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“You must learn from the mistakes of others.

You can’t possibly live long enough to make them all yourself.” –

Sam L

08/27/12

Tulsa Resource and Adolescent Intervention Center of Excellence

T.R.A.I.C.E-HJHS PORTFOLIO

Ms. Venable-Principal Mr. Cole –Asst. Principal Mr. Jones- Dean of Students Ms. Noble-T.R.A.I.C.E Advisor

evenson.


TRADITIONAL TRACK CAREER PROGRAMS OF CHOICE T.R.A.I.C.E SATELLITES BIG PICTURE INSPIRED HIGH SCHOOLS OF CHOICE

TPS/BIG PICTURE NETWORK

In 1995, Big Picture Learning burst upon America’s languishing public education system. This brainchild of two daring educators, Dennis Littky and Elliot Washor, has grabbed the hearts, hands and minds of young people, inspiring them to become: Lifelong learners. PRODUCTIVE WORKERS. Engaged human beings

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I

NNOVATIVE SCHOOL DESIGN


INITIAL DIRECTIVE STATED ON AUGUST 20TH 2009 From: Jeter, Marvin H. Sent: Thursday, August 20, 2009 4:32 PM To: Principals - HS; Principals – Middle School Cc: 'lakimburley@aol.com'; 'gfitk1@yahoo.com'; 'cn.baird@gmail.com'; 'aanana@windstream.net'; Pasco, Doug; 'agbach@tulsaschools.org'; 'tonyaytaylor@yahoo.com'; 'notgrimm@gmail.com'; 'olivers143@yahoo.com'; Vo, Anissia; 'twhogan74@yahoo.com'; Hirsch, Jamison; Wilson, Jill; Noble, Pamela; Morris, Gregory; McIntosh, Eldon Brette; Johnson, Maurice; Day, John; James, Wanda; Davison, Donnie; 'anthonyistheman@mad.scientist' Subject: TRAICE Satellites Good afternoon! I wanted to share with you some information regarding the TRAICE Satellites in our traditional sites! We have been training the advisors in creating cultures to support students in making significant modifications in their behaviors by developing better skills for success. These strategies will fit perfectly with the basic philosophies and concepts of PBiS so that when they are included in your building trainings and developments, they will see a clear connection as the next steps after the classroom and building strategies have been employed! I am working with Larry Smith and others to finalize the remaining few needs for the Satellites. When we first began the planning for these centers in early June, you may recall that we indicated that each center could potentially cost around $88,000 to include the teacher salary, the computers, the resources/trainings, and support resources. I realize that Larry has graciously worked with many to come up with other ways to cover many of the costs; however, there are some rumors that there are some challenges in getting basic material resources such as paper and copies, etc. I appreciate your working with us to provide this support. Last week when we met at charge, we also indicated that these TRAICE Satellites are to be positive resource centers rather than punitive holding cells and that we needed them to be located in classrooms that are typical for the rest of the classrooms in your buildings. I realize that there seem to have been some issues related to the placement of the rooms and the message that was delivered to staff regarding these programs. Please revisit this issue to ensure that your site has a comfortable and appropriate home and that all understand the purpose behind the new philosophy for the interventions. One of the things that we are asking is that when a student is referred to TRAICE Satellite, it is not for a specified amount of time beyond the class period(s) during which the student had problems, or for a day. Once the TRAICE Satellite teacher has the opportunity to begin intervening, they will recommend to administration the frequency (every day or every other day for 3 days, for example) and duration (one period per day, up to all day) that the student should return to work on behavior modification. I am attaching copies of the documents that the TRAICE Satellite teachers will be using to open the centers and to begin to intervene with students. I will be sending more over the coming weeks to make certain that we are all together in this endeavor! Thanks so much for your collaboration. I am confident that the teachers in this program will rise to high levels of performance and in turn support your students in increasing their performance! Respectfully, Dr. Marvin H. Jeter, III Marvin H. Jeter, III, PhD Assistant Superintendent for School Innovation Tulsa Public Schools-Education Service Center Room 201E 3027 South New Haven/P.O. Box 470208 Tulsa, Oklahoma74147-0208 Telephone 918-746-6282 - fax 918-746-6333


MS. NOBLE’S DAILY ITENERARY

T

.R.A.I.C.E meets in room 200 from 8:15am - 3:20 pm.

FIRST RESTROOM BREAK IS @ 10:30am

SECOND BREAK IS LUNCH FROM 12:11 PM-12:40 pm

SECOND RESTROOM BREAK IS @ 2:20pm - 2:25pm

T

RAICE Classroom Rules are as follows:

1. be Respectful. 2. Remain Quiet. 3. Follow Directions. 4. Talking

will Not be Permitted.

From the day your child is born you must teach him to do things. Children today love luxury too much. They have detestable manners, flout authority, and have no respect for their elders. They no longer rise when their parents and teachers enter the room. What kind of awful creatures will they be when they grow up? - Socrates, 399 B.C.


TRAICE LETTER TO PARENTS Date: Dear Parent/Guardian:

__________________________________ has been referred to the Hale JH School TRAICE Satellite program for support in learning more appropriate behaviors related to the following disciplinary infraction – The Tulsa Resource and Adolescent Intervention Center of Excellence, or TRAICE, is a program designed to help students to be more successful in the high school setting. Through instruction and/or counseling, students work with the TRAICE Satellite teacher to help find the root causes of un-preferred behaviors or obstacles to learning. The TRAICE Satellite setting provides lessons that teach new behaviors through their particular learning styles or how to deal with the social aspects of junior high school. The role of the TRAICE Satellite teacher is to work with students using a series of interventions to discover their strengths and build on them so that students may realize what they are capable of, both academically and behaviorally. TRAICE will provide additional resources outside the regular classroom to assist them in achieving success. There is no set time frame for a student to be assigned to TRAICE. Students will work with the TRAICE Satellite teacher until their behavior goals are met. Students that require additional help or are unsuccessful in the TRAICE program may be referred to other alternative school settings or face other disciplinary consequences if the un-preferred behaviors continue. Please contact the school at (918)7469260 if you have any questions.


P

ROCEDURE FOR RESPONDING TO SUBSTANCE-RELATED BEHAVIORS

First, distinguish between Use/Influence versus Intent to Sale or Distribute! 212: Use or possession of Alcohol, Drugs or Drug Paraphernalia and/or Being Under the Influence of Alcohol, Controlled Substances or Unauthorized Drugs/Substances For this offense: 1) A student should be suspended for the remainder of the day of the use/influence and the next day. Upon return, the student must report to TRAICE Satellite/ISI per the Behavior Response Plan. Failure will constitute truancy. 2) The administrator administering discipline for the use/influence with collaboration from the TRAICE Satellite teacher, when possible, will provide the student and parent/guardian with contact information for Palmer Continuum of Care – 918-832-7763. 3) The student and guardian shall contact Palmer Continuum of Care to arrange a free assessment available to walk-ins on Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9AM-12PM, or other times by appointment, to identify level of need for intervention:

4) 5)

6) 7)

3015 East Skelly Drive, Suite 270 Tulsa, Oklahoma 74105 The student may remain in TRAICE Satellite until the Satellite teacher receives a report from Palmer indicating level of need. Based upon the assessment feedback, the student will be offered one of the following options: a) If minimal intervention is indicated, then the student shall be allowed to return to regular classes while attending up to 9 hours of treatment weekly for up to nine weeks. The student shall report to the TRAICE Satellite teacher weekly to monitor progress and to provide communication and support for student when dismissed from the program. b) If moderate intervention is indicated, students will be referred to the New Vision services at Tulsa Met-Franklin for 6-8th grade and Tulsa Met-Lombard for 9-12th grade. c) If more critical care is indicated, students may be referred by the Palmer staff to an appropriate inpatient facility. Procedures for students with IEP’s must be followed. Should option b) or c) be required, the student will report to the TRAICE Satellite upon the return to traditional sites at the end of treatment for support in transitioning back into the learning environment.

309: Drug/Alcohol Sale or Distribution


For this offense: 1) A Referral – Tier II to III/IV form should be completed to refer student to the Continuation School per the Behavior Response Plan. 2) Procedures for students with IEP’s must be followed. 3)

Student should also be referred to Palmer for Assessment.

FREQUENT USED TIER 2 BEHAVIOR ASSESSMENT-DATA COLLECTION

STUDENT LAST NAME

Sample

N

STUDENT FIRST NAME

One more

SUBDESCRIPTION

He did not have school supplies today.

TYPE

INTERVENTION

109

Sent a note home with him. Referred to social worker for assistance

OTE: DATA COLLECTION PURPOSES ONLY!


LESSON PLAN SEMESTER PER

I will be conducting workshops involving "Covey's-Seven Habits of an Effective Teen" "Mark Liston's End’s Character Challenge”.

"

M

y DAILY class schedule is as follows: UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE!

9:00a.m.-12:00 p.m. –Teacher Assignments 12:05 p.m.-1:05 p.m. -T.R.A.I.C.E -"COVEY" 1:35 p.m.-3:20 p.m. T.R.A.I.C.E- C2 "Character Challenge"

N

OTE: This schedule will run in conjunction with T.R.A.I.C.E and SCHOOL INNOVATIONS

Complete Descriptions of The Character Strengths: Character Strengths and Virtues the 6 virtues are in bold.

1. Insight: cognitive strengths that entail the acquisition and use of knowledge a. Learning: Love of learning, mastering new skills, topics, and bodies of knowledge; systematically adding to what one knows; preparation for future success b. Wisdom: Perspective, able to counsel others, making sense out of the world to oneself and others c. Creativity: originality, ingenuity, thinking of novel and productive ways to conceptualize and do things; and Curiosity: hunger for truth, interest, novelty-seeking, open to experience, fascination, exploring, discovering


d. Discernment: Open-mindedness, judgment, critical thinking, discrimination; thinking things through, not jumping to conclusions, not impulsive, being willing to change one’s mind in light of the evidence; weighing the evidence carefully before forming an opinion; foresight, prudence, caution, good sense, discretion.

2. Passion: Emotional strengths that involve the exercise of will to accomplish goals in the face of opposition, both internal and external. a. Responsibility: Admitting when I am wrong, doing what I say I will do, being responsible, having integrity, reliable, consistent, dependable b. Integrity: honesty; authenticity/authentic, trustworthy, speaking the truth but more broadly presenting oneself as genuine and sincere; taking responsibility for one’s feelings and actions; conscience c. Courage: Bravery, valor, not shrinking from threat, challenge, difficulty, or pain; speaking up for what is right even if there is opposition; acting on convictions even if unpopular; defending the oppressed; overcoming evil; includes physical bravery d. Perseverance: Persistence, industriousness, doing hard work, dealing with adversity; finishing what one starts; persisting in a course of action in spite of obstacles; “getting it out the door”; taking pleasure in task completion. 3.

Love: interpersonal strengths that involve tending and befriending others while also taking care of yourself

a. Kindness: gentleness, generosity, nurturance, compassion, niceness, doing good deeds, helping, respect, service, living by the Golden Rule b. Care: concern, love, closeness, relationships, valuing close relations with others, in particular those in which sharing and caring are reciprocated; being close to people and spending time with them; value of life; respecting diversity c. Trust: social intelligence, sense of community, social skills, awareness of motives and feelings of others and self, knowing how to fit in different settings, knowing what makes people tick; respecting individuality and personal boundaries, tolerance, friendship d. Awareness: of one’s true self, self-worth, seeing the truth about oneself, accurate perception of one’s strengths, abilities, and appearance 4. Cooperation: civic strengths that underlie healthy community life a. Respect: honor, giving attention to whom it is due, deference, valuing, and appropriate conduct toward another, especially those in authority; view of ownership, property, and other rights; submission to authority, yielding b. Fairness: lack of bias, just treatment; treating all people the same according to notions of fairness and justice; not letting personal feelings bias decisions about others; giving everyone a fair chance c. Teamwork: citizenship, social responsibility, loyalty, doing one’s share; ability to follow leadership, to discover and perform one’s role in a group d. Leadership: ability to command respect, encouraging a group of which one is a member to get things done while maintaining good relations within the group; organizing group activities and seeing that they happen. 5. Discipline: strengths that protect against excess a. Forgiveness: mercy, apology, restitution, forgiving self; accepting the shortcomings of others; giving a second chance; vs. hatred, revenge b. Humility: modesty, deference; letting one’s accomplishments speak for themselves; not seeking the spotlight; not regarding oneself as more valued or having greater worth; sober; vs. pride, selfish ambition


c. Diligence: the consistent application of effort to a worthwhile task; industrious, staying on task in an employment or pursuit; steady or habitual effort; finishing what one has started, keeping on despite obstacles, taking care of business, achieving closure, getting it off one’s desk and out the door; the mustering of will to perform in the face of contrary impulses; vs. sloth, laziness d. Self-control: self-discipline, self-regulation; reining in one’s words, appetites, and emotions; regulating what one feels and does; vs. impulsive

T

6. ranscendence: strengths that forge connections to the larger universe and provide meaning a. Wonder: appreciation of beauty, excellence, awe, and majesty; valuing nature; seeing design and worth in creation and one’s place in that design; Peace: release, calmness, facing difficulty with competency, self-assurance, tranquil, serene b. Humor: playfulness, liking to laugh and tease; bringing smiles to others; making or telling jokes; and Joy: Vitality, zest, zeal, enthusiasm, vigor, energy; employing one’s personal power; approaching life with excitement and energy; not doing things halfway or halfheartedly; living life as an adventure; c. Spirituality: faith, trust in a higher power, religiousness, faith, sense of sovereignty and of a higher purpose and meaning, beliefs about the meaning of life that shape conduct and provide comfort d. Gratitude: being aware and thankful for the good things of life, seeing meaning and purpose in the difficult or bad things; taking time to express thanks; being appreciative; and

S

ample of

C

2: Group Format THAT I WILL BE USING

The following is a three-page sample of one C2 session [it's actually 5 pages long including Key Notes and Journal Questions]. The student doesn’t get a copy of this but only of the Key Notes and the Journal Questions. Introduction: Will you devote the next few minutes to change your life? Will you think about your life and what you will make of it? Will you examine your belief system to determine why you believe what you believe? Will you dedicate yourself to do what will make your life richer, better, and more successful, even if doing so is hard work? Will you think with me about responsibility?

Movie Clip #1: “Coach Carter”

Presentation: Developing Your Responsibility Sample of the Key Notes:


Responsibility 1 .Responsibility has two parts: a. A responsible person is “able to choose for oneself between ____________ and _______________________.” b. A responsible person is “able to answer for one’s conduct and obligations; Accountable; ________________________________, ____________________”

2. Responsibility is a big part of ______________________________________. 3. Having a _____________ to live by is an important part of becoming responsible. 4. Some people choose never to be responsible because they can’t ______________ doing anything wrong. 5. A person who refuses to admit his mistakes will make the same bad ___________ over and over.

Sample of the Journal Questions: The last section WILL BE THE Journal Questions handout. In these, the students individually write out their answers in order to apply the training to their life and relationships. After recording their answers, they gather as a group to discuss them. No group member is required to talk or tell their answers, but most want to.

PASSION: Responsibility Journal Questions: 1. In the movie, “Coach Carter,” the players were held responsible for their grades and behavior. Some upheld their responsibilities and some didn’t. Who is the most irresponsible person you know? What proves their irresponsibility? 2. In the movie, Tim Cruz’s irresponsibility hurt the team, but it hurt him worse. What really bothers you about the person’s irresponsibility you named in #1? Who is s/he hurting most by his/her irresponsibility? My lesson plans will consist of key words, character strengths, journaling and incorporating all the tools and personal skills NEEDED TO BECOME PRODUCTIVE STUDENTS AT HJHS and beyond.


From the day your child is born you must teach him to do things. Children today love luxury too much. They have detestable manners, flout authority, and have no respect for their elders. They no longer rise when their parents and teachers enter the room. What kind of awful creatures will they be when they grow up? - Socrates, 399 B.C.

INITIAL INTAKE QUESTIONS

REFLECTION 1 1)

I was referred to TRAICE because

2)

The code that I violated was

3)

The definition of this code is

4)

I violated it by

5)

This demonstrated a lack of respect for me or others by

6)

Some may have interpreted by behavior as discourteous or antisocial because

7)

I demonstrated that I was not prepared for success in school because

8)

My behavior was inappropriate because

9)

In the future, I may improve my credibility and chance of success by

Practice Role Play Schools-Attuned Assessment


REFLECTION 2 1) I was referred to TRAICE because 2) The code that I violated was And I violated it by

Achieving a Personal Victory – 3) The reasons I violated the code was because I being proactive in order to 4) My behavior did/ did not accomplish the end that I had in mind. 5) I believe that I put first things first to accomplish what I needed because 6) Next time, a better way to achieve this personal goal or need might be to

Achieving a Public Victory – 7) In an effort to think win-win, I should remember to 8) Some ways that I can demonstrate respect for others by seeking first to understand and also know how to better achieve my own needs might be to 9) I may be able to gain more support, or synergize, by working with others through

Sharpening the Saw – 10) In the future, I may improve my credibility and chance of success by

Practice Role Play


REFLECTION 3 )

 Covey’s 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens and Goldstein’s Skill-streaming the Adolescent My priority for learning the skills that I marked above and the reasons would be: 

Personal Victory

Public Victory

H

abit 1: Be Proactive –

H

abit 2: Begin with

H

abit 3: Put First Things First –

responsible for what happens in one’s life. Assertive Skills 1. Asking Permission 2. Sharing Something 3. Helping Others 4. Negotiating 5. Using Self-Control 6. Standing Up for Your Rights 7. Responding to Teasing 8. Avoiding Trouble with Others 9. Keeping Out of Fights

the End in Mind – setting goals. Planning Skills 10. Deciding on Something to Do 11. Deciding What Caused a Problem 12. Setting a Goal 13. Deciding on Your Abilities 14. Gathering Information 15. Arranging Problems by Importance 16. Making a Decision 17. Concentrating on a Task

prioritizing. Social Skills 18. Listening 19. Starting a Conversation 20. Having a Conversation 21. Asking a Question 22. Saying Thank You 23. Introducing Yourself 24. Introducing Other People 25. Giving a Compliment

H

H

H

abit 4: Think Win-

Win – 26. 27. 28. 29. 30.

Advanced Social Skills Asking for Help Joining In Giving Instructions Following Instructions Apologizing

abit 5: Seek First to

Understand, Then to be Understood – Interpersonal Skills 31. Convincing Others 32. Knowing Your Feelings 33. Expressing Your Feelings 34. Understanding the

abit 6: Synergize

Advanced Teamwork Skills 35. Dealing with Someone Else's Anger 36. Expressing Affection 37. Dealing with Fear 38. Rewarding Yourself 39. Making A Complaint 40. Answering a Complaint 41. Being a Good Sport


Feelings of Others

Sharpening The Saw

Skill #

H

abit 7: Sharpen the

Saw –

Advanced Teamwork Skills 42. Dealing with Embarrassment 43. Dealing with Being Left Out 44. Standing Up for a Friend 45. Responding to Persuasion 46. Responding to Failure 47. Dealing with Contradictory Messages 48. Dealing with an Accusation 49. Getting Ready for a Difficult Conversation 50. Dealing with Group Pressure Reasons for wanting assistance:

THE ACT OF REFLECTING OR THE STATE OF BEING REFLECTED-DICTIONARY.COM


REFLECTION 4 H

OW ARE YOU WIRED?

The Prophet  TOTAL POINTS: Problem: The prophet is often misunderstood. Frankness may be perceived as carelessness. Motivation for what is right and ‘by-the-book’ causes them to be wounded when others make mistakes. Practice:  Reflection: Is this my primary area of giftedness? What does it look like when I am effectively using it? What does this look like when I am ineffective? How can I respond more effectively?

The Servant  TOTAL POINTS: Problem: The servant wants everyone to be happy with them, and when operating in ineffective ways, the servant can desire to promote self.

Practice:  Reflection: Is this my primary area of giftedness? What does it look like when I am effectively using it? What does this look like when I am ineffective? How can I respond more effectively?


The Teacher  TOTAL POINTS: Problem: The teacher tends to lack warmth and may have a know-it-all attitude that left unattended may lead to pride. They can look down on practical wisdom, and they want to understand everything. Practice:

 Reflection: Is this my primary area of giftedness? What does it look like when I am effectively using it? What does this look like when I am ineffective? How can I respond more effectively?

The Encourager  TOTAL POINTS: Problem: The encourager thinks they have all the answers and everyone should listen to them. They can develop the mentality that they have all the truth. Practice:

 Reflection: Is this my primary area of giftedness? What does it look like when I am effectively using it? What does this look like when I am ineffective? How can I respond more effectively?

The Giver  TOTAL POINTS: Problem: The giver wants to exercise control over gifts, so he/she gives with strings attached; the giver will either lavish on their family or neglect their family to give to others. Practice:


Reflection: Is this my primary area of giftedness? What does it look like when I am effectively using it? What does this look like when I am ineffective? How can I respond more effectively?

The Leader/Administrator  TOTAL POINTS:

Problem: The leader/administrator can become much calloused and you may be unable to get through to them. If they are not aligned with their faith, beliefs, and values, he/she will become insensitive. Projects may become more important than people. Practice:

 Reflection: Is this my primary area of giftedness? What does it look like when I am effectively using it? What does this look like when I am ineffective? How can I respond more effectively?

Mercy  TOTAL POINTS:

Problem: The person gifted with mercy interjects in a process to ask, “Why is this happening?” He/she may be indecisive when a decision is needed, and may have their expressions of love misunderstood. He/she may find him/herself in precarious relationships and may ignore established safeguards to avoid that dilemma.

Practice: Reflection: 2 Is this my primary area of giftedness? What does it look like when I am effectively using it? What does this look like when I am ineffective? How can I respond more effectively?


1. Sees everything as black and white – either right or wrong. 0 Never 2. Feels a need to express ideas regarding right and wrong and will often do so on the spur of the moment. 0 Never 3. Is uniquely gifted to spot hypocrisy in others and is extremely direct when confronting it. 0 Never 4. Has strong convictions and strict personal standards.

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

0 Never 5. Is open in expressing his/her own personal faults and accepting brokenness as leading to development and improvement in his/her life. 0 Never 6. Has a genuine concern to see right done and will defend the rules even when it means personal suffering. 0 Never 7. Views the handbook, curriculum, or code of conduct as the source of his/her convictions and the basis of all truth, action, and authority. 0 Never 8. Has few or no close friends.

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

0 Never 9. Exhibits loyalty and commitment without reservations.

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

0 Never

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

0 Never

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

10. Operates with boldness.

Effective –

Ineffective –

1. Boldness 1. Fear & Anxiety 2. Purity of life 2. Wicked & Sensual 3. Commitment 3. Indecisiveness 4. Sincerity 4. Hypocrisy 5. Persuasiveness 5. Demanding 6. Forgiveness 6. Bitterness 7. Joy 7. Frustration 1. Quickly spots a practical need and feels compelled to meet that need in a swift, meticulous manner.


0 Never 2. Derives joy and a sense of purpose in serving others beyond the expected. 0 Never 3. Tends to sacrifice personal needs (even health) to serve others. 0 Never 4. Has difficulty saying “no” to requests for help.

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

0 Never 5. Enjoys manual projects that combine attention to detail with a remarkable memory. 0 Never 6. Needs communication of specific instructions before service is rendered and appreciation after the fact. 0 Never 7. Loves being around people.

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

0 Never 8. Prefers working on immediate goals rather than long-range goals. 0 Never 9. Feels inadequate as a leader but readily supports those who are in leadership. 0 Never 10. Operates at a high level.

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

Effective –

0 Never Ineffective –

1. Alertness 1. Insensitivity 2. Hospitality 2. Seclusion 3. Generosity 3. Stinginess 4. Availability 4. Detachment 5. Flexibility 5. Rigid 6. Endurance 6. Resignation 7. Joy 7. Frustration 1. Believes the discovery of truth is the foundation of all that is important. 0 Never 2. Delights in doing research and study. 0 Never 3. Presents truth in a systematic manner.


0 Never 4. Evaluates all ideas by what he/she knows to be true.

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

0 Never 5. Expresses an interest in the factual basis of what others have to say. 0 Never 6. Emphasizes accuracy to the minutest detail.

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

0 Never 7. Is alert to spot details and facets of a situation not noticed by others? 0 Never 8. Listens carefully to others before offering an opinion.

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

0 Never 9. Has a small, select group of friends.

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

0 Never 10. Exercises self-discipline and endurance with consistency.

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

Effective –

0 Never Ineffective –

1. Discipline 1. Self-indulgence 2. Thoroughness 2. Inconsistency 3. Reverence 3. Disrespect 4. Patience 4. Impatience 5. Dependability 5. Unreliability 6. Security 6. Anxiety 7. Joy 7. Frustration 1. Encourages others to maturity. 0 Never 2. Perceives where a person is in his/her maturing process and visualizes his/her potential for growth. 0 Never 3. Prescribes definite steps of action to take a person from where they are to where they need to be. 0 Never 4. Expects to see a visible response to the prescribed steps that have been offered. 0 Never 5. Identifies easily with people and effectively communicates a message of unity among diverse groups.


0 Never 6. Finds truth in practical experiences and then validates it.

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

0 Never 7. Views personal trials as opportunities for growth in body, mind, and/or spirit. 0 Never 8. Acts with decisiveness and moves on without regret.

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

0 Never 9. Performs all tasks with thoroughness and endurance.

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

0 Never 10. Has high expectations for self and others.

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

0 Never Ineffective –

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

0 1 Never Seldom 3. Believes realizing blessings is the source and motivation of giving. 0 1 Never Seldom 4. Is thrilled to discover that a gift is a blessing and can be used as a blessing to others. 0 1 Never Seldom 5. Gives the best because giving is seen as an investment of self.

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

0 Never 6. Practices personal thriftiness as a result of contentment with the necessities of life. 0 Never 7. Demonstrates wisdom in investments and has success in handling business and financial matters. 0 Never

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

Effective –

1. Wisdom 1. Foolish 2. Discernment 2. Impulsiveness 3. Faith 3. Presumption 4. Love & Acceptance 4. Selfishness 5. Creativity 5. Generality 6. Enthusiasm 6. Apathy 7. Joy 7. Frustration 1. Is generous with money, possessions, time, energy and love. 0 Never 2. Derives pleasure from giving without recognition.


8. Spots financial needs that others miss. 0 1 Never Seldom 9. Desires to use giving to motivate others to give and to operate in the area of giftedness. 0 1 Never Seldom 10. Discerns with accuracy the mental and or spiritual condition of a person or situation on their handling of finances. 0 1 Never Seldom Effective – Ineffective –

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

0 1 Never Seldom 8. Displays loyalty and expects loyalty in interaction with others. 0 1 Never Seldom 9. Approaches each task with great enthusiasm until the major goal is accomplished and then prefers to move quickly to a new challenge.

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

1. Thriftiness 1. Extravagance 2. Resourcefulness 2. Wastefulness 3. Punctuality 3. Tardiness 4. Tolerance 4. Prejudice 5. Caution 5. Rashness 6. Gratitude 6. Ungratefulness 7. Contentment & Joy 7. Frustration 1. Visualizes the end result and the broad perspective of any major undertaking. 0 Never 2. Accepts responsibility for a project and quickly moves to organize it. 0 Never 3. Possesses a remarkable ability to subdivide long-range goals into smaller tasks. 0 Never 4. Prefers to operate by the principle of authority in the acceptance and delegation of responsibility. 0 Never 5. Utilizes the appropriate resources and people to accomplish goals. 0 Never 6. Accepts criticism from others as a necessary part or reaching the ultimate goal. 0 Never 7. Enjoys motivating and working with people.


0 Never 10. Derives great fulfillment from seeing a goal accomplished.

Effective –

0 Never Ineffective –

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

1. Order 1. Disorganization 2. Imitative 2. Laziness 3. Responsibility 3. Irresponsibility 4. Humility 4. Egotism & Dictatorial 5. Determination 5. Indecisiveness 6. Loyalty 6. Unfaithfulness 7. Joy 7. Frustration 1. Possess a tremendous capacity to love and to discern genuine love when exhibited by others. 0 1 Never Seldom 2. Focuses on the spiritual and emotional distress of others rather than their own physical distress. 0 1 Never Seldom 3. Attracts people who are hurting. 0 Never 4. Looks for opportunities to give preference to others.

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

0 Never 5. Postpones decisions and conflicts except when eliminating great hurts. 0 Never 6. Needs deep friendships which exhibit mutual loyalty and commitment. 0 Never 7. Enjoys a special unity with those who are sensitive to the needs and feelings of others. 0 Never 8. Possess and inner joy that can rejoice when others are blessed and weep when others are hurt. 0 Never 9. Relies on emotion rather than logic to guide them.

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

0 Never 10. Takes a stand when the cause is right.

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

1 Seldom

2 At times

3 Usually

4 Mostly

5 Always

Effective –

0 Never Ineffective –


1. Attentiveness 2. Sensitivity 3. Fairness 4. Compassion 5. Gentleness 6. Meekness 7. Joy

1. Disinterest 2. Calloused 3. Partiality 4. Apathy 5. Rudeness 6. Anger 7. Frustration


E

SSENTIAL

W

EBSITES

http://halejh.tulsaschools.org/ http://halejh.tulsaschools.org/faculty/noblep amela/ www.bigpicture.org/Share www.allkindsofminds.org/Share www.characterchallenge.org http://ok.gov/sde/oklahoma-teacher-leadereffectiveness-tle https://www.stephencovey.com/7habits/7ha bits.phpShare



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