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DANCE TO THE HEART BEAT Local dancers are moving to the music to strengthen their hearts and encouraging the ones they love to do the same. How are you making your heart dance? BY Tiffany White & Alissa Hicks PHOTOS Melissa Donald MAKEUP Marie Fulkerson

COVER Regan Judd

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HEAT UP THE

DANCE FLOOR

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usie Rhode, 58, a former cardiac critical care nurse at Jewish Hospital, says it is a real passion for her to help heart patients. Susie, who now works for Thoratec as a clinical educator, says that seeing the poor lifestyles of heart patients has helped her realize how important it is to take care of your heart. Susie is also a runner and has run 31 mini-marathons, as well as continues to walk three miles a day. She began dancing a few years ago at Bravo Dance Studio and now does competitions. Her dancing has also encouraged her patients. “I’ll be a better mom and a more sane person if I can exercise,” she says. “You’re never old too old to do it!”

Spotting a Heart Attack Most heart attacks involve discomfort in the center of the chest that lasts more than a few minutes or that goes away and comes back. It can feel like uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain. Symptoms can include pain or discomfort in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw, or stomach or shortness of breath. It may include breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea or lightheadedness. Source: American Heart Association

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GETTING INTO THE

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at Richardson, 65, got into ballroom dancing about six years ago with her husband, Bob. In 1998, Bob was diagnosed with heart disease and had an open heart triple bypass. The couple dances regularly at Bravo Dance Studio. “We got into ballroom dancing as a way for us to make connections and new friends and to stay active,” Pat says.

SWING OF THINGS

The recently retired realtor is now a competitive dancer and says her husband is more of a social dancer. “It’s good for him to stay active and keep his spirits up, and the social aspect of it really helps a lot. The doctors always encouraged diet and exercise.”

Exercise Regular, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity helps prevent heart and blood vessel disease. The more vigorous the activity, the greater your benefits. Hold the measuring tape around your waist at your bellybutton. The measurement you are wanting for less heart risk: Men < 40 inches, Women < 35 inches. Source: American Heart Association Pat is wearing: Dress, $230; necklace, $78 available at Boutique Serendipity, 1301 Herr Lane, Suite 189, 502.423.0058

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INTERNATIONAL

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arlina Churn-Diallo, 56, is an exsmoker. She stopped smoking 15 years ago after seeing her brother and both parents experience heart attacks. Harlina, who has always been a dancer and is now also a choreographer, says the exercise helped her offset the heart disease risks. “I also started exercising and eating properly,” she says.

Smoking Cigarette smoking increases the risk of coronary heart disease by itself. When it acts with other factors, it greatly increases risk. Smoking increases blood pressure, decreases exercise tolerance, and increases the tendency for blood to clot. Cigarette smoking is the most important risk factor for men and women. Also, women who smoke and use oral contraceptives greatly increase their risk of coronary heart disease and stroke compared with nonsmoking women who use oral contraceptives.

Harlina teaches all styles of dance from African and liturgical (her specialty) to jazz and ballet. She also owns the Imani Dance and Drum Company and is a dance educator at Lincoln Elementary Performing Arts School. “My parents say I started walking at six-and-a-half months and have been moving ever since!” she says.

Source: American Heart Association

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GRAB A

PARTNER D

eborah Denenfeld, 61, has taken her passion for dancing and channeled it into 25 years of dance education. Deborah is also the executive director of Dancing Well: The Soldier Project, which brings free dance to veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder and their families. Her connection to heart disease lies close to home: Her father has had heart attacks, high blood pressure, and diabetes, and her mother has had high blood pressure and congestive heart failure.

Deborah is also a dance caller and travels around to schools teaching different styles of dance. Her main passion is Contra dance, which she does with the Louisville Country Dancers. “Dancing is the most fun you can have while exercising,” she says.

Genetic Risk Your family history provides a picture of the environment and genetics in place when diseases occurred in your family. “You can’t counteract your genetics,” says Dr. William Kraus, M.D., a preventive cardiologist and research scientist at Duke University. If you have a history, you must do what you can to change your environment. That means lowering your risk by changing behaviors that can increase your chances of heart disease or stroke.

Deborah’s partner is Nat Johnson. She is wearing: Elenor Dress, $315, available at Rodeo Drive, 2212C Holiday Manor Center, 502.425.8999

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Source: American Heart Association

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ADD A LITTLE

HIP HOP TO THE MIX

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egan Judd, 24, was a typical college student when she discovered she needed open heart surgery. After having chest pains and shortness of breath at dance practice for the University of Kentucky, her parents suggested she seek medical attention. Following an abnormal EKG and other tests, Regan

learned she had a severe congenital heart defect and needed surgery to repair it. Regan returned to dancing just three months later and graduated on time with her four-year degree. She is now a local spokesperson for the American Heart Association and one of 10 national spokeswomen for Go Red for Women.

Heart Defects

Up to 1.3 million Americans alive today have some form of congenital heart defect. At least nine of every 1,000 infants born each year have a heart defect. The causes of congenital heart disease are still under investigation, but scientists and physicians are making progress. Source: American Heart Association

Regan is wearing: Antonio Melani dress, $169 from Dillardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mall, St. Matthews. She also appears on the cover.

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DO-SI-DO &

PROMENADE! P

eggy Campbell, 72, master gardener and volunteer for the St. Matthew’s Area Ministry, has been dancing for about 25 years. “It’s a good social activity — good, clean activity with nice people,” she says. Peggy and her husband both dance with the Beaus and Belles Square Dancers. They also collect for heart disease in the community, especially since Peggy’s family has a history with heart disease and hypertension. Peggy and her husband enjoy square dancing, line dancing, and mainstream dancing. She is also active in her church and is a tree journalist for the city of Bellemeade.

Know Your Numbers

As blood cholesterol rises, so does risk of coronary heart disease. Here’s the lowdown on where those numbers need to be: Total Cholesterol: Less than 200 mg/dL LDL (bad) Cholesterol: • Low risk for heart disease: Less than 129 mg/dL (less than 100 mg/dL is optimal) • Intermediate risk: 130 to 159 mg/dL • High risk (including those with existing heart disease or diabetes): More than 160mg/dL HDL (good) Cholesterol: 40 mg/dL or higher for men and 50 mg/dL or higher for women Triglycerides: Less than 150 mg/dL Source: American Heart Association

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RED AT WORK

Front row (l-r) Jill Bell, Vice President & Chief Communications Officer with Passport Health Plan; Jennifer Hunt, Business System Analyst, Baptist Health and Kentuckiana Goes Red Chair; Ellen Cavanaugh, Rhythm Management Nurse, Louisville Cardiology and Open Your Heart Co-Chair; Deborah Hagerman Charlton, CEO/ President, PMR Companies, LLC; Dr. Toni Ganzel, Dean of the School of Medicine, University of Louisville

Go Red for Women Executive Leadership Committee The Go Red for Women Executive Leadership Committee donates their time, talent, and treasure to improve heart health in our community. Volunteers work to increase awareness and education, raise funds to support the mission, and plan the Go Red For Women Luncheon in May. To get involved, contact Jane Merman at 502.371.6014 or email jane.merman@heart.org.

2nd row (l-r) Kathy Renbarger, Metro Vice President, American Heart Association; Ashley Mast, Assistant Vice President, Private Banking Officer, Republic Bank & Trust and Open Your Heart Co-Chair; Leigh Pittman, Vice President/ Director, Brown-Forman and Circle of Red Co-Chair 3rd row (l-r) Cathy Zion, Publisher, Zion Publications (on ladder); Jane Merman, Go Red for Women Director, American Heart

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Back row (l-r) Pattie Imperial, Division Manager, Fifth Third Private Bank Kentucky; Deanna Keal, Development Associate, American Heart Association; Charlotte Ipsan, President, Norton Women’s Hospital and Kosair Children’s Hospital-St.Matthews, Norton Healthcare and Go Red Executive Chair; Missy Bonsutto, Regional Director of Operations, Caretenders/Almost Family; Janey Jennings, Certified Financial Planner, U.S. Bancorp Investments, Inc.; Connie Steller, Executive Territory Manager, Abbott Vascular and Luncheon Program Chair

Not pictured: Dana Allen, Chief Marketing Officer, Norton Healthcare; Sheri Ash, Community Relations, Belmont Village Senior Living; Leigh Ann Barney, EVP-Chief Operating Officer, Trilogy Health Services; Becky Beanblossom, Founder & President, Home Instead Senior Care; Linda Danna, President & General Manager, WHAS 11 - TV; Shari House, Vice President, BB&T Insurance Services; Pattie Dale Tye, President Large Employer Group, Segment Vice President, Humana; Angela A. Weathers, Quality Control Manager, Ford – Louisville Assembly Plant; Mary Zappone, CEO, RecoverCare

Location: The site of the future Norton Women’s Hospital and Kosair Children’s Hospital – St. Matthews

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Association; Tammy York Day, Vice President of Operations, Delta Dental of Kentucky; Judie Parks, Broker/Owner, BHHS Parks and Weisberg Realtors and Circle of Red Co-Chair; Kelley Bright, Business Development Leader, EY; Micaela Skura, Business Project Liaison, Delta Dental of Kentucky (on ladder)

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CIRCLE OF RED

Circle of Red The Circle of Red and Men Go Red for Women represents a group of women and men who have the passion, motivation, and inspiration to influence change in our community regarding women’s heart health. Circle of Red Women and Men Go Red help support the mission of Go Red For Women by making a personal financial commitment to the movement while serving as ambassadors for the American Heart Association. For more information, contact Jane Merman at 502.371.6014 or email jane.merman@heart.org. Location: Norton Suburban Hospital

Front row (l-r): Jennifer Hancock, Chief Executive Officer, Volunteers of America of Kentucky; Dr. Jessica Dowe, Medical Director, Hardin Memorial Hospital; Kim Evans, APRN, Institute for Integrative Medicine; Dr. Kendra Grubb, Cardiovascular Surgeon, University of Louisville/Jewish Hospital; April Charlton Leonardo, Chief Operating Officer, PMR Companies; Deborah Charlton, Chief Executive Officer/ President, PMR Companies, LLC and Ruby member; Kellie Sheryak, Senior Vice President, UBS Financial Services and Ruby member; Debbie Reiss, Co-owner, Carlisle of Louisville; Kristen Augspurger-Loehr, Director, Clinical Care Services, Humana; Leigh Pittman, Vice President, Brown-Forman and Circle of Red Co-Chair; Dr. Toni Ganzel, Dean of the School of Medicine, University of Louisville; Karen Shelton, survivor and volunteer; Debra Smith, Vice President, Humana Inc. and Ruby member; Gail Burke Tway, Vice President and Senior Investment Advisor, PNC Bank 2nd row (l-r): Cathy Zion, Publisher, Zion Publications; Lynn Carrie, Hospital Account Manager, Otsuka America Pharmaceutical, Inc.; Pattie Imperial, Division Manager, Fifth Third Private Bank Kentucky and Ruby member; Dr. Debra Clary, Corporate Director, Humana; Peggy Heuser,

Chief Medical Officer, Heuser Health; Judie Parks, Broker/Owner, BHHS Parks and Weisberg Realtors and Circle of Red Co-Chair; Connie Steller, Executive Territory Manager, Abbott Vascular; Tim Gornet, Manager, Rapid Prototyping Center, University of Louisville; Melissa Fraser, Partner, Chief Operating Officer, Strothman & Co.; Sara Haynes, Owner of Sassy and Chic, Etcetera Casuals; Kathy Minx, Vice President Healthcare Services, Humana and Ruby member; Apriel Williams, U.A.W., Ford; Michele Coan, GM Corporate Governance, AIG; Dr. Lori Warren, Gynecologist, Women First of Louisville; Janey Jennings, Certified Financial Planner, US Bancorp Investments, Inc.; Dr. Rebecca Booth, Gynecologist, Women First of Louisville; Shawn Parker, Retired Active Duty (Navy); Joanne Caridis, Business Development, Essential Details/Huber Decor; Carole Christian, Attorney, Wyatt, Tarrant & Combs, LLP; Missy Bonsutto, Regional Director of Operations, Caretenders/Almost Family; Sarah Ahmad-Wilson, Director, Clinical Business Solutions, Humana; Micaela Skura, Business Project Liaison, Delta Dental of Kentucky; Tammy York Day, Vice President of Operations, Delta Dental of Kentucky; Charlotte Ipsan, President, Norton Women’s Hospital and Kosair Children’s Hospital-St. Matthews and Go Red Executive Chair

Not pictured: Dana Allen, Chief Marketing Officer, Norton Healthcare; Leigh Ann Barney, EVP-Chief Operating Officer, Trilogy Health Services; Becky Beanblossom, Founder, & President of Home Instead Senior Care; Linda Danna, President & General Manager, WHAS 11- TV; Mary Dossett, Director of Advancement, Hosparus Inc.; Amanda Grubb, Commercial Relationship Manager, Forcht Bank; Leslie Hornback, Senior Wealth Strategist and Managing Partner of the Women’s Wealth Division, Lamkin Wealth Management; Katy Mackin, Civic Volunteer and Ruby member; Deb Moessner, President & GM, Kentucky Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield; Mary Raible, Civic Volunteer; Shelley Shaughnessy, Vice President, Ambulatory Services, KentuckyOne Health; Dr. Janet Smith, Cardiologist, Norton Healthcare; Sally Snavely, Civic Volunteer; Mary Ellen Stottmann, Civic Volunteer; Kim Tharp-Barrie, System Vice President Institute for Nursing and Outreach, Norton Healthcare; Tierra Kavanaugh Turner, Chief Executive Officer, TKT & Associates, Inc.; Pattie Dale Tye, President Large Employer Group, Segment Vice President, Humana and Ruby member; Lynn Von Hoene, President, Project Appraisals, Inc.; Robert Wray, Deputy Commander, US Army Accessions Support Brigade, Fort Knox, KY; Edith Mae Wright, UAW Union Member, Ford Motor Co. and Ruby member; Mary Zappone, Chief Executive Officer, RecoverCare LLC

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10 WAYS to beat heart disease BY Gina Roberts-Grey

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t’s the number one cause of death for women — but heart disease is also 80 percent preventable, according to the Mayo Clinic. How do you stop this sometimes-silent killer? Taking one heart-healthy step a day, even if it’s a small step, can greatly reduce the risk of your family developing heart disease. 1. Go nuts Reign in cholesterol by sprinkling unsalted nuts on a salad or your oatmeal. “Nuts are rich in plant sterols, natural substances that block absorption of cholesterol from the digestive tract,” says Stephen Devries, M.D., a preventive cardiologist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital. Two handfuls a day (about 2 ounces) have been shown to reduce “bad” LDL cholesterol by 10 points. Four handfuls of nuts have been shown to cut the risk of heart disease by more than 1/3. “All nuts appear to be beneficial, but almonds and walnuts have the most benefit,” Devries says. 2. Start everyone’s day the heart-healthy way Keep your family’s hearts beating strong with a heart-healthy breakfast of two slices of whole grain toast, an 8-ounce glass of orange juice, and ½ cup of low-fat yogurt. “You can reduce your cholesterol by as much as 15 to 20 percent with a healthy diet of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and lean proteins,” says Suzanne Steinbaum, M.D., cardiologist and director of Women and Heart Disease at the Heart and Vascular Institute of Lenox Hill Hospital.

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3. Stop and smell the roses Allot 10 minutes of “me time” every day, no matter how busy you are. “Enjoying life and doing something indulgent for yourself leads to a positive attitude and the likelihood you’ll make heart-smart choices like exercising and eating healthy,” says Martha Grogan, M.D., a cardiologist at the Mayo Clinic.

If coffee isn’t your thing, fill your mug with hot cocoa. The natural plant compounds in cocoa help your blood vessels function better to reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease.

4. Soak, don’t shower Send stress packing with a soothing soak in the tub tonight instead of a rushed shower. “Your blood pressure and heart rate both jump up when you’re stressed or angry. And people who experience a lot of anger and stress get more heart disease,” says A. Marc Gillinov, M.D., cardiologist and surgical director of the Center for Atrial Fibrillation at The Cleveland Clinic.

6. Make someone else feel good Go out of your way to compliment someone or ask another person about her day. “If you make someone happy, you’ll make yourself happy,” says Grogan. Happiness reduces stress hormones in your body and helps your heart recover faster after vigorous exercise or exertion, according to a study from the University of Illinois.

5. Fill up your cup No need to shy away from coffee this morning or any time of the day. A new Harvard study says there is no risk of heart disease associated with coffee, even as much as six cups a day. And as long as it’s brewed using a paper filter, boiled, or prepared in a French press, 8 ounces of coffee can help shave off a few points of cholesterol.

7. Get in touch with nature Instead of walking on a treadmill or at the mall, switch things up and walk in a park, woods, or other green space. Japanese researchers found walking in woodsy places lowers the stress hormone cortisol by almost 16 percent and blood pressure by almost 4 percent. Indoor walking yielded about one-third less benefits.

8. Grab an apple Florida State University researchers found an apple a day just might keep the doctor away by lowering LDL cholesterol by 23 percent and raising “good” HDL cholesterol by about 4 percent, according to their study. 9. Take a stand Grogan suggests standing up to perform tasks such as folding laundry, balancing the checkbook, or paying bills online. “Studies have shown that prolonged sitting or sitting for the majority of the day is equivalent to smoking as far as the risk for cardiovascular disease,” she says. On the flip side, standing helps improve circulation and the health of your arteries. 10. Stop snoring Sixty-four percent of people with high blood pressure have sleep apnea. If your hubby’s snoring kept you up last night, insist he have his blood pressure checked ASAP. Snoring is a sign of sleep apnea. TODAY’S WOMAN


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Today's Woman Heart Supplement 2014  

Local dancers are moving to the music to strengthen their hearts and encouraging the ones they love to do the same. How are you making your...

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