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DECemBER 2010

P o w e r

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n e s s

C o n n e c t i o n s

Look at

Louisville!

new things to do, people to meet

Cheery Christmas …awesome trees, glowing lights, thoughtful gifts

have a


Contents

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December 2010 articles

CLICK HERE to Read thIS special online-only article:

Wish You Were Here…

Arts Insider Must-See with Jim Brickman

By Barbara MacDonald and Bridget K. Smith

By Anita Oldham

(At the end of our regular issue)

Postcards from Our Writers

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I am Today’s Woman Because… By Lucy Pritchett

Biz View: Michelle

Jones

By Cheryl Stuck

Former Lady Bird Kristina Powell relaxes in the new arena.

18 Things By Anita Oldham

A Welcome Eulogy

page 26

By Kim Crum

Her View: Celebrating her 18th Year By Cathy Zion

It’s My Kind of Town By Gioia Patton

Louisville: Experience

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STYLE

the Best of the City in 24 Hours By Jennifer Thompson and Anita Oldham

Catch Sight of the Beautiful By Barbara MacDonald

A Trip to Wakefield-Scearce By Mary Jo Harrod

Dressing for Occasions By Wendy Anguiano

26 34 38 48

WELLNESS Monthly Muffin: The

Gingersnap Muffin with Sweet Cherries By Melissa Donald

No Pity Party By Bob Mueller

Healthy Woman: A

Donor Saved Her By Cheryl Stuck The Prudent Pig-out Guide By Sandra Gordon

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CONNECTIONS 7 Things Not to Miss This Month By jennifer thompson and Gioia Patton

The Tourists We Found

By Jennifer Thompson Wish You Were Here: My Wonderful Weekend in Bardstown, KY By Gioia Patton

Dating Dilemmas:

Gift Guide for the Men in Your Life By Caitlyn Gaynor

Go Gallery Hopping in Louisville By Deborah Kohl Kremer

Just Ask Joyce By Joyce Oglesby

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*Online issue pagination differs from printed issue

Makeover By Tiffany White

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photo by Barbara MacDonald

Wish You Were Here...

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e are having a great time. Take a new look at where you live and find a way to enjoy it in a different way. We found some great new possibilities and some historic places that we had forgotten. Make some plans. Enjoy. — Anita Oldham

On the cover: Laura Wallace looks out on the possibilities of Louisville. Read about her on page 24. Photo By Chet White. Illustration by Silvia Cabib. (Makeup by Isidro Valencia and styling by Wendy Anguiano.) 6

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Volume 20 • Number 12

PUBLISHER • Cathy S. Zion publisher@todayspublications.com

EDITOR • Anita Oldham editor@todayspublications.com

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR • Susan Allen susan@todayspublications.com

Assistant EDITOR • Tiffany White tiffany@todayspublications.com

SALES DIRECTOR • Cheryl Suhr cheryl@todayspublications.com

COntributing EDITOR • Lucy M. Pritchett

account executive • Teri Hickerson teri@todayspublications.com

SenioR page & Graphic Designer • Kathy Bolger kathyb@todayspublications.com

account executive • Helen Ratterman helen@todayspublications.com

PRODUCTION COORDINATOR • Kathy Kulwicki kathyk@todayspublications.com

SENIOR Advertising Designer • April H. Allman april@todayspublications.com

Editorial assistant • Jennifer Thompson jennifer@todayspublications.com

OFFICE MANAGER • Julie Mayberry julie@todayspublications.com

writer/photographer • Melissa Donald melissa@todayspublications.com

CIRCULATION MANAGER • W. Earl Zion

Makeup artist • Holly Oyler

INTERNS • Kristen Becht, Caitlyn Hack, Maggie Nelson

IT Support Provided by Skye Technologies www.skyetechnologies.com

For advertising information in Today’s Woman, call (502) 327-8855. Today’s Woman

is published monthly by:

Zion Publications LLC 9750 Ormsby Station Road, Suite 307, Louisville, KY 40223 Phone: (502) 327-8855 • Fax: (502) 327-8861 www.iamtodayswoman.com

Subscriptions are available by sending $18 to the above address for 12 monthly issues. Today’s Woman magazine is published monthly by Zion Publications LLC and distributed free to the people of metropolitan Louisville and Southern Indiana. Circulation 50,000 guaranteed. The opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the writers and do not necessarily reflect the position of the publisher. Today’s Woman magazine does not endorse or guarantee any advertiser’s product or service. Copyright 2010 by Zion Publications LLC with all rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited without permission from Zion Publications LLC.

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glorious of thee patio sipping ic p a d you itting on th n chips and y s o d to sen da Just htas here! We’riteas, munchineg with us. Tow e r r e a e s g h n ow e’r r r a e r r su m o e r m w a o e T u P o . y e s ly h k g in t a in ic t Pr Moun hills of r nd wish salsa, aed the Tucsoinng in the fooctitement so feay are ik id x r h e . Th k e ig t c r b w a e b e s e e h s t d r o . But bbits in the his weekend ona going hC T atalina’s ra riz Santa eeing two jackway very fastt.e Park, the A Space d a a s n t a p s S o a ir w avernsd the Pima A e with us. d can h C n a r e e n g h u h it Karc ld um, an ’ll com we’ll viasDesert Musee we hope you rbara MacDona a r B o im n t — o t S . Nex Museum

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Doggie Te legram fo r: Wrigley To: Louisv Smith ille,Kentuc ky From: San Jose, Califo rnia USA

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Dear Wrig and hope ley: I finally made the airpla you understand wh it to California! I m fur out be ne with me. PAWS Y y I couldn’t bring y iss you 34,ooo feeing under a seat fo ou would have pull ou on over. PAW t! So I am sending r hours at an elevati ed your world call S San Jose had the you these pictures on of dogs runned “Bark in the Parkbiggest dog festiv to drool Beach, wh ing on the beach? .” See the picture al in the humans c ere huge cliffs tow That was Fort Funstof the birds. Let ould hang glide off ered near the shore on Dog one who wme explain the “othand over the ocean and like over and o ould listen to me w er” dog. He was th to write in ver. PAWS And the hen I talked about e only pictures… the sand to the on last picture is wha you, e thing mis t .…YOU! W sing in all I tried OOF! of my Your edito r, Bridget

Note: Throughout this issue you will find “postcards” from our writers from their travels.

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I am a wife, mom, musician, lawyer, banker, writer, activist, scholar, teacher, and entrepreneur — indebted to yesterday’s women (and a husband who is today’s man and has enabled me to follow my heart) for the ability to make many of those choices.

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photo: Melissa Donald

by Lucy m. Pritchett

I Am Today’s Woman Because…

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Marcia Cassady 53 Founder and head of Louisville Classical Academy, a school (grades 3-12) in the classical liberal arts tradition based on goals and methods of age-old practices. Neighborhood: Prospect Household: Husband, Ballard

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n ower I feel powerful if I can honor “my highest and best use.” That is a land-planning concept that I have made my lifeplanning concept. It means taking stock of who and what I am and choosing work that honors my highest and most enduring goals to impact the lives of others. For me that is teaching.

On Style... My only claim to notable style is when I dress up in an ancient Greek tunic, a peplum, for Latin conventions. I resemble an unmade bed. Other than that, I shop at Chico’s.

On Wellness... Wellness is developing mind, body, and soul. I lay claim to a sound mind. I sing “It is well, with my soul” with hope and conviction at church. Two out of three will have to suffice during these intense years of founding the school.

On Connections... My relationships with my family, friends, colleagues, the students, and their families are essential to my well-being. At the same time I want to be in a relationship with the likes of Homer, Euclid, Isaac Newton, Abigail Adams, and Alexis de Tocqueville. It is through all of these that I’m able to sift out the small, petty, and ephemeral as I set the priorities of my version of a life well lived.

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BizView

by cheryl stuck

A Powerful WOman At Work

Michelle Jones Age: 34 Title: Creator and publisher of Consuming Louisville Website: www.consuminglouisville.com

photos: Melissa Donald

Michelle Jones considers herself the head cheerleader for Louisville. “I love the city and the

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fantastic artists and entrepreneurs and all the creative people we have here. I want to do everything I can to encourage people to help them,” she said. To that end, Michelle began a blog called Consuming Louisville. She reviews restaurants like Hillbilly Tea, a downtown cafe with a menu that notes the vegan selections. She also notes special events like a car-free happy hour with bowling at Vernon Lanes. Michelle gets her ideas from her readers, business owners, and public relations firms, plus she spends a lot of time roaming around town checking out new businesses and trying out the restaurants. Finding her audience “In the beginning, it was a slow, steady climb. For the first two years I did an average of three posts a day. I would comment on other local blogs and link to other local blogs… I tried to naturally improve my ranking. I would do features, like where to eat in Louisville, because that’s a phrase that people would google. I intentionally named the blog Consuming Louisville, so that when people were searching for things in Louisville, my blog would start coming up. I paid close attention to my server statistics and would look to see near misses, like someone was searching for this topic and they landed on Consuming Louisville even though I didn’t have exactly what they were looking for. So I would write about topics that people were searching for.” Her measure of success “Last year I was named a Louisville Connector from Leadership Louisville and it was a nice validation. As long as I’m providing value to my readers

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Her Path FIRST JOB “I grew up on a farm and my family raised tobacco. I did everything it takes: setting, cutting, and stripping tobacco. My first non-farm job was in high school. I worked for Kentucky Fried Chicken.” EDUCATION “I went to Western Kentucky University and University of Louisville and got a degree in history.” HER PLAN “I didn’t really have a plan. When I started out, I thought I wanted to be a history professor. When I was a junior, a professor I really loved ended up not getting tenure because she didn’t publish enough and that was an awakening about academia. But I really liked history so I finished and got my degree. “At the same time, I was starting to get interested in the internet. I started doing some technical editing. I would test manuscripts for technical accuracy and user- appropriate content. “In the meantime, I was blogging in 2002 before most people had even heard the word. Back then it was personal stuff. What was going on in my life, very generic stuff.” TURNING POINT “I lived in Indianapolis for a few years while my partner was doing her residency. I figured that if I was looking for more independent things to see and do, there had to be at least a few more people also looking for those things, so I started a blog in 2006, called Consuming Indy. It was moderately successful. Then my partner got a job back in Louisville, so I was very happy about that. I instantly bought the domain name for Consuming Louisville and started it in April 2007. “In Indianapolis I had to really look hard to find interesting things to write about, but in Louisville there are a million interesting things to write about, so my role has changed from researcher to curator. I try to help people wade through it all.” NOW “I spend about 20 to 25 hours a week on website maintenance, upgrading the software that runs the site, and I’m active on Twitter which adds another five hours a week. I enjoy it and it helps keep connections and relationships with people so they will send me information about things that are going on.”

and giving them interesting information, that meets my definition of success.” Making money from her blog “You can buy an ad to run on the sidebar. I set the price where it allows me to spend more time on Consuming Louisville.” Best part “People in Louisville are the best people in the world, and I’ve gotten to meet so many of them. I’ve run an event called Let Them Tweet Cake, which is for women to discuss technology. I meet so many smart, interesting people.” Worst part “I have a very simple comment policy and there are only two rules. One is don’t be mean, and two is don’t be a spammer. Like don’t drop a press release into a comment. The first one is sometimes hard to maintain, because I have to be the arbiter of what’s mean. If it’s mean stuff about me, I can deal with that easier.” Best part “Occasionally I’ll go into a business and the owner will recognize me and will say ‘Hey we had so many people come in last week and try XYZ because you wrote about it.’ That really makes me feel like I’m doing a good job.” w w w . i a m t o d a y s w o m a n . c o m

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by ANITA Oldham

re... e H e r e W u Wish Yo

ect for: Perf ie d ch to is re F e d, and tlyn over This pladc ent fooo d a n c a e g le e r, e weath e that flows s gue. There are languag ve resident’s ton, and an amazing the natiul shops, people outside my beautif the ocean right cious glass view of . I enjoyed a delih some of windowal wine paired wit’ve ever tasted. of loc shest seafood I up and take a . the fret I plan to dress vish Monte Carlo Tonigh car ride to the la actually going to! short believe that I’m casino in person I can’ tnce this famous rance. a yn or experie ir from Nice, F — Caitlin G Au Revo D e c e m b e r

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Happy Birthday to Us! We are celebrating the beginning of

our 19th year. Here are some covers that show our celebrations of the past.

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Happenings, news, celebrations, and tidbits that caught Today’s Woman’s eye for this month.

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“How do you choose the ladies for your cover?”

The truthful answer is we don’t have only one way to choose cover women. However, we are always on the lookout for women to feature on our cover or in the pages of the magazine. If you want to be in our magazine, come to our next Tuesday with Today’s Woman event on December 7 from 5:30-7 p.m. at the Sam Swope Care Center at Masonic Homes (3701 Frankfort Avenue) to take a test shot and get your name in our files. Also, you will learn how to look your best in photos — good at this time of year. Sign up on our website at www.iamtodayswoman.com or call 502.327.8855.

Attention:

Parents of Teenagers

Operation: PARENT is determined to “drive the message home” about peer pressure, underage drinking, drunk driving, and the critical need for your support of Operation: PARENT’s ongoing mission to educate, equip, encourage, and engage parents of teens and preteens. The night’s festivities will include a silent auction, drunk driving simulator rides, and an engaging speech from Sarah Panzau, who can speak about her own drunk driving accident. When  COST 

January 27, 6:30-8pm Where  North Oldham Theater $25 until January 1, then $35 Find more information at www.operationparent.org

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We had some great photo shoots around Louisville. We can’t help but show you a few more here that we weren’t able to use in our feature on page 24.

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The exhibits change at 21c but these are still there through January. This one is part of the Woman on the Run show by Tracey Snelling.

Today’s Transitions is a resource magazine that is produced by the same people who produce Today’s Woman magazine. The magazine is for those who want to learn how to live life better and a resource to find high quality care for later living. Since the new magazine is coming out on December 16, I walked to the office next door to find out some inside scoop from Today’s Transitions Editor Tiffany White. What’s going on in December issue?

“We’ll be giving readers some expert advice about how to dig their way out debt.” How about the cover? I know you have a great illustration planned.

“Yes. I am keeping details of the cover design a secret for now, but I can say that it will bring a smile to your face.” You are not really in the age demographic for the magazine (geared toward those 50 and up), so how do you stay relevant to your readers?

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“Talking to people who are in the Today’s Transitions age group — including my mother — about the issues that matter to them.” Pick up the magazine at your local Kroger or read it online at www.todaystransitions.com

Get ready to run at www.louisvilletriplecrown.com The first race — the Anthem 5K Fitness Classic — is set for February 26.

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et me say a few words about our illustrator Silvia Cabib. We have worked together for more than five years and we seem to be able to communicate with the fewest of words. Silvia, who has won many awards for her illustration and artwork, lives in Jerusalem and illustrated our cover photo, which was taken by Chet White.

Today’s Family magazine, which hits the stands on December 6, is all about “responsibility.” We met some families while we took photos for the Today’s Woman Style/Fashion section. Jared, age 3, had practiced his poses for the shoot and had several to throw to us while we were in the MegaCaverns. The next issue of Today’s Family also has information on how to enter your baby in our Beautiful Baby Contest. See www.todaysfamilymag.com for more information or to read the magazine online.

To Write Love on Her Arms This nonprofit organization promotes the message of presenting hope and finding help for people struggling with depression, addiction, self-injury, and suicide. www.TWLOHA.com

Here are a few of Silvia’s rough ideas before we reached our final cover design. Don’t you love how she can conceptualize our city from miles away?

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11 12 A company run by a woman is a company that is making changes to adjust to the times. We admire Margaret Ann Gnadinger who has been running Colonel Quick Formal Wear for 40 years. She just opened a new location in Middletown at 12414 Shelbyville Road. • You can now rent a little black dress much as you would a tuxedo. • A wedding party can have the CQ Butler make final adjustments to rented garments onsite. • You can get dry-cleaning at the new location and you can get a “free press” throughout December at their new store.

Can’t You Smell It? Fresh wreaths and special holiday plants will be available at Whitehall House & Gardens for their Holiday Plant Sale on December 4, 10 am-5 pm or December 5, 9 am-12 pm. Proceeds benefit Whitehall House & Gardens, a historic house owned and operated by the not-for-profit Historic Homes Foundation.

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Erika Galiette, a UofL freshman, plays the role of the Sugar Plum Fairy in the 15th annual performance of Clara’s Dream by the UofL School of Music’s Dance Theatre and the University Symphony Band on December 3-5. 502.852.6878 or www.uldanceacademy.com

After 50+ years of baking the iconic Derby-Pie chocolate nut pie, Kern’s Kitchen has announced the debut of the Golden Pecan pie. We got each of our writers one of these pies for a 2010 special appreciation gift from us, so ask one of them how it tasted.

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We were impressed with the writing talents of Caitlin Tegart, a young woman who was educated at the local private school, St. Francis, in 2001 and went on to Indiana University, Bloomington.

“My play Waiting for Obama ran at the Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre in New York, which I started writing on President’s Day in 2009,” says Caitlin. “The run of the show was fantastic. It was different every night! The audience would laugh or sigh in different places, which was really interesting,” she explained. “Live theater is really alive. The characters of the play are all US Presidents, so it was fascinating to see how different audiences reacted to the political leanings of each president.” Currently Caitlin is a writer for ESPN’s Pretty Good Sports Show, “and I’ve recently written for MTV. I create web videos for UCBcomedy.com and my own website www.CaitlinTegart.com .” Encouraged by Caitlin’s success, we did find out that her alma mater, St. Francis High School, is the only private school in Louisville that has 40 percent of its students on financial aid, which allows children from a variety of economic backgrounds to attend. Their annual Art Auction raises money to support these scholarships. Consider attending the St. Francis High School Art Auction “Imagine,” a fine art auction of original works by artists of local, regional, and national acclaim, on February 5 at the Gillespie. Contact 502.736.1044, www.sfhs.us

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Hollydays at Mellwood Arts and Entertainment Center

sponsored by Junior League — you can shop from more than 60 local and national vendors. December 3-5. Find information at www.juniorleaguelouisville.org

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Find handcrafted clay items on December 10, 8am-8pm or December 11, 10am-2pm at University of Louisville’s annual ceramics sale. Go to Room 136 of the Studio Arts Building at the intersection of Floyd and Warnock streets. On December 10, sale-goers can park without a pass at Papa John’s Cardinal Stadium and take the university shuttle to the Studio Arts Building. On December 11, sale-goers can park in the blue lot just south of the building. Contact Burns at 502.852.6796 or todd.burns@louisville.edu

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2010 was a great year

at Today’s Woman. Thanks for being loyal readers.


A Welcome Eulogy:

Dear Frien ds &

t n Y he nu l H lid t L T A a o a e er Family

… “We slept fu lly-dressed under two wore his in down com su lated sk forters. Jo i-pants (ou in case of hn tfitted with an ava lan a c microchip he). We re the room-t scued a po , emperatur rk roast fr e freezer a sauerk rau om nd I cooke t on top of d the roas a gas burn hats, we c By Kimberly Crum t with er. Fu lly o onsumed utfitted in our pork r remember coats oasmy legcelevated for five days, watching t by and ity the annual Christmas letter, which is sincere and well- the pecu“Ilisat on the couch, andlelight. ar pleasur of Law & in a laund Iglass e s p episode-after-episode Order, with a of water e e ci o a f lly and a d oing si x lo intentioned, but often parodied. Generally, most of us would romat with ads of laun citizens, a a gathatermy bottle of Demerol side.” in ll d g ry o o f us cheris f fellow Old rather not hear about Katy’s breast enhancement or Ethan’s SAT hing the fl Louisv ille registers, The latter u o description includes specific details, helps the r e scent ligh and the pr scores. Yet, a thoughtfully-composed Christmas letter t, toasty h “I can omise of c sat obe n theaudience e a t le writer on couch, allows your couch, visualize anthe un derweand my leg ethe entertaining for the audience and therapeutic for the episwriter. ar.” ode-after-e le v a te d fo pisode to r fivvacation audience ruined being told. e days, without ofunderstand What follows are observations, learned from my experience Law & Orthe watching dethird-person and Prefer r, with a g pronoun a bottFirst Person. The might le la ss of water be all right of Demero sending Christmas letters for the past 15 years. (For the purpose l at my sid e .” for Miss Manners, the advice columnist (e.g. “Miss Manners thinks of this essay, the annual letter will be referred to as the “holiday your husband is a lout for giving you a Swiffer Sweeper for your letter,” not to be politically correct, but because the “Twelve anniversary”). But the use of third-person pronouns distances the Days of Christmas” ends on January 6th.) writer from the reader and seems disingenuous. Readers can quickly The best funeral eulogies tell the audience stories about a discern who wrote the holiday letter, because the writer has a unique person’s life. How the deceased person befriended waiters, liked point-of-view. Consider the following example: to whistle, adopted stray dogs, baked flaky pie crusts, or prized

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a collection of Elvis memorabilia. Like the eulogy, the holiday letter tells stories about the passing year. As an example, here is part of a 2009 holiday letter, describing the aftermath of the infamous ice storm: “We slept fully-dressed under two down comforters. John wore his insulated ski-pants (outfitted with a microchip, in case of an avalanche). We rescued a pork roast from the roomtemperature freezer, and I cooked the roast with sauerkraut on top of a gas burner. Fully outfitted in coats and hats, we consumed our pork roast by candlelight. I especially remember the peculiar pleasure of doing six loads of laundry in a laundromat with a gathering of fellow Old Louisville citizens, all of us cherishing the fluorescent light, toasty heat registers, and the promise of clean underwear.”

Consider your audience. Most holiday letter audiences are a diverse mix of people we love, or have befriended us, or with whom we have business relationships. Consequently, the letter writer must try to compose a missive that will appeal to all three groups. As with most compositions, wise writers consider the audience when choosing stories to tell. For example, your loved ones already know about your hysterectomy, and the people you barely know might prefer not to be told. Even though the concept of privacy seems an antiquated value in today’s reality television world, there is still something known, in text-speak, as T.M.I. (too much information). Prefer details to generalities. “The specific is universal,” according to creative writing teachers. In the holiday epistle, the letter writer should prefer details to generalities. For example, if one wants to describe how a fractured ankle ruined a skivacation, she might say, “It ruined my vacation because my ankle throbbed and I was stuck on the couch.” Alternatively, the writer might describe the event as follows: w w w . i a m t o d a y s w o m a n . c o m

“This has been the first year of our empty nest, and Kim misses the socks and shoes that once littered the hallway.”

Many of us would guess that Kim, the mother, wrote that sentence. It is more personal and genuine to use the “I” pronoun in the holiday letter. One cautionary note: When writing in first person, it is extremely important to let the family proofread your letter and suggest edits, to ensure your words portray them accurately. Readers prefer small inconveniences to grand adventures. Readers prefer complex characters whose behavior, thoughts, and actions are imperfect. So be careful not to brag. One year, my daughters and husband critiqued the paragraph in which I wrote, under a vacation photo, “Here we are at the Ponte Vecchio, in Florence, just before touring the Accademia to see the statue of David.”

The family howled in unison, “We sound snooty!” And so I changed the letter to describe the discomforts of our foreign travel: being scolded in cafes for sitting down when we had paid the stand-up price; getting lost in our rental Fiat Multipla, a uniquely ugly car, on winding roads with inscrutable signage. The beauty of holiday letter-writing is its occasional unintended consequence. Through storytelling, the writer discovers the meaning of the events of her life. For example, I really do miss the litter of socks, shoes, and coats on the hallway floor. And during the ice storm I was comforted to discover the simple pleasures of warm heat registers and the promise of clean underwear. For this writer, 2009 was a stormy year. As I eulogized 2009, I surprised myself with a spiritual observation, “Perhaps God was pruning more than trees.”

There is serendipity in writing the annual holiday letter, which helps me recognize the importance of the past and prepares me to move forward with another year of life-unpredictable. 2 0 1 0

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Her View

by cathy zion Publisher

Celebrating Her 18th Year T

his month, Today’s Woman magazine celebrates her 19th birthday. That’s an important milestone for a young woman…her last year as a teen. As I look back on her 18th year, I’m filled with emotions similar to any parent who is in awe of watching a daughter mature. There are many poignant memories from the past year, but here are 18 of my most memorable:

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Launching our monthly Tuesday’s with Today’s Woman events, hosted by our advertisers. Topics included fashion tips and advice on everything from beauty and rejuvenation to dancing and cooking. We had fun meeting our readers and connecting them to these resources. Expanding our distribution network with the addition of the seven area Panera Bread cafes, which are a perfect fit for our readers. They’re great places to eat and meet as well! Introducing you to our eighth class of Most Admired Woman winners. They are remarkable women and amazing in their persistence and passion. The 2011 nominees will be in our March issue. Enlarging our Today’s Woman family. Kathy Kulwicki started in April as our Production Coordinator, taking the place of Mary Burton who moved to Indianapolis. Jennifer Thompson joined us in October as Editorial Assistant to try to bring some calm to our editorial efforts. Sharing the Today’s Woman story as I spoke to a number of groups. Of course, I also bragged a bit about her sister publications, Today’s Transitions and Today’s Family. Reading your notes and emails about articles that touched your life. Thanks for taking the time to share. Transforming my office into a movie studio for my three grandchildren and kids of other employees as they watched DVDs and ate cold pizza during a snow day in February. Getting Today’s Woman online so that everyone with internet access can read through the magazine, even during the times when our distribution racks go empty. Celebrating with our staff when we won nine editorial excellence awards from the Society of Professional Journalists. Hearing that Grant Oldham, our editor’s youngest child, was celebrating his 13th birthday and rocked by the realization that Grant was born 9 months after I bought Today’s Woman.

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Rejoicing in tallying the nearly 35,000 votes received for sister publication Today’s Family’s Beautiful Baby Contest. Breathing the fresh air as the staff devoted one day to “clean the office day.” Countless bags of trash were pitched, the refrigerator scrubbed, and desktops re-discovered! Watching the 100 Wise Women leadership mentoring series grow to sell-out crowds. Launched in 2007 by Today’s Woman in partnership with Leadership Louisville, the quarterly break­fasts help young and seasoned women to visualize and realize their goals. Fixing lunch for the Women for Habitat house built this year for the Lonet Peavy family. Each staff member made a dish, and we delivered and served it to the women volunteers on a sweltering day in August. Severing my Achilles tendon while delivering magazines on Oaks Day and hoping that all the surgeons were not at the track. Luckily for me, Dr. Madhu Yakkanti was not and got me back on my feet. He’s a wonderful doctor and a caring person. Celebrating with Senior Advertising Designer April Allman on her three-year cancer-free check-up. Watching our network of new “friends” grow on our Facebook pages. Join us at www.Facebook.com/ todayswoman Just learning that sister publication Today’s Transitions won three awards, including second in General Excellence, in the annual competition of the North American Mature Publishers Association. Over 35 publications from across the country competed.

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r the night. Lick Resort foens, and ch en Fr t a etaway iful gard n We’re on a ge mineral springs, beauttennis, golf, concerts, a th s s, e op ha lov t sh d I y . lt You’ ants, specia of this resort architecture ainment center, restauron a mid-afternoon e rt ed te decid some chang indoor en rvice spa. We th re spending and a full-se e Power Plant Bar befofollowed by a mineral ba cocktail at th and specialty shops, t desserts at the casino massage. Ahhh! and indulgen and Swedishwith a little wine, steak, rn style rockers lining e. in old Southe a little Woodford Reserv n. candlelight Dinner was bykhouse. Then, we lingered bourbo pping ea iate with the lking and si at the 1875 Sth of the resort while ta would’ve seemed appropr sort. The rc the front po uthern setting, a cigar West Baden Springs Re s weekend Given the So y home, we stopped at nt. Hey, let’s do a girl ed magnifice On our wa — Brenda Re this resort is restoration of ents soon! tm with spa trea

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As I leaf through the pages of her past, I revel at her future, trusting that Today’s Woman magazine’s 19th year will be even more memorable with the support of you, our readers and advertisers. w w w . i a m t o d a y s w o m a n . c o m

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W o m e n ’ s P o w e r B u z z


It’s My Kind

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By Gioia Patton photo by chet white

I

t was just a few days away from the 2010 Kentucky Derby that Laura Wallace received an urgent message to contact a Louisville hotel salesperson, who’d come across an ad about Wallace’s business, City Concierge Louisville: “My clients have just arrived and the 21 tickets for Millionaires Row for Derby supposedly secured by a broker do not exist!’ blurted the stressed-out saleswoman. ‘Can you help?” Welcome to the world of Laura Wallace, who, exactly one year ago this month, founded City Concierge Louisville, located at 205 South Shelby Street (at East Market street — part of the buildings that used to house the Wayside Christian Mission.) “It was like pulling the ultimate hat trick when I secured those 21 tickets on Millionaire’s Row through my own terrific broker,” Laura recalls, speaking by phone. However, because the tickets were not positioned together, the millionaires “who were very inflexible, turned them down,” Laura Laura is wearing: Kenneth Cole red coat, $325; Charter says with a groan. Club scarf, $38. All available at Macy’s Oxmoor Center. Laura’s first Louisville job after I’ve had customers tell me that hands down I ‘made their vacation!’ she relocated here 20 years ago was — Laura Wallace of City Concierge Louisville with the Rudyard Kipling restaurant and bar. She came here from San It was Laura’s ‘let me tell you about Louisville!’ informative Francisco on the heels of having spent two weeks in Louisville. interactions with tourists during those years that led to her The Rudyard Kipling is where Laura was first introduced to the eventual career as a concierge. history of Louisville by way of the restaurant’s owners and also “Whenever I encountered a visitor to Louisville I would one of its regular customers, Burrell Famsley, whose late father, make recommendations on what they should do while in Charles Famsley, was mayor of Louisville from 1948-1953. town, based on their personality and taste, often writing down “I was inquisitive about Louisville, always wanting to learn recommendations on whatever scrap of paper was handy. On more about its history, people, arts, etc.,” Laura mentions. occasion, I even personally showed them around. Eventually, Over the next 16 years, Laura’s plethora of employment postpeople started saying that I should become a tour guide for Rudyard Kipling included: retail manager at the mall, pastry the city,” she explains. “And after a friend of mine, who was a chef at Ruth Chris Steakhouse, giveadogabone Bakery, and concierge at the Brown Hotel, heard about a job opening, I ended Omar’s Gyro. 24 D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 0 t o d a y ’ s w o m a n


up there as a concierge in early 2007. Once there, I reorganized everything and just fell in love with being a concierge. Although…16 months later, on December 17, 2008 (which was also her birthday), the day I thought I’d be getting a raise, I was fired instead.” Flash forward to the weeks leading up to the 2009 Kentucky Derby. Some of Laura’s former clients found her. Amazingly, it wasn’t just some of Laura’s former clients who reached out to her the spring of 2009 (i.e. ‘Where do I find a hat to go with this $10,000 Derby dress?’ or ‘I need tickets to this high profile party!’) but also the Brown Hotel concierge service itself. And although Laura ended up declining the Brown Hotel’s requests for help — “they wouldn’t meet my price” — soon afterwards she said to herself ‘I could probably make a living at being a concierge…plus, I really miss doing this.’ When City Concierge Louisville opened its doors exactly one year from the time she’d been fired, it had come together, Laura remarks with a laugh “on a shoe-string budget.” As to her favorite local tourist attractions, she enthuses: “First of all the Belle of Louisville, because there’s no other paddleboat like it in the country that has that kind of history. It even has a Bluegrass music cruise on Sundays. And the Conrad-Caldwell House located in Old Louisville. I love that place soooo much!” she declares. “It’s the most amazing example of Southern Victorian architecture. You cannot help but be wowed. Also, the 21c Hotel…especially the art, which I don’t think people would expect to find there. And finally, the Old Louisville neighborhood. I mean — 48 blocks of continuous Victorian houses!” When asked her #1 business strength, Laura laughs, then wisecracks: “I’m OCD (Obsessive Compulsive ) I just keep going and going and going until I find solutions to my clients’ requests.”

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rs u o h 4 n2 i y t i c the f o t s be e h t g cin n e i r e p Ex by Jennifer thompson and Anita Oldham photos by Chet White Styling by Wendy Anguiano Makeup by Isidro Valencia

Only have one day to pick up the Louisville vibe? Not a problem. These Louisville area natives will lead you through four of the city’s hot spots that will keep you energetic and engaged even in the dead of winter. Morning at 21C MUSEUM HOTEL Wake up bright and early (or bright and late — checkout isn’t until 11a.m.) at Louisville’s 21c Museum Hotel, where you can walk downstairs from your luxury room straight into a museum full of modern art. Karen Fuller, director of sales at 21c, says: “There is a great energy here. The museum, restaurant, and bar are always buzzing with locals and tourists, and the art here leads to some very interesting conversations. Many of our exhibitions are interactive, like Text Rain in front of the elevator. As you walk by, people are always laughing and taking pictures. People don’t realize they even like contemporary art until they visit.” Her husband Tim agrees: “It’s all about the art and the uniqueness of the place. You may think you’re in Manhattan instead of Louisville.” Karen and Tim also enjoy the art scene beyond 21c, including Museum Row on Main Street, the NuLu District along East Market, and the Highlands and Crescent Hill areas. 26

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TIM IS WEARING: Alfani suit separates jacket, $165; Alfani suit separates pants, $85; Alfani dress shirt, $25; Calvin Klein tie, $30; Alfani belt, $20; Bostonian men’s dress shoe, $60, all from Macy’s, Oxmoor Mall. w w w . i a m t o d a y s w o m a n . c o m

KAREN IS WEARING: Esley backless dress, $75; bracelet, $18; ring, $16; DbDk shoes, $35; earrings, $20, all from Apricot Lane, 1301 Herr Lane, Suite 170. 2 0 1 0

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urs 24 ho in y cit f the After lunch at 21c’s Proof on Main restaurant, you est o b e h gt iencin can travel just a few blocks down Main Street to the Exper new KFC Yum! Center, the future site of countless

1 p.m. Cheer Loud at the Game

events and concerts and, of course, UofL basketball games. Mindy Reed says that she and her husband Bobby are “such big fans, it’s gross,” and so their perfect Louisville afternoon would certainly involve watching the Cards light up the new scoreboard. Mindy also shares some other favorite family

spots: “The Louisville Science Center is family fun meets learning, and the Louisville Zoo is very well maintained and beautiful! Incredible Dave’s is also a place where parents and kids can let their hair down.” And when baby Skylar goes to sleep: “Every time I have family and friends visit, we go to Fourth Street Live. It reminds me of New York with all the lights and different types of people. You can eat, drink, dance, or catch a show at the Improv.”

BOBBY IS WEARING: Buffalo David Bitton jeans, $79; INC plaid shirt, $30, from Macy’s; Crable grey UofL sweater vest $62, from Fan Outfitters, 4600 Shelbyville Road, Suite 207. SKYLAR IS WEARING: Little King baby UofL outfit, $30; pom-poms, $3.99 each, hairband, $14.99; booties, $8, all from Fan Outfitters.

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MINDY IS WEARING: Hoop earrings, $?; necklace, $75; Alpaca In Style ruffle cardigan sweater, $225; Majestic Paris turtleneck, $110; Trina Turk leggings, $198, all from Rodeo Drive, 2212c Holiday Manor Center. t o d a y ’ s

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>> 5 p.m. Christmas Lights

Once the sun has set, you’ll see Christmas lights dotting many homes and storefronts, but you will see many more lights as you travel under the city to the Mega Cavern’s Lights Under Louisville display now through January 2. Amber Taylor, her husband Lorenzo, and their children Alexis and Jared got a sneak peak at the 17-mile light spectacle.

Amber and Lorenzo believe that Louisville has a very warm environment for families in addition to great historic landmarks, art festivals, and sports events. They say the Louisville Science Museum and IMAX are a definite “must-see” because “it will keep parents and children entertained for hours with plenty of hands-on activities.”

ALEXIS IS WEARING: Imperial Star jeans, $25; Epic Threads top, $32; Epic Threads crop sweater, $20, from Macy’s. JARED IS WEARING: Hilfiger corduroy pants, $37; Hilfiger shirt with tie, $39; Greend 9 sweater vest, $18, from Macy’s.

AMBER IS WEARING: Hanii Y fur jacket, $879; A’Nue Ligne tank, $69; Jennifer Ouellette hairband, $85; earrings, $119, from Peacock Boutique, 2828 Frankfort Avenue; Joe’s Jeans, $158, from Macy’s.

LORENZO IS WEARING: Roundtree & Yorke khaki pants, $45; Daniel Cremieux belt, $42; Perry Ellis grey shirt, $80; Vertical Bert Comstock vest, $200, from Dillard’s, Mall St. Matthews.

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ours h 4 2 y in t i c e of th t s e b the g n i ienc Exper 8 p.m. AN Elegant Evening (minus dancing on the bar)

Former Lady Bird Kristina Powell takes us off-court in the KFC Yum! Center to the Evan Williams Bourbon Bar, where lower level Club Seat Holders enjoy a different kind of team spirit in the red lights and plush seating of the club. Another evening activity that Kristina enjoys is the Kentucky Center for the Arts “because I love the shows and it is usually a time when my husband and I have a date night just for us.” Kristina loves Louisville tourism because “there is something to satisfy everyone’s interests. We have sports, horse racing, Broadway plays, movie theaters, and lots of great places to dine.” KRISTINA IS WEARING: Madison Marcus dress, $270; By the Stones earrings, $80; Alexis Bittar lucite cuffs, $130/$130/$65; Alexis Bittar necklace, $428, from the Dressing Room, 2836 Frankfort Avenue; Gianni Bini shoes, $79, from Dillard’s.

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rs 4 hou 2 n i ity the c f o t es the b g n i c ien Exper 11 p.m. You Can Bet On It As the rest of Louisville drifts to sleep, across the river the Horseshoe Casino is open 24/7 offering games, food, and entertainment to round out our 24 hours in Louisville. Friends Brandon Bonner, Kurshanna Cox, and Allie Miller try their hand at roulette under the encouraging eye of pit boss Wade Spegal. “Horseshoe has a great atmosphere, great dining, and great entertainment,” Brandon says. “Even if you don’t play, it’s a quick getaway from Louisville — a hidden treasure with great dining at Paula Dean’s buffet.” Another place these ladies like to visit is Churchill Downs. “It’s a great place to spend time with friends,” Kurshanna says, “especially during night racing season.” Allie adds, “I love the atmosphere and the horses at Churchill Downs. I grew up riding, and it makes me feel close to home.”

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ALLIE IS WEARING: Shiny tank dress, $130; faux fur jacket, $210; San Francisco heel, $375; Summer Eliason wood necklace, $84; Summer Eliason hunter drop earrings, $80, from Blink, 3706 Lexington Road.

BRANDON IS WEARING: Look leggings, $28; Costa Blanca top, $44; Akzialani loop vest, $68; bangle bracelets, $16; gold earrings, $13; silver cuff, $11, from Chartreuse, 1301 Herr Lane, Suite 152; Impulse shoes, $100, from Macy’s.

KURSHANNA IS WEARING: Covet shirt dress, $220; San Diego Hat Co. fur collar, $42; Grace Hats hunting cap, $36; W&M earrings, $69; Wooden Ship gloves, $28, from Croquis, 1201 Herr Lane, Suite 140; Impulse boots, $159, from Macy’s. 2 0 1 0

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Story & photos By Barbara MacDonald

Catch Sight Some days I sit here at my computer, Word document open and ready to go, and can’t think of a thing to write. Well, I suppose that isn’t true. I can think of plenty to write, but I don’t because that little voice in my head says it isn’t creative enough. I want to inspire. I want my words to ring true. I want to make a difference.

of the

Beautiful

So, I sit. And write a word, then delete it. Write a phrase and delete that. Write a few sentences, then, yes, delete those, too. And I’m still sitting there looking at a blank page. I recently Googled ‘how to boost creativity’ and something interesting popped up — the biggest killer of creativity is perfectionism. Creativity exists in all of us, but along the way many of us unlearn how to be creative because we’ve learned instead that things should be one way. When coloring in grade school we learn that the sky should be blue. The sun should be yellow, and the grass should be green. That begins a lifetime of learning what things should be. When we try to be creative, we’re often hampered by all those shoulds floating around. For many of us that means we either work too long and too hard trying to make it ‘perfect,’ or we are stopped in our tracks, paralyzed by the fear of not knowing how to do it perfectly. I was pondering this a few weeks ago as I arrived at the dePaul School just off Bardstown Road. I was there to take photographs for a slide show for the school’s annual fund-raising auction dinner. In the art room, the students were painting images of the school and its mascot when I noticed a sign on the wall. It read: “Make mistakes, then make my mistakes into art.” I’ve decided to make that a mantra.

The dePaul lesson, Make mistakes, then make my mistakes into art.

Creativity Every Day — 365-Day Photography Project The first time I picked up a camera, I was eight or nine years old and it was one of those Vivatar models that took 110mm film and used flashcubes. Remember those? There was a smell associated with those cubes when they fired, sort of like a just-struck match. I began taking pictures of my Barbie dolls. I’d dress them up, grab some flowers from the garden, and pretend they were my models. In high school, I got my first 34

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Growing up in Hawaii, when I wasn’t at the photo lab, I was at this beach on the north shore of O’ahu. I took this photo for a project when I was a sophomore in high school.

35mm single lens reflex camera and was smitten. I carried it everywhere with me and always had extra film on hand. On weekends, you could find me at the photo hobby shop at Pearl Harbor. For about $2 I could spend the day developing film and printing it in the darkroom. Over the years photography has been my passion, my hobby, and sometimes a source of income. But lately, I was feeling sort of stagnant. I wanted to be more creative, but didn’t know how. I wanted to grow as an artist and find the confidence to share my more artistic work with others. But I was afraid. ‘What if it isn’t good enough?’ I’d ask myself. What if no one likes it? What if, what if, what if. Through a website run by a photographer who offers online courses, and dedicated to children’s portrait photographers (www.ilovephotography.com), I stumbled on an interesting assignment: the 365-Day Photography Project. Members who are just starting out and have not yet qualified through the site for professional status are encouraged to take a photograph every day for an entire year, and post those photos daily at the site for peer review. Some also post them on personal blogs or Facebook pages. Each week, a different theme is announced — everything from Lines, to Trees, to Backlighting, to One Object Seven Different Ways. In August, I decided to start this project and post my work on Facebook. The results have been inspiring. It’s been interesting to read comments from longtime friends who have supported my passion over the years as well as those

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Catch Sight from new friends who have never really seen my work. Taking pictures every day forces you to get past that whole perfection thing because you have to shoot something…you can’t wait for the perfect setting. It’s liberating when you can get perfection out of the way to make room for creativity.

of the

Beautiful One week,the challenge was to shoot “Curly Things” and I really struggled finding seven images for that category. I found these roses growing in a park near Baptist Milestone in St. Matthews and loved how the petals curled under. Water droplets also create a cool effect.

For the theme ‘Things I Love,” I took this image of my sons, Joey and Noah.

While lounging near a pond along Harrod’s Creek one late summer day, this butterfly appeared. I wasn’t following a theme that week.

This week’s theme was lines. Even though it was taken on a summer day the image invokes a feeling of Fall.

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After reading an article about creating starbursts around lights, I took this image of downtown and the KFC Yum! Arena, before the signage was in place.

Clear the Clutter Another thing that stands in the way of creativity for many of us is clutter. I recently met a local woman who is taking her passion and turning it into a business. Her passion is organizing other people’s stuff. Besides homes, closets, and offices, she is also helping people organize their storage space. I met Lorese Harper of Neat Nest Clutter Clearing & Organizing at the new CITYspace on Main in downtown Louisville. Rather than just shoving boxes of your stuff into a storage space, Lorese will help you get rid of the stuff you’re never going to want or need again, while making the things you will go looking for much easier to find. (Neat Nest LLC., 502.548.5537 or neatnestorganizing@gmail.com) Create Something New As this year comes to a close and we look towards a new year with new beginnings, let’s try to let go of those things that hold us back. Make room for something new. Create the life you want. Barbara MacDonald is a Louisvillebased writer and photographer. She lives downtown with her husband, twin sons, three cats, and two hermit crabs. She’d love to hear from you. Find her on Facebook or send her a note at Barbara@todayspublications.com

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A Trip to

Wakefield-Scearce Where can you go to see 30-inch tall elves with their rolling pins, baking holiday treats? Try the WakefieldScearce Galleries in Shelbyville.

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Galleries

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t Christmastime,

An elegant 18-foot-tall tree provides a stunning focal point for the main gallery’s first floor. w w w . i a m t o d a y s w o m a n . c o m

By Mary Jo Harrod Photos by James Moses

the Wakefield-Scearce Galleries creates an elegant holiday atmosphere among their collection of quality antiques. The store has been decorating for Christmas for more than 40 years. What started in a small room in the gallery has grown to encompass the entire multiroomed structure. For many families, their holiday tradition includes a trip to the galleries to admire the store’s newest holiday decorations. “This is like a grand opening,” explains Patti Wilson, the store’s visual coordinator. “Tables are rearranged, and the rooms are all changed. What may have been set up like a bedroom may now be a dining room. It is a process and is not done haphazardly. Everything is organized, and we help each other with the decorating.” The entire gallery’s inventory is either shifted or removed at the beginning of August to make way for new ideas and recently acquired inventory. By the middle of October, it is actually beginning to look like Christmas at the store.  Wilson, who has a degree in interior design from the University of Kentucky, and has been with the store for 25 years, says, “Each year, all new themes and decorations appear. The one traditional thing that reappears each year is the 18foot, floor-to-ceiling tree in the main gallery area. The actual decorations do change a little each year.” It takes an all-out team effort to get the job done, including cleaning silver, the facility, repairs, and fresh, new colors for the room settings. Moving furniture, sewing drapery, and upholstery work are 2 0 1 0

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>> A Trip toWakefield-Scearce Galleries

In the Chocolate Room, 30-inch elves bake holiday treats.

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also integral parts in getting the galleries prepared. The floral designer on staff visualizes and directs several employees to execute the themes for decorating the trees. All of the rooms have some holiday decorations — some as simple as garlands, while others are more elaborate. The Boehm Room is filled with Christmas scenes of Byers’ Choice figurines, made in the United States and each with an individually handcrafted face. The room is fashioned in a dinner-party atmosphere with centerpieces of tall goblets filled with glittering pine cones. Table runners are made of leaf-shaped green velvet. In the Shrimp Room, the theme is a dressy, frosted woodland look. Bees dominate the Yellow Room with bejeweled ornaments decorated with bees in an urn filled with curly willow branches and gold angel hair. The room also features black lacquered tables and screens. A strictly racehorse theme featuring a decorated tree, Derby hats, framed horse prints, and crystal etched with racing scenes highlights the Downs room. For something completely different, visit the Chocolate Room with its brown walls, a decorated tree and several 30-inch elves dressed in lime green, red, and white, baking holiday treats. The Williamsburg Room with its Concord Red walls features a surprise for this season — a prelit tree that folds flat in the front and back but opens wide like a regular tree. The concept saves space and gives the appearance of a traditional tree. Here also are 4-foot tall resin angels and nativity scenes placed atop planters. The crystal chandelier t o d a y ’ s

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and fireplace add to the elegance of the room. This year the Christmas Shop has been moved to a permanent location in the Poynter Wing by the Silver Shop and features whimsical items such as upsidedown trees and holiday-themed curtains. In the courtyard, where boys used to court girls from the school in the formerly open and grassy area, there are sparkling lights among the tables and chairs. All of the galleries’ decorations are sure to evoke the holiday spirit. “The fun part is overhearing our customers’ conversations,” explains Wilson. “One comment from years ago in particular sticks in my mind. Someone asked, ‘Do you think they planned it this way for it all to coordinate or did it just happen by accident?’ Yes, someone really said that!” Each year, the Christmas open house begins on the Wednesday after Election Day in November. Guests are treated to fruitcake and punch while listening to a piano player. Shelbyville is a great small town with a lot of shopping opportunities and is only a short drive from either Louisville or Lexington. Wakefield-Scearce Galleries has loads of parking around the building and on the street. Plan to spend the day

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The Chicken Coop Room has snowmen as the theme.

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akefield-Scearce Galleries, which has been in business for the past 63 years, is still owned within the Scearce family. Co-founder, Mark Scearce’s daughters now own the business.  A son-in-law, W. Patrick Burnett, is the president of the company and has been part of the business for more than 30 years. Mr. Scearce’s grandson, Matthew Burnett, has been part of the business for several years. Listed on the National Register of Historic Landmarks, part of the building began as a home and later became the Science Hill School in 1825, and was founded by Julia Hieronymus Tevis, whose husband, John, was a Methodist minister from Virginia. According to the history of the site, Julia’s vision was a girls’ school that taught more than the traditional gentlelady’s education of reading, writing, and the social graces; she also endeavored to teach her students the sciences, something unheard of in those times. The school closed in 1939. w w w . i a m t o d a y s w o m a n . c o m

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>>A Trip to

Wakefield-Scearce Galleries

when you go. Under one roof there are many different opportunities to shop: the New Silver Shop; Linen Press and gift shop; Country Lady, offering fine ladies’ clothing; and W. Cromwell, selling fine men’s clothing. Also, the Science Hill Inn serves lunch from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. daily, except on Mondays. Reservations are suggested, especially this time of year, by calling 502.633.2825.

In the Shrimp Room, the theme is a dressy frosted woodland.

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AN ADVERTISING SECTION PRESENTED BY

Holiday SMART

Styles December 2010 December 2010

Holiday

Styles

SMART


y a Styles d i l o H

SMART

Les Filles Boutique

Artisan Jewelry • Handbags • Accessories Inspired by art shows across the country, Les Filles exhibits a wide variety of local as well as national artists specializing in women’s accessories. Designs pictured are by the following artists: Cathy Wade, Cherry & Violet, and Tickled Pink. Other local talent includes: Cindy Borders, Daisylee, Posh Ponytails, Phyllis Minnery, Silver Dragons, by Kelli, Lavana Shurtliff, and more. Westport Village 1301 Herr Ln., Ste. 160 502.618.4888 www.lesfillesboutique.com

A Mother’s Touch Personalized Jewelry Large selection of Christmas items — Unique, personalized, and custom made. Specializing in Mother’s, Grandmother’s, Children’s, Spirit and Themed jewelry, including a large selection of charms. Offering corporate shopping and fundraisers; party room available for parties for all ages or group. Free engraving on select items. 502.253.9477 12312 B Shelbyville Road www.amotherstouchjewelry.com

HollyCosmetics.com A Taste of Kentucky The new 2011 Kentucky Derby Poster by internationally known equine artist Lesley Humphrey is a bold and striking interpretation of the pageantry of the Run for the Roses. Downtown in the Aegon Center 400 West Market Facing 4th St. 502.566.4554 Mall St. Matthews by the Women’s Dillard’s 502.895.2733

Your Image Enhancement Resource

Offering: • Skin Care Products Including: ~ Wrinkle Relaxing Complex ($39) ~ Self-Tanning Creme • Mineral Makeup • Eyebrow Products, and more! Holly’s makeup artistry has been featured on many Today’s Woman magazine covers. You can reach Holly at hollyoyler@me.com Order online or call 502.423.1233 or 800.222.3964

Two Chicks and Company Jewelry & Gifts Shop Two Chicks and Company for the best selection of holiday gifts! We make “gift-giving” unique, easy and fun! Personalize your gifts with a cute monogram! Give the perfect present with the perfect presentation with our FREE gift wrapping!

Two Chicks and Company – your one-stop shopping experience for the Holidays. 12121 Shelbyville Road • Louisville, KY 502.254.0400 • www.twochicksandcompany.com

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ALSO, check out lots of great tips, advice, and how-to’s from Holly.


Wild Strawberry Hair & Nail Studio We believe in real BEAUTY! True BEAUTY is timeless and you don’t have to follow trends to be and feel beautiful. Make an appointment to discover new ways to look and feel beautiful.

Mention this ad and receive:

Style Calendar December 4, 10am-6pm

A Mother’s Touch Jewelry

Open House

• $25 off Hair & Skin Service • $10 off Nail Service

502.253.9477

104 Bauer Avenue • St. Matthews 502.897.9453 www.wildstrawberrystudio.com

December 11 – All Day

Les Filles Boutique Sister Symbols Jewelry Trunk Show

502.618.4888

The Clothes Boutique UPSCALE RETAIL! Nina Leonard Red Knit Dress – $15.00. Wide Black Patent Belt – $9.00. Steve Madden Zebra Print Handbag – $30.00. Consign and earn cash. Shop consignment and save cash. Smart. VERY Smart! 6502 W. Hwy 22 • Crestwood, KY 502.241.9438 www.theclothesboutique.com

December 1-31

Two Chicks and Company Visit Two Chicks and Company to receive Holiday coupons and weekly specials good throughout December, or go to www.twochicksandcompany.com for printable coupons.

December 1-24

Always Beautiful December Special $25 off all Procedures.

502.693.2029 December 1-31

TotalMed Spa

15% off Medically Guided Weight Loss program. Call for appointment.

Louisville’s Luxuries New by Louisville’s Luxuries Jewelry are fabulous custom designed fleur de lis and equestrian pieces. Discover a one-of-a-kind artisan creation, perfect for that special Louisville lady who has it all! Retail locations: www.louisvillesluxuries.com

502.895.2120 December 1-24

Wild Strawberry

Purchase a $100 Gift Certificate and receive $25 for Yourself!

502.897.9453 December 1-31

Beyond Beauty Eyelash Extensions Today’s Woman $20 Discount

Beyond Beauty Eyelash Extensions

502.235.6878

Your Lashes Can Look Stunning This Holiday Season …

December 1-24

Eyelash Extensions • Eyelash Perming • Eyelash Tinting • • •

Lengthens and Thickens Lasts Several Weeks or More – Touch-ups required after 4 weeks. Can be worn for extended periods until your own lash completes its life cycle. Pharmaceutical grade Adhesive – DOES NOT CAUSE LASH LOSS.

We are conveniently located, call: 502.235.6878 —ADVERTISEMENT—

A Taste of Kentucky

Call or check our website for tastings at all 3 locations.

502.244.3355

www.atasteofkentucky.com

December 1-31

Clater Jewelers Diamond Center

Special Discounts, PLUS register to win a $100.00 gift certificate.

502.426.0077


y a Styles d i l o H

SMART

Sophie’s Fine Yarn Shoppe Visit, browse, and let us assist you with all your knitting and crocheting needs.

Our shop is conveniently located in the Stonefield Square Shopping Center next to the Fresh Market. Open 7 days with a wide selection of yarn and accessories. 10482 Shelbyville Rd. Louisville, KY 502.244.4927 sophiesfineyarn.com

John Seelye Furs Offers a wide variety of the latest fashions & styles of fine furs and accessories. Purchase from our showroom, or have your fur custom designed. John Seelye Furs provides cold storage, cleaning, restyling and repair on premises. A family business locally owned and operated for 48 years.

9800 Shelbyville Road #111 Louisville, KY 40223 502.423.8555 Fri. & Sat., Dec. 17 & 18 50% off all regular priced merchandise.

Classes available.

Korrect Optical

Always Beautiful Permanent Makeup

You’ll outshine the holiday lights in a pair of incredible Bulgari designer sun wear. Choose from a great selection of styles, shapes, colors and materials; many adorned with dramatic jewels and gems for that unique, one-of-a-kind look that expresses your personality. A great gift to give yourself, or someone else!

What could be better than waking up in the morning knowing you look as beautiful as you did before you closed your eyes? With permanent makeup you look fabulous no matter what time it is or what you’re doing.

4036 Dutchmans Lane 4747 Dixie Highway 502.895.2020 www.korrect.com

Makes a Great Gift! Eyeliner • Eyebrows • Lips • Scar Correction • Brow & Lash Tinting

Gloria Bogert, MPS 502.693.2029 • www.gloriabogert.com

Clater Jewelers Diamond Center Since 1949 This Holiday Season let us be your one-stop-shop for everyone on your list. There is always something sparkling at Clater Jewelers. Visit our website for our exclusive collections and a full list of services. Now located Westport Village 1201 Herr Lane 502.426.0077 www.claterjewelers.com

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y a Styles d i l o H

SMART Mine & Yours Consignment Boutique

&

TotalMed Spa

This year, let us help you KEEP your New Year’s Resolution! Lose 1/2 to 2 lbs a day, lose from your CORE, reset your metabolism and maintain the loss!

Mine & Yours 2 Everything Fleur de lis It’s a Louisville Thing ...

You Wouldn’t Understand

t-shirts and hoodies make the perfect fun Christmas gift! Designed by Mine & Yours and only sold here!

Davis Jewelers Knotty or Nice Your Choice $99

The knot – Is a sterling silver love knot pendant with a diamond cluster containing 9 diamonds weighing 1/10ctw. TotalMed Spa has a full menu of spa services, including injectables/fillers! We offer Botox® and Dysport® at the lowest prices in Kentuckiana. TotalMed Spa

106½ Fairfax Ave., St. Matthews & Mall St. Matthews • 502.891.0246 www.mineandyoursconsignment.com Be our friend on Facebook!

Now offering a revolutionary new weight loss program!

Totally for you! 4900 Shelbyville Road 502.895.2120

Angel – Sterling silver and diamond angel pendant holding a heart. 9901 Forest Green Blvd. Louisville, KY 502.212.0420 www.davisjewelers.com

Faceworks

We are dedicated to making a difference in your complexion. Dermaplaning is the latest trend in skin renewal with instant results in smoothness and clarity, all in 30 minutes. Join us over the holidays and celebrate a refreshing new look. Try it for the first time for just $25. Two convenient Faceworks locations: 137 St. Matthews Avenue 502.896.2898 2011 Lake Point Way 502.253.1898 www.faceworks.com

Expressions ... Gifts & Decor

Style Calendar December 1-31

Faceworks Polish up your complexion!

Fifty-minute massage just $39 with any facial. FREE lash tint with a first-time brow wax. Limited time offers ... call 502.896.2898 December 1-24

Expressions ... Gifts & Decor Take 25% off of any one item. 812.923.GIFT (923.4438) December 1-31

RELAX & SHOP... perfect gifts for all occasions.

Sophie’s Fine Yarn Shoppe

Ladies, take the stress out of your holiday shopping! Enjoy the best selection of unique gifts, home décor items and custom florals, while experiencing Azure Skin & Wellness Centre next door. Get your shopping, decorations, gift cards, facials, massages, laser services and more, plus FREE GIFT WRAPPING all in one stop!

Donate 8” knit or crochet squares & infant toiletry items for Infant Resource Project.

502.244.4927 December 1-24

409 LaFollette Station, Floyds Knobs, IN (off I-64, Exit 119, 10 min. from Lou.) 812.923.GIFT • www.ExpressionsGiftsandDecor.com —ADVERTISEMENT—

Mine & Yours Consignment & Boutique $5 off with any purchase of $20 or more. 502.891.0246 Exp. 12/24/10


In Your Closet

Dressing for

Occasions

By Wendy Anguiano Photos by Melissa Donald

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You find you have been invited to a party that requires a certain type of dress. You stand confused because you are not sure what that dress attire is exactly. “Help!” Most of us have encountered this situation. Not sure what to wear and wish there were a “fashion hotline” to call and get expert advice. Here we are. Formal Attire/Black Tie: Men wear tuxedos and women wear cocktail, long dresses or dressy evening separates. Black Tie Optional: This is more for men than for women. It gives men the option of wearing a tuxedo or a dark suit and tie. Women wear cocktail, long dresses or dressy evening separates. Creative Black Tie: This gives you the option for inserting trendy interpretations into your formal wear. Semi-Formal/After Five: Tuxedos are not required, nor are long dresses. Evening semiformals would require a dark suit for him and

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a cocktail dress for her. Daytime semi-formals suggest a suit for him and a dressy short dress or suit for her. Business Formal: For men, this is the same as semi-formal. For women, business formal suggests a woman opt for more tailored dressy suits and dresses, nothing slinky or sexy. Cocktail attire: Dark suits for him and short, elegant dresses for her. Informal: Depending upon the event, this could require the same attire as semi-formal, especially when associated with a wedding or special event. However, if it is a dinner party at someone’s home, it could mean anything from the semi-formal to jeans and a nice top. Dressy Casual: This is the dressed-up version of casual. For him, it could be trousers

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and a sport coat. For her, a dressy pants look. Jeans, shorts, t-shirts, and sneakers are not appropriate for dressy casual. Casual: Typically, this means anything goes. After the party: After the party is over, most women will not want to wear that dress again, especially if it is a formal or cocktail dress. Some options for these dresses are to sell them at a consignment store, exchange them with a friend, give them away or host a Dress Exchange Party where all your friends bring their dresses and exchange them. For the brave, keeping the dress for another time is a great way to save time and money. Storing a formal or cocktail dress properly is important. First and foremost, the dress must immediately be dry-cleaned to remove any stains or body odor. This can also extend the life of the garment. If the gown contains many sequins or beads, a dry-cleaner may not

be able to clean it. You may need to seek out a preservation specialist or an expert who has been trained in cleaning and preparing gowns for storage. Store the gown in either a clear, heavy-duty bag designed for evening gowns or in a box. If storing in a box, be sure to wrap the gown in acid-free white tissue paper. Stuff enough tissue in the curvatures of the bodice to fill out the garment. Store your gowns in a cool, dry place. A damp basement or hot, musty attic can cause mildew and yellowing of fabric, so avoid these areas. If the dress is exposed to light, the rays can cause fading. The back of a roomy closet in a spare room is the best place to store these dresses. Follow these simple rules and you will have a lifetime of enjoyment with your dress and possibly your loved ones may too!

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story & photos by melissa donald

Monthly Muffin

The Gingersnap Muffin With Sweet Cherries

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everal years ago, when I was working on an organic farm in northern California, we accommodated many guests from all over the state as well as the greater southwestern region. The majority of our visitors were families, vacationing for a week with their loved ones in the quiet countryside of the Eel River Valley. I was one of the chefs, preparing California-style meals from the fresh, seasonal ingredients provided by our many garden plots. In the cooler months, many of our meals were spent inside at a few tables clustered around the wood stove. Off to the side, a separate table was designated for dessert. The most popular desserts this late in the season were ginger cake and gingersnap cookies. And so‌I decided to make a muffin that has the texture of the ginger cake but the taste of a gingersnap cookie. Hence, the Gingersnap Muffin has been created. This muffin is prized with sweet cherries, molasses, and fresh ginger, a winning trio to help pull us through this busy time of year. Sweet cherries are loaded with vitamin C as well as B-complex vitamins. Molasses is high in iron, which helps boost energy and is also high in calcium. The fresh ginger root is a great digestive aid as well as a natural decongestant. This year, during the holiday season, I will be the guest/tourist. Most likely, I will be sharing this recipe with my hosts. This muffin reminds me of having fun and exploring new territory during the fall/winter seasons. So whether you are the guest or the host, plan on starting your mornings with this muffin. And have fun being a tourist during this festive time of year.

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RECIPE >>>

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Gingersnap Muffin with Sweet Cherries

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1 c white all-purpose unbleached flour 1 /2 c whole-wheat flour 1 /2 c wheat germ 1 /2 tsp salt 11/2 tsp baking powder 1 /2 tsp baking soda 1 /4 tsp ground cloves 1 /4 tsp ground nutmeg 1 /2 tsp ground cinnamon 4 Tbsp unsalted butter — melted and cooled to room temperature 1 /2 c molasses 1 /4 c honey 1 Tbsp grated fresh ginger root — use a small grater opening 1 tsp apple cider vinegar 1 /2 c almond milk or soy, rice or regular milk 1 egg — room temperature and slightly beaten 1 tsp vanilla 1 c chopped sweet cherries (frozen or dried) Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Prepare a 12-cup muffin tin with Crisco shortening or a nonstick cooking spray. In a small saucepan, melt the butter on medium heat. Remove from the pan and let sit in a small bowl at room temperature. In a large bowl, combine the flours, wheat germ, salt, baking powder, baking soda, cloves, nutmeg, and cinnamon. Whisk until well incorporated. In a medium bowl, combine the molasses, honey, grated ginger root, apple cider vinegar, milk, egg, vanilla, and melted butter. In the large bowl, make a well in the dry ingredients and add the wet ingredients from the medium bowl. Stir until the dry mixture is almost incorporated with the wet. Add the chopped sweet cherries and continue mixing until everything is well mixed. Bake on a center rack in the oven for 14-16 minutes. Place either a toothpick or cake tester down the center of a muffin to make sure the muffins are done. If the instrument comes out clean, then the muffins are Nutritional Information: done. Let the muffins sit in the Calories: 180 tin for one minute before Total Fat: 5g Cholesterol: 29g removing. Place on a wire Sodium: 229 mg rack to cool. Serve warm or Potassium: 439 mg at room temperature. Store in Total Carbohydrates: 31g an airtight container. Fiber: 2g Sugar: 8g Serves 12. Protein: 4g w w w . i a m t o d a y s w o m a n . c o m


by Bob Mueller

Living Well

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No Pity Party We all have days when the bad things seem to outweigh the good. We begin to think that life is not fair. We get stuck in traffic, which makes us late for an important meeting, and then our car gets towed. “Why me?” we say to ourselves. Events such as these can test anyone’s ability to be grateful and feel optimistic. If you have a tendency to feel sorry for yourself (and many of us do) things usually progress to the next stage — the pity party. You begin to feel like the innocent victim of a dismal fate because you are seeing your life through inaccurate lenses. Most of the thoughts that run through your mind at times like these are not helpful, and they mainly serve to increase your indignation and sense of powerlessness. What these feelings and thoughts do not do is change your circumstances or make you feel better. When you have a horrible day, there should definitely be a time and place to experience your feelings so that you can process them. It is important not to pretend that you are fine with things when you are not. It is also important, however, to notice when you are having a pity party. It is a good idea to set a time limit in which to fully express your emotions and not to feel guilty, be ashamed or judge yourself. Having a friend or spouse witness you during this process can be helpful. You may also want to write about how you feel. When your time is up, let go of the negativity you just expressed. You can declare your intention to your companion. If you have written down your feelings, you can burn the piece of paper or throw it into the recycling bin. Try not to dwell on unpleasant experiences. Do everything you can to avoid holding on to negative emotions. When you indulge in self-pity, you only make a bad day worse. Try to stop feeling sorry for yourself, release the notion that you are a victim, and notice the good that exists in your life. When we pay attention to our failures, mistakes, and flaws, we only know what’s not right. I often meet

folks who say, “I don’t know what I want; I just know I don’t want this.” As they’ve experienced, focusing on what’s wrong doesn’t help them move toward anything, nor does it create the uprush of positive emotion that we experience as happiness. They feel demoralized, deenergized, depressed. This is not to say that we should never look at a problem. But once you’ve done that, it’s time to focus on the positive to find the solution and more happiness. So if a project or relationship is stuck, once you’ve recognized that, it’s best to ask yourself questions like: “What could be right about this situation?” “When have I dealt with something like this successfully in the past?” “What did I do then?” “What’s the best outcome I can imagine here?” “What do I need to do to make that happen?” For instance, a friend is trying to sell her house and has no takers. When I asked her what could be right about this, she said she was very impatient and this seemed to be a way for her to learn patience. Now, every time she finds herself getting frustrated about the sale, she remembers that it’s a patience test and challenges herself to be grateful for the opportunity to learn. Have you caught the connection to personal happiness? The more we recognize and affirm our strengths, successes, and potentials, and the more we know the things that give us health, vitality, and excellence, the more fulfilling our lives are and the happier we feel moment to moment. The energy of noticing what’s right creates excitement to move forward, like plants turning toward the light. Centering on what’s bad gives us a pity party. Focusing on what’s right gives us hope and energy.

Bob Mueller is vice president of Gift Planning at Hosparus, the community hospices of Louisville, Southern Indiana and Central Kentucky. He has three books available: Look Forward Hopefully, The Gentle Art of Caring, and his latest, Create a Better World. Find Bob online at www.bobmueller.org and email him at bobmueller@insightbb.com.

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by cheryl stuck

HealthyWoman

A Donor Saved Her Pam Mahdavi I

n the summer of 2004, Pam Mahdavi was too busy to go to the doctor. “My godfather was dying at the time. I was experiencing this pain on my left side, but I was planning his funeral and I was going to do the eulogy, so I was trying my best to ignore it.” But after a few days of suffering, she stopped by a local clinic to check it out. They told her she had a respiratory problem and wrote a prescription. The pain got worse, so the next week her husband took her to the hospital. “I didn’t expect anything serious, but the doctor came back with the blood work and she had a very serious look on her face.” Pam was diagnosed with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). “My first reaction was ‘Oh, that couldn’t be me. You read the slide wrong.’” Pam was rushed to the James Graham Brown Cancer Center in an ambulance. The doctors told Pam’s husband that she wouldn’t live three more weeks without immediate treatment. Pam was in the hospital for a month, then home for a month, then back in the hospital for another month. On her break, she flew to Houston, Texas, to MD Anderson Cancer Center for a second opinion. Doctors there assured her that the treatment she was receiving was exactly what they would recommend. After three months of treatment she was happy to hear that she was in remission.

AGE: 57

• President of Simtech; Telerecruiter for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society; Retired school teacher, Jefferson County Public Schools Family: Husband, Mohammad Mahdavi; Children - daughter, Shahla Mahdavi, son, Hassan Mahdavi

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photo: Melissa Donald

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But the following March, the disease came back full force. Pam went through the whole treatment again, but the doctor delivered bad news. They couldn’t get it and her only hope for survival was a stem cell bone marrow transplant. Pam’s only sibling was tested and was not a match, but there were two perfect matches in the bone marrow donor bank. Doctors allowed Pam to go home for a few weeks while arranging for the transplant. Through educational meetings, she learned that even with the transplant, she would only have a 20 percent chance of survival. Pam said that, as she lay in the hospital, she felt like a “shell of a human being,” as they prepared her to receive the stem cells. Then another glitch. The donor couldn’t produce enough stem cells for the transplant. “My husband said, “‘What does that mean?’ My doctor shrugged his shoulders and said ‘I don’t know. This has never happened before.’” But, remembering that there were two perfect matches, they called the other person. Pam didn’t know the details of what followed until a year later. The other donor lived in Michigan. Maureen McNamara was packed and ready to walk out the door on a vacation to New York when the phone rang. Pam said she learned later that Maureen almost didn’t answer the phone. When they asked her if she would do the donation, she asked if it could wait a week, but they said no, this person will not last a week. “She gave up her vacation for a total stranger and did this,” Pam said and began to cry.

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Five years after the transplant, in June 2010, Pam was told she was in full remission. Pam planned a large party and invited her donor. She had been allowed to contact her after the first year, so they had talked on the phone and by email, but had never met. To Pam’s delight, Maureen came to the party. Pam said, “I felt so grateful and didn’t know how to thank her enough, and she said she felt like it was something she wanted to do.” WHAS and WLKY filmed the meeting of the two women. “It was fantastic.” Pam’s Facebook page features the faces of the two women together because that’s how Pam feels — like they are melded. Financially, the disease took its toll on the family. Pam was lucky to have good health insurance from her former job as a retired school teacher at Dunn Elementary, but the out-of-pocket expenses were still high. She said her medical bills “went into the millions.” During the illness, she lost her income and her husband almost lost his business, a computer company that sells parts and recycles computers and printers. The couple sold their house and now they are trying to rebuild the business. “My husband works six to seven days a week, 12 hours a day.” Pam also works in the company and works part-time for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society and tries to encourage others to be donors. Pam feels fortunate to have lived long enough to see her daughter marry and her son graduate from UofL with two degrees. Pam said, “I’m a proud mama. Today, I feel fantastic — and so lucky and blessed.”

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The Prudent Pig-out Guide

How to eat, drink, and not gain an ounce

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BY Sandra Gordon

oliday parties may boost the spirit, but they can really give your waistline a pounding. According to Tammy Baker, M.S., R.D., a registered dietitian in Scottsdale, Az., it’s hard to survive a cocktail party without scarfing down 1,500 calories. The trick is knowing what’s in each nibble and budgeting accordingly. Here’s the system: Take one small plate (about six inches across) and fill it up once with any four of the hors d’oeuvres from the chart below. (It helps if you spend the first half of the party talking with friends, before you head for the buffet.) No matter what you pick, you’ll come in at around 400 calories. Have one of the drinks we list here, and you’re still under 500. Cheers! What You Get

Tips for Party Givers

70 calories 4 carrot sticks; 1 gram of fat 6 green and red pepper slices; 3 cherry tomatoes; 4 broccoli florets

Serving size

They’ve got antioxidants plus filling fiber. Start here and return if you’re still hungry.

Make like Martha Stewart and thread vegetables onto skewers. Cut radishes into roses and brighten green beans and broccoli by blanching them.

Tortilla chips and salsa

6 chips with 2 Tbs. salsa

145 calories 7 grams of fat

Salsa is a sneaky way to get a bit of the 5 to 9 servings of fruits and vegetables you should eat daily.

Lighten up! For 110 calories and a single gram of fat, your guests can wolf down 21 baked tortilla chips.

Potato Chips

8 chips with 2 Tbs. dip

120 calories 10 grams of fat

You’re actually chipping away at your vitamin C quota (but it’s worth only about 10 percent of your daily total).

2 slices

80 calories 2 grams of fat

Turkey is lean protein, a good way to fill up with minimal calories.

Want a more colorful option? Try sweet-potato chips. Sixteen chips total 140 calories — and your guests will score almost their entire Daily Value of vitamin A. For about the same calories and a bit more fat, ham and roast beef are also good bets. Get your meat from a deli and ask the butcher to slice thinly.

2 Tbs hummus; One half pitabread pocket

125 calories 3.5 grams of fat

Check your supermarket for zingy ready-made hummus like Tribe.

Cheese and crackers

1 oz. cheese; 8 baked wheat crackers such as Wheat Thins

170 calories 8 grams of fat

You’ll get your own halo for choosing this fiber- and protein-rich combo. These two offer calcium and fiber (1 gram of fiber and 20 percent of your DV for calcium).

Guacamole

2 Tbs.

50 calories 4 grams of fat

Yes, this avocado dip contains fat, but it’s monounsaturated — the type that’s good for you.

You can reduce the calories when you make it at home by adding more chopped tomatoes.

4 boiled shrimp; 2 Tbs. cocktail sauce

65 calories 1 gram of fat

Shrimp is a low-cal, low-fat source of protein.

Sushi and smoked salmon are also good low-fat splurges.

4oz. (a full champagne flute)

104 calories 0 grams of fat

Sip champagne after you eat — the dis-inhibiting effects of alcohol will send your willpower out the window.

Strawberries and raspberries in the bottom of a champagne glass look pretty and crowd out some of the calories

Red Wine

4 oz. (the amount in 92 calories a wine glass) 0 grams of fat

Want two glasses for the price of one? Just make them wine spritzers: half wine, half seltzer.

You can feel saintly for serving red wine — it’s got good-foryou antioxidants

Eggnog

3 oz. (half a punch cup)

This serving of eggnog gives you about 110 mgs of calcium.

Love eggnog, hate calories? Make it yourself, substituting Egg Beaters for whole eggs and skim for whole milk

Crudites

Turkey

Hummus and pita

Shrimp cocktail

Champagne

Calories\fat

98 calories from the store, rum adds 70 calories per oz. 3 grams of fat.

Soft cheeses like Brie and Camembert weigh in at about 20 calories and are 1 to 2 grams of fat lighter than Cheddar or Swiss.


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Things

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NOT TO MISS this month

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Tuesdays with Today’s Woman: Cover Girls

Ever pictured yourself in a magazine? How about on the cover? Join the 2010 Today’s Woman cover girls and learn how you can be a model for Today’s Woman magazine. Grab your friends and dress your best, because photos will be taken of those interested in being in the magazine. And even if you decide you’d rather stay on the outside of the magazine’s pages, still join us as we sample some special wines and are among the first to preview the future of senior living in Masonic Home’s new Sam Swope Care Center.

When  December 7 @ 5:30pm Where  3701 Frankfort Avenue tickets  $15 Contact  502.327.8855

The Brown-Forman Nutcracker

The holiday season wouldn’t be complete without a visit with Marie, her Nutcracker Prince, and that nasty rascal the Rat King. When  December 4-19 Where  Kentucky Center for the Arts tickets  $25-95 Contact  502.584.7777

A Christmas Carol

Louisville’s biggest and best holiday tradition — the classic story of Ebenezer Scrooge, Tiny Tim, and the spirits of Christmas Past, Present, and Future, brought to life with visual splendor and the warmth of holiday music. When  December 7-23 Where  Actors Theatre tickets  $27-$49 Contact  502.584.1205

Santa’s Gingerbread Village

Santa’s Gingerbread Village is the largest life-sized gingerbread village in the U.S. — and yes, it’s all edible! When  Now through January 3 Where  Galt House tickets  Free Contact  502.589.5200

Whitehall House & Gardens Victorian Christmas Tea

— Gioia Patton

December 4 @ 3pm Where  Whitehall tickets  $35/adult; $20/child age 12 and under Contact  502.897.2944

When 

*Space is limited, so reservations are required. The boutique is open with free admission from 10am-2pm prior to the tea for those wishing to only shop at the boutique.

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KMAC’s 9th Annual Martinis & Mistletoe Party

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The Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft will host this popular holiday event including Finlandia martinis, appetizers, live music, artist trunk shows, and a huge selection of holiday gifts for sale from the gallery shop. When  December 9 @ 5-8pm. Where  Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft ADMISSION  Free for members; $20 for nonmembers Contact  502.589.0102

Holiday Candlelight Tours

Locust Grove is once again opening its doors for a candlelight tour. See the house decorated with fresh greens and fruits and listen to live music of the time in the ballroom. When  December 10 @ 5:30pm and December 11 @ 1pm Where  Locust Grove Historic Home ADMISSION  $8/general; $4/children, 6-12 Contact  502.897.9845

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Beautifully decorated for the holiday season, this event will feature English tea and an array of tasty sweets and savory tea sandwiches served in a proper formal setting. Along with the tea, guests may peruse the holiday boutique, which will be displayed in the historic bed chambers of the mansion. Originally built in the mid-1850s as an Italianate farmhouse, Whitehall was transformed in 1909 into the iconic Classical style we know today that epitomizes the stately beauty of early twentieth-century architecture. Proceeds benefit Whitehall House & Gardens.

34th Annual Old Louisville Holiday House Tour

Explore the country’s most extensive collection of Victorian mansions and picturesque homes — an absolute must-see for architecture and history buffs alike. Visitors to this one-of-a-kind national historic preservation district tour eight neighborhood dwellings that have been lovingly decked in Old-World finery and festive holiday décor. Proceeds fund the Old Louisville Information Center. — Gioia Patton

When 

December 4-5 @ 12-6pm tickets  $20/advance; $25/day of 502.635.5244

4 Contact 

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The Victorian Tea at the Inn at the Park

The Inn at the Park Historic Bed & Breakfast (located in Old Louisville) is the location for a high Victorian tea each day of the holiday house tour. Featuring English teas and a tasteful sampling of savories and sweets reminiscent of holiday teas in the 19th century, the food will be prepared by David Dominé, The Bluegrass Peasant. Entertainment provided by harpist Nancy Stagner. All proceeds go to the Conrad-Caldwell House Museum.

>>

— Gioia Patton

December 4-5 @ 11:30am, 1pm, 2:30pm, and 4pm tickets  $20 Contact  502.635.5244 When 

If you would like to include your event in our upcoming issue, send it to Calendar@iamtodayswoman.com. Please include a hi-res jpeg image (photo should be 300 dpi at 4x6 size). We must receive your information at least 6 weeks in advance. No phone calls, please.

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Some of the most favorite moments of my life have happened while I was on stage. So that is a special, special place. — Sara Bareilles

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>>

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Plaid Tidings Plaid Tidings begins where Forever Plaid left off. Filled with Christmas standards that have been “Plaid-erized,” the boys (Sparky, Jinx, Smudge, and Frankie — best known for their smashing harmonic renditions of the great nostalgic hits of the 1950s) are back on Earth. At first the boys don’t know why they’ve returned, as they’d died in a bus accident en route to a Beatles concert. But a phone call from the heavenly Rosemary Clooney lets them know that they’re needed to put a little harmony into a discordant world. Sprinkled among the Christmas offerings are audience favorites like the riotous 3-minute-and-11-second version of The Ed Sullivan Show — this time featuring the Rockettes, the Chipmunks, and the Vienna Boys Choir. (Plaid Tidings was last presented at DDP in 1999.) — Gioia Patton

Now through December 31 Where  Derby Dinner Playhouse tickets  $33-$42 Contact  812.288.8281 When 

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A Salvage Yard Christmas First came SALVAGE YARD in 2000, followed by SALVAGE YARD REVISITED in 2002, and now Bunbury Theatre’s Producing Artistic Director Juergen K. Tossman has made the popular series into a trilogy, with himself reprising the role of Johnny Colletti and Bunbury’s Artistic Associate Matt Orme once again playing the cantankerous Pops. This third play comes with a twist though, as the old salvage yard has been turned into a pawn shop, which is about to be torn down by the owner of the property. As the employees and town folk gather for (one last?) Christmas celebration a miraculous event occurs. — Gioia Patton

December 2-19 Where  The Henry Clay Building tickets  $21/general; $18/seniors; $16/students; $10/12 and under Contact  502.585.5306 or www.bunburytheatre.org When 

*In celebration of the 25th anniversary season, items in the play will be available for silent auction-bidding taking place at the end of each performance.

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Planes, Trains, and Superheroes

Colors of the Season

This exhibition features more than 100 games, gadgets, and toys that have inspired childhood imagination for decades. When  Now through December 31 Where  Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft tickets  $6/adults; free/ kids under 12 Contact  502.589.0102

Holidays Around the World

This celebration of diverse holiday traditions ranges from traditional Christmas trees to cultural trees and displays showcasing holidays observed throughout the year in other countries. When  Now through January 2, 2011 Where  Frazier International History Museum tickets  $9.50/ adults; $8/seniors; $6 children 5-17 Contact  502.753.5663

KaLightoscope Attraction

KaLightoscope is a holiday attraction with a landscape of larger-than-life lighted holiday sculptures never before seen in the U.S. Inspired by ancient Chinese art, each sculpture is made from colorful silk materials lit from within and towering up to 22 feet. When  Now through January 3 Where  Belvedere Park tickets  $17.95/adults; $14.95/ children ages 5-12; $13.95/seniors Contact  800.775.7777

This unique dinner show opens simply in the living room of a couple awaiting the holidays, but the setting soon transforms into a magical world of lights and color as the cast presents a joyous review of favorite songs. This is the essence of the holidays all rolled together into one enchanting experience. When  Now through December 24 Where  Galt House tickets  $45/matinee; $60/ evening Contact  502.584.7777

Best Christmas Pageant Ever

The Herdmans are the worst kids in the history of the world, and they have bullied their way into the church’s annual Christmas pageant! The whole town has gathered to see the Herdmans ruin Christmas, but will the spirit of the season change the hearts and minds of the Herdman family? When  Now through December 18 Where  Kentucky Center for the Arts tickets  $12.50 Contact  502.582.7777

WhoDunnit’s A Carroll’s Deadly Christmas

In sultry Savannah, a most unusual family gathers on Christmas Eve, knowing that one of them will be murdered before morning! But which, and why? Match wits with Lt. Carroll as a fascinating holiday mystery unfolds around you. Ticket price includes dinner and the show. When  Now through December 18 Where  Hyatt Regency Downtown tickets  $43.95 Contact  502.426.7100 or http://www.whodunnitky.com

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It’s A Wonderful Life: A Live Radio Play

Inspired by the classic Jimmy Stewart-starring film, this radio play is performed as a 1940s live radio broadcast for a studio audience. As the theater transforms into WBFR in New York City, the story of Bedford Falls, George Bailey, and the angel that saves his life unfolds. With Foley sound effects, and the occasional commercial jingle, this production is a peek into a bygone era when your imagination worked in overdrive. The talent of actor Tyler Bliss, who plays George Bailey, has not only been a very welcome addition to the local area theater scene the past few years, but Bliss’s speaking voice will give the film’s fans goose bumps, as it is, coincidentally, exactly like Jimmy Stewart’s. — Gioia Patton

December 3, 5, 16, & 17 @ 7pm; December 4, 5, & 12 @ 4pm Kentucky Center’s Bomhard Theatre tickets  $18; $15/groups 15 or more Contact  800.775.7777 When 

Where 

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The Tourists We Found

Location: Glassworks Names: Susanna Cagle

Mark Hamilton

Where they live:

campus

and

near UofL’s

Rich (Shelby is in the green shirt and Kayla is in the pink) Where they live: J-town Why they visited: Kayla came to Glassworks on a field trip and wanted to come back to do the glassblowing. Favorite exhibit: flameworking studio

wanted to try something new for Mark’s birthday Favorite exhibit: watching the glassblowing Why they visited:

Another favorite place to visit in Louisville: tandem

biking at Waterfront Park

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Location: Glassworks Names: Shelby and Kayla

Another favorite place to visit in Louisville: Slugger Museum

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By Jennifer Thompson Photos by Melissa Donald

Location: Louisville Slugger Museum & Factory Names: Jenny Burns and family

Location: Louisville Slugger Museum & Factory Names: Kim Sarabyn

Where they live:

Brownsbugh, IN

Owensboro, KY

Why they visited:

stopped by the Slugger Museum on the way to Lexington Favorite exhibit:

Where they live:

son is an aspiring professional baseball player Favorite exhibit: factory tour Why they visited:

factory tour

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Location:

Location:

Center

Muhammad Ali

Names: Ayanna Williams Where they live: Indianapolis Why they visited: loves

Center

Muhammad Ali

Names: Vivian Smith Where they live: Long

Island, NY

visiting museums to “find out what Louisville’s about”; considers Ali an AfricanAmerican icon Favorite exhibit: 15-minute museum intro video about Ali’s life

going to all the museums in Louisville; wanted to learn about Ali as the “humanitarian behind the fighter” Favorite exhibit: 15-minute museum intro video about Ali’s life

Another favorite place to visit in Louisville: E&S

Another favorite place to visit in Louisville: Cave Hill

Gallery

Why they visited:

Cemetery

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Location: Frazier International History Museum Names: Valerie Hopkins Where they live: Highlands Why they visited: loves British history Favorite exhibit:

demonstrations/tournament ring, which shows how weapons were used Another favorite place to visit in Louisville: Slugger

Museum

Location: Frazier International History Museum Names: Leah Doherty and Kris Baird Where they live: Roseville, MN Why they visited: in town for a conference, interested in medieval history Favorite exhibit: medieval Another favorite place to visit in Louisville: Highlands,

Waterfront Park, 21c Museum Hotel, Slugger Museum

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ere: H ere eekend W u erful W o Y h y Wondrdstown, KY s i W M in Ba Te

nd xt a

pho

to s

io by G

o att ia P

n

M

y 32-hour whirlwind first-time visit to Bardstown, KY, went off without a hitch as I accomplished my entire “Ten Things I Must Do” jammed-packed itinerary! 1. Toured the charming, yet a bit spooky Jailer’s Inn B&B, which according to the Travel Channel is “amongst the top 10 most haunted sites in the USA.” The former dungeon area in particular gave off a rather creepy vibe! My friend Kyra Hackley accompanied me to Bardstown that weekend.

2. The very impressive Civil War Museum, which was voted by the Civil War magazine North & South as being the fourth finest in the U.S. 3. The neighboring Women of the Civil War Museum, the memorable collection of which portrays in detail women’s roles as nurses, (male) soldiers, spies, and plantation workers of the period.

4 & 5. Heaven Hill Distilleries Trolley Hop tour of the town, the final stop being the bourbon tasting at the H.H. Distillery. My Old Kentucky Dinner Train. 6. A delightful experience on My Old Kentucky Dinner Train. My prime rib dinner also one of the best I’ve ever had. *Special thanks to the great company sitting at my table that night — Debbie & Mike of J-Town! I would also like to repeat this excursion with the change of each season. The spontaneous moment I captured during the excursion, which was like stepping back into an elegant bygone era. If only we’d continued on to New York City or Chicago!

The lovely mediums, (L to R) twin sisters Katie and Michael Wilhite at haunted Wickland.

7. Sunday brunch in the original section of the historic Old Talbott Tavern, built in 1779, followed by a tour of the lovely guest suites. 8. Touring the absolutely beautiful Georgian-style mansion Federal Hill onemillion-dollar renovation in 2007 resulted in 50 percent of the furnishings from the 1840s time period now being original to the home. Composer Stephen Collins Foster was rumored to have been inspired to pen My Old Kentucky Home after visiting his cousins, who were the original owners. 9. The stately Wickland, home of three Kentucky governors between the years 1839-1907. *Most notable about my time at Wickland was the paranormal tour led by mediums and twin sisters, Michael and Katie Wilhite of Bardstown, who had in-depth conversations with some of the spirits.

10. A scrumptious home-roasted turkey breast and blueberry cobbler Sunday dinner at nationally renowned Kurtz’s Restaurant (since 1937), set in the twostory stone former home of the founder. — Gioia Patton

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Wickland


Dating Dilemmas

By Caitlin Gaynor

Gift Guide for the

Men

in

Your Life

L

et’s face it, guys are extremely hard to shop for! Especially when you ask them what they want, the response is usually, “Oh nothing. I have everything I need.” Hopefully these helpful hints will steer you in the right direction. Lets start with who NOT to get gifts for: 1. The guy you’ve had a crush on forever, but he doesn’t know it. Getting him a gift is not romantic; it is creepy. 2. You’ve been on a date, but you’re already planning the wedding. Play it cool. No gift. 3. The “I don’t know what we are.” Don’t give him a gift. If he gives you a gift, it opens the table for discussion about your relationship. 4. Your “friend with benefits.” Keep things simple with him. Gifts can send mixed signals like perhaps you are wanting to be more than friends. Boyfriend of two months or less: Sometimes clothes are the best option. Eye what he wears and what his friends wear. Keep an open ear for something he may like. Make sure it’s something you know he wants so that you don’t have to worry about an awkward exchange. Casually bring it up with his friends, maybe they have a good idea. Boyfriend of 5-11 Months: Something thoughtful but not too elaborate. You are at the point where you know that you really like each other, and either you can see a future or not. Maybe get him tickets to a concert he’d like to see or a sporting event. Perhaps a round of golf at the country club he’s been dying to try. Boyfriend of 1+ Years: Okay, obviously, it’s serious. Depending on your age bracket and financial ability, usually a romantic gesture is good at this point to show that you really care and value the relationship. The element of surprise is especially important because that can make a good idea turn into a great idea. Think outside the box. Maybe your man needs a day of being pampered, a couple’s massage is a great way to go. A lot of guys have never had a massage, and we know they definitely need relaxing. Dear Old Dad: You can’t forget the number one man in your life! Maybe his wallet is completely shredded, and he needs a new one. A golf lesson could help out his game or a personal training session to jump-start his workout regimen. Dads are hard to buy for, but any gift from his daughter he will love.

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Go

Gallery Hopping IN LOUISVILLE By Deborah Kohl Kremer

Paris. New York City. Milan. All huge names in the art world, but Louisville, with all her classy galleries, funky artistic shops and efforts to keep it weird, has stepped up to the plate. Get your girlfriends together and spend some time taking in all the vast artistic talent right here. You’ll be glad you did and you might even find just the piece you’ve been wanting for above your fireplace.

IF YOU GO... Pyro Gallery

624 West Main Street Louisville, KY 40204 502.587.0106 Thursday, 11am-3pm Friday, 11am-5pm Saturday, 11am-5pm Sunday, 11am-3pm Mellwood Arts and Entertainment Center

1860 Mellwood Avenue Louisville, KY 40206 502.895.3650 Wednesday- Saturday, 11am-4pm Joe Ley Antiques

615 E Market Street Louisville, KY 40202 502.583.4014 Tuesday-Saturday, 8:30am-5pm Zephyr Gallery

610 East Market Street Louisville, KY 40204 502.585.5646 Wednesday-Saturday, 11am-6pm Swanson Reed Contemporary

638 East Market, Louisville, KY 40202 502.589.5466 Wednesday-Saturday, 11am-6pm

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Pyro Gallery Featuring contemporary art meant to ignite, excite, and inspire, this cooperative gallery includes a visual feast for the eyes with the works of many artists on display at one time. The artists, whose mediums vary as much as the artists themselves, join together to run the gallery, pay the bills, and keep it open. They share the burden of being gallery owners, but they enjoy the perks of personally selecting the pieces they want to display. Changing exhibits feature works from recent additions to the co-op, as well as a once-a-year exhibit that displays at least one piece of work from every artist involved. Photographer John Fitzgerald is a member and contributing artist at Pyro. “Any fan of visual art will enjoy a trip to Pyro,” he said. “It is a great place to see the work of some of the best quality local contemporary artists in the region.” Mellwood Arts and Entertainment Center This former meat packing plant, now transformed into 200 artist’s studios, is massive. Sprawling over 360,000 sq. ft., you could spend your day here and get a taste of just about every medium of art you could imagine. Artist Sue Hinkebein has booth space at Mellwood. She says that other large cities have similar places where artists can gather, paint, share, and critique each other’s work. “Mellwood is a great thing for Louisville,” said the painter who works in watercolors, oils, and acrylics. “I especially like to paint oils in my studio there to keep the odors out of my house, and I like meeting the people who wander through who appreciate art.” This massive building also has three galleries, a giant reception room available for rental, rehearsal space for dancers and theater groups, and even a fitness center. They also have a couple cafes and coffee shops scattered about to meet your hunger needs. Joe Ley Antiques As if traipsing around three creaky floors of an 1890s schoolhouse wouldn’t be amusing enough, Joe Ley’s has packed the place to the brim with architectural antiques, like chandeliers, mantles, and banisters and hard-to-find items like antique dentist chairs, carousel horses, and full-size suits of armor. Remodeling an old home? Joe’s has about 5,000 doors in stock. t o d a y ’ s

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Hop’n’eat...

All that consuming of art can leave a hollow place in your stomach, so be sure and stop along the way for edible nourishment, as well. Whether you need a light snack or a full meal, below are a few eateries located right on your way. Mayan Café

Specializing in local ingredients, prepared as it is in the Yucatan Peninsula, and presented like a work of art, The Mayan Café is the perfect stop along a day of gallery hopping. It is not the place for tacos, but if you want slow-roasted meats infused with peppers and chiles and not-so-common ingredients and side dishes like pumpkin seeds, plantains, and yucca, the Mayan is your place. 813 E Market Street Louisville, KY 40206 502.566.0651 Lunch: Monday-Friday, 11am-2:30pm, Dinner, Monday-Thursday, 5pm-10pm, Friday and Saturday, 5pm-10:30pm Closed Sunday

Muth’s Candy Store Photos Courtesy Swanson Reed Contemporary Gallery

“Coming here is like a treasure hunt,” said Sheila Ley, Joe’s daughter. “The items we carry are beyond description, but there is something here for everybody.” As they say, beauty, as well as art, is in the eye of the beholder. The amazing collection of trinkets, historic furniture pieces, lawn statues and door knobs, may be classified as antiques by some, but it becomes art when displayed correctly. “We’re a little weird, so you hear lots of weird stories about what people are going to do with the things they find in our store,” she said. Zephyr Gallery As the oldest Louisville gallery featuring the contemporary fine art of an artist’s cooperative, you can be assured that the works on display are not something you could find anywhere else. Currently home to about 23 artist-members, each piece has been painstakingly crafted to maintain the integrity of the gallery. The artists have a stake in the gallery, and your chances of meeting the creator of that piece you have your eye on, are very high. “We don’t include works from artists that don’t live in the area,” said Joel Pinkerton, a sculptor who creates 3D works out of found materials. “If you are interested in a particular artist, we could certainly arrange for you to meet that person.” Zephyr Gallery does not have any employees; it is run strictly by its members. Pinkerton explains that the gallery is almost museum-like, with a quiet atmosphere. “We encourage people to come in on their own time, relax and look around,” he said. “That way you can make your own decision on the art, without any distractions.” Swanson Reed Contemporary Gallery Featuring a new show every four or five weeks, you will truly see something unique every time you stop in the Swanson Reed Gallery. “We don’t have a permanent collection,” said Chuck Swanson, gallery co-owner. “Typically everything in the gallery is for sale so our inventory is always changing.” Although they showcase paintings, sculpting, and photography pieces of contemporary art, Swanson Reed also displays video, installation, and performance art. “Whenever we have a show, the pieces in it are being shown for the first time,” he said. “The artist may have had shows previously, but this body of work is brand new.”

Every woman knows that chocolate is one of the finest things on earth. And right in the heart of Louisville is a must-stop for this much-needed elixir. Muth’s Candy Store, a Louisville staple for generations, has been hand-dipping bourbons, caramels, and creams for generations. They are also the home of a candy called the Modjeska, a sinfully delicious marshmallow creation dipped in heavenly caramel. Pick out a few pieces of your favorites, and enjoy them for yourself. 630 East Market Street Louisville, KY 40202 502.585.2952 Tuesday-Friday, 8:30am-4pm, Saturday, 10am-4pm, Closed Sunday and Monday

Toast on Market

Serving a hash brown casserole to-die-for, Toast on Market knows how to put the comfort in comfort food. Sure, they have scrumptious French toast, and delicious egg dishes for breakfast, and equally riveting fresh salads and sandwiches for lunch, but if you can only get one item, go for the hash brown casserole. 736 East Market Street Louisville, KY 40202 502.569.4099    Tuesday-Friday,  7am-2pm, Saturday-Sunday,  7am-3pm

Wish You Were Here...

LOS ANGE LES, CA —

The Gett y Cente r

We loved this place, sta rting wit h the tra m rid e. What a spectacula r aeria l vie w of Los Angeles plus the sur rou nd ing hil lsides fur rowed wit h vineyard s and olive orcha rds. Just str oll ing the mountai n-top set ting of bri llia nt architecture an d viv id ga rdens is treat enough, but we went inside an d were blown away by an ex hibit of works by rea list French pa inter Jea n-L éon Gérôm e. — XO, Ma rie Bradby


Just Ask Joyce Q:

By Joyce Oglesby

“My heart is broken. I have been engaged to a man I thought I knew. We were to get married next Spring. Quite by accident, I discovered he is living a double life. He has a family in another state. His wife is a lovely person, and they are well respected in the town. I have broken the engagement. Should I blow his cover and destroy his wife and children? It feels easier just to take care of myself.

Joyce: Shake the cobwebs out of your head. You’ve been caught in a bitter snare of deceit! Your initial concern should be to take care of yourself. Collect your thoughts. Pull yourself out of the hovering fog. Immerse yourself in quiet time, family support, limited goodfriend contact, and prayer. God will give you strength and begin to repair and prepare your heart for love again. The latter may not appeal to you immediately, but your heart will soon long for companionship. It’s a natural desire. I’m certain there were many expenses you and/or your family

incurred as a result of your impending wedding. Reserving facilities and vendors can become quite costly, not to mention the purchase of the wedding dress and accessories. You should certainly entertain recovering your losses through some means. You may not have to resort to legal remedies, but if the pressure you place on him does not spill forth restitution, I would not dismiss the thought. Don’t be surprised at yourself if you decide to cut your losses and call it a day. Such a decision is understandable in order to move on with your life. The best cure for a broken heart is found in the next round of love. And fear not, you will love again!

Q:

“My daughter has turned 18, and suddenly thinks she gets to make her own decisions. Every day is a huge battle. I was hoping her senior year would be one to enjoy. It’s not turning out that way.” Joyce: Amazing! Kids think parents should take great delight in their overnight accomplishment at conquering life! Having traveled this rocky road twice, I will share my limited wisdom. • Sit down with your daughter and listen to her heart. Don’t interrupt; let her have her say. Then, demand equal time. Share how special the year should be for the two of you. It is a wonderful time – your last time together in this type of mother-daughter relationship. Agree between the two of you to make it special. It will be if stubborn wills are set aside and love dictates the end result. • My house, my rules. Redefining the rules during a senior year is often necessary. Understand she soon will join the ranks of having to make decisions on her own, so some consideration might be wise. Depends on the circumstances. Regardless, as long as they stay under your roof, your rules remain the gospel. • You have leverage. Whose car does she drive? Who buys the gas? The insurance? Funds all expenses? If she has a job and is making her way, according to her, remind her how expensive it would be should she have to make it on her own. Tough love can dictate showing a child the door when battles get too costly. This suggestion often brings a child to their better senses, but make sure st ! e saw her la w e you are willing to follow through with the challenge should it present itself. nc si d ay. ange nnah has ch ed, yet fu ndamenta l w wling Ba be, Sava fin ra These years are challenging. It’s the parent who tempers this season with de sp some un ra nches Maturing in r might y oa ks, their b gers fin r ei th ng he ki balance, who makes life more tolerable for all parties concerned. You’ll reca ll creek. and interloc

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On-Line Question

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“I continue to be friends with someone I cannot trust. I love her like a sister, but I know she uses me to justify her own means at times, and that really hurts. We have been friends since grammar school. What is it that keeps me drawn to her, and why can’t I just let it go once and for all?”

(Go to www.iamtodayswoman.com/justaskjoyce for answers to this question.) t o d a y ’ s

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Reach more than 150,000 readers each month. Adver tising rates as low as $ 408. For more information call 502.327.8855


f MAKEOVER By Tiffany White Photos by Melissa Donald

After Donna Miller

Receiving Lead, Genco Reynolds

Lovely Long Locks

Before Her Story: 
Donna Miller can’t remember the last time she stepped inside a salon. Between balancing the responsibilities of work and family, taking time out to improve herself has been last on the priority list. “I’ve always cut my hair myself, and I totally quit wearing makeup because it was too expensive. I started to gain weight and thought nothing would work.” Her Hair: Since Donna prefers to keep her hair long, Julia Harris, salon manager at Beauty First (4600 Shelbyville Road, 502.897.6888), took off five inches of her hair and cut in long layers to create more body. She worked in caramel highlights to enhance the color and followed up with a gloss to lock in color and add shine. Her MAKEUP: Julia waxed her eyebrows to give her eyes more shape and definition, then applied a powder foundation to her face to even out her skin tone. To play up her greenishbrown eyes, Julia chose eye shadows in shades of pink and light green (Glo Mineral ballerina trio, $33), then dusted sheer pedal blush onto Donna’s cheeks. She lined her eyes with powder liner, applied a few coats of mascara and finished with pink-toned gloss. Nominate Someone for a Makeover!

Do you know someone who is in dire need of a makeover? Each month, we are on the prowl for good candidates to highlight, and we would love to hear from you! Send a brief note about why your friend deserves a makeover and a photo of her to tiffany@todayspublications.com

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SPECIAL ONLINE-ONLY ARTICLE

>>


An Arts Insider Must-See

By Gioia Patton

Jim Brickman

The Comfort Zone


TW ONLINE SPECIAL

The reason the CD is entitled Home is because it’s something (we) can all relate to. (People) use my music for the most part at home to set the mood for a romantic dinner party. — Jim Brickman

If the term ‘the healing powers of music’ had a list of artists’ names associated with it, hands down, the platinum-selling songwriter/pianist Jim Brickman would be on it. “Actually the Cleveland Clinic has done a number of studies about music and it’s connection to healing for stress,” begins Brickman on the subject. “And I think it’s true,” adds the Shaker Heights, OH native, whose soothing-sounding track names on his current CD, Home (Target & Somerset Music), include: By the Fire, Sanctuary, Sunday Drive and Hideaway. “For Home, I was pushed to (create) a little bit out of my comfort zone, although it was subtle,” he continues by phone. “For example, rather than just me at the piano, some instruments (like guitars) were added to my arrangements to give the music a homey, relaxing weekend feel. I had to really hold myself back from some of the really present melodies that I’m used to,” he admits “and just have it be about a quiet, relaxing time.” When I tell Brickman the ambiance of his holiday concerts (this year’s is his 15th) invokes sitting by a roaring fireplace next to the Christmas tree in

Brickman’s home while he and his friends perform song after song, he enthuses: “That’s exactly the case! “I’m very aware of the vibe and the tone of the environment I’m (performing) in,” he stresses. “Is it a huge theater that I have to contain…is there a snowstorm outside...is it a month, or five days before Christmas? What contributes to the feeling of that night’s experience? “I think it’s a very important thing to consider, especially (for) a solo performer,” adds Brickman, who’s accompanied by guest singers and musicians during his holiday tours. “Because you want to make sure you connect to the audience. Otherwise, when (they) leave, they don’t feel like they’ve taken any sort of journey. (Sighs) I’ve never understood performers who only do the ‘…and for my next number’ chatter in between numbers. I mean, that’s very self-indulgent!” he declares. As to his fans, Brickman remarks: “I was very surprised to notice a woman no older than 25 sitting in the audience recently; my initial reaction being ‘what are you doing here?’” he admits sounding amused. “But when we met after the concert, she explained that from the age of nine she’d taken piano lessons to my music, (having been introduced to it from Brickman’s 1994 debut CD No Words) and had loved it ever since. So now what’s happening is that it’s passing to another generation (of fans) who were kids when first introduced to my music, and who even played it in recitals.”

The 15th Anniversary Holiday Concert w/Jim Brickman & Friends Wednesday, December 22, @7:30pm Kentucky Center tickets f $32-$75 Contact  Call the box office 502.584-7777 or visit in person. Group discounts, contact: 502.562.0152. When f

Where f

Gioia Patton is an arts & entertainment celebrity profiler.

Today's Woman December 2010  

Wish You Were Here...we are having a great time. Take a new look at where you live and find a way to enjoy it in a different way. We found s...