hendler Schneider

Former security clearance specialist for defense contractor TRW; sales executive, Digital Equipment Corporation, later Compaq; founder, Imagine That Children’s Museum of Rockville, Md.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION

TOP LEFT PHOTO BY MIKE MORGAN; TOP RIGHT ART BY MARGARET HALL; RIGHT PHOTOS BY JOHN T. CONSOIL

In Abraham: The Last Jew (Authorhouse), a new novel that depicts resurrection of horrific events, Mark Carp ’69 opens the door to a futuristic world where a global holocaust takes place in 2250. Throughout Carp’s depiction of the future, the surviving Jews’ ability to confront horrific wrongs, their personal loyalty and their faith are put to the test. Eileen Warburton ’69 provides a richly detailed, authoritative portrait of John Fowles, the troubled and triumphant man who became one of the 20th century’s most important writers. John Fowles: A Life In Two Worlds (Penguin Group) is a biography of a man who was as much a mystery as the twists and turns of his most famous novels. In Shifting: The Double Lives of Black Women in America (Harper Collins), Kumea Shorter-Gooden ’75, ’78 and Charisse Jones attempt to shine a light on the ways African American women have, at times, altered their speech, appearance and behavior to cope with racial and gender discrimination. As African American women talk openly about their lives, they will come to understand how important it is to be aware of “shifting.”

TERP FALL

2004

11


classact

BYalumni

Class Members Return to Lead Reunions Love for the Black and Gold, deep in their hearts they hold—love that has brought these five loyal alumni back to Maryland to coordinate their classes’ reunion activities. Here, then and now, are the 1954, 1964 and 1979 Reunion Committee Chairs. —MW Class Reunions will be held over Homecoming Weekend, October 15–16. For more information contact 301.405.4678, 800.336.8627 or visit www.alumni.umd.edu

For Association Members, It’s the “Big Tent Party” Donald M. Goldstein ’54, ’63 M.A. The alumni association’s members-only tent is located on Ludwig Field, next to Lot 1. Not a member? You can sign up today by visiting www.alumni.umd.edu.

Then: “Glip” Goldstein

College of Arts and Humanities, B.A., M.A. History; Omicron Delta Kappa; “M” Club, Secretary; Men’s League, President. Now: Donald M. Goldstein, Ph.D.

Lt. Colonel (Ret.), United States Air Force; professor of public and international affairs, University of Pittsburgh; co-author of more than 21 books; consultant to ABC, NBC, The History Channel and more. IT’S GAME DAY and you’re

Woodrow Wilson Hancock ’64 Then: “Woody” Hancock

College of Business and Management, B.S., Accounting; Omicron Delta Kappa; Senior Class, President; SGA, Treasurer. Now: Woodrow Hancock

Sales representative, IBM; sales and sales management for Memorex, PacificCorp Capital and Hitachi Data Systems; outdoor enthusiast; owner of H&R Block Franchise in Evergreen, Colo.

Leah Dawson Thayer ’64 Then: Leah Dawson

College of Arts and Humanities, B.A., Spanish; SGA Cultural Committee; Central Student Court Justice. Now: Leah Dawson Thayer

Former Defense Department linguist; former assistant dean of students, Chatham College, Pittsburgh; promotions director for Marilyn Dover Advertising; commercial real estate developer.

Dr. Philip and Mrs. Joyce Hendler Schneider ’79 Then: Phil Schneider

College of Life Sciences, B.S., Biochemistry; SGA, Treasurer; Omicron Delta Kappa; undergraduate teaching assistant and tutor, Department of English.

rushing out of the house. No time for a meal—you’ve got to make it to campus early if you’re going to find that elusive parking space.

Once here, safely parked in Lot 1, you’re wishing you had grabbed a Twinkie.The smell wafting from tailgaters’ barbecues is driving you crazy and it sounds like a capacity crowd is roaring in your stomach. Thankfully, you are carrying your Maryland Alumni Association membership card. In the past, it has brought you discounts on services and merchandise. Today, it is your free pass into the association’s exclusive members-only tent, where

Then: Joyce Hendler

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences, B.A., Criminology; HELP Center phone counselor; St. Mary’s Hall Residence Assistant; Campus Police loss-prevention educator.

My TerpTV TERPTV IS ON the air! Maryland is the first university in the nation to take the concept of streaming video to the next level. TerpTV is an Internet TV channel devoted solely to the people, traditions and spirit of University of Maryland alumni. TerpTV is a joint venture produced by TV Worldwide and former NFL and Maryland kicker Jess Atkinson ’85 of Atkinson and Co.—the team that also produces FridgeTV.com. “We’re excited about the TerpTV pilot. This innovative Web site streams Terp pride right onto the screens of Maryland alumni,” says Danita D. Nias ’81, executive director of alumni relations. Get to know our most accomplished alumni, journey with well-known graduates to the places on campus that were meaningful to their lives, reminisce with couples who met as students in College Park, and stay up-to-date on the development of the new alumni center. The alumni association is bringing the vibrancy of your alma mater to you, no matter where you live. Tune in today at www.TerpTV.com. —GS

Now: Philip Schneider, M.D.

Orthopedic surgeon; president, Montgomery Orthopedics; hospital chief of staff and director of the Spine Center, Holy Cross Hospital, Silver Spring, Md.; Colonnade Society Council member, and Gridiron Network member, University of Maryland.

10

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you’ll find a full buffet, beverages and a place to relax with fellow university graduates. “It’s our way of bringing alumni together for some Terrapin spirit—and buffalo wings—before kickoff,” says Sonia Huntley, the association’s director of membership. Visit the tent on Homecoming (October 16) for even more fun, including an open bar and live entertainment. If you have family or friends with you on game day, bring them in with you for a nominal fee. So relax, enjoy, then cheer the Terps to victory. —MW

Now: Joyce Hendler Schneider

Former security clearance specialist for defense contractor TRW; sales executive, Digital Equipment Corporation, later Compaq; founder, Imagine That Children’s Museum of Rockville, Md.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION

TOP LEFT PHOTO BY MIKE MORGAN; TOP RIGHT ART BY MARGARET HALL; RIGHT PHOTOS BY JOHN T. CONSOIL

In Abraham: The Last Jew (Authorhouse), a new novel that depicts resurrection of horrific events, Mark Carp ’69 opens the door to a futuristic world where a global holocaust takes place in 2250. Throughout Carp’s depiction of the future, the surviving Jews’ ability to confront horrific wrongs, their personal loyalty and their faith are put to the test. Eileen Warburton ’69 provides a richly detailed, authoritative portrait of John Fowles, the troubled and triumphant man who became one of the 20th century’s most important writers. John Fowles: A Life In Two Worlds (Penguin Group) is a biography of a man who was as much a mystery as the twists and turns of his most famous novels. In Shifting: The Double Lives of Black Women in America (Harper Collins), Kumea Shorter-Gooden ’75, ’78 and Charisse Jones attempt to shine a light on the ways African American women have, at times, altered their speech, appearance and behavior to cope with racial and gender discrimination. As African American women talk openly about their lives, they will come to understand how important it is to be aware of “shifting.”

TERP FALL

2004

11


m-file NEWSdesk UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND FACULTY ARE THE SOURCE NEWS MEDIA TURN TO FOR EXPERTISE—FROM POLITICS AND PUBLIC POLICY TO SOCIETY AND CULTURE TO SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY.

Blackout Yields Blue Skies A NEW STUDY by researchers at the University of

“There are only a small number of publishers and printers … in the world who are capable of producing such a book.” CHARLES LOWRY, DEAN OF LIBRARIES, ANNOUNCING THIS COMPENDIUM OF TENNESSEE WILLIAMS’ WORKS AS THE 3 MILLIONTH VOLUME TO BE ADDED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND’S COLLECTION, WASHINGTON TIMES, JUNE 15

“I worry that amid the din of recrimination, a major point is being lost: Our cherished higher education system, once a source of national pride and international envy, is now threatened with what I call ‘graceful decline.’ Unless this threat is addressed, we face the likely prospect that our leadership in the knowledge based economy will erode.”

“Any news outlet—or any private individual, for that matter— who makes available footage of the actual beheadings is, to my mind, an accessory to the crime itself.Those are the individuals who are essentially finishing the work of the terrorists, by delivering their grisly ‘message.’ ” THOMAS KUNKEL, DEAN OF THE PHILIP MERRILL COLLEGE OF JOURNALISM, CHICAGO TRIBUNE, JUNE 30

C.D. MOTE JR., UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND PRESIDENT, WASHINGTON POST EDITORIAL, JUNE 20

“I think what’s going on is like an old spiritual. Everybody wants to go to heaven, but nobody wants to die.” ERIC USLANER, GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS, ON

“The FBI has never had a culture which rewarded analysis; they’re far more focused on reacting to crime, but that’s got to change.”

Maryland shows that skies were dramatically bluer and the air was much cleaner during the August 2003 blackout that hit the northeastern United States and southeastern Canada. The findings demonstrate that power plants in Ohio, West Virginia and Pennsylvania play a big role in our region’s air pollution. Aircraft measurements showed a 90 percent reduction in sulfur dioxide, a gas that leads to haze and acid rain, and a 50 percent reduction in smog. Visibility increased by some 20 miles. “The clean air benefit was realized over much of the eastern United States,” says research scientist Lackson Marufu, who directed the aircraft measurements. “The improvement in air quality provides dramatic evidence that transported emissions from power plants hundreds of kilometers upwind play a dominant role in our haze and smog. “What surprised us was not that air quality improved during the blackout, but the magnitude of the improvement,” says Marufu. Fellow researcher Russell Dickerson, professor and chair of the Department of Meteorology, says, “Scientists long have speculated about what would happen to air quality if all the power plants suddenly disappeared. The blackout performed for us an otherwise impossible experiment.” —LT

Talking to Your Kids About Sex WHEN IT COMES to talking to your kids about sex, do it early and often,

says University of Maryland sexuality expert Robin Sawyer. Sawyer, associate professor and chair of the Department of Public and Community Health, teaches undergraduate classes in human sexuality, and, with his wife Anne, who lectures at Howard Community College, also makes presentations to parents from area schools about how to talk to kids about sex. From his experience in academia and raising four daughters—ages 25, 22, 14 and 10—Sawyer offers the following advice for parents on communicating with kids about sex.

Start Now ◗ Do talk. Parents fear that if they talk about sex, they will

introduce the idea of having sex. Kids will discover sex, whether you like it or not. Research shows that parents who talk openly to their kids about sex are less likely to have kids who get pregnant. ◗ Start young. The notion that you wait until kids are 13 and have the big talk is not going to work. If you haven’t been building blocks along the way and make talking about sexuality normal, children are not going to listen to you when they’re teenagers. ●

Different talks for different ages. ◗ Toddlers: When they’re on the potty, call body parts by their proper

name. It’s okay to say “vagina” and “penis.” If you don’t start using the right vocabulary, communication about sexuality will be difficult. ◗ Early elementary school: This is the time mainly for answering questions. You don’t have to give children all the information in the world. At 6, 7, 8, most kids will be happy with a small bit of information. Always be honest with them. ◗ Late elementary and middle school: Before puberty strikes, talk to them about what is going to happen to them, the body changes, the emotions they might experience. ◗ High school: This is the nitty gritty—dating, contraception, date rape. Teenagers always profess to knowing more than they do. To some

extent you may have to force the issue. My wife took our daughter for a ride in the car and talked about [these issues] while they drove around, not letting her out until she’d finished! When you talk about alcohol and drugs, you need to include sex. Alcohol use can lead to huge problems with sex. Know what kids are watching on television and what they’re seeing on the computer. It gives you the perspective of what their world looks like.

LEE STRICKLAND, INFORMATION STUDIES (AND FORMER CIA OFFICER), BUSINESS WEEK, JUNE 28

POLITICIANS CATERING TO THE PUBLIC’S DESIRE FOR BI-PARTISANSHIP, LOS ANGELES TIMES, JULY 5

“I challenge anyone to show me any major prison system where the primary goal is rehabilitation rather than punishment.”

A GOOD BOOK CAN HELP. SAWYER RECOMMENDS:

“Five billion dollars for an F-22 will not help us in the battle against terrorism. Language that helps us understand why they’re trying to harm us will.”

◗ Body Changes, Carey, Barron’s Educational Series, 2002. ●

◗ It’s Perfectly Normal: Changing Bodies, Growing Up, Sex & Sexual Health, Penguin Putnam Incorporated, 1996. ◗ My Body, My Self for Girls: For Preteens and Teens, Madaras & Madaras, Newmarket Press, 2000.

RICHARD BRECHT, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE CENTER

ARNETT GASTON, CRIMINOLOGY AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE

FOR THE ADVANCED STUDY OF LANGUAGE (A JOINT

(AND FORMER HEAD OF CORRECTIONS IN PRINCE

PROJECT OF THE DEFENSE DEPARTMENT AND THE

GEORGE’S COUNTY, MD., AND AT RIKERS ISLAND IN

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND), NEW YORK TIMES, JUNE 16

◗ My Body, My Self for Boys: For Preteens and Teens, Madaras & Madaras, Newmarket Press, 2000.

N.Y.), THE [BALTIMORE] SUN, JUNE 20

12

TERP FALL

2004

TOP LEFT PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI; ILLUSTRATION BY JASON QUICK

ILLUSTRATION BY CYNTHIA MITCHEL

Starting the conversation at any age. ◗ Create an atmosphere in the home that is honest and open with

regard to sexuality issues. Make the home a safe place for children to ask questions. —ET Robin Sawyer works with college athletes in the area of sexual violence. He received his Ph.D. at Maryland in 1990. His wife, Anne AndersonSawyer, received her B.S. from Maryland in 1982 and her M.S. in 1990.

TERP FALL

2004

13


m-file NEWSdesk UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND FACULTY ARE THE SOURCE NEWS MEDIA TURN TO FOR EXPERTISE—FROM POLITICS AND PUBLIC POLICY TO SOCIETY AND CULTURE TO SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY.

Blackout Yields Blue Skies A NEW STUDY by researchers at the University of

“There are only a small number of publishers and printers … in the world who are capable of producing such a book.” CHARLES LOWRY, DEAN OF LIBRARIES, ANNOUNCING THIS COMPENDIUM OF TENNESSEE WILLIAMS’ WORKS AS THE 3 MILLIONTH VOLUME TO BE ADDED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND’S COLLECTION, WASHINGTON TIMES, JUNE 15

“I worry that amid the din of recrimination, a major point is being lost: Our cherished higher education system, once a source of national pride and international envy, is now threatened with what I call ‘graceful decline.’ Unless this threat is addressed, we face the likely prospect that our leadership in the knowledge based economy will erode.”

“Any news outlet—or any private individual, for that matter— who makes available footage of the actual beheadings is, to my mind, an accessory to the crime itself.Those are the individuals who are essentially finishing the work of the terrorists, by delivering their grisly ‘message.’ ” THOMAS KUNKEL, DEAN OF THE PHILIP MERRILL COLLEGE OF JOURNALISM, CHICAGO TRIBUNE, JUNE 30

C.D. MOTE JR., UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND PRESIDENT, WASHINGTON POST EDITORIAL, JUNE 20

“I think what’s going on is like an old spiritual. Everybody wants to go to heaven, but nobody wants to die.” ERIC USLANER, GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS, ON

“The FBI has never had a culture which rewarded analysis; they’re far more focused on reacting to crime, but that’s got to change.”

Maryland shows that skies were dramatically bluer and the air was much cleaner during the August 2003 blackout that hit the northeastern United States and southeastern Canada. The findings demonstrate that power plants in Ohio, West Virginia and Pennsylvania play a big role in our region’s air pollution. Aircraft measurements showed a 90 percent reduction in sulfur dioxide, a gas that leads to haze and acid rain, and a 50 percent reduction in smog. Visibility increased by some 20 miles. “The clean air benefit was realized over much of the eastern United States,” says research scientist Lackson Marufu, who directed the aircraft measurements. “The improvement in air quality provides dramatic evidence that transported emissions from power plants hundreds of kilometers upwind play a dominant role in our haze and smog. “What surprised us was not that air quality improved during the blackout, but the magnitude of the improvement,” says Marufu. Fellow researcher Russell Dickerson, professor and chair of the Department of Meteorology, says, “Scientists long have speculated about what would happen to air quality if all the power plants suddenly disappeared. The blackout performed for us an otherwise impossible experiment.” —LT

Talking to Your Kids About Sex WHEN IT COMES to talking to your kids about sex, do it early and often,

says University of Maryland sexuality expert Robin Sawyer. Sawyer, associate professor and chair of the Department of Public and Community Health, teaches undergraduate classes in human sexuality, and, with his wife Anne, who lectures at Howard Community College, also makes presentations to parents from area schools about how to talk to kids about sex. From his experience in academia and raising four daughters—ages 25, 22, 14 and 10—Sawyer offers the following advice for parents on communicating with kids about sex.

Start Now ◗ Do talk. Parents fear that if they talk about sex, they will

introduce the idea of having sex. Kids will discover sex, whether you like it or not. Research shows that parents who talk openly to their kids about sex are less likely to have kids who get pregnant. ◗ Start young. The notion that you wait until kids are 13 and have the big talk is not going to work. If you haven’t been building blocks along the way and make talking about sexuality normal, children are not going to listen to you when they’re teenagers. ●

Different talks for different ages. ◗ Toddlers: When they’re on the potty, call body parts by their proper

name. It’s okay to say “vagina” and “penis.” If you don’t start using the right vocabulary, communication about sexuality will be difficult. ◗ Early elementary school: This is the time mainly for answering questions. You don’t have to give children all the information in the world. At 6, 7, 8, most kids will be happy with a small bit of information. Always be honest with them. ◗ Late elementary and middle school: Before puberty strikes, talk to them about what is going to happen to them, the body changes, the emotions they might experience. ◗ High school: This is the nitty gritty—dating, contraception, date rape. Teenagers always profess to knowing more than they do. To some

extent you may have to force the issue. My wife took our daughter for a ride in the car and talked about [these issues] while they drove around, not letting her out until she’d finished! When you talk about alcohol and drugs, you need to include sex. Alcohol use can lead to huge problems with sex. Know what kids are watching on television and what they’re seeing on the computer. It gives you the perspective of what their world looks like.

LEE STRICKLAND, INFORMATION STUDIES (AND FORMER CIA OFFICER), BUSINESS WEEK, JUNE 28

POLITICIANS CATERING TO THE PUBLIC’S DESIRE FOR BI-PARTISANSHIP, LOS ANGELES TIMES, JULY 5

“I challenge anyone to show me any major prison system where the primary goal is rehabilitation rather than punishment.”

A GOOD BOOK CAN HELP. SAWYER RECOMMENDS:

“Five billion dollars for an F-22 will not help us in the battle against terrorism. Language that helps us understand why they’re trying to harm us will.”

◗ Body Changes, Carey, Barron’s Educational Series, 2002. ●

◗ It’s Perfectly Normal: Changing Bodies, Growing Up, Sex & Sexual Health, Penguin Putnam Incorporated, 1996. ◗ My Body, My Self for Girls: For Preteens and Teens, Madaras & Madaras, Newmarket Press, 2000.

RICHARD BRECHT, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE CENTER

ARNETT GASTON, CRIMINOLOGY AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE

FOR THE ADVANCED STUDY OF LANGUAGE (A JOINT

(AND FORMER HEAD OF CORRECTIONS IN PRINCE

PROJECT OF THE DEFENSE DEPARTMENT AND THE

GEORGE’S COUNTY, MD., AND AT RIKERS ISLAND IN

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND), NEW YORK TIMES, JUNE 16

◗ My Body, My Self for Boys: For Preteens and Teens, Madaras & Madaras, Newmarket Press, 2000.

N.Y.), THE [BALTIMORE] SUN, JUNE 20

12

TERP FALL

2004

TOP LEFT PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI; ILLUSTRATION BY JASON QUICK

ILLUSTRATION BY CYNTHIA MITCHEL

Starting the conversation at any age. ◗ Create an atmosphere in the home that is honest and open with

regard to sexuality issues. Make the home a safe place for children to ask questions. —ET Robin Sawyer works with college athletes in the area of sexual violence. He received his Ph.D. at Maryland in 1990. His wife, Anne AndersonSawyer, received her B.S. from Maryland in 1982 and her M.S. in 1990.

TERP FALL

2004

13


m-file When a Political Dance Tells All CAN DANCING AND politics coexist? For those who are certified in Laban Movement Analysis, the way a politician “dances” or moves can provide volumes about what kind of person he or she really is—and how well they connect with voters. Karen Kohn Bradley has been watching the way politicians “dance” for some 30 years using Laban as her guide. A visiting assistant professor (and director of graduate studies) in dance, she also runs her own consulting service for politicians called “Moving to Win.” Bradley says politicians have become more sophisticated over the past three decades, retraining themselves as they became “much more aware of both the camera and the immediate audience.” Bradley likes to talk about the “shaping ability” of politicians—the subtle way they move their bodies, in tune with people and their surroundings. She points to former President Bill Clinton as a good example of a political “dancer” who is able to “convey self-confidence and other qualities” wherever he goes. She says it was Clinton’s “shaping ability” that helped him win two presidential elections. Bradley says President Bush does not exhibit the confidence his predecessor had: “Bush has practiced well; his movement has become much more integrated and relational; however, it has also become greatly reduced. He has about six very specific gestures he uses over and over,” she says. Vice President Dick Cheney, a master politician, is “very even, very grounded, with very little revealed.” As for Democrat John Kerry, Bradley has seen some progress in his “dancing.” She says he has become “more serious, grounded and tenacious” as a candidate. But Bradley also admits that Kerry is still “a little bit dry at times.” Kerry may have helped himself there with the selection of North Carolina Senator John Edwards as his running mate. “Edwards tends to send his energy upwards and outwards, filling the room with exuberance,” says Bradley. “Both,” she adds, “are very focused men.” Bradley does not know who will win in November. But she says the challenge for certified movement analysts like herself is to observe these candidates “in impromptu situations, and across a range of audiences in order to see who they really are and what they believe in.” And there’s one other thing: she hopes their sound bites don’t get any shorter! —DO

14

TERP FALL

2004

New Persian Center at Maryland Is First of Its Kind

UM Sensor Tells Tale of Ions in Saturn’s Magnetosphere

NEW TO CAMPUS this fall is one of the leading intellec-

IN JULY, AFTER nearly seven years and some

tual authorities of Persian studies working outside of Iran today. Professor Ahmad Karimi-Hakkak comes to Maryland as a fully tenured faculty member and as the founding director of the university’s new Center for Persian Studies. Michael Long, director of the School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures, which will house the new center, said that the university could not have found a more qualified director. “He is the heir apparent of Persian studies. Quite simply, Professor Karimi is considered to be the best in the business in this generation,” says Long. In a career spanning more than 30 years, Karimi has become a highly sought after lecturer on Persian studies worldwide. He is the author of 18 scholarly books and monographs on topics of Persian culture and literature, and is the president of the Society for Iranian Studies, the largest association of Iranian scholars in the world. Housed in Jim´enez Hall, the new center will not only be the home of several academic programs in Persian studies and related interdisciplinary coursework, but will serve as a touchstone for conferences, guest speakers and cultural events. Karimi said that Maryland is a logical place to create such a center, since the Washington-MarylandVirginia area is home to the second-largest Persian population in the United States, about 85,000 people. While other universities may have broad centers for Middle Eastern studies or a center for Iranian studies, Karimi says the new Persian center is unlike any existing center in American universities and takes a “very forward-thinking” approach. Within the next few years the center will provide undergraduate and graduate majors specializing in various aspects of Persian language, history, literature, culture, sociology and politics. —SLK

2 billion miles, the University of Maryland’s CHEMS sensor on the Cassini spacecraft reached its target—the immense magnetosphere of the ringed planet, Saturn. For four years, the CHEMS (CHarge Energy Mass Spectrometer) sensor will measures ions—positively charged atoms—in Saturn’s magnetosphere. “CHEMS has already indicated that plasma, or ionized gas, in Saturn’s magnetosphere consists mostly of hydrogen and oxygen ions and molecular ions derived from water,” says Douglas C. Hamilton, a professor of physics and leader of the university’s space physics

LEFT ILLUSTRATION BY JASON QUICK; RIGHT PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

After seven years, the Cassini spacecraft reaches Saturn’s magnetosphere. On board is the CHEMS Sensor built by Maryland researchers.

team that designed and built CHEMS. “This suggests the plasma comes from the surfaces of Saturn’s icy moons and rings.” Maryland’s CHEMS is one of three sensors that make up Cassini’s Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument. Under the leadership of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, this instrument will profile the plasma environment and provide global images of Saturn’s magnetosphere. Sensors built by Maryland’s space physics group are currently operating on 13 spacecrafts including Cassini. —LT

African American History Anew THIS FALL, WITH the help of professor of geography Charles M. Christian, thousands of public school students will take a unique African American journey. They’re part of a pilot project developing Maryland’s first statewide curriculum to teach the African American experience in the elementary and secondary schools. “We’re not only teaching history, we’re making it,” Christian says with excitement. “We’re breaking new ground in a number of ways.” As chair of the Education Task Force created by the Maryland State Department of Education, Christian and his colleagues have spent the past three years developing An African American Journey, a series of 40 lessons covering history and culture. “These lessons will not be addons—the goal is to fully integrate this material throughout the courses,” Christian says. “You can’t begin to understand the American experience unless you understand

the African American experience.” The material won’t just cover history, but will include language arts, fine arts and social studies. An unprecedented part of the program links the curriculum to Baltimore’s Reginald F. Lewis Museum of African American History and Culture, now in the final stages of construction. “Marrying this powerful teaching resource with the classroom is historic in itself, and will infuse an amazing vitality into the instruction,” Christian says. As an example, students will learn that the Harlem Renaissance— an African American artistic explosion in the 1920s—was not limited to New York City. “Baltimore was a part of it. Chick Webb, Billie Holiday and Eubie Blake all had Baltimore roots,” Christian says. Last summer, Christian and the task force ran a workshop to train 120 teachers who are piloting the program. “Participants told me

TOP PHOTO COURTESY OF NASA; BOTTOM PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

they felt empowered by the whole process,” he says. The consensus was, ‘It’s about time!’ ” This year Maryland school districts are piloting the curriculum, and after some fine-tuning, the

plan is to fully implement it in the 2005–2006 school year. As Christian puts it, “Maryland is about to become a national role model for teaching African American history.” —NT

TERP FALL

2004

15


m-file When a Political Dance Tells All CAN DANCING AND politics coexist? For those who are certified in Laban Movement Analysis, the way a politician “dances” or moves can provide volumes about what kind of person he or she really is—and how well they connect with voters. Karen Kohn Bradley has been watching the way politicians “dance” for some 30 years using Laban as her guide. A visiting assistant professor (and director of graduate studies) in dance, she also runs her own consulting service for politicians called “Moving to Win.” Bradley says politicians have become more sophisticated over the past three decades, retraining themselves as they became “much more aware of both the camera and the immediate audience.” Bradley likes to talk about the “shaping ability” of politicians—the subtle way they move their bodies, in tune with people and their surroundings. She points to former President Bill Clinton as a good example of a political “dancer” who is able to “convey self-confidence and other qualities” wherever he goes. She says it was Clinton’s “shaping ability” that helped him win two presidential elections. Bradley says President Bush does not exhibit the confidence his predecessor had: “Bush has practiced well; his movement has become much more integrated and relational; however, it has also become greatly reduced. He has about six very specific gestures he uses over and over,” she says. Vice President Dick Cheney, a master politician, is “very even, very grounded, with very little revealed.” As for Democrat John Kerry, Bradley has seen some progress in his “dancing.” She says he has become “more serious, grounded and tenacious” as a candidate. But Bradley also admits that Kerry is still “a little bit dry at times.” Kerry may have helped himself there with the selection of North Carolina Senator John Edwards as his running mate. “Edwards tends to send his energy upwards and outwards, filling the room with exuberance,” says Bradley. “Both,” she adds, “are very focused men.” Bradley does not know who will win in November. But she says the challenge for certified movement analysts like herself is to observe these candidates “in impromptu situations, and across a range of audiences in order to see who they really are and what they believe in.” And there’s one other thing: she hopes their sound bites don’t get any shorter! —DO

14

TERP FALL

2004

New Persian Center at Maryland Is First of Its Kind

UM Sensor Tells Tale of Ions in Saturn’s Magnetosphere

NEW TO CAMPUS this fall is one of the leading intellec-

IN JULY, AFTER nearly seven years and some

tual authorities of Persian studies working outside of Iran today. Professor Ahmad Karimi-Hakkak comes to Maryland as a fully tenured faculty member and as the founding director of the university’s new Center for Persian Studies. Michael Long, director of the School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures, which will house the new center, said that the university could not have found a more qualified director. “He is the heir apparent of Persian studies. Quite simply, Professor Karimi is considered to be the best in the business in this generation,” says Long. In a career spanning more than 30 years, Karimi has become a highly sought after lecturer on Persian studies worldwide. He is the author of 18 scholarly books and monographs on topics of Persian culture and literature, and is the president of the Society for Iranian Studies, the largest association of Iranian scholars in the world. Housed in Jim´enez Hall, the new center will not only be the home of several academic programs in Persian studies and related interdisciplinary coursework, but will serve as a touchstone for conferences, guest speakers and cultural events. Karimi said that Maryland is a logical place to create such a center, since the Washington-MarylandVirginia area is home to the second-largest Persian population in the United States, about 85,000 people. While other universities may have broad centers for Middle Eastern studies or a center for Iranian studies, Karimi says the new Persian center is unlike any existing center in American universities and takes a “very forward-thinking” approach. Within the next few years the center will provide undergraduate and graduate majors specializing in various aspects of Persian language, history, literature, culture, sociology and politics. —SLK

2 billion miles, the University of Maryland’s CHEMS sensor on the Cassini spacecraft reached its target—the immense magnetosphere of the ringed planet, Saturn. For four years, the CHEMS (CHarge Energy Mass Spectrometer) sensor will measures ions—positively charged atoms—in Saturn’s magnetosphere. “CHEMS has already indicated that plasma, or ionized gas, in Saturn’s magnetosphere consists mostly of hydrogen and oxygen ions and molecular ions derived from water,” says Douglas C. Hamilton, a professor of physics and leader of the university’s space physics

LEFT ILLUSTRATION BY JASON QUICK; RIGHT PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

After seven years, the Cassini spacecraft reaches Saturn’s magnetosphere. On board is the CHEMS Sensor built by Maryland researchers.

team that designed and built CHEMS. “This suggests the plasma comes from the surfaces of Saturn’s icy moons and rings.” Maryland’s CHEMS is one of three sensors that make up Cassini’s Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument. Under the leadership of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, this instrument will profile the plasma environment and provide global images of Saturn’s magnetosphere. Sensors built by Maryland’s space physics group are currently operating on 13 spacecrafts including Cassini. —LT

African American History Anew THIS FALL, WITH the help of professor of geography Charles M. Christian, thousands of public school students will take a unique African American journey. They’re part of a pilot project developing Maryland’s first statewide curriculum to teach the African American experience in the elementary and secondary schools. “We’re not only teaching history, we’re making it,” Christian says with excitement. “We’re breaking new ground in a number of ways.” As chair of the Education Task Force created by the Maryland State Department of Education, Christian and his colleagues have spent the past three years developing An African American Journey, a series of 40 lessons covering history and culture. “These lessons will not be addons—the goal is to fully integrate this material throughout the courses,” Christian says. “You can’t begin to understand the American experience unless you understand

the African American experience.” The material won’t just cover history, but will include language arts, fine arts and social studies. An unprecedented part of the program links the curriculum to Baltimore’s Reginald F. Lewis Museum of African American History and Culture, now in the final stages of construction. “Marrying this powerful teaching resource with the classroom is historic in itself, and will infuse an amazing vitality into the instruction,” Christian says. As an example, students will learn that the Harlem Renaissance— an African American artistic explosion in the 1920s—was not limited to New York City. “Baltimore was a part of it. Chick Webb, Billie Holiday and Eubie Blake all had Baltimore roots,” Christian says. Last summer, Christian and the task force ran a workshop to train 120 teachers who are piloting the program. “Participants told me

TOP PHOTO COURTESY OF NASA; BOTTOM PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

they felt empowered by the whole process,” he says. The consensus was, ‘It’s about time!’ ” This year Maryland school districts are piloting the curriculum, and after some fine-tuning, the

plan is to fully implement it in the 2005–2006 school year. As Christian puts it, “Maryland is about to become a national role model for teaching African American history.” —NT

TERP FALL

2004

15


The Art Gallery Free An exhibition of 62 original paintings, drawings, mixed media and sculptures on public view for first time. Read more on page 31.

DECEMBER 30 Deep Impact Rocket Launch

Long Live Testudo: Get a close look at live terrapins Physics Is Fun: Find out how to make silly putty An Apple a Day? Learn more about nutrition and fad diets Horsing Around Maryland: Discover the economic and recreational impact of Maryland’s horse industry

During the Homecoming Festival, enjoy these Alumni College programs, led by university faculty and other experts.

for families.

★The 60-minute performance at 3 p.m. on October 23 is recommended

Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center From amazing puppetry to awe-inspiring Peking Opera … from beguiling dance treasures to bewildering “changing masks” … from mysterious firebreathing to marvelous martial-arts acrobatics … Washington Chu Shan Chinese Opera Institute transports audiences back in time to ancient China for a magical and wondrous evening of traditional Chinese stage arts. A rare and dazzling blend of music, artistry and storytelling.

OCTOBER 22: 8 P.M. OCTOBER 23: 3 P.M.★, 8 P.M. Traditional Chinese Opera Arts

TOP LEFT PHOTO COURTESY OF AZAR NAFISI; CENTER TOP PHOTO COURTESY OF PENN STATE UNIVERSITY; TOP RIGHT PHOTO COURTESY OF THE CLARICE SMITH PERFORMING ARTS CENTER; CENTER LEFT PHOTO COURTESY OF MARYLAND ATHLETICS; CENTER PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI; BOTTOM LEFT COURTESY OF THE ART GALLERY; BOTTOM RIGHT COURTESY OF NASA

´ JIMENEZ-PORTER WRITERS’ HOUSE 301.405.0675, www.writershouse.umd.edu

DEEP IMPACT MISSION http://deepimpact.umd.edu

CLARICE SMITH PERFORMING ARTS CENTER 301.405.ARTS (Ticket Office), www.claricesmithcenter.umd.edu/

ATHLETICS 301.314.7070 (Ticket Office), www.umterps.com

ART GALLERY 301.405.2763, www.artgallery.umd.edu

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 301.405.4678 or 800.336.8627, www.alumni.umd.edu

H OT L I N E

Cape Canaveral, Fla. 5-4-3-2-1 … blast off! A rocket will launch the Deep Impact Spacecraft from Cape Canaveral, the beginning of a six-month flight to Comet Tempel 1. Upon impact, part of the spacecraft will form a deep crater—as large as a football stadium and seven to 15 stories deep—into the speeding comet. Dramatic images will be sent back to Earth as data in near-real time. The NASA Discovery Mission, led by University of Maryland researchers, will provide clues to the formation of the solar system.

6:30 p.m. Frank Auditorium,Van Munching Hall Presented by the Robert H. Smith School of Business Nobel laureate John F. Nash Jr. speaks on campus as part of the Alumni College program. The former MIT mathematician and Princeton University professor discusses “Ideal Money,” including the theoretical and practical concepts of money as a medium of exchange. For cost and ticket information, visit www.rhsmith.umd.edu/alumni or call 301.405.9460

OCTOBER 14 Alumni College: John F. Nash Jr.

Time: TBA Byrd Stadium The Terps have triumphed over the Wolfpack in their last two meetings—both down-to-the-wire victories, including last year’s gamewinning field goal by star kicker Nick Novak. Watch as the Terps try to do it again back at Byrd. Fear the Turtle!

Homecoming Football Game—Maryland Terrapins vs. N.C. State

OCTOBER 25–DECEMBER 18 “Magical Adventures: Fantasy Art from The Frank Collection”

OCTOBER 16

10:00 a.m.–1:00 p.m. (or 3 hours prior to kickoff ) Ludwig Field (next to Kehoe Track and Field Facility near Lot 1) Expand your mind through alumni college activities and enjoy music, free snacks and beverages, a visit by the Maryland Marching Band and a tailgate competition. Within the festival, all alumni association members are invited to visit the MembersOnly Hospitality Tent. Stop by the tent and enjoy complimentary beverages and a pre-game meal—all provided as a benefit of your membership in the alumni association. (See details on page 11.)

Maryland Alumni Association Annual Homecoming Festival

HOMECOMING!

OCTOBER 16

7 p.m. Dekelboum Concert Hall, CSPAC Reception and Book Signing: Faculty Lounge, CSPAC Presented by the Jiménez-Porter Writers' House As part of the Jiménez-Porter Series, best-selling author and human rights activist Azar Nafisi reads from her highly acclaimed memoir. Reading Lolita in Tehran reflects on Nafisi's experience discussing forbidden Western literature in her home with female students from the University of Tehran. She shares how the writings of F. Scott Fitzgerald, Jane Austen and others influenced their lives and offers readers a glimpse of Iran's revolution and the Iran-Iraq war.

OCTOBER 14 Reading Lolita in Tehran Azar Nafisi Reads from Her Best-selling Memoir

Come home to Maryland this fall for arts, academia, athletics and more.The university hosts a best-selling author hailing from Iran and a spectacular opera saluting the Far East. At Homecoming, celebrate the Terrapin Spirit at an annual festival before heading into Byrd where Maryland takes on N.C. State. Go Terps!


The Art Gallery Free An exhibition of 62 original paintings, drawings, mixed media and sculptures on public view for first time. Read more on page 31.

DECEMBER 30 Deep Impact Rocket Launch

Long Live Testudo: Get a close look at live terrapins Physics Is Fun: Find out how to make silly putty An Apple a Day? Learn more about nutrition and fad diets Horsing Around Maryland: Discover the economic and recreational impact of Maryland’s horse industry

During the Homecoming Festival, enjoy these Alumni College programs, led by university faculty and other experts.

for families.

★The 60-minute performance at 3 p.m. on October 23 is recommended

Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center From amazing puppetry to awe-inspiring Peking Opera … from beguiling dance treasures to bewildering “changing masks” … from mysterious firebreathing to marvelous martial-arts acrobatics … Washington Chu Shan Chinese Opera Institute transports audiences back in time to ancient China for a magical and wondrous evening of traditional Chinese stage arts. A rare and dazzling blend of music, artistry and storytelling.

OCTOBER 22: 8 P.M. OCTOBER 23: 3 P.M.★, 8 P.M. Traditional Chinese Opera Arts

TOP LEFT PHOTO COURTESY OF AZAR NAFISI; CENTER TOP PHOTO COURTESY OF PENN STATE UNIVERSITY; TOP RIGHT PHOTO COURTESY OF THE CLARICE SMITH PERFORMING ARTS CENTER; CENTER LEFT PHOTO COURTESY OF MARYLAND ATHLETICS; CENTER PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI; BOTTOM LEFT COURTESY OF THE ART GALLERY; BOTTOM RIGHT COURTESY OF NASA

´ JIMENEZ-PORTER WRITERS’ HOUSE 301.405.0675, www.writershouse.umd.edu

DEEP IMPACT MISSION http://deepimpact.umd.edu

CLARICE SMITH PERFORMING ARTS CENTER 301.405.ARTS (Ticket Office), www.claricesmithcenter.umd.edu/

ATHLETICS 301.314.7070 (Ticket Office), www.umterps.com

ART GALLERY 301.405.2763, www.artgallery.umd.edu

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 301.405.4678 or 800.336.8627, www.alumni.umd.edu

H OT L I N E

Cape Canaveral, Fla. 5-4-3-2-1 … blast off! A rocket will launch the Deep Impact Spacecraft from Cape Canaveral, the beginning of a six-month flight to Comet Tempel 1. Upon impact, part of the spacecraft will form a deep crater—as large as a football stadium and seven to 15 stories deep—into the speeding comet. Dramatic images will be sent back to Earth as data in near-real time. The NASA Discovery Mission, led by University of Maryland researchers, will provide clues to the formation of the solar system.

6:30 p.m. Frank Auditorium,Van Munching Hall Presented by the Robert H. Smith School of Business Nobel laureate John F. Nash Jr. speaks on campus as part of the Alumni College program. The former MIT mathematician and Princeton University professor discusses “Ideal Money,” including the theoretical and practical concepts of money as a medium of exchange. For cost and ticket information, visit www.rhsmith.umd.edu/alumni or call 301.405.9460

OCTOBER 14 Alumni College: John F. Nash Jr.

Time: TBA Byrd Stadium The Terps have triumphed over the Wolfpack in their last two meetings—both down-to-the-wire victories, including last year’s gamewinning field goal by star kicker Nick Novak. Watch as the Terps try to do it again back at Byrd. Fear the Turtle!

Homecoming Football Game—Maryland Terrapins vs. N.C. State

OCTOBER 25–DECEMBER 18 “Magical Adventures: Fantasy Art from The Frank Collection”

OCTOBER 16

10:00 a.m.–1:00 p.m. (or 3 hours prior to kickoff ) Ludwig Field (next to Kehoe Track and Field Facility near Lot 1) Expand your mind through alumni college activities and enjoy music, free snacks and beverages, a visit by the Maryland Marching Band and a tailgate competition. Within the festival, all alumni association members are invited to visit the MembersOnly Hospitality Tent. Stop by the tent and enjoy complimentary beverages and a pre-game meal—all provided as a benefit of your membership in the alumni association. (See details on page 11.)

Maryland Alumni Association Annual Homecoming Festival

HOMECOMING!

OCTOBER 16

7 p.m. Dekelboum Concert Hall, CSPAC Reception and Book Signing: Faculty Lounge, CSPAC Presented by the Jiménez-Porter Writers' House As part of the Jiménez-Porter Series, best-selling author and human rights activist Azar Nafisi reads from her highly acclaimed memoir. Reading Lolita in Tehran reflects on Nafisi's experience discussing forbidden Western literature in her home with female students from the University of Tehran. She shares how the writings of F. Scott Fitzgerald, Jane Austen and others influenced their lives and offers readers a glimpse of Iran's revolution and the Iran-Iraq war.

OCTOBER 14 Reading Lolita in Tehran Azar Nafisi Reads from Her Best-selling Memoir

Come home to Maryland this fall for arts, academia, athletics and more.The university hosts a best-selling author hailing from Iran and a spectacular opera saluting the Far East. At Homecoming, celebrate the Terrapin Spirit at an annual festival before heading into Byrd where Maryland takes on N.C. State. Go Terps!


International Students Bring Brain Power and Much More to Maryland

n warm weekday evenings at the University of Maryland, a lively game of softball or Ultimate Frisbee often takes place on the athletic fields across from the engineering school. Come weekends, however, these traditionally American outdoor pastimes take a back seat to dozens of foreign students enjoying their own favorite sport—an intense game of cricket. “Cricket is almost like religion for many of us at home,” says Alok Priyadarshi, a 28-year-old graduate student from India.“You won’t see many people in their offices on the days of major matches, they will be at the stadium or watching at a café.” The informal cricket matches at Maryland are very popular with Indian and Pakistani students, Priyadarshi says, with teams from other universities as far away as Harrisonburg,Va., often invited to come and play. Priyadarshi is just one of the 3,790 international students from almost 150 countries who are currently enrolled at the University of Maryland.The majority of these students—all but about 700—are graduate students pursuing advanced degrees and conducting important research.

O

An Intellectual

Exchange International students at the University of Maryland this semester include (clockwise, from top left) Nina Koffi, Yang Wang, Elizabeth Miheikin and Alok Priyadarshi.

STORY BY TOM VENTSIAS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

TERP FALL

2004

19


International Students Bring Brain Power and Much More to Maryland

n warm weekday evenings at the University of Maryland, a lively game of softball or Ultimate Frisbee often takes place on the athletic fields across from the engineering school. Come weekends, however, these traditionally American outdoor pastimes take a back seat to dozens of foreign students enjoying their own favorite sport—an intense game of cricket. “Cricket is almost like religion for many of us at home,” says Alok Priyadarshi, a 28-year-old graduate student from India.“You won’t see many people in their offices on the days of major matches, they will be at the stadium or watching at a café.” The informal cricket matches at Maryland are very popular with Indian and Pakistani students, Priyadarshi says, with teams from other universities as far away as Harrisonburg,Va., often invited to come and play. Priyadarshi is just one of the 3,790 international students from almost 150 countries who are currently enrolled at the University of Maryland.The majority of these students—all but about 700—are graduate students pursuing advanced degrees and conducting important research.

O

An Intellectual

Exchange International students at the University of Maryland this semester include (clockwise, from top left) Nina Koffi, Yang Wang, Elizabeth Miheikin and Alok Priyadarshi.

STORY BY TOM VENTSIAS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

TERP FALL

2004

19


“Science is not a single country,” says Timothy Ng, associate vice president for research at the university. “And these international students have only helped to broaden our entire spectrum of academic and research programs.” In the past two decades, an upswing in the number of foreign students at the university has directly paralleled its rise as a top public research university. Indeed, certain academic departments, predominately in the physical sciences, engineering and business, have relied heavily on non-U.S. students to expand their graduate enrollment and initiate new research programs. For Priyadarshi, the opportunity to explore new areas of research was a prime consideration in his decision to attend graduate school at Maryland. After earning an engineering degree from the Indian Institute of Technology in Kanpur, he spent a year helping to develop new computer-aided design (CAD) software with an international software firm in India. He contacted associate professor S.K. Gupta in the A. James Clark School of Engineering, specifically wanting to collaborate with Gupta on developing new CAD software that could automatically generate multi-piece mold geometry at the click of a button. “I recognized that this new CAD software could make designing molds for complex, organic shapes a viable option in industry,” says Priyadarshi, who graduated last spring with a master’s degree in mechanical engineering and is now working toward his Ph.D. An unexpected twist in his academic journey has been the formation of Spatial Software Solutions, a software development startup comprised of Priyadarshi, fellow graduate student Rohit Kumar, and Gupta.The startup company won first prize in the university’s 2003 business plan competition and has received substantial investor funding from the state of Maryland.

Getting Involved, Sharing Ideas

A

diverse base of international students not only brings a tremendous amount of academic talent to a university, says the research division’s Timothy Ng, but it also contributes to the free exchange of cultures and ideas that define any great institution of higher education. “If we are talking about the depth and breadth of education,” Ng says, “then the educational and cultural background of all our students—where they come from, their academic orientation, the values that they hold—must be taken into account.” This sharing of ideas and cultures takes place at the undergraduate level as well, particularly with many of the living-learning programs at Maryland like Global Communities or the Language House, where 21-year-old senior Elizabeth Miheikin currently lives. Miheikin is a native of Estonia, a small country in Eastern

20

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2004

“Just being the only one— the only different person in a group—that was hard at first,” she recalls. “But it was also good, because it gave me a chance to explain and share more of my own culture with others.” —Nina Koffi Europe, and is fluent in English, Russian, Estonian, SerboCroatian, French and some Spanish. She plans to finish her degree at Maryland and then attend law school with a focus on international law. What has made her undergraduate experience particularly rewarding, Miheikin says, is an involvement with extracurricular activities like the Russian Club, which sponsors trips to Russian art museums and theaters as well as Russian literature readings. “It’s very important for these student cultural clubs to exist, because we’re all here trying to learn about each other,” she says. Nina Koffi, a native of the Ivory Coast, says that she was at first “overwhelmed” upon arriving on campus two years ago as a 19year-old freshman, especially when realizing that she was the only student from Africa in the entire residence hall. “Just being the only one—the only different person in a group—that was hard at first,” she recalls. “But it was also good, because it gave me a chance to explain and share more of my own culture with others.” Koffi became active with the African Student Association last fall and, it is there, she says, that she learned to “be myself, to express myself, [and] to be proud to be African.” Now a junior with a dual major in government and politics, and Japanese (French is her native language), Koffi wants to attend law school and work in the area of international law and children’s rights.

Bridging a Language Gap

O

ne of the biggest obstacles to overcome for many foreign students is a language gap. “The best foreign students don’t always speak perfect English,” says Valerie Woolston, director of International Education Services at the university. It is

imperative that international students have a good command of the English language, Woolston says, especially prospective graduate students who need to effectively communicate in English with other researchers or teach undergraduates as part of an assistantship. One of the most proactive moves by the university,Woolston says, was in creating the Maryland English Institute, which offers new international students and visiting researchers intensive English-immersion courses. “We needed these language-intensive programs so that we could absolutely admit anyone who was well qualified,” she says. Other assistance in overcoming a language hurdle comes from foreign students already here, or those who have graduated and are still in the area. “The English that we learned in China was so different from the English that is spoken here,” recalls Yang Wang, who attends graduate school at Maryland part time while working full time as a software specialist in the university’s Institute for Advanced Computer Studies.Wang graduated from Maryland with two undergraduate degrees: one in economics in 2000, and a dual major of computer science and mathematics in 2001. Although he speaks fluent English himself,Wang says that some

of his fellow Chinese students arrive at the university with a language learning curve. “They can have a perfect score on the GRE, or write perfect English, but may not be able to communicate well verbally,” he says.This can be immensely frustrating, he adds, with some new students wanting to “slip back” into their own cultural identity, communicating only with other Chinese students. An organization that Wang is active with, the Chinese Student and Scholar Association, encourages new students to speak English as much as possible, even when conversing with other Chinese students.The organization also helps by renting two apartments that offer new Chinese students temporary housing until they are somewhat acclimated to American culture. For Valerie Woolston, who in working with international students at Maryland since 1978 has seen thousands of students from hundreds of countries succeed, the foreign students “certainly add a different twist to things,” and contribute a great deal to the university. “This is an incredibly diverse campus,” Woolston says. “When people talk about diversity in higher education today, they are talking about diversity well beyond our own borders—and that is really important—because that’s the world we live in today.”TERP

Drop in International Applications Is Cause for Concern

A

t the University of Maryland and other major universities across the country, applications from international students, particularly at the graduate level, have taken a precipitous drop in the past 18 months. Foreign student applications at Maryland for the fall 2005 semester are down 36 percent from last year, with applications from prospective students in China and India—which represent the two largest groups of foreign graduate students—down almost 50 percent. These declines are only in the number of applications received, university officials say, with the number of students admitted next fall expected to remain the same as this year. Still, these downward trends are being watched closely by national organizations that represent higher education. “When we see declines in applications of almost 80 percent for [non-U.S.] engineering students at some of the nation’s top research universities, of course we’re concerned,” says Peter Syverson, vice president for research and information services for the Council of Graduate Schools. The council recently completed a survey of international student applications at more than 130 graduate schools across the United States, and is working with the Association of American Universities and other organizations to formulate recommendations that will be offered to the federal government.

The basis for these application declines is varied, but part of it is certainly due to the stringent new visa regulations required for all foreign students entering the United States in light of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. And in China, the government is increasingly reluctant to issue student visas to its citizens, part of an effort to stem a “brain drain.” Other reasons are less security-related or political, but are instead a matter of logistics or economics. In the past few years, for example, universities in Australia, New Zealand and Singapore have actively recruited students from China; in India, there is a technology and job boom, so more students there are working instead of coming to America for grad school. “This is the age of globalization,” says Dan Mote, president of the university. “And in this age, every university of stature will be a player on the international stage, so remaining a highly attractive educational option for the world’s best students is our goal.” He adds that for the university to maintain itself as the state’s most important resource, as well as a major national resource, it must continue to recruit the very best students, including international students. “The more difficult it becomes to recruit international students, the greater the challenge for our country to remain the leader in science and technology,” Mote says. —TV

TERP FALL

2004

21


“Science is not a single country,” says Timothy Ng, associate vice president for research at the university. “And these international students have only helped to broaden our entire spectrum of academic and research programs.” In the past two decades, an upswing in the number of foreign students at the university has directly paralleled its rise as a top public research university. Indeed, certain academic departments, predominately in the physical sciences, engineering and business, have relied heavily on non-U.S. students to expand their graduate enrollment and initiate new research programs. For Priyadarshi, the opportunity to explore new areas of research was a prime consideration in his decision to attend graduate school at Maryland. After earning an engineering degree from the Indian Institute of Technology in Kanpur, he spent a year helping to develop new computer-aided design (CAD) software with an international software firm in India. He contacted associate professor S.K. Gupta in the A. James Clark School of Engineering, specifically wanting to collaborate with Gupta on developing new CAD software that could automatically generate multi-piece mold geometry at the click of a button. “I recognized that this new CAD software could make designing molds for complex, organic shapes a viable option in industry,” says Priyadarshi, who graduated last spring with a master’s degree in mechanical engineering and is now working toward his Ph.D. An unexpected twist in his academic journey has been the formation of Spatial Software Solutions, a software development startup comprised of Priyadarshi, fellow graduate student Rohit Kumar, and Gupta.The startup company won first prize in the university’s 2003 business plan competition and has received substantial investor funding from the state of Maryland.

Getting Involved, Sharing Ideas

A

diverse base of international students not only brings a tremendous amount of academic talent to a university, says the research division’s Timothy Ng, but it also contributes to the free exchange of cultures and ideas that define any great institution of higher education. “If we are talking about the depth and breadth of education,” Ng says, “then the educational and cultural background of all our students—where they come from, their academic orientation, the values that they hold—must be taken into account.” This sharing of ideas and cultures takes place at the undergraduate level as well, particularly with many of the living-learning programs at Maryland like Global Communities or the Language House, where 21-year-old senior Elizabeth Miheikin currently lives. Miheikin is a native of Estonia, a small country in Eastern

20

TERP FALL

2004

“Just being the only one— the only different person in a group—that was hard at first,” she recalls. “But it was also good, because it gave me a chance to explain and share more of my own culture with others.” —Nina Koffi Europe, and is fluent in English, Russian, Estonian, SerboCroatian, French and some Spanish. She plans to finish her degree at Maryland and then attend law school with a focus on international law. What has made her undergraduate experience particularly rewarding, Miheikin says, is an involvement with extracurricular activities like the Russian Club, which sponsors trips to Russian art museums and theaters as well as Russian literature readings. “It’s very important for these student cultural clubs to exist, because we’re all here trying to learn about each other,” she says. Nina Koffi, a native of the Ivory Coast, says that she was at first “overwhelmed” upon arriving on campus two years ago as a 19year-old freshman, especially when realizing that she was the only student from Africa in the entire residence hall. “Just being the only one—the only different person in a group—that was hard at first,” she recalls. “But it was also good, because it gave me a chance to explain and share more of my own culture with others.” Koffi became active with the African Student Association last fall and, it is there, she says, that she learned to “be myself, to express myself, [and] to be proud to be African.” Now a junior with a dual major in government and politics, and Japanese (French is her native language), Koffi wants to attend law school and work in the area of international law and children’s rights.

Bridging a Language Gap

O

ne of the biggest obstacles to overcome for many foreign students is a language gap. “The best foreign students don’t always speak perfect English,” says Valerie Woolston, director of International Education Services at the university. It is

imperative that international students have a good command of the English language, Woolston says, especially prospective graduate students who need to effectively communicate in English with other researchers or teach undergraduates as part of an assistantship. One of the most proactive moves by the university,Woolston says, was in creating the Maryland English Institute, which offers new international students and visiting researchers intensive English-immersion courses. “We needed these language-intensive programs so that we could absolutely admit anyone who was well qualified,” she says. Other assistance in overcoming a language hurdle comes from foreign students already here, or those who have graduated and are still in the area. “The English that we learned in China was so different from the English that is spoken here,” recalls Yang Wang, who attends graduate school at Maryland part time while working full time as a software specialist in the university’s Institute for Advanced Computer Studies.Wang graduated from Maryland with two undergraduate degrees: one in economics in 2000, and a dual major of computer science and mathematics in 2001. Although he speaks fluent English himself,Wang says that some

of his fellow Chinese students arrive at the university with a language learning curve. “They can have a perfect score on the GRE, or write perfect English, but may not be able to communicate well verbally,” he says.This can be immensely frustrating, he adds, with some new students wanting to “slip back” into their own cultural identity, communicating only with other Chinese students. An organization that Wang is active with, the Chinese Student and Scholar Association, encourages new students to speak English as much as possible, even when conversing with other Chinese students.The organization also helps by renting two apartments that offer new Chinese students temporary housing until they are somewhat acclimated to American culture. For Valerie Woolston, who in working with international students at Maryland since 1978 has seen thousands of students from hundreds of countries succeed, the foreign students “certainly add a different twist to things,” and contribute a great deal to the university. “This is an incredibly diverse campus,” Woolston says. “When people talk about diversity in higher education today, they are talking about diversity well beyond our own borders—and that is really important—because that’s the world we live in today.”TERP

Drop in International Applications Is Cause for Concern

A

t the University of Maryland and other major universities across the country, applications from international students, particularly at the graduate level, have taken a precipitous drop in the past 18 months. Foreign student applications at Maryland for the fall 2005 semester are down 36 percent from last year, with applications from prospective students in China and India—which represent the two largest groups of foreign graduate students—down almost 50 percent. These declines are only in the number of applications received, university officials say, with the number of students admitted next fall expected to remain the same as this year. Still, these downward trends are being watched closely by national organizations that represent higher education. “When we see declines in applications of almost 80 percent for [non-U.S.] engineering students at some of the nation’s top research universities, of course we’re concerned,” says Peter Syverson, vice president for research and information services for the Council of Graduate Schools. The council recently completed a survey of international student applications at more than 130 graduate schools across the United States, and is working with the Association of American Universities and other organizations to formulate recommendations that will be offered to the federal government.

The basis for these application declines is varied, but part of it is certainly due to the stringent new visa regulations required for all foreign students entering the United States in light of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. And in China, the government is increasingly reluctant to issue student visas to its citizens, part of an effort to stem a “brain drain.” Other reasons are less security-related or political, but are instead a matter of logistics or economics. In the past few years, for example, universities in Australia, New Zealand and Singapore have actively recruited students from China; in India, there is a technology and job boom, so more students there are working instead of coming to America for grad school. “This is the age of globalization,” says Dan Mote, president of the university. “And in this age, every university of stature will be a player on the international stage, so remaining a highly attractive educational option for the world’s best students is our goal.” He adds that for the university to maintain itself as the state’s most important resource, as well as a major national resource, it must continue to recruit the very best students, including international students. “The more difficult it becomes to recruit international students, the greater the challenge for our country to remain the leader in science and technology,” Mote says. —TV

TERP FALL

2004

21


Calculating Success Two Mathematicians Make Their Mark Story by Monette A. Bailey Portraits by John T. Consoli

The Pacesetter Ruth Davis’ life path began in high school; she refused to take typing. Most girls growing up in the 1940s were destined for clerical jobs and Davis wanted no part of that. So years later when she approached IBM after earning her doctorate in mathematics from the University of Maryland in 1955, company administrators said Davis couldn’t be hired. Women only filled secretarial positions. Fortunately, this left her available for employment when the Navy’s Adm. Hyman Rickover came looking for people who knew computers. The pioneering officer, who developed the country’s first nuclear powered submarine, wanted a team who could make better machines. “I would like to say that it was hard, as a woman, to get hired, but he was eccentric enough that it wasn’t,” says Davis.“He gathered six of us from around the country. He didn’t care if you were yellow, purple, green or had five arms.” This first job kicked off more than two decades of innovation by Davis, who was already a pacesetter. She was one of the first women to graduate from the university with a doctorate in math. She was the only woman enrolled in what is now the Institute for Physical Science and Technology. Also armed with a master’s in mathematics ’52, she began changing the way the military and the health care industry do business. Davis was assigned to the David Taylor Model Basin at Carderock in Maryland, which is now known Davis’ awards reflect a full and varied career. as the Naval Surface

T H E D AV I S F I L E

Warfare Center, Carderock Division.There she created the Navy’s first computer-based Command and Control System. At just 27, she became technical director of the new program. “They gave me a bunch of officers and enlisted men to work with,” in order to design a system for managing naval operations worldwide. In fact, she designed some of the earliest computer software for defense and space applications as deputy undersecretary of defense for research and advanced technology under Adm. Arleigh Burke, then chief of naval operations. “I had a 1-cubic-foot computer on my desk about 15 years before the world heard about PCs,” she says, speaking of what was used to guide satellites. “That was a lot of fun and I worked hard.” Being the first or the only in something can be a burden, but Davis wears it with a shrug, though her work over the years has translated into valuable tools for intelligence operations and the medical profession. Under her direction, the Department of Defense created its first software packages designed for more accurate command, control and government systems. The university recognized Davis’ contributions with induction into the Alumni Hall of Fame four years ago. Last year, Davis gave something back by donating $500,000 to endow the Ruth M. Davis Professorship in Mathematics. “An endowed professorship is a wonderful asset; it provides a permanent source of funds to support the work of a great faculty member and the title is a prestigious honor” says Steve

AGE: 75 CAREER: Pioneering mathematician;

founder and CEO of The Pymatuning Group, an Alexandria, Va.-based technology management company ACCOMPLISHMENTS: Named a Jimmy Doolittle Fellow in 2000 by the Aerospace Education Foundation

Received President’s Distinguished Alumnus Award and an honorary doctorate from the university in 1993 Is an elected member of the National Academy of Engineering, the National Academy of Public Administration and the Academy of Arts and Sciences Received the National Women’s Economic Alliance Director’s Choice Award in 1989 Joined The Aerospace Corporation’s board of trustees in 1983, served as vice chair from 1989–91 and chair from 1992–2000 Was named Computer Science Man of the Year in 1979 by the Data Processing Management Association. It was the last year the association used the term “man.”

TERP FALL

2004

23


Calculating Success Two Mathematicians Make Their Mark Story by Monette A. Bailey Portraits by John T. Consoli

The Pacesetter Ruth Davis’ life path began in high school; she refused to take typing. Most girls growing up in the 1940s were destined for clerical jobs and Davis wanted no part of that. So years later when she approached IBM after earning her doctorate in mathematics from the University of Maryland in 1955, company administrators said Davis couldn’t be hired. Women only filled secretarial positions. Fortunately, this left her available for employment when the Navy’s Adm. Hyman Rickover came looking for people who knew computers. The pioneering officer, who developed the country’s first nuclear powered submarine, wanted a team who could make better machines. “I would like to say that it was hard, as a woman, to get hired, but he was eccentric enough that it wasn’t,” says Davis.“He gathered six of us from around the country. He didn’t care if you were yellow, purple, green or had five arms.” This first job kicked off more than two decades of innovation by Davis, who was already a pacesetter. She was one of the first women to graduate from the university with a doctorate in math. She was the only woman enrolled in what is now the Institute for Physical Science and Technology. Also armed with a master’s in mathematics ’52, she began changing the way the military and the health care industry do business. Davis was assigned to the David Taylor Model Basin at Carderock in Maryland, which is now known Davis’ awards reflect a full and varied career. as the Naval Surface

T H E D AV I S F I L E

Warfare Center, Carderock Division.There she created the Navy’s first computer-based Command and Control System. At just 27, she became technical director of the new program. “They gave me a bunch of officers and enlisted men to work with,” in order to design a system for managing naval operations worldwide. In fact, she designed some of the earliest computer software for defense and space applications as deputy undersecretary of defense for research and advanced technology under Adm. Arleigh Burke, then chief of naval operations. “I had a 1-cubic-foot computer on my desk about 15 years before the world heard about PCs,” she says, speaking of what was used to guide satellites. “That was a lot of fun and I worked hard.” Being the first or the only in something can be a burden, but Davis wears it with a shrug, though her work over the years has translated into valuable tools for intelligence operations and the medical profession. Under her direction, the Department of Defense created its first software packages designed for more accurate command, control and government systems. The university recognized Davis’ contributions with induction into the Alumni Hall of Fame four years ago. Last year, Davis gave something back by donating $500,000 to endow the Ruth M. Davis Professorship in Mathematics. “An endowed professorship is a wonderful asset; it provides a permanent source of funds to support the work of a great faculty member and the title is a prestigious honor” says Steve

AGE: 75 CAREER: Pioneering mathematician;

founder and CEO of The Pymatuning Group, an Alexandria, Va.-based technology management company ACCOMPLISHMENTS: Named a Jimmy Doolittle Fellow in 2000 by the Aerospace Education Foundation

Received President’s Distinguished Alumnus Award and an honorary doctorate from the university in 1993 Is an elected member of the National Academy of Engineering, the National Academy of Public Administration and the Academy of Arts and Sciences Received the National Women’s Economic Alliance Director’s Choice Award in 1989 Joined The Aerospace Corporation’s board of trustees in 1983, served as vice chair from 1989–91 and chair from 1992–2000 Was named Computer Science Man of the Year in 1979 by the Data Processing Management Association. It was the last year the association used the term “man.”

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23


Halperin, dean of the College of Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sciences. “Ruth Davis has always been there for us with her time, energy and moral support. And she’s fun to be with.” A tour of Davis’ suburban Maryland home reveals the scientist’s fun side. Sharing room space with floor-to-ceiling shelves of awards for technological advancements is her “critter collection,” an extensive assortment of stuffed animals and dolls, including two from her childhood. Her garage houses two Porsche Carreras. She and her late husband used to buy, in cash, two new Porsches every three years. She still drives them—with six-speed manual transmissions. Birds flit around several feeders in her lush backyard. She jokes that “little elves” take care of the landscaping, especially since a now-healed crushed ankle hampered her mobility a few years ago. “I couldn’t get out of the house without a wheelchair and 15 people,” she jokes. It is similar to the sentiment she feels about her professional accomplishments. She gives credit to her “wonderful staff,” who transferred with her from assignment to assignment.While at National Institutes of Health (NIH) they helped her create Medline, the U.S. National Library of Medicine’s collection of

journal articles housed at NIH. Another project found Davis and her staff on the roof of an NIH building with an antennae stuck into a bucket of cement, attempting to find just the right location to catch a satellite signal. She was connecting Aleut vilages in Alaska with medical expertise at Midwestern universities. “Everybody was excited … but it introduced me to privacy considerations with the possible interception of people’s medical information,” she says. This led to another area of Davis innovation: data encryption. Not finding software available for non-military use at the National Security Agency, Davis, as the first director of the Institute for Computer Science and Technology at the National Institute for Standards and Technology, developed the Data Encription Standard for public use. Davis doesn’t talk much about being a woman working in settings reserved for men. She emphasizes the what and not the who. “You go to work in the morning, come home in the evening and you have worked on something that had never been done before,” she says, a bit of marvel finally creeping into her voice.

The Motivator Tasha Inniss understands Davis’ reluctance to play up her accomplishments as a woman. However, it is precisely her position as a black woman in mathematics that excites Inniss. An assistant professor of mathematics at Spelman College since last spring, she is one of the first three African American women to graduate from Maryland’s mathematics department with doctoral degrees in 2000, along with Kimberly Weems and Sherry Scott Joseph. Where Davis chose management after school, Inniss selected academia. Her passion for mathematics is clear when she talks about illuminating math’s wonders for another generation, especially its females. “It requires a complete change of perspective. How long will that take?” she asks. She teaches challenging subjects such as discrete math and applied calculus. Her research interests include data mining—“which I love”—and aviation. Inniss admits that the time immediately after graduation is what could be called challenging. “It was awe inspiring and it felt very surreal. I was just excited to be done,” she says.“And there were so many people interested in the fact that we finished, but we didn’t think it was such an unusual feat.” 24

TERP FALL

2004

THE INNISS FILE

Numerous requests to speak, write essays, serve on panels and talk to the media proved to her otherwise. “For two years after I finished, it was nonstop.” However, Inniss has embraced outreach activities as a way to spread the word that math is good. “I love it when people invite me to give motivational speeches and I also love that I can tell people how math applies to the real world. Math is everywhere. It’s life.” A math fan from way back, Inniss says teachers in her native New Orleans elementary and junior high schools were women who worked to build math self esteem in their students. Inniss wants to follow their example. “All kids love math, but somewhere along the way—I’m thinking about fourth grade—it shifts. [But] it’s not some abstract thing only very smart people can do. “One of my biggest goals in life is to mentor, especially young women,” she says. She works with women of color from the age of 17 to 30.“My high school mentee plans to attend Spelman and major in math or chemestry. I have many mentees in grad school and my primary role is to help them stay encouraged to completion of the doctorate. “People should pursue their passion.” TERP

AGE: 33 GRADUATION YEAR: 2000 Ph.D. CAREER: First landed at Trinity

College (Washington D.C.) as its Clare Booth Luce Professor of Mathematics, now assistant professor of mathematics at Spelman College. Visiting researcher at the Federal Aviation Administration from 2000–2003 ACCOMPLISHMENTS: Received the Federal Aviation Administration’s Centers of Excellence Student of the Year Award in 2000

Received a Packard Scholarship in 1993 while a student at Xavier University of Louisiana Was a Packard Scholar at Georgia Tech and the University of Maryland

Inniss, teaching a summer course (right), believes young people can find everyday usefulness in math.

TERP FALL

2004

25


Halperin, dean of the College of Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sciences. “Ruth Davis has always been there for us with her time, energy and moral support. And she’s fun to be with.” A tour of Davis’ suburban Maryland home reveals the scientist’s fun side. Sharing room space with floor-to-ceiling shelves of awards for technological advancements is her “critter collection,” an extensive assortment of stuffed animals and dolls, including two from her childhood. Her garage houses two Porsche Carreras. She and her late husband used to buy, in cash, two new Porsches every three years. She still drives them—with six-speed manual transmissions. Birds flit around several feeders in her lush backyard. She jokes that “little elves” take care of the landscaping, especially since a now-healed crushed ankle hampered her mobility a few years ago. “I couldn’t get out of the house without a wheelchair and 15 people,” she jokes. It is similar to the sentiment she feels about her professional accomplishments. She gives credit to her “wonderful staff,” who transferred with her from assignment to assignment.While at National Institutes of Health (NIH) they helped her create Medline, the U.S. National Library of Medicine’s collection of

journal articles housed at NIH. Another project found Davis and her staff on the roof of an NIH building with an antennae stuck into a bucket of cement, attempting to find just the right location to catch a satellite signal. She was connecting Aleut vilages in Alaska with medical expertise at Midwestern universities. “Everybody was excited … but it introduced me to privacy considerations with the possible interception of people’s medical information,” she says. This led to another area of Davis innovation: data encryption. Not finding software available for non-military use at the National Security Agency, Davis, as the first director of the Institute for Computer Science and Technology at the National Institute for Standards and Technology, developed the Data Encription Standard for public use. Davis doesn’t talk much about being a woman working in settings reserved for men. She emphasizes the what and not the who. “You go to work in the morning, come home in the evening and you have worked on something that had never been done before,” she says, a bit of marvel finally creeping into her voice.

The Motivator Tasha Inniss understands Davis’ reluctance to play up her accomplishments as a woman. However, it is precisely her position as a black woman in mathematics that excites Inniss. An assistant professor of mathematics at Spelman College since last spring, she is one of the first three African American women to graduate from Maryland’s mathematics department with doctoral degrees in 2000, along with Kimberly Weems and Sherry Scott Joseph. Where Davis chose management after school, Inniss selected academia. Her passion for mathematics is clear when she talks about illuminating math’s wonders for another generation, especially its females. “It requires a complete change of perspective. How long will that take?” she asks. She teaches challenging subjects such as discrete math and applied calculus. Her research interests include data mining—“which I love”—and aviation. Inniss admits that the time immediately after graduation is what could be called challenging. “It was awe inspiring and it felt very surreal. I was just excited to be done,” she says.“And there were so many people interested in the fact that we finished, but we didn’t think it was such an unusual feat.” 24

TERP FALL

2004

THE INNISS FILE

Numerous requests to speak, write essays, serve on panels and talk to the media proved to her otherwise. “For two years after I finished, it was nonstop.” However, Inniss has embraced outreach activities as a way to spread the word that math is good. “I love it when people invite me to give motivational speeches and I also love that I can tell people how math applies to the real world. Math is everywhere. It’s life.” A math fan from way back, Inniss says teachers in her native New Orleans elementary and junior high schools were women who worked to build math self esteem in their students. Inniss wants to follow their example. “All kids love math, but somewhere along the way—I’m thinking about fourth grade—it shifts. [But] it’s not some abstract thing only very smart people can do. “One of my biggest goals in life is to mentor, especially young women,” she says. She works with women of color from the age of 17 to 30.“My high school mentee plans to attend Spelman and major in math or chemestry. I have many mentees in grad school and my primary role is to help them stay encouraged to completion of the doctorate. “People should pursue their passion.” TERP

AGE: 33 GRADUATION YEAR: 2000 Ph.D. CAREER: First landed at Trinity

College (Washington D.C.) as its Clare Booth Luce Professor of Mathematics, now assistant professor of mathematics at Spelman College. Visiting researcher at the Federal Aviation Administration from 2000–2003 ACCOMPLISHMENTS: Received the Federal Aviation Administration’s Centers of Excellence Student of the Year Award in 2000

Received a Packard Scholarship in 1993 while a student at Xavier University of Louisiana Was a Packard Scholar at Georgia Tech and the University of Maryland

Inniss, teaching a summer course (right), believes young people can find everyday usefulness in math.

TERP FALL

2004

25


Story by DIANNE BURCH Illustrations by EDWARD

e s o h y t Weali R is it

?

26

TERP FALL

2004

When the term “reality TV” entered the vernacular several years back, it conjured up one image: Survivor. Now, with the fall television lineup including more reality shows than any other single genre, it’s no longer easy to categorize. Take NBC’s The Contender. Consider it the latest attempt to capture the watercooler-buzz of that network’s No. 1 show, The Apprentice, except these battles are waged to see who gets to stay in the ring instead of the boardroom. Then there are the reality shows that prey upon an individual’s poor selfimage, calling on contestants to vie to be transformed into The Swan, thanks to “improvements” brought on through massive plastic surgery. Somewhere

PHOTO COURTESY OF

in the mix is the talent show like American Idol, which drew No. 1 ratings as millions of viewers voted on which unknown singer would gain a recording contract. Even Bravo, the cable arts channel, offers Blowout, which takes viewers inside a trendy L.A. salon for what it bills as “reality TV, Bravo style.” This is the same channel that gave America a different dose of reality with Queer Eye

for the Straight Guy. To sort it all out, we sought the expertise of Sheri Parks, associate professor of American Studies, who specializes in popular culture.“The genre is now so huge that you can’t talk about it as an individual type of show,” says Parks. “I think it is really transforming television itself.”

TERP FALL

2004

27


Story by DIANNE BURCH Illustrations by EDWARD

e s o h y t Weali R is it

?

26

TERP FALL

2004

When the term “reality TV” entered the vernacular several years back, it conjured up one image: Survivor. Now, with the fall television lineup including more reality shows than any other single genre, it’s no longer easy to categorize. Take NBC’s The Contender. Consider it the latest attempt to capture the watercooler-buzz of that network’s No. 1 show, The Apprentice, except these battles are waged to see who gets to stay in the ring instead of the boardroom. Then there are the reality shows that prey upon an individual’s poor selfimage, calling on contestants to vie to be transformed into The Swan, thanks to “improvements” brought on through massive plastic surgery. Somewhere

PHOTO COURTESY OF

in the mix is the talent show like American Idol, which drew No. 1 ratings as millions of viewers voted on which unknown singer would gain a recording contract. Even Bravo, the cable arts channel, offers Blowout, which takes viewers inside a trendy L.A. salon for what it bills as “reality TV, Bravo style.” This is the same channel that gave America a different dose of reality with Queer Eye

for the Straight Guy. To sort it all out, we sought the expertise of Sheri Parks, associate professor of American Studies, who specializes in popular culture.“The genre is now so huge that you can’t talk about it as an individual type of show,” says Parks. “I think it is really transforming television itself.”

TERP FALL

2004

27


WHERE, OH WHERE, HAS THE SITCOM GONE?

But it’s not all negative. Parks finds American Idol to be much more uplifting than the combative reality shows.Take the two finalists from last season.“Diana was talked about as the girl next door and Fantasia was a young mother, and so we watched these young women fulfill their dreams.” Many of the lifestyle reality shows also affect participants in a positive way.“TV is starting to look much more like magazines, where the audience is very tight and you can predict their behavior,” says Parks, who admits to being a fan of Queer Eye, particularly its first season.“It’s interesting to watch a show transform at least the public acceptance of a minority group in a few short months.” Today, we have much more sophisticated ways of segmenting the market, explains Janet Wagner, associate chair of the Department of Marketing in the Robert H. Smith School of Business.This is in sharp contrast to the homogenous group of viewers who watched sitcoms in the 1950s. “So market segments are becoming smaller GETTING REAL and smaller,” says Wagner. “And, they’re not What all of the programs do have in comjust demographically driven; they’re also mon is the use of people who are not being driven by lifestyle.” trained actors. Because they are not scriptWith cable TV now in nearly 80 percent ed, viewers find it easier to become involved with these people’s lives, to identi- of American homes, some viewers can choose from dozens of stations already fy with them more, says Parks. attuned to their interests—which also leads The media provides that opportunity, for to more aggressive use of product placement, a price.“I think we are beginning to see particularly within the reality show format. much more emphasis on social class,” says When the Queer Eye guys talk about a Parks.“You can take the long road or you can say,‘How can I get there more quickly?’” “chofa”—a cross between a chair and a sofa—one furniture store in a local mall displays one with an CLEARLY HEARD “As Seen on” sign. Parks observes that people are Each Saturday at 7 a.m. (with rebroadcast drawn to look at the piece of Sunday at 8 a.m.) on 89.7 FM from Baltimore, furniture because they like the Md., Sheri Parks, associate professor of show.“The program becomes American Studies, offers her insight into the point of sale.” popular culture and cultural affairs on the Since most reality shows hour-long radio show, Clear Reception with appeal to a younger demoSheri Parks. On one recent show, celebrated graphic group who are lookjournalists Tom Brokaw, Tim Russert and Bill ing for something edgy, Moyers shared their views with Parks about the need Wagner finds The Apprentice for Americans to examine the historical soul of the nation. unusual in that it crosses The signal reaches most of Maryland and the show is also demographic segments. It has Webcast simultaneously and archived at www.wtmd.org.

She finds today’s offerings a far cry from The Cosby Show, which Bill Cosby said that he used to instruct parents and their children on how to behave. As a backlash to this perfect world where all problems—minor— could be solved within 30 minutes, there was the advent of situation comedies with “happy losers,” such as Seinfeld and Friends. “So, there’s this collapsing between the idealized form and the audience. And reality TV is a continuation of that process,” says Parks, who is fascinated by the anomaly of the name. If it truly were reality, we would follow the events in real time, a format tried by PBS about 20 years ago and never repeated. “The aesthetic of television is that everything is condensed. On Queer Eye, for instance, notice that [the Fab Five appear to] run everywhere,” observes Parks, a device that allows them to condense what is really four or five days into a very short period of time.

28

TERP FALL

2004

With last season’s final curtain call for two sitcom staples, Friends and Frazier, dark days loom for those in search of humor. “We’re in a period where [the sitcom] is losing ground to other genres, such as reality shows but I wouldn’t write it off just yet,” says Lawrence Mintz, associate professor of American Studies and director of the Art Gliner Center for Humor studies. He bemoans the fact there isn’t a current show with the status of a M.A.S.H. or Cheers or an All in the Family. Comedy, for the time being, has been supplanted by reality television. The irony is that both represent opposite takes on the American Dream. “One of our dreams is a dream of success, fame and fortune, individual achievement, ‘winning’ and such,” says Mintz, characteristics of most reality shows. “But another is a dream of peace, harmony, acceptance, cooperation, unity, community, family and such,” which are the underpinnings of situation comedy. Mintz explains that the sitcom, from the earliest days, relied on people helping each other in spite of their failures or problems. Mintz gives the example of I Love Lucy: “Lucille Ball was always trying to get out of her role as housewife but she always failed; she always screwed up. But in the end the idea was, ‘it’s OK,’ because she’s got Ricky and she’s got her world. And she belongs there.” Consider M.A.S.H.: It was set during the Korean War, but the comedy revolved around antics like making bootleg gin, with a benevolent father figure and a child to care for (Radar), surrounded by an array of lovable aunts and uncles. In short, says Mintz: “What the sitcom is about is a place where everybody knows your name.”—DB

the “young Turks” competing for a job with Donald Trump, who appeals to the middle-aged consumer or viewer. “I think that’s one of the reasons why that has had such broad appeal,” says Wagner, who notes that two faculty members in the business school even used it in conjunction with a management course on negotiations. When will reality TV lose its luster? “The television industry tends to imitate itself to death,” says Parks, reminding us of those ubiquitous quiz shows several decades back. Stay tuned. TERP

PHOTO COURTESY OF SHERI PARKS

in

theloop The Colonnade Society: Maryland’s Top Tier IF YOU WALK past Cole Field House on

Homecoming, about three hours before game time, you will hear a mighty sound: the Mighty Sound of Maryland Marching Band serenading members of the Colonnade Society. A big noise is appropriate for these alumni and friends as they gather together under skies at the society’s annual Homecoming brunch. Everyone here has made a big noise in support of the University of Maryland to the tune of $1,000 or more. Members of the Colonnade Society give to programs all over campus, from academics, to athletics to the arts.They give to building projects, scholarship funds or wherever Maryland’s need is greatest, depending on how the Terrapin Spirit moves them. By making a gift of $1,000 or more anywhere on campus, they automatically become a part of this prestigious organization. “I am happy to contribute to the progress that Maryland is making on the road to becoming a great university. My

membership in the Colonnade Society provides me with a connection to the successes achieved on that journey,” says Russ Strand ’68. The university’s outstanding students are the primary beneficiaries of Colonnadelevel generosity. Unrestricted dollars for colleges and schools allow deans to fund experiential learning opportunities that bring classrooms to life. Gifts to scholarship funds present a world of choices to students who face financial difficulties while earning a degree at Maryland. “All gifts to the university are impor-

University President Dan Mote (left) with two Colonnade Society members. Other members cheer for Maryland’s “top tier” at last year’s Homecoming brunch.

tant,” says Christopher Harvey ’00, assistant director of the program, “but we wanted to recognize those who have taken a leadership role, giving $1,000 or more—the top-tier of Maryland’s annual donors.” As its membership grows and the Homecoming brunch tent expands to cover more Terps, the mighty sound of the Colonnade Society is spreading across campus and beyond, increasing Maryland’s excellence. Just listen … —MW

specialGIFTS The Maryland School of Public Policy received the largest gift in its 22-year history when Roy F. Weston of Newtown Square, Pa., contributed $1.65 million to endow the Roy F. Weston Chair in Natural Economics and provide startup funding to launch a new initiative in natural economics. Weston, who pioneered the field of natural economics, is the retired CEO of Roy F. Weston Consulting, now Weston Solutions, which he founded in 1957. This contribution will assist the school in charting innovative research and teaching on the management of material and energy use and associated technological, social, economic and institutional challenges. Maryland’s Mathias Ruth (pictured above) holds the Roy F. Weston Chair in Natural Economics. The College of Health and Human Performance received a $2.4 million grant from The Atlantic Philanthropies to support a policy research project in eight demonstration sites in disadvantaged communities

PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION

throughout the United States. The project will assess new options for intergenerational volunteer service programming to meet communitybased health and independent living needs. This work is being undertaken by faculty in the Center on Aging, one of the nation’s premier gerontological research programs. Through the generosity of Ross H. Mandell ’78 (pictured below), who recently made a gift of $500,000, the university is able to launch the Leaders for Tomorrow program in the fall 2004 semester. This initiative is designed to help students to compete successfully for prestigious national postgraduate awards and to encourage public service and leadership. Each year a group of 20 of Maryland’s most outstanding students will be selected to participate in this extraordinary program. —PS

TERP FALL

2004

29


WHERE, OH WHERE, HAS THE SITCOM GONE?

But it’s not all negative. Parks finds American Idol to be much more uplifting than the combative reality shows.Take the two finalists from last season.“Diana was talked about as the girl next door and Fantasia was a young mother, and so we watched these young women fulfill their dreams.” Many of the lifestyle reality shows also affect participants in a positive way.“TV is starting to look much more like magazines, where the audience is very tight and you can predict their behavior,” says Parks, who admits to being a fan of Queer Eye, particularly its first season.“It’s interesting to watch a show transform at least the public acceptance of a minority group in a few short months.” Today, we have much more sophisticated ways of segmenting the market, explains Janet Wagner, associate chair of the Department of Marketing in the Robert H. Smith School of Business.This is in sharp contrast to the homogenous group of viewers who watched sitcoms in the 1950s. “So market segments are becoming smaller GETTING REAL and smaller,” says Wagner. “And, they’re not What all of the programs do have in comjust demographically driven; they’re also mon is the use of people who are not being driven by lifestyle.” trained actors. Because they are not scriptWith cable TV now in nearly 80 percent ed, viewers find it easier to become involved with these people’s lives, to identi- of American homes, some viewers can choose from dozens of stations already fy with them more, says Parks. attuned to their interests—which also leads The media provides that opportunity, for to more aggressive use of product placement, a price.“I think we are beginning to see particularly within the reality show format. much more emphasis on social class,” says When the Queer Eye guys talk about a Parks.“You can take the long road or you can say,‘How can I get there more quickly?’” “chofa”—a cross between a chair and a sofa—one furniture store in a local mall displays one with an CLEARLY HEARD “As Seen on” sign. Parks observes that people are Each Saturday at 7 a.m. (with rebroadcast drawn to look at the piece of Sunday at 8 a.m.) on 89.7 FM from Baltimore, furniture because they like the Md., Sheri Parks, associate professor of show.“The program becomes American Studies, offers her insight into the point of sale.” popular culture and cultural affairs on the Since most reality shows hour-long radio show, Clear Reception with appeal to a younger demoSheri Parks. On one recent show, celebrated graphic group who are lookjournalists Tom Brokaw, Tim Russert and Bill ing for something edgy, Moyers shared their views with Parks about the need Wagner finds The Apprentice for Americans to examine the historical soul of the nation. unusual in that it crosses The signal reaches most of Maryland and the show is also demographic segments. It has Webcast simultaneously and archived at www.wtmd.org.

She finds today’s offerings a far cry from The Cosby Show, which Bill Cosby said that he used to instruct parents and their children on how to behave. As a backlash to this perfect world where all problems—minor— could be solved within 30 minutes, there was the advent of situation comedies with “happy losers,” such as Seinfeld and Friends. “So, there’s this collapsing between the idealized form and the audience. And reality TV is a continuation of that process,” says Parks, who is fascinated by the anomaly of the name. If it truly were reality, we would follow the events in real time, a format tried by PBS about 20 years ago and never repeated. “The aesthetic of television is that everything is condensed. On Queer Eye, for instance, notice that [the Fab Five appear to] run everywhere,” observes Parks, a device that allows them to condense what is really four or five days into a very short period of time.

28

TERP FALL

2004

With last season’s final curtain call for two sitcom staples, Friends and Frazier, dark days loom for those in search of humor. “We’re in a period where [the sitcom] is losing ground to other genres, such as reality shows but I wouldn’t write it off just yet,” says Lawrence Mintz, associate professor of American Studies and director of the Art Gliner Center for Humor studies. He bemoans the fact there isn’t a current show with the status of a M.A.S.H. or Cheers or an All in the Family. Comedy, for the time being, has been supplanted by reality television. The irony is that both represent opposite takes on the American Dream. “One of our dreams is a dream of success, fame and fortune, individual achievement, ‘winning’ and such,” says Mintz, characteristics of most reality shows. “But another is a dream of peace, harmony, acceptance, cooperation, unity, community, family and such,” which are the underpinnings of situation comedy. Mintz explains that the sitcom, from the earliest days, relied on people helping each other in spite of their failures or problems. Mintz gives the example of I Love Lucy: “Lucille Ball was always trying to get out of her role as housewife but she always failed; she always screwed up. But in the end the idea was, ‘it’s OK,’ because she’s got Ricky and she’s got her world. And she belongs there.” Consider M.A.S.H.: It was set during the Korean War, but the comedy revolved around antics like making bootleg gin, with a benevolent father figure and a child to care for (Radar), surrounded by an array of lovable aunts and uncles. In short, says Mintz: “What the sitcom is about is a place where everybody knows your name.”—DB

the “young Turks” competing for a job with Donald Trump, who appeals to the middle-aged consumer or viewer. “I think that’s one of the reasons why that has had such broad appeal,” says Wagner, who notes that two faculty members in the business school even used it in conjunction with a management course on negotiations. When will reality TV lose its luster? “The television industry tends to imitate itself to death,” says Parks, reminding us of those ubiquitous quiz shows several decades back. Stay tuned. TERP

PHOTO COURTESY OF SHERI PARKS

in

theloop The Colonnade Society: Maryland’s Top Tier IF YOU WALK past Cole Field House on

Homecoming, about three hours before game time, you will hear a mighty sound: the Mighty Sound of Maryland Marching Band serenading members of the Colonnade Society. A big noise is appropriate for these alumni and friends as they gather together under skies at the society’s annual Homecoming brunch. Everyone here has made a big noise in support of the University of Maryland to the tune of $1,000 or more. Members of the Colonnade Society give to programs all over campus, from academics, to athletics to the arts.They give to building projects, scholarship funds or wherever Maryland’s need is greatest, depending on how the Terrapin Spirit moves them. By making a gift of $1,000 or more anywhere on campus, they automatically become a part of this prestigious organization. “I am happy to contribute to the progress that Maryland is making on the road to becoming a great university. My

membership in the Colonnade Society provides me with a connection to the successes achieved on that journey,” says Russ Strand ’68. The university’s outstanding students are the primary beneficiaries of Colonnadelevel generosity. Unrestricted dollars for colleges and schools allow deans to fund experiential learning opportunities that bring classrooms to life. Gifts to scholarship funds present a world of choices to students who face financial difficulties while earning a degree at Maryland. “All gifts to the university are impor-

University President Dan Mote (left) with two Colonnade Society members. Other members cheer for Maryland’s “top tier” at last year’s Homecoming brunch.

tant,” says Christopher Harvey ’00, assistant director of the program, “but we wanted to recognize those who have taken a leadership role, giving $1,000 or more—the top-tier of Maryland’s annual donors.” As its membership grows and the Homecoming brunch tent expands to cover more Terps, the mighty sound of the Colonnade Society is spreading across campus and beyond, increasing Maryland’s excellence. Just listen … —MW

specialGIFTS The Maryland School of Public Policy received the largest gift in its 22-year history when Roy F. Weston of Newtown Square, Pa., contributed $1.65 million to endow the Roy F. Weston Chair in Natural Economics and provide startup funding to launch a new initiative in natural economics. Weston, who pioneered the field of natural economics, is the retired CEO of Roy F. Weston Consulting, now Weston Solutions, which he founded in 1957. This contribution will assist the school in charting innovative research and teaching on the management of material and energy use and associated technological, social, economic and institutional challenges. Maryland’s Mathias Ruth (pictured above) holds the Roy F. Weston Chair in Natural Economics. The College of Health and Human Performance received a $2.4 million grant from The Atlantic Philanthropies to support a policy research project in eight demonstration sites in disadvantaged communities

PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION

throughout the United States. The project will assess new options for intergenerational volunteer service programming to meet communitybased health and independent living needs. This work is being undertaken by faculty in the Center on Aging, one of the nation’s premier gerontological research programs. Through the generosity of Ross H. Mandell ’78 (pictured below), who recently made a gift of $500,000, the university is able to launch the Leaders for Tomorrow program in the fall 2004 semester. This initiative is designed to help students to compete successfully for prestigious national postgraduate awards and to encourage public service and leadership. Each year a group of 20 of Maryland’s most outstanding students will be selected to participate in this extraordinary program. —PS

TERP FALL

2004

29


play-by-play

spotlight SCOREcard

Coaches Creating Soccer Successes MARYLAND’S HEAD WOMEN’S and men’s soccer coaches, Shannon Higgins-Cirovski and Sasho Cirovski, might be producing soccer stars at work and at home.This season the women’s soccer recruitment class is ranked eighth in the nation and the men’s is ranked fifth. Four of the men’s soccer players joined the MLS this year, ending the season second overall. At home, the couple’s oldest daughter, Hailey, 10, is quick to tell the story that since her mom started playing soccer at three and Mia Hamm started playing soccer at two, she will be better than both of them because she started playing soccer at one. Though success is probably in her genes, Hailey will need a lot of fancy footwork to develop a better command of the sport than her mother, Shannon, who in 2002 at the age of 34 became the second woman and the youngest person ever to be inducted to the National Soccer Hall of Fame. If Hailey and her sisters, Karli, 8, and Ellie, 2, have winning in their blood, they get it just as much from their dad. Originally from a tiny village in Macedonia, Sasho Cirovski attended Wisconsin-Milwaukee on a soccer scholarship and won the firstever Herman Kluge Award for Male Athlete of the Year. He went on to become an assistant coach there, guiding the team to the NCAA tournament for the first time in 10 years. Since coming to Maryland in 1993, Sasho has gone to task at turning around a struggling men’s program, bringing it to 10 NCAA tournaments and winning three ACC titles in 1996, 2002 and 2003.

30

TERP FALL

2004

The same year Sasho came to Maryland, he married his wife, after a nine-month romance sparked in part, by the urging of mutual friends and fellow coaches who thought the two would make a good match. Finding common ground with their schedules became easier to coordinate when Shannon left George Washington University to coach at Maryland in 1998. Jason Yellin, the media relations director for the women’s team and the public announcer for the men’s during home games, is also a close personal friend. “Sasho is a 100 percent competitive person,” says Yellin. “He has a million ideas at once. He is always on.Twenty-four seven.” Yellin contends that Shannon is just as intent on winning, but expresses it in a calmer way. Though they stay out of the management of one another’s programs, they keep constant tabs on each other’s teams.When their matches coincide, Yellin is the coaches’ link, often providing play-byplay updates on his cell phone.“Sasho’s calling me 20 times,‘Tell me how they are playing.’ ” While soccer is without a doubt a huge part of their lives, the Cirovskis are extremely familyoriented.“We don’t just sit around talking about soccer tactics all day,” says Sasho.“We love to spend time with our kids.” The Cirovskis say they have tried hard not to push the sport on their girls, but their daughters might indeed be Maryland soccer’s most loyal fans. “They love to come to our games,” says Sasho. “It’s very rare that more than a few days go by when they’re not wearing a Maryland soccer shirt. They have a lot of Maryland pride.” —SLK

A number of voluntary initiatives to improve fan behavior at athletic events have been suggested by a student task force. Recommendations include a T-shirt exchange in which students turn in profane shirts for new T-shirts. Former Terrapin star recruit who helped bring Men’s Basketball to the national level, Keith Booth ’03, comes back to Maryland as assistant coach. Booth started every game during his career here in ’94 –’97 and helped lead the team to two straight NCAA Sweet 16 finishes. For the second consecutive year, Maryland athletics is part of “The Elite 25” when compared to the more than 320 Division I schools in the nation, according to the United States Sports Academy Directors’ Cup standings for 2003–2004. Ali Wolff-Toole ’01, a former standout Maryland goalkeeper, and Emily Janss ’00, a three-time All-ACC selection for the Terps, were named assistant coaches for Women’s Soccer. One of the most respected coaches of all time, former Terp coach Dick Edell was inducted to the National Lacrosse Hall of Fame. Edell racked up 282 career victories and led Maryland to the NCAA Championship game in 1995, 1997 and 1998.

PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

A Magical Obsession THE COUPLE HAD little idea 35 years ago

that they were beginning an adventure that would result in amassing the world’s most comprehensive collection of fantasy art as well as science fiction art and books. Howard Frank, dean of the Robert H. Smith School of Business, and his wife, Jane, owner of Worlds of Wonder Art Gallery, in McLean,Va., built upon Howard’s collection of illustrated pulp novels that began while he was still in high school. He would spend his allowance at the used bookstores along Fourth Ave. in New York City. By the time they met in college, he already had a thriving collection. “Within 10 years of being married, we started going to science fiction conventions and fantasy conventions,” says Jane. Howard would haunt the book dealers and Jane began seeking out art exhibitors. He agreed that his attraction to the books included the elaborate illustrations, so began a collecting mania that was, indeed, magical.

“All illustration art of the kind we are collecting began soon after the turn of the century,” says Jane, because that is when dust jackets first appeared on books. Today, their collection of fantasy art spans 80 years of illustrations by the most significant artists of the genre and includes some 400 works hung salon-style in their white-walled, contemporary home in McLean. The 62 works on display from October 25–December 18 in The Art Gallery’s exhibition, “Magical Adventures: Fantasy Art from The Frank Collection,” bring into public view the full-scale original paintings, drawings, mixed media and sculptures that have rarely been seen.These works illustrate themes of departure from the real world to that of the impossible, unconventional, magical and fantastical. As Dorit Yaron, assistant director of The Art Gallery explains, the purpose of the illustrations was to capture readers’ attention.The works are narrative, representational and marked by brilliant colors

Above: Portait of an Alchemist, James Warhola’s oil on canvas (1990); center: detail from Hannes Bok’s Gizzlesteen, Grimalkin and the Flying Grozzle (1948), oil on panel.

and, sometimes, blurred brushstrokes that obscure the fine line between dream and reality. Indeed, the artists’ ability to invent such spectacular images from their imagination without real-life models is the appeal for the Franks. As for the books that began this remarkable quest, they now number in the thousands. Says Jane of their combined collections, “It’s a happy obsession that we’re delighted to share.”—DB

IS THERE A COLLECTOR IN YOU? SOME PEOPLE ACQUIRE things at random. A collector’s house, on the other hand, is home to specific

objects—perhaps figural teapots or roosters or golf balls from courses near and far. It’s been said if you have three of anything, it’s a budding collection. Jane Frank agrees. Collecting chooses you. When several cobalt blue bottles turn into a dozen or more, you no longer have a choice. “Even if you are attracted to a different color, the collector wouldn’t add a red bottle because it would disturb the established pattern,” says Frank. Collections begin first with an interest: a hobby, an activity, a childhood memory, says Frank. Take a golfer. “If you have the collector instinct, then you are likely to collect objects associated with [the sport], be it golf balls or tees or whatever.” Howard and Jane Frank’s extensive fantasy art collection The other sign of a collector is grouping particular items. ”When abounds throughout their you have them in such an array they’re much more visually effective,” house, including this colorful says Frank. “They make a much more powerful statement.” —DB display in their kitchen.

TOP PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE ART GALLERY; BOTTOM PHOTO COURTESY OF HOWARD AND JANE FRANK

TERP FALL

2004

31


play-by-play

spotlight SCOREcard

Coaches Creating Soccer Successes MARYLAND’S HEAD WOMEN’S and men’s soccer coaches, Shannon Higgins-Cirovski and Sasho Cirovski, might be producing soccer stars at work and at home.This season the women’s soccer recruitment class is ranked eighth in the nation and the men’s is ranked fifth. Four of the men’s soccer players joined the MLS this year, ending the season second overall. At home, the couple’s oldest daughter, Hailey, 10, is quick to tell the story that since her mom started playing soccer at three and Mia Hamm started playing soccer at two, she will be better than both of them because she started playing soccer at one. Though success is probably in her genes, Hailey will need a lot of fancy footwork to develop a better command of the sport than her mother, Shannon, who in 2002 at the age of 34 became the second woman and the youngest person ever to be inducted to the National Soccer Hall of Fame. If Hailey and her sisters, Karli, 8, and Ellie, 2, have winning in their blood, they get it just as much from their dad. Originally from a tiny village in Macedonia, Sasho Cirovski attended Wisconsin-Milwaukee on a soccer scholarship and won the firstever Herman Kluge Award for Male Athlete of the Year. He went on to become an assistant coach there, guiding the team to the NCAA tournament for the first time in 10 years. Since coming to Maryland in 1993, Sasho has gone to task at turning around a struggling men’s program, bringing it to 10 NCAA tournaments and winning three ACC titles in 1996, 2002 and 2003.

30

TERP FALL

2004

The same year Sasho came to Maryland, he married his wife, after a nine-month romance sparked in part, by the urging of mutual friends and fellow coaches who thought the two would make a good match. Finding common ground with their schedules became easier to coordinate when Shannon left George Washington University to coach at Maryland in 1998. Jason Yellin, the media relations director for the women’s team and the public announcer for the men’s during home games, is also a close personal friend. “Sasho is a 100 percent competitive person,” says Yellin. “He has a million ideas at once. He is always on.Twenty-four seven.” Yellin contends that Shannon is just as intent on winning, but expresses it in a calmer way. Though they stay out of the management of one another’s programs, they keep constant tabs on each other’s teams.When their matches coincide, Yellin is the coaches’ link, often providing play-byplay updates on his cell phone.“Sasho’s calling me 20 times,‘Tell me how they are playing.’ ” While soccer is without a doubt a huge part of their lives, the Cirovskis are extremely familyoriented.“We don’t just sit around talking about soccer tactics all day,” says Sasho.“We love to spend time with our kids.” The Cirovskis say they have tried hard not to push the sport on their girls, but their daughters might indeed be Maryland soccer’s most loyal fans. “They love to come to our games,” says Sasho. “It’s very rare that more than a few days go by when they’re not wearing a Maryland soccer shirt. They have a lot of Maryland pride.” —SLK

A number of voluntary initiatives to improve fan behavior at athletic events have been suggested by a student task force. Recommendations include a T-shirt exchange in which students turn in profane shirts for new T-shirts. Former Terrapin star recruit who helped bring Men’s Basketball to the national level, Keith Booth ’03, comes back to Maryland as assistant coach. Booth started every game during his career here in ’94 –’97 and helped lead the team to two straight NCAA Sweet 16 finishes. For the second consecutive year, Maryland athletics is part of “The Elite 25” when compared to the more than 320 Division I schools in the nation, according to the United States Sports Academy Directors’ Cup standings for 2003–2004. Ali Wolff-Toole ’01, a former standout Maryland goalkeeper, and Emily Janss ’00, a three-time All-ACC selection for the Terps, were named assistant coaches for Women’s Soccer. One of the most respected coaches of all time, former Terp coach Dick Edell was inducted to the National Lacrosse Hall of Fame. Edell racked up 282 career victories and led Maryland to the NCAA Championship game in 1995, 1997 and 1998.

PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

A Magical Obsession THE COUPLE HAD little idea 35 years ago

that they were beginning an adventure that would result in amassing the world’s most comprehensive collection of fantasy art as well as science fiction art and books. Howard Frank, dean of the Robert H. Smith School of Business, and his wife, Jane, owner of Worlds of Wonder Art Gallery, in McLean,Va., built upon Howard’s collection of illustrated pulp novels that began while he was still in high school. He would spend his allowance at the used bookstores along Fourth Ave. in New York City. By the time they met in college, he already had a thriving collection. “Within 10 years of being married, we started going to science fiction conventions and fantasy conventions,” says Jane. Howard would haunt the book dealers and Jane began seeking out art exhibitors. He agreed that his attraction to the books included the elaborate illustrations, so began a collecting mania that was, indeed, magical.

“All illustration art of the kind we are collecting began soon after the turn of the century,” says Jane, because that is when dust jackets first appeared on books. Today, their collection of fantasy art spans 80 years of illustrations by the most significant artists of the genre and includes some 400 works hung salon-style in their white-walled, contemporary home in McLean. The 62 works on display from October 25–December 18 in The Art Gallery’s exhibition, “Magical Adventures: Fantasy Art from The Frank Collection,” bring into public view the full-scale original paintings, drawings, mixed media and sculptures that have rarely been seen.These works illustrate themes of departure from the real world to that of the impossible, unconventional, magical and fantastical. As Dorit Yaron, assistant director of The Art Gallery explains, the purpose of the illustrations was to capture readers’ attention.The works are narrative, representational and marked by brilliant colors

Above: Portait of an Alchemist, James Warhola’s oil on canvas (1990); center: detail from Hannes Bok’s Gizzlesteen, Grimalkin and the Flying Grozzle (1948), oil on panel.

and, sometimes, blurred brushstrokes that obscure the fine line between dream and reality. Indeed, the artists’ ability to invent such spectacular images from their imagination without real-life models is the appeal for the Franks. As for the books that began this remarkable quest, they now number in the thousands. Says Jane of their combined collections, “It’s a happy obsession that we’re delighted to share.”—DB

IS THERE A COLLECTOR IN YOU? SOME PEOPLE ACQUIRE things at random. A collector’s house, on the other hand, is home to specific

objects—perhaps figural teapots or roosters or golf balls from courses near and far. It’s been said if you have three of anything, it’s a budding collection. Jane Frank agrees. Collecting chooses you. When several cobalt blue bottles turn into a dozen or more, you no longer have a choice. “Even if you are attracted to a different color, the collector wouldn’t add a red bottle because it would disturb the established pattern,” says Frank. Collections begin first with an interest: a hobby, an activity, a childhood memory, says Frank. Take a golfer. “If you have the collector instinct, then you are likely to collect objects associated with [the sport], be it golf balls or tees or whatever.” Howard and Jane Frank’s extensive fantasy art collection The other sign of a collector is grouping particular items. ”When abounds throughout their you have them in such an array they’re much more visually effective,” house, including this colorful says Frank. “They make a much more powerful statement.” —DB display in their kitchen.

TOP PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE ART GALLERY; BOTTOM PHOTO COURTESY OF HOWARD AND JANE FRANK

TERP FALL

2004

31


Interpretations

Securing U.S. Scientific Innovation a Must

THOSE OF US old enough to remember the launch of Sputnik in 1957 will also recall that it sparked the renewal of a national commitment to basic science and engineering. In one moment we realized that we had lost the preeminent position in science and technology.We were behind in space, our national security challenged, and our confidence in the future shaken. Our public policy position was to invest heavily in science and technology, change our national course, restructure higher education, retake the lead, especially in space sciences, and keep it. And we did just that. Unfortunately, the pendulum is now swinging the other way.We are not investing in long-term basic research sufficiently to retain preeminence in the future. Apart from biosciences our effort has been declining across the board. As a nation, we are not providing incentives for Americans to pursue careers in basic science, and foreign scientists are discouraged from coming here.This trend must be reversed. Demand for highly skilled graduates at the nation’s technology-based corporations

32

TERP FALL

2004

and federal agencies exceeds the supply that is possible from U.S. citizens alone.That is one reason why the 36 percent drop in international graduate student applications this year is troubling.While caused in part by heightened visa restrictions, it also reflects the more attractive opportunities these students have in other countries. Other nations are competing effectively for those scientists and will gain technological advantages, weakening our economic and technological supremacy and our security. In the first part of the last century, America was not the world’s technological leader.We rose to prominence in innovation because we were eager to invest in basic science and technology as a defense strategy.The national security threat was by itself the persistent driver for science and technology development that brought us into the nuclear age, then the space age and then the information age. While the impact of technology on our daily business and personal lives has expanded astronomically over the past 30 years, the inflation adjusted federal support for research in physical sciences and engineering has been essentially flat over this period. Support for life sciences research has increased five fold. But advances in health care cannot continue without advances in physical sciences and engineering. Our competitors in Asia and Europe are rapidly expanding their commitments to basic discovery and innovation.We are no longer the only tall ship in the harbor. Our national security and way of life depend upon a sustained public investment in science and engineering as a key source of innovation. However, to attract public investment people must understand and support the mission.We can ill afford to slide back.

As alumni and friends of this institution, you have a personal stake. Many of you live and work in the region and can convey your views about the role such research means to security and the economy. The University of Maryland is well positioned to be a technology catalyst through our strong partnerships with federal agencies. The sidebar illustrates some recent examples of our pre-eminence. Given our strengths, it is incumbent on us to assume a leadership role on this issue.We will do so through a range of forums, both national and local. As always I welcome your thoughts and support in our efforts. Dan Mote, President INNOVATION AT MARYLAND Bioscience Research Building Groundbreaking for $60.6 million new facility. Sept. 14

M-Square Groundbreaking for second tenant, NOAA, in Maryland’s research park. Oct. 14

Launch of Deep Impact NASA’s $270 million project. Dec. 30

Jeong H. Kim Engineering Building The building serves as a virtual laboratory. Opens Jan. ’05

TOP LEFT PHOTO BY JEREMY GREENE


Student loan rates at historic lows Consolidate today and lock in an incredibly low rate! The University of Maryland Alumni Association has teamed with Nelnet to offer student loan consolidation. Qualifying borrowers can lock in a fixed interest rate as low as 2.875% for the life of their loan and take 1

advantage of great repayment incentives that can reduce the rate even further.

• 1% interest rate reduction after 36 initial, regular, on-time payments

2

• .25% additional interest rate reduction for auto-debit payments

Today, eligible borrowers that choose a Nelnet Consolidation Loan will not only reduce their monthly payment, but also experience the following benefits:

• Flexible repayment terms

• No credit checks

• No fees

• No prepayment penalty

To determine your loan eligibility and discuss the best loan options for you, contact a Nelnet Loan Advisor today.

Toll-free 1.866.4CONSOL (426.6765) www.alumniconsolidation.nelnet.net

1The Consolidation loan interest rate is calculated by taking the weighted average of the rates on the federal loans you are consolidating, rounded up to the nearest one-eighth percent. 2Applicants who electronically sign the loan application online are eligible for the 1% rate reduction after 36 initial, regular, on-time payments. Borrowers completing applications through the mail are eligible to earn a 1% interest rate reduction after 48 initial, regular, on-time payments. Nelnet reserves the right to modify or terminate the interest rate reduction programs at its discretion without prior notice. Terms described above are in effect as of July 1, 2004. Student loan interest rates adjust every July 1 and remain in effect through June 30 of the following year. Other conditions including the length of repayment are as important as the interest rate when considering whether consolidation is right for you. Your borrower’s rights may change when you consolidate your student loans; please refer to your Borrower Rights and Responsibilities statement or contact a Nelnet Loan Advisor for more information. To qualify, borrowers must be in repayment or in the grace period with a combined total of at least $7,500 in qualified student loan debt, and less than 90 days delinquent. ©2004 Nelnet. Nelnet is a registered service mark of Nelnet, Inc. All rights reserved.


Building

The Excitement is Homecoming 2004:

…and so is your alumni association! We’re hosting an

even greater tailgate party, adding more class reunions,

and expanding our line of Terp merchandise.We’re also building the Samuel Riggs IV Alumni Center, your

home address on campus. Come see it all this October 16, when the Terps take on NC State in Byrd Stadium. Gear up before the big game by visiting the alumni association's online store, today. You'll find the latest Terp-wear and accessories at www.alumni.umd.edu.

WEAR THE

TURTLE!

Division of University Relations College Park, Maryland 20742-8724 Change Service Requested

Printed on Recycled Paper

Before the Big Game…

N Laugh and learn at the Homecoming Festival and Alumni College. N Grab a bite at our Members-Only Tent on Ludwig Field. Not a member? Join online. N Pick up the latest Terp-wear at our Merchandise Tent, or shop now online.

There’s no better time to be a Terp.

301.405.4678, 800.336.8627 N www.alumni.umd.edu See page 16 for more details!

Nonprofit Org. U.S. Postage PAID Permit No. 10 College Park, MD


Terp Fall, 2004  

Terp Magazine, University of Maryland

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