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Poultry Times PERIODICALS

Since 1954, the nation’s only poultry industry newspaper

January 30, 2012

Mark Waller


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Poultry Times

January 30, 2012 Volume 59, Number 3 www.poultrytimes.net

Industry innovations on display at IPE/IFE By Barbara Olejnik Poultry Times Staff

bolejnik@poultrytimes.net

ATLANTA — The 64th annual International Poultry Expo, joined by the International Feed Expo, got underway this week at the Georgia World Congress Center, where exhibitors displayed the latest innovations for the poultry, egg and feed industries. John Starkey, president of the U.S. Poultry & Egg Association, sponsor of the IPE, said, “We are thrilled with the number of exhibitors we have in the show this year. We are right at 900, holding at the same level as last year in a very tough economy.” This year marked the beginning of a new Expo schedule with the trade show running Tuesday through Thursday as opposed to previous years when the show was a Wednes-

Photo by David B. Strickland

IPE/IFE 2012: The U.S. Poultry & Egg Association’s 64th annual International Poultry Expo was held this week in Atlanta, Ga. This year marked the sixth annual co-location with the International Feed Expo, sponsored by the American Feed Industry Association. More than 900 exhibitors and 20,000 attendees were on hand for this premier event.

day through Friday event. “Everyone is getting use to the new schedule — including us as the organizer,” Starkey said. “But, we’ll take a look at everything we learned on this schedule, and use that to plan for next year.” Exhibitors representing all aspects of the poultry, egg, feed and allied industries displayed the latest in equipment, technology and services used in the production and processing of product. These included exhibits showcasing feed milling, hatchery, layers, live production, processing,

further processing, rendering and transportation. The new schedule also included additional and expanded educational sessions along with providing time for meetings by industry-related organizations such as the National Chicken Council and United Egg Producers. “The educational programs continue to add value to the attendee experience, which we think in turn brings more folks to the show floor,” Starkey said. “We have had some

See Overview, Page 8

Photo by David B. Strickland

Workhorse 2012: Bill Bradley, right, vice president of the Egg Division for CCF Brands, is the recipient of the U.S. Poultry & Egg Association’s 2012 Workhorse of the Year Award. Last year’s award winner Monty Henderson, retired president of George’s Inc., placed the ceremonial horse collar on Bradley during the award reception on Monday, Jan. 23.

Bradley receives Workhorse of the Year ATLANTA — Bill Bradley, vice president of the Egg Division for CCF Brands and 2008 U.S. Poultry & Egg Association chairman, was named Workhorse of the Year by USPOULTRY during the 2012 International Poultry Expo. The group’s most esteemed honor is given annually by USPOULTRY

in recognition of dedicated service and valuable leadership given to the association and the poultry industry. Bradley was “collared” with the long-established horse collar by 2011 Workhorse of the Year recipi-

See Workhorse, Page 8

Waller elected chairman of USPOULTRY for 2012

Waller

ATLANTA — Mark Waller, Ingram Farms, Cullman, Ala., was elected chairman of the board of directors of the U.S. Poultry & Egg Association at its annual meeting during the 2012 International Poultry Expo. He previously served as vice chairman. Waller was presented with the time-honored “working man’s gavel” by 2011 Chairman Gary Cooper, Cooper Farms. Waller has a bachelor of science degree in poultry science from Mississippi State University. Prior to

See Waller, Page 24


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POULTRY TIMES, January 30, 2012

Abit Massey receives lifetime achievement award

Photo by David B. Strickland

Passing the gavel: Mark Waller, left, the new chairman of the U.S. Poultry & Egg Association, receives the chairman’s gavel from Gary Cooper, Cooper Farms, immediate past chairman, during the group’s annual board of directors meeting held Jan. 23, at the International Poultry Expo in Atlanta, Ga.

ATLANTA — Abit Massey, president emeritus of the Georgia Poultry Federation, was honored by the U.S. Poultry & Egg Association during the 2012 International Poultry Expo, where he received the Harold E. Ford Lifetime Achievement Award. The Harold E. Ford Lifetime Achievement Award is presented to an individual whose dedication and leadership during the years have far exceeded the ordinary and impacted both the poultry industry and U.S. Poultry & Egg Association in an exemplary manner. The award is presented non-annually and when the Awards and Recognition Committee unanimously recognizes and endorses the need for occasional, unique recognition for

exceptional contributions. “In addition to being recognized as a Georgia poultry industry icon, Abit is recognized Massey as a leader in several fields, including the lobbying profession, association management field and among collegiate supporters,” said Gary Cooper, Cooper Farms, immediate past chairman of USPOULTRY. “Abit is well respected and highly regarded within the industry; and his legacy will be acknowledged for many years to come.”

Dolph Baker receives 2012 Lamplighter Award ATLANTA — The U.S. Poultry & Egg Association presented the organization’s annual Lamplighter Award to Dolph Baker Baker during the 2012 International Poultry Expo. The award pays tribute to individuals for “sustained and exemplary service” to the poultry and egg industry. Baker is president and chief executive officer of Cal-Maine Foods. He has been employed with Cal-Maine since 1986 and

has served as a director since 1991. Baker graduated from Mississippi State University with a degree in business administration. He has served on numerous boards, including past chairman of the American Egg Board, past board chairman of the Mississippi Poultry Association, past chairman of the United Egg Producers and was a former USPOULTRY board member. “We value the commitment, hard work and support Dolph has provided to our industry,” said 2011 USPOULTRY Chairman Gary Cooper, Cooper Farms. “Dolph is dedicated to advancing the industry, and we appreciate his service and devotion.”

John Starkey, USPOULTRY president, said, “Abit has labored diligently and efficiently on behalf of the Georgia poultry industry, and his touch can be seen and felt on many of the initiatives and programs that have contributed to the state’s poultry success, as well as nationally. On behalf of our association, Abit has provided a constant source of knowledge and experience. He has been a visionary in evaluating the industry’s future needs and has acted to address those needs. The hallmark of Abit’s career has been his integrity and his personal touch, which forms the foundation of every relationship he has.” A graduate of the University of Georgia and an Eagle Scout, Massey is past chairman of the board of directors for the American Society of Association Executives, past president of the Georgia Society of Association Executives and GSAE Foundation, past president of the Uni-

See Massey, Page 9

INDEX AEB Hotline ..................... 23 Business ......................... 6-7 Calendar .......................... 10 Classified......................... 20 Viewpoint............................ 4 A directory of Poultry Times advertisers appears on Page 23

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POULTRY TIMES, January 30, 2012

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Sumner receives NPFDA Lifetime Achievement ATLANTA — The National Poultry & Food Distributors Association has presented James Sumner, president of the USA Poultry and Egg Export Council, with the NPFDA Poultry Industry Lifetime Achievement Award. The award, given each year to a poultry industry leader who has played a major role in the growth of the poultry industry, was presented Jan. 25 at the NPFDA awards reception. Sumner has served as president of the USA Poultry & Egg Export Council (USAPEEC) since February 1990. USAPEEC is a non-profit membership organization, which represents approximately 220 of the leading poultry processing companies, trading companies and affiliated organizations involved in exporting. The council, as a cooperator with USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS), is responsible for the worldwide promotion of U.S. poultry and egg products and maintains offices in 13 foreign countries. The council also represents the industry in various trade policy and other export-related is-

sues. The council’s 200+ member companies account for more than 95 percent of all the poultry and eggs exported from the U.S. Sumner has been appointed by the past five U.S. secretaries of agriculture and U.S. trade Sumner representatives, including U.S. Trade Representative Ron Kirk and U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack, to serve on the Agricultural Policy Advisory Committee to provide industry input for various international trade issues and World Trade Organization negotiations. Under the Clinton Administration he served on the Market Access Group of the Gore-Chernomyrdin Commission to deal with U.S.-Russian trade issues. He also serves as the export advisor to the American Egg Board and as presi-

dent of the UIPDP (the USAPEEC International Poultry Development Program), which for 10 years operated a joint venture broiler production project in Russia known as Elinar Broiler, which was developed by the U.S. broiler industry and USDA. In 2005, Sumner was elected president of the International Poultry Council, an organization he helped form which represents the poultry industries of more than 28 countries representing more than 90 percent of the world’s poultry meat production. He has continued to serve in that capacity since IPC’s inception. Sumner also serves on the Executive Committee of the U.S. Agricultural Export Development Council, an industry-supported organization that represents approximately 80 U.S. agricultural commodity trade associations, farmer cooperatives and state regional trade groups from throughout the U.S. Prior to joining the USAPEEC staff, Sumner served as director of corporate communications for Dairymen Inc., a regional milk

USPOULTRY updates logo and web site TUCKER, Ga. — U.S. Poultry and Egg Association recently updated its logo to “USPOULTRY.” For a number of years, the poultry industry has shortened the a s s o c i a t i o n ’s name for ease of use. The association decided to embrace the shortened name with the introduction of the new logo. The logo design includes USPOULTRY in all capital letters and an “egg and feather” combination in replacement of the “O” in the logo, as well as U.S. Poultry & Egg Association in smaller type under the logo design.

In addition, USPOULTRY has updated its web site to reflect the new logo change. The web site is now http://www.uspoultry.org, and incorporates the new logo design element and color scheme. U.S. Poultry & Egg Association is an all-feather organization representing the complete spectrum of today’s poultry industry, with a focus on serving member companies through research funding, education, communication and technical assistance. Founded in 1947, the association is based in Tucker, Ga.

marketing cooperative based in Louisville, Ky., and as director of marketing for the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture. In the 1970’s he served as the farm editor of the Lancaster (Pa.) Intelligencer Journal newspaper. A journalism graduate of Southern Illinois University, Sumner has done postgraduate studies at Temple University in public relations. A native of southern Illinois, Sumner and his wife Ann have two sons, a daughter and two granddaughters and reside in Covington, Ga., near Atlanta. The Lifetime Achievement Award has been presented annually since 1991. Previous recipients were Frank Perdue, Perdue Farms; Lloyd Peterson, Peterson

Farms; Don Tyson, Tyson Foods; Henry Saglio, Avian Farms; Joe Hatfield, Fieldale Farms; Lonnie (Bo) Pilgrim, Pilgrim’s Pride; Albin S. Johnson, Columbia Farms; James T. (Red) Hudson, Hudson Foods; Norman Fries, Claxton Poultry; J. Douglas Cagle, Cagle’s Inc.; Abit Massey, Georgia Poultry Federation; George Watts, National Chicken Council; Marshall Durbin Jr., Marshall Durbin Cos.; Thomas Arrendale, Fieldale Farms; S. Truett Cathy, Chickfil-A; Colonel Harland Sanders, Kentucky Fried Chicken; Marvin Johnson, House of Raeford; Doug Carnes, Mar-Jac Poultry; Terry Tucker, Maple Leaf Farms; Eric Joiner, AJC International; and Tom Rueger, Eastern Poultry Distributors.

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POULTRY TIMES, January 30, 2012

Viewpoint Compiled by Barbara Olejnik, Associate Editor 770-718-3440 bolejnik@poultrytimes.net

NCC looks for more favorable economic climate By Mike Brown

Special to Poultry Times

WASHINGTON — After many years of reading former National Chicken Council President George Watts’ byline on this Vi e w p o i n t column, I am both humbled and honored to pen my inaugural piece and follow in George’s footsteps — Brown both in this space and in the chair where he sat for 38 years. I can say with utmost sincerity that being afforded the opportunity last June to present George with his induction into the Meat Industry Hall of Fame was the achievement of which I am most proud since succeeding George in March. It was an honor for me to celebrate the value of his vision Mike Brown is president of the National Chicken Council with offices in Washington, D.C.

and foresight and his lifetime of achievement for our industry. George is one of the most important people in the development of the modern poultry business. He joined an elite group of only three other men in the chicken industry to be elected into the Hall of Fame: Colonel Sanders, Frank Perdue and Don Tyson. That is pretty good company.

Inside the beltway 2011 2011 was certainly a challenging year for a chicken industry fraught with record high production costs, bankruptcies, consolidation and onerous regulations. But last year also provided many opportunities for us to thrive and I am happy to report that NCC was on the front lines embracing those opportunities headon with measured success. As we all are aware, chicken companies have been under intense economic pressure from the rising cost of feed grains — much of which is caused by the federal government’s proethanol policies. This is why NCC worked tirelessly for the expiration of two of those

misguided policies — The Volumetric Ethanol Excise Tax Credit (VEETC) and the import tariff on foreign ethanol. Their sunset on Dec. 31 was a culmination of growing concern among the American public and on Capitol Hill, marked in June by overwhelming bipartisan and bicameral votes, which NCC helped to achieve, to end unnecessary federal support of corn-based ethanol. NCC’s feed security task force identified and targeted this issue as a top priority. Last year also saw congressional passage of long-stalled free trade agreements with Korea, Colombia and Panama — a top priority for the council. Once fully implemented these agreements could increase U.S. poultry exports by $102 million and result in 1,200 new jobs in the poultry sector.

2012 outlook After the most challenging economic year in history for the U.S. broiler industry, 2012 should be a much more favorable year, barring any unforeseen problems with feed costs or consumer demand. In a nutshell, it should be a good operating environment for our industry, due to production adjustments allowing higher feed costs to be passed on to the market. Hopefully we will have a more favorable economic climate to operate in 2012 and there is enough growth in the U.S. economy that consumer demand picks up both in the retail and food service sectors. Chicken production will be down in 2012 compared with last year — a slip in output is very unusual for the chicken industry. Only four times in the past four decades have we

Chicken companies must remain innovative and must work to create successful new chicken products that stimulate the average consumer to eat chicken more often.

produced fewer pounds than the previous year. If the corn crops are adequate going forward, however, and the ethanol industry

leaves some corn for animal agriculture, I see the chicken industry expanding over the

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See Brown, Page 11

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POULTRY TIMES, January 30, 2012

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Georgia Tech Institute receives $2,333 grant TUCKER, Ga. — The Georgia Tech Research Institute has received a $2,333 student recruiting grant from the U.S. Poultry & Egg Association Foundation. The check was presented by Elton Maddox, president of Wayne Farms and USPOULTRY board member, to Steven Thomas, communications officer for the GTRI Food Processing Technology Division. Mike Giles and Abit Massey from the Georgia Poultry Federation assisted in the check presentation. “Georgia Tech Research Institute’s Agricultural Technology Research Program is working with the USPOULTRY Foundation and universities with poultry science departments to create a “smart app” for student recruitment, which will work on Apple’s iPhone and iPad, Android

phones and desktop computers. The “smart app” will provide information for students and parents explaining what a poultry science degree entails, employment opportunities after graduation and paths to successfully choosing the right program. Geared toward high school students, the “smart app” will use social media outlets, such as Facebook and Twitter, to allow potential students to interact with current students,” Thomas said. The USPOULTRY Foundation board has approved student recruiting grants totaling more than $180,000 to the six U.S. universities with poultry science departments and 14 other institutions with poultry programs. The foundation provides annual recruiting funds to colleges and universities to attract students to their poultry programs.

Special

Check presentation: Elton Maddox, second from left, president of Wayne Farms and U.S. Poultry & Egg Association board member, presents a USPOULTRY Foundation student recruiting check to Steven Thomas, communications officer for the Georgia Tech Research Institute Food Processing Technology Division. Georgia Poultry Federation president Mike Giles, far left, and GPF president emeritis Abit Massey assisted in the check presentation.

USDA to close 259 offices nationwide WASHINGTON — USDA has announced that it will close 259 domestic offices, facilities and labs across the country, as well as seven foreign offices. as part of the department’s Blueprint for Stronger Service, a plan to streamline operations and cut costs. “The USDA, like families and businesses across the country, cannot continue to operate like we did 50 years ago,” said U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack. “We must innovate, modernize and be better stewards of the taxpayers’ dollars. We must build on the record accomplishments of farm communities in 2011 with a stronger, more effective USDA in 2012 and beyond.” The department noted that the offices to be closed are no longer staffed or have a very small staff of one or two people; many are within 20

miles of other USDA offices. In other cases, technology improvements, advanced service centers and broadband service have reduced some need for brick and mortar facilities. The Blueprint for Stronger Service is based on a department-wide review of operations conducted as part of the administration’s Campaign to Cut Waste to make government work better and more efficiently. When fully implemented, these actions along with other recommended changes are expected to provide efficiencies valued at about $150 million annually, USDA said. The office closing include: l Farm Service Agency (FSA): Consolidate 131 county offices in 32 states l Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS): Close two country offices

l Animal & Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS): Close 15 APHIS offices in 11 states and five APHIS offices in five foreign countries l Rural Development (RD): Close 43 area and sub offices in 17 states and U.S. territories l Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS): Close 24 soil survey offices in 21 states

l Food Safety & Inspection Service (FSIS): Close five district offices in five states l Agricultural Research Service (ARS): Close 12 programs at 10 locations l Food, Nutrition and Consumer Services (FNCS): Close 31 field offices in 28 states In addition, USDA is implementing a series of other changes to eliminate redun-

dancies and inefficiencies. These improvements include consolidation more than 700 cell phone plans into about 10; and standardized civil rights training and purchases of cyber security products. More information on the Blueprint for Stronger Service and the offices involved in the closures can be obtained at http://www.usda.gov/strongerservice.

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POULTRY TIMES, January 30, 2012

Business Compiled by David B. Strickland, Editor 770-718-3442 dstrickland@poultrytimes.net

Chick-fil-A debuts new kid’s meal ATLANTA — On Jan. 9, Chickfil-A® began offering its new kid’s meal options. In recent months, many fast food chains have updated their side options in an attempt to offer healthier children’s menu items. Chick-fil-A instead is concentrating on making the entrée healthier by adding Grilled Chicken Nuggets as an alternative for children, the company said. The chain also is enhancing its side choices, adding Buddy Fruits® Pure Blended Fruit To Go applesauce as a complement to the Fruit Cup option Chick-fil-A added to its menu in 2004. And, the chain is changing its children’s beverage line to only feature 1 percent milk, 100 percent apple juice, its signature freshly squeezed lemonade and water as drink choices. The Grilled Nuggets kid’s meal, paired with the Fruit Cup and 1 percent milk has only 210 calories and 3 grams of fat, reflecting an 86 percent cut in fat grams and a 56 percent calorie reduction compared with its previous offerings, the company said. “According to reports from the Centers for Disease Control, Americans frequently choose convenience over nutrition. This has created a greater likelihood of our children becoming overweight or obese. The reality is that we live in an on-thego world where parents have limited healthy meal options for their kids on the way to and from recreational activities,

See Meal, Page 8

In other Business news:

Zaxby’s unveils new restaurant design ATHENS, Ga. — On Jan. 17, Zaxby’s unveiled its new, comprehensive restaurant design to be rolled out at two inaugural Georgia locations — 1102 North St. Augustine Road, Valdosta; and 1220 Lakes Blvd., Lake Park. The company said that the new design will feature innovative operational efficiencies, a heightened guest experience through aesthetics and functionality and a curb appeal that exudes the Southern charm of the Zaxby’s brand. “We are always looking for new ways to surprise our guests,” said Zach McLeroy, Zaxby’s cofounder and CEO. Since its inception more than 20 years ago, this is only the third restaurant modification by Zaxby’s. “This new design is another way for us to continuously improve how we serve our guests with great food, outstanding service and a vibrant atmosphere,” McLeroy added. The new restaurant design will showcase a new, open kitchen

design, allowing multiple equipment options and additional storage capacity. The 90-seat restaurant will feature an open, inviting atmosphere with spacious seating and bright graphics, the company said, adding that the unique interior will include a redesigned drink station to provide improved customer access and convenience, and a high-performance heating and air-conditioning system that reduces humidity and provides a comfortable seating area and kitchen. Reminiscent of the architecture found in rural farmhouses across the South, the 3,785-square-foot building exterior will feature corrugated tin awnings, brick trimming below the windows, fluted gooseneck light fixtures and, most recognizably, a metal silo that highlights Zaxby’s drivethru services. “This new design houses everything we want Zaxby’s to be known for by allowing our team members to work better, faster and smarter, and providing our guests with a fun, relaxing experience that sets us apart as a quick-casual restaurant,” McLeroy said. The new, corporately owned Lake Park and Valdosta, Ga., restaurants will be the first in the market to display this design, as

Special

New Zaxby’s design: Zaxby’s has announced a new design for its restaurants, which will incorporate a rural, farmhouse look. The exteriors will feature tin awnings, brick trimming and a metal silo feature at the drive-thru window. The first two locations with the new design will be in Valdosta and Lake Park, Ga.

well as the first in the company. Zaxby’s will also be returning to Valdosta to replace a past Zaxby’s that closed as a result of a fire. The previous location was the third Zaxby’s in existence for the company, before the expansion into franchising. Both Georgia locations featuring the new design are scheduled to open mid- to late February 2012.

New advertising Zaxby’s has also returned its Fried Pickles and Chicken Finger Sandwich Meal as part of its latest promotion. The menu items are being promoted by comedic actress Rachel Dratch, best known for her career on the late-night television sketch comedy show “Saturday Night Live.” Dratch expresses her hunger for Zaxby’s in four TV commercials that began airing on Jan. 9. “We are constantly getting feedback from our fans,” McLeroy said. “They have told us they love the Chicken Finger Sandwich Meal and have been pleading for the return of our Fried Pickles. With the feature of these two Southern favorites, we are happy to give our loyal fans exactly what they have asked for.” The chain’s more than 400,000 Facebook fans have been longing for the return of the Fried Pickles, as has Dratch, the 45th celebrity to join the chain’s ongoing “Indescribably Good” ad campaign. Each of the commercials will air in 46 markets through the chain’s 12-state operating area. Keeping with tradition, Zaxby’s Facebook fans received an exclusive look at the spots prior to TV broadcast at http://www. facebook.com/zaxbys. Zaxby’s operates more than 535 locations in 12 states, including Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, (Continued on next page)


POULTRY TIMES, January 30, 2012 (Continued from previous page)

Texas and Virginia. More information can be obtained at http://www.zaxbys. com.

7

Business

AB Vista is the Feed Ingredients division of AB Agri Ltd., the Agriculture Group of Associated British Foods.

Novogen enters accord for UK & Irish distrib.

AB Vista expands in Eastern Europe CHESTERFIELD, Mo. — AB Vista has expanded its customer service in Hungary and Poland — by switching to new distributors in both countries. NOACK Magyarország will distribute AB Vista’s feed enzymes and yeast in Hungary, while Biochem Polska will do so in Poland. Both companies have a pedigree in the field of animal nutrition, having developed feed additives that perfectly complement AB Vista’s own portfolio, the company said, adding that, as local distributors of its Finase, Econase and Quantum brands, NOACK and Biochem will help AB Vista to further improve the technical support and services it can offer its Hungarian and Polish customers. “I am delighted to confirm the names of our new distributors in the important markets of Hungary and Poland, said Ari Kiviniemi, global sales director for AB Vista. “Both NOACK Magyarország and Biochem Polska specialize in the technical aspects of high-value feed additives, which will help Hungarian and Polish customers take full advantage of AB Vista products in their feed formulations.”

QUINTIN, France — Novogen and Tom Barron Ltd. have announced that they have entered into an agreement to distribute the NOVOgen Brown and NOVOgen White layers into the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland. “We are extremely happy with this agreement to market the Novogen products in this important part of North West Europe,” said Mickaël Le Helloco, Novogen general manager. “Since the introduction of Novogen in 2008 we quickly have become a well-recognized and important supplier of layer breeding stock around the world. Field results have proven that, thanks to our genetic strategy, our layers produce very well under different circumstances including the barn and free range systems.” Neil Leeming, CEO of Tom Barron Ltd., added, “We are totally convinced that the Novogen layers will be a welcome alternative for the UK and Irish layer industry. Being a family-company, established more than 100 years ago, it is very important to us to give our customers a real choice of the best products available around the world. This new venture also secures the supply of commercial layers from the only independent commercial layer hatchery in the UK and Ireland.” More information can be obtained at http://www.novogenlayers.com; or http://www. tombarron.co.uk.

Perdue grant helps fund Junior Achievement SALISBURY, Md. — As part of its ongoing commitment to education, Perdue has announced that it has provided a $10,000 grant funded through the Arthur W. Perdue Foundation to help Junior Achievement reach nearly 500 students through the Our Region® program. Officials noted that, Junior Achievement of the Eastern Shore in Maryland is committed to educating and inspiring young people to value free enterprise, business and economics to improve the quality of their lives. One way Junior Achievement does this is through the Our Region program for fourth-graders in the public schools in Wicomico, Worcester and Somerset counties by focusing on regional agricultural businesses and helping students understand how they produce goods and services for consumers. “We are so grateful to have the support of the Perdue Foundation for the Our Region program,” said Jayme Weeg, president of the Junior Achievement of the Eastern Shore. “Through the support of their contribution and a Perdue volunteer, students on the lower Eastern Shore will have the opportunity to understand the impact and interdependence of agriculture on the economy. Not just locally, but regionally, nationally and globally. What a perfect collaboration!” Bill Hetherington, executive director of the Arthur W. Perdue Foundation, in presenting the grant, said, “We are honored to

present this grant on behalf of Perdue through the foundation in support of Junior Achievement’s innovative learning opportunities. Junior Achievement brings a unique element to a young person’s education by introducing fundamentals of how businesses function. We think that it provides a very valuable learning experience and we’re proud to support their efforts.” “With this Junior Achievement project for fourth-graders, we will be able to reach 500 more students and help them learn how they can be a part of something big — helping feed the hungry — and make a living while analyzing markets, addressing scarcity and being a part of a core economic driver for not just our area, but America and the world,” said Dr. John Fredericksen, superintendent of Wicomico County Public Schools. “If we’re to be successful as a country, our children will have to understand these core concepts at a personal level early, as they learn and grow.”

John Reichenberg, a retail customer service representative at Perdue, has been a volunteer teacher for Junior Achievement of the Eastern Shore since 2004. Through the Our Region program, he helps students distinguish U.S. economic regions, identify resources businesses use to make products, learn how resources relate to business income and expenses, calculate profits and losses and understand how important location is to a business. “One of the examples I use is that you wouldn’t want to run a surf shop in Arizona,” said Reichenberg, who was named the 2009 Junior Achievement Volunteer of the Year and the 2011 Junior Achievement Community Hero. “On the Shore, this really is a key program for students of this age who are starting to form relationships between money and its value, and how businesses operate. I really enjoy my time in the classroom.” More information can be obtained at http://www.easternshoreja.org.

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POULTRY TIMES, January 30, 2012

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•Meal (Continued from page 6)

school or other events,” said Woody Faulk, Chick-fil-A’s vice president of brand strategy and design, who oversees Chick-fil-A’s menu. “Our new Kid’s Meal reflects our commitment to helping parents strike a balance between nutrition, convenience and price. We want parents to know that they do have a choice at Chickfil-A.” The company also offers the following information on the new kid’s meals: l Introduction of Grilled

•Overview (Continued from page 1)

standing room only events, and there have been a number of truly excellent presentations.” He added, “We are grateful to UEP and NCC for holding their board meetings in conjunction with the IPE. Together with our board meeting, this helps ensure the top decision makers in the industry are here to conduct business with our exhibitors.” Highlights of the 2012 IPE/IFE show included USPOULTRY presentations of the following: Workhorse of the Year award to Bill Bradley, vice president of the Egg Division for CCF Brands and 2008 USPOULTRY chairman; Harold E. Ford Lifetime Achievement Award to Abit Massey, president emeritus of the Georgia Poultry Federation; and Lamplighter Award to Dolph Baker, president and chief executive officer of Cal-Maine Foods. The 2013 IPE/IFE is scheduled to again be held at the Georgia World Congress Center on Jan. 29-31.

Nuggets: The gluten-free Grilled Nuggets are made from a boneless, skinless breast of chicken tumbled in a salt and pepper spice blend and then grilled. The four count is 80 calories and 1 gram of fat, while the six count contains 110 calories and 1.5 grams of fat. l Addition of Buddy Fruits Fruit To Go, Apple Cinnamon: Each squeezable fruit pouch is gluten-free, all natural and contains 100 percent pure fruit. It is 60 calories, zero grams of fat and equals one serving of fruit. l Improved beverage options. According to Chick-fil-A’s full-time dietitian Jodie Worrell, these new menu additions come as part of Chick-fil-A’s broader initiative to offer healthier menu options to customers. Initiative highlights include the addition of the Fruit Cup in 2004 and moving

to a complete menu (including all condiments) with zero trans fats in 2008. Chick-fil-A also noted that it is actively working to reduce sodium across its menu, including a 40 percent sodium reduction in its Chargrilled Chicken filet, 25 percent less sodium in breads and removing 10 percent of sodium in dressings and sauces. “While we are excited about the moves we have made on the Kid’s Meal menu, we also are extremely proud of the progress we have made with our overall menu,” Worrell said. “Removing trans fats, adding more nutritious salads and reducing sodium are examples of some of the steps we have taken in recent years to further our commitment to customers of offering a well-balanced menu of choices. Our work is not complete though. We are constantly looking for a better way to offer our customers healthier choices.”

•Workhorse (Continued from page 1)

ent Monty Henderson. He was also presented with a commemorative plaque by 2011USPOULTRY Chairman, Gary Cooper, Cooper Farms. “We are honored to recognize Bill with this special award and acknowledge his many contributions to the association and the industry,” Cooper said. “Bill has committed a great deal of time and energy to help address and meet the challenges facing our industry every day. We are deeply appreciative of his leadership and commitment.” After earning his bachelor of science degree at Oklahoma State University and his master of science degree at Kansas State University, Bradley began his career with DeKalb Poultry Research in Illinois. He later worked for Moark Productions in Missouri until 2002. Bradley’s involvement with USPOULTRY spans 30 years on various committees and projects, the association noted.


POULTRY TIMES, January 30, 2012

9

UGA awarded funds NCSU receives $20,126 grant to aid recruiting TUCKER, Ga. — The University of Georgia Poultry Science Department recently received a $16,334 student recruiting grant from the U.S. Poultry & Egg Association Foundation. Tom Hensley, president of Fieldale Farms and USPOULTRY board member, presented the check to Dr. Mike Lacy, professor and head of the Poultry Science Department at the University of Georgia. Mike Giles, president of the Georgia Poultry Federation, and Abit Massey, GPF’s president emeritus, assisted with the check presentation. “The University of Georgia Department of Poultry Science uses funds from the USPOULTRY Foundation to attract students to its majors through summer programs, which introduce high school students to the interesting field of poultry science,” Lacy said. “Funds are also used to create recruiting materials to help students who already attending UGA, but are not familiar with the poultry science, become aware of the tremendous number and diversity of career opportunities available in the poultry industry.” The USPOULTRY Foundation board recently approved student recruiting grants totaling more than $180,000 to the six U.S. universities with poultry science departments and 14 other institutions with poultry programs. The foundation provides annual recruiting funds to colleges and universities to attract students to their poultry programs. The U.S. Poultry & Egg Association is an all-feather organization representing the complete spectrum of the poultry industry. Founded in 1947, the association is based in Tucker, Ga.

TUCKER, GA —– North Carolina State University recently received a student recruiting grant from the U.S. Poultry & Egg Association Foundation. Tim Davis, director of commercial operations for Pfizer Animal Health Global Poultry and USPOULTRY board member, presented a check in the amount of $20,126 to Dr. Sam Pardue, head of the Poultry Science Department at North Carolina State University. “The USPOULTRY Foundation’s support is vital to the N.C. State Poultry Science Department recruiting efforts. Their commitment to assisting us in identifying the next generation of leadership for the poultry industry is another example of the vision they possess. We are grateful for all that they do,” Pardue remarked. The USPOULTRY Foundation board recently approved student recruiting grants totaling more than $180,000 to the six U.S. universities with poultry science departments and 14 other institutions with poultry programs.

•Massey (Continued from page 2)

Special

UGA grant: The U.S. Poultry & Egg Association Foundation recently presented the University of Georgia Poultry Science Department with a $16,334 student recruiting grant. On hand for the presentation were, left to right, Dr. Mike Lacy, head of the UGA Poultry Science Department; Tom Hensley, president of Fieldale Farms, as well as a USPOULTRY board member; Mike Giles, president of the Georgia Poultry Federation; and Abit Massey, GPF’s president emeritus.

versity of Georgia Alumni Association, and organizer and first president of the State Poultry Executives Association. Massey has been listed twice by Georgia Trend as one of the 100 Most Influential Georgians. He received the Inaugural Medallion of Honor for Service to the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences in June 2006 and the seventh Presidential Citation presented by Georgia Tech in March 2009. He has also been recognized with the 2008 Distinguished Service Award from the Agricultural Economics Association of Georgia and received the Key to the City of Gainesville, Ga., in December 2008.

Special

Grant awarded: Tim Davis, left, U.S. Poultry & Egg Association board member, presents a check from the USPOULTRY Foundation to Dr. Sam Pardue, center, head of the North Carolina State University Poultry Science Department. Taking part in the presentation is Bob Ford, executive director of the North Carolina Poultry Federation. The funds will be used for student recruiting.

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POULTRY TIMES, January 30, 2012

Calendar Compiled by Barbara Olejnik, Associate Editor 770-718-3440 bolejnik@poultrytimes.net

FEB 8-10 — POULTRY FOCUS ASIA 2012, Queen Sirikit Center, Bangkok, Thailand. Contact: Positive Action Publications Ltd., P.O. Box 4, Driffield, East Yorkshire YO25 9DJ, England. Ph: +44 1377 241724; http://www.positiveaction.co.uk or http://www.nccexhibition.com. FEB 15-18 — NTF ANNUAL CONV., Tampa Marriott Waterside Hotel & Marina, Tampa, Fla. Contact: National Turkey Federation, 1225 New York Ave., N.W., Suite 400, Washington, D.C. 20005. Ph: 202-898-0100; info@turkeyfed.org; http://www.eatturkey.com. FEB 18-20 — BEGINNING FARMER & RANCHER CONF., Amway Grand Plaza Hotel & DeVos Place Convention Center, Grand Rapids, Mich. Contact: info@start2farm.gov; http:/ /2012bfrconference.eventbrite.com. FEB 19-21 — ANNUAL MEAT CONF., Rosen Shingle Creek, Orlando, Fla. Contact: American Meat Institute, 1150 Connecticut Ave., N.W., 12th Floor, Washington, D.C. Ph: 202-5874200; http://www.meatami.com. FEB 22-23 — NPI ANNUAL CONV., Norfolk Lodge & Suites, Divots Conference Center, Norfolk, Neb. Contact: Nebraska Poultry Industries Inc., University of Nebraska, 102 Mussehl Hall, P.O. Box 830721, Lincoln, Neb. 68583-0721. Ph: 402-472-2051; egg-turkey@unl.edu. FEB 23-24 — USDA AGRICULTURAL Crystal OUTLOOK FORUM, Gateway Marriott Hotel, Arlington, Va. Contact: http://www.gov/oce/forum. FEB 23-25 — SGFA AND GFGA ANNUAL CONV., Hyatt Regency Savannah, Savannah, Ga. Contact: Bonnie Holloman, Southeastern Grain & Feed Association and Georgia Feed & Grain Association, P.O. Box 58220, Raleigh, N.C. 27658. Ph: 919-8558981; bonnieholloman@yahoo.com. FEB 27-29 — PEPA ANNUAL CONV., Sheraton Maui Resort & Spa, Maui, Hawaii. Contact: Pacific Egg & Poultry Association, 1521 I St., Sacramento, Calif. 95814. Ph: 916-441-0801; dmurdock@cgfa. org; http://www.pacificegg.org. FEB 28-March 18 — HOUSTON LIVESTOCK SHOW & RODEO, Houston, Texas. Contact: Houston Livestock Show & Rodeo, P.O. Box 20070, Houston, Texas 77225-0070. Ph: 832-667-1000; questions@rodeohouston.com; http://www.hlrs.com. MAR 1-3 —ASA COMMODITY CLASSIC CONV., Gaylord Opryland Resort, Nashville, Tenn. Contact: American Soybean Association, 12125 Woodcrest Executive Drive, Suite 100, St. Louis, Mo. 63141. Ph: 800-688-7692; membership@soy.

org; http://www.soygrowers.com MAR 4-7 — FMI ANNUAL BUSINESS CONF., Orlando, Fla. Contact: Food Marketng Institute, 2345 Crystal Drive, Suite 800, Arlington, Va. 22202-4813. Ph: 202-452-8444; fmi@fmi.org; http://www.fmi.org. MAR 6-8 — AEB MTNG., Chicago, Ill. Ariz. Contact: American Egg Board, 1460 Renaissance Drive, Park Ridge, Ill. 60068. Ph: 847-296-7043; aeb@aeb.org; http://www.aeb.org. MAR 7-8 — ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SMNR., Doubletree Hotel, Nashville, Tenn. Contact: U.S. Poultry & Egg Association, 1530 Cooledge Road, Tucker, Ga. 300847303, Ph: 770-493-9401; info@poultryegg.org; http://www.poultryegg.org, MAR 12 — CPF WINTER BOARD MTNG., Doubletree Hotel, Modesto, Calif. Contact: California Poultry Federation, 4640 Spyres Way, Suite 4, Modesto, Calif. 95356. Ph: 209-576-6355; califpoultry@cs.com; http://www.cpif.org. MAR 12-14 — AFIA SPRING COMMITTEE MTNGS./PURCHASING & INGREDIENT SUPPLIERS CONF., Omni Orlando Resort at Champions Gate, Orlando, Fla. Contact: American Feed Industry Association, 2101 Wilson Blvd., Suite 916. Arlington, Va. 22201. Ph: 703-524-0810; afia@afia.org; http://www.afia.org. MAR 13-14 - MPF ANNUAL CONV., Saint Paul River Centre, St. Paul, Minn. Contact: Midwest Poultry Federation, 108 Marty Drive, Buffalo, Minn. 55313. Ph: 763-6825546l steve@midwestpoultry.com; http://www.midwestpoultry.com. MAR 14 — BEAM ANNUAL MTNG., Saint Paul River Centre, St. Paul, Minn. Contact: Broiler & Egg Association of Minnesota, 108 Marty Drive, Buffalo, Minn. 55313. Ph: 763-6825546l steve@midwestpoultry.com; http://www.midwestpoultry.com. MAR 14 — MTGA ANNUAL MTNG., Saint Paul River Centre, St. Paul, Minn. Contact: Minnesota Turkey Growers Association, 108 Marty Drive, Buffalo, Minn. 55313. Ph: 763-6825546l steve@midwestpoultry.com; http://www.midwestpoultry.com. MAR 15-16 — PHTQA ‘TRAIN THE TRAINER’ MTNG., Saint Paul RiverCentre, St. Paul, Minn. Contact: Dr. Eva Waller-Pendleton, Poultry Handling & Transportation Quality Assurance coordinator, 100 Orchard Road, Animal Diagnostic Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pa. 16802; 814-8630837; eaw10psu.edu; Registration: lara@midwestpoultry.com, http:// www.midwestpoultry.com, or h t t p : / / w w w. p o u l t r y h a n d l i n g . o rg MAR 18-20 —NGFA ANNUAL CONV.,

Charleston Place Hotel, Charleston, S.C. Contact: National Grain & Feed Association, 1250 I St., N.W., Suite 1003, Washington, D.C. 20005. Ph: 202-289-0873; ngfa@ ngfa.org; http://www.ngfa.org. MAR 21-22 — FEED MILL MANAGEMENT SMNR., Doubletree Hotel, Nashville, Tenn. Contact: U.S. Poultry & Egg Association, 1530 Cooledge Road, Tucker, Ga. 30084-7303, Ph: 770493-9401; info@poultryegg. org; http://www.poultryegg.org, MAR 29-30 — FLAX INSTITUTE CONF., Doublewood Inn, Fargo,N.D. Contact: Flax Institute of the United States, P.O. Box 6050, Dept. 7670, North Dakota State University, Fargo, N.D. 58108-6050. Ph: 701-2317122; lisa.johnson@udsu.edu. APR 13 — OPA CELEBRATION BANQUET, Renaissance Columbus Downtown Hotel, Columbus, Ohio. Contact: Ohio Poultry Association, 5930 Sharon Woods Blvd., Columbus, Ohio 43229. Ph: 614882-6111; jchakeres@ohiopoultry. org; http://www.ohiopoultry.org. APR 13-14 — GPF ANNUAL MTNG., Brasstown Valley Resort, Young Harris, Ga. Contact: Georgia Poultry Federation, P.O. Box 763, Gainesville, Ga. 30503. Ph: 770-532-0473. APR 13-15 — ALABAMA CHICKEN & EGG FESTIVAL, Lions Club Fairgrounds, Moulton, Ala. Contact: Festival web site at http://www.alabamachickenandeggfestival.com. APR 16-18 — HUMAN RESOURCES SMNR., Sandestin Golf & Beach Resort, Destin, Fla. Contact: U.S. Poultry & Egg Association, 1530 Cooledge Road, Tucker, Ga. 300847303, Ph: 770-493-9401; info@poultryegg.org; http://www.poultryegg.org, APR 24-25 — PF LIVE PRODUCTION SYMPM., Rogers, Ark. Contact: Poultry Federation, P.O. Box 1446, Little Rock, Ark. 72203. Ph: 501-375-8131; http://www.thepoultryfederation.com. APR 30-May 1 — FEDERAL FOOD REGULATORY CONF., Washington, D.C. Contact: Susan Glenn, conference coordinator, Prime Label Consultants, 536 7th St., S.E., Washington, D.C. 20003. Ph: 202546-3333; conference@primelabel. com; http://www.primelabel.com. APR 30-May 1 — I-RIM CONF., Hilton Fort Lauderdale Marina Resort, Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Contact: International Reflective Insulation Manufacturers (I-RIM), rima@rima.net. APR 30-May 3 — AMI INT’L. MEAT POULTRY & SEAFOOD CONV., Dallas Convention Center, Dallas, Texas. Contact: American Meat Institute, 1150 Connecticut Ave., N.W., 12th Floor, Washington, D.C. 20036. Ph: 202587-4200; http://www.meatami.com MAY 1-3 — FMI EXHIBIT & EDUCATION EVENT, Dallas Convention Center, Dallas Texas. Contact: Food Marketing Institute, 2345 Crystal Drive, Suite 800, Arlington, Va. 22202-4813. Ph: 202-452-8444; fmi@fmi.org; http://www.fmi.org. MAY 1-3 — UFPA UNITED FRESH MARKETPLACE & FRESHTECH, Dallas Convention Center, Dallas, Texas. Contact: United Fresh Produce Association, 1901

Pennsylvania Ave., N.W., Suite 1100, Washington, D.C. 20006. Ph: 202-303-3400; united@unitedfresh. org; http://www.unitedfreshs.org. MAY 2-3 — STAKEHOLDERS SUMMIT, Arlington, Va. Contact: Animal Agriculture Alliance, 2101 Wilson Blvd, Suite 916B, Arlington, Va. 22201. Ph: 703-562-5160; http://www.animalagalliance.org. MAY 3-4 — POULTRY BREEDERS OF AMERICA NATIONAL BREEDERS ROUNDTABLE, Airport Marriott Hotel, St. Louis, Mo. Contact: U.S. Poultry & Egg Association, 1530 Cooledge Road, Tucker, Ga. 30084-7303, Ph: 770-493-9401; info@poultryegg. org; http://www.poultryegg.org, MAY 7-9 — UEP LEGISLATIVE BOARD MTNG., Washington Court Hotel, Washington, D.C. Contact: United Egg Producers, 1720 Windward Concourse, Suite 230, Alpharetta, Ga. 30005. Ph: 770-360-9220; gene@unitedegg. com; http://www.unitedegg.com. MAY 15-16—TPFANNUALCONV.,College Station, Texas. Contact: Texas Poultry Federation, 595 Round Rock W. Drive, Suite 305, Round Rock, Texas 78681. Ph: 512-248-0600; tpf@texaspoultry. org; http://www.texaspoultrly.org. MAY 16-17 — POULTRY PROCESSOR WORKSHOP, Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, Ga. Contact: U.S. Poultry & Egg Association, 1530 Cooledge Road, Tucker, Ga. 30084-7303, Ph: 770-493-9401; info@poultryegg. org; http://www.poultryegg.org, MAY 21-24 — NATIONAL EGG QUALITY SCHOOL, Indianapolis, Ind. Contact: Deanna Baldwin, Program Manager, Maryland Department of Agriculture, Food Quality Assurance Program, 50 Harry S. Truman Pkwy., Annapolis, Md. 21401. Ph: 410-8415769; baldwidl@mda.state.md.us. JUN 6-8 — POULTRY INDUSTRY NATIONAL SAFETY CONF., Sawgrass Marriott Resort, Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. Contact: Kristi Campbell, 404-407-8822 or kristi.campbell@gtri.gatech.edu. JUN 8-9 — AP&EA GOLF TOURNEY & EVENING OF FUN, Birmingham, Ala. Contact: Alabama Poultry & Egg Association, P.O. Box 240, Montgomery, Ala. 36101. Ph: 334-2652732; http://www.alabamapoultry.org. JUN 11-14 — AFIA FEED INDUSTRY INSTITUTE, Westin St. Louis, St. Louis, Mo. Contact: American Feed Industry Association, 2101 Wilson Blvd., Suite 916, Arlington, Va. 22201, 703-524-0810, afia@ afia.org, http://www.afia.org. JUN 12-14 — USAPEEC ANNUAL MTNG., Hotel Del Coronado, San Diego, Calif. Contact: USA Poultry & Egg Export Council, 2300 W. Park Place Blvd., Suite 100, Stone Mountain, Ga. 30087. Ph: 770-413-0006; usapeac@ usapeec.org; http://www.usapeec.org. JUN 15-16 — DELMARVA CHICKEN Salisbury, Md. FESTIVAL, Contact: Delmarva Poultry Industry Inc., 16681 County Seat Hwy., Georgetown, Del. 19947-4881. Ph: 302-856-9037; dpi@dpichicken. com; http://www.dpichicken.org. JUN 15-16 — PF ANNUAL POULTRY FESTIVAL, Rogers, Ark. Contact: Poultry Federation, P.O. Box 1446, Little

Rock, Ark. 72203. Ph: 501-375-8131; http://www.thepoultryfederation.com. JUN 20-22 — GEA ANNUAL MTNG., King and Prince Beach & Golf Resort, St. Simons Island, Ga. Contact: Jewell Hutto, Georgia Egg Association, P.O. Box 2929, Suwanee, Ga. 30024. Ph: 770-932-4622; goodeggs@bellsouth. net; http://www.georgiaeggs.org. JUN 20 — MTGA SUMMER CONF.., Bemidji, Minn. Contact: Minnesota Turkey Growers Association, 108 Marty Drive, Buffalo, Minn. 55313. Ph: 763-682-5546l steve@midwestpoultry. com; http://www.midwestpoultry.com. JUN 21-23 — NCC SUMMER BOARD OF DIRECTORS MTNG., Ritz-Carlton Highlands, Lake Tahoe, Calif. Contact: National Chicken Council, 1015 15th St., N.W., Suite 930, Washington, D.C. 20005. Ph: 202-296-2622; http://www.nationalchickencouncil. cm; http://www.eatchicken.com. JUN 25-26 — CPF SUMMER BOARD MTNG., The Cliffs Resort, Shell Beach, Calif. Contact: California Poultry Federation, 4640 Spyres Way, Suite 4, Modesto, Calif. 95356. Ph: 209-576-6355; califpoultry@cs.com; http://www.cpif.org. JUN 25-27 — FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SMNR., Crowne Plaza Resort, Hilton Head, S.C. Contact: U.S. Poultry & Egg Association, 1530 Cooledge Road, Tucker, Ga. 30084-7303, Ph: 770-493-9401; info@poultryegg. org; http://www.poultryegg.org, JUL 9-12 — PSA ANNUAL CONV., Georgia Center, Athens, Ga. Contact: Poultry Science Association, 2441 Village Green Place, Champaign, Ill. 61822. Ph: 217-356-5285; pas@assochq. org; http://www.poultryscience.org. JUL 12-15 — SCPF ANNUAL CONV., Crowne Plaza Resort, Hilton Head, S.C. Contact: South Carolina Poultry Federation, 1921-A Pickens St., Columbia, SC. 29201. Ph: 803-779-4700; martyg@scpoultry.com; http://www.scpoultry.org. JUL 10-12 — AEB MTNG., Chicago, Ill. Contact: American Egg Board, 1460 Renaissance Drive, Park Ridge, Ill. 60068. Ph: 847-296-7043; aeb@ aeb.org; http://www.aeb.org. JUL 15-17 — NCC & NPFDA CHICKEN Stowe MARKETING SMNR., Mountain Lodge, Stowe, Vt. Contact: National Chicken Council, 1015 15th St., N.W., Suite 930, Washington, D.C. 20005, 202296-2622, http://www.nationalchickencouncil.com, http://www. eatchicken.com; or National Poultry & Food Distributors Association, 2014 Osborne Road, St. Marys, Ga. 31558, 770-535-9901, kkm@ npfda.org, http://www.npfda.org. JUL 16-17 — INFORMATION SYSTEMS SMNR., Doubletree Hotel, Nashville, Tenn. Contact: U.S. Poultry & Egg Association, 1530 Cooledge Road, Tucker, Ga. 30084-7303, Ph: 770493-9401; info@poultryegg. org; http://www.poultryegg.org, JUL 23-24 — AP&EA ANNUAL MTNG., Hilton Sandestin Beach, Fla. Contact: Alabama Poultry & Egg Association, P.O. Box 240, Montgomery, Ala. 36101. Ph: 334-265-2732; http://www.alabamapoultry.org.


POULTRY TIMES, January 30, 2012

11

•Brown (Continued from page 4)

next five years. The rate of annual increase may not be the 45 percent we enjoyed up until 2000, but a rate of 2-3 percent per year will allow companies to seek more growers, more workers and invest more. I will say, however, that during 2012, 2013 and most likely beyond, chicken companies must remain innovative and must work to create successful new chicken products that stimulate the average consumer to eat chicken more often than 5.7 times in a two-week period. What can we expect in 2012 from Washington during the second session of the 112th Congress? Being a major election year for Congress and the White House — not too much. But here are a handful items on NCC’s radar this year: l With VEETC and the import tariff expiring on Dec. 31, 2011, we will work to ensure that similar tax treatment is not made available for corn-based ethanol infrastructure. l Work to eliminate or adjust the Renewable Fuels Standard in the House and Senate and achieve a favorable outcome in our E-15 waiver lawsuit. l Continue our proactive leadership in food safety by working with industry and USDA on a Salmonella Reduction Initiative for ground poultry products. l Stay abreast of USDA attempts to regulate birds on the farm and other pre-harvest steps. l Submit comments on a USDA rule that proposes a new inspection system for young poultry slaughter establishments.

l Update the NCC Animal Welfare Guidelines and Audit Checklist for broilers and breeder flocks. l File comments with the Environmental Protection Agency discussing the concerns of confidentiality, location of pre-existing data and the financial burden of a proposed CAFO (Concentrated Animal Feeding Operation) reporting rule would have on the chicken industry. l Remain engaged on the status of the lawsuit filed regarding the Chesapeake Bay TMDL (Total Maximum Daily Load) and follow the path EPA may take with regards to other watersheds across the United States.

Political outlook In the Senate, Democrats will defend 23 of the 33 seats on the ballot in November to 10 for Republicans. Most analysts agree that whatever the outcome, whether Republicans pick up the four seats they need to gain the majority, or Democrats find a way to keep a hold on the chamber, there will be four states that determine which way the pendulum swings: Virginia, Massachusetts, Nevada and Montana. All four of these races as of print remain within the margin of error in public polling, which means they will be targeted by both national parties and many outside interest groups and PACs. Three of the four involve incumbents — Scott Brown (R-Mass.), Jon Tester (D-Mont.) and Dean Heller (R-Nev.) — which will be a good bellwether of voters’ anti-incumbent mood. Maybe most importantly, two of these

races (Virginia and Nevada) take place in major presidential battleground states. Keep an eye on how these four states fare. Their outcome will have a major impact on which party holds the gavel in the Senate next year. The current line-up in the House of Representatives consists of 242 Republicans, 192 Democrats and one vacant seat in Oregon’s 1st Congressional District which will be decided in a special election on Jan. 31, 2012. With retirements or members running for other office, there are 15 open Democratic seats and nine open GOP seats. 49 of the 435 races are considered toss-ups, meaning

Democrats would have to fare extremely well in those races to significantly close the gap. The real prize this year, of course, is the White House. A Jan. 12, 2012, Gallup poll showed President Obama with a 43 percent approval rating and 48 percent saying they disapprove of the job the president is doing. It is way too early to predict this race, especially without the GOP nominee in place, although the nomination seems at this point former Governor Mitt Romney’s to lose. That said, Real Clear Politics’ Jan. 13 poll average showed any Republican candidate at 43.6 percent and President Obama 42.6 percent.

I’ll close my inaugural column echoing something George Watts said in his last Viewpoint piece in January 2011, something that I’ve learned pretty quickly in my first 11 months on the job: “These chicken people are the individuals you would want to be your friends even if you were in a different line of work.” I couldn’t agree more. I’m blessed to have the opportunity to work with so many outstanding individuals who have made this industry the success it has become and I look forward to working extremely hard to maintain and expand on that success.


12

POULTRY TIMES, January 30, 2012

Richmond Community College presented USPOULTRY grant TUCKER, Ga. — Riched materials to inform mond Community College of the job opportuniin Hamlet, N.C., recently ties available to them received a $5,000 student in the poultry industry. recruiting grant from the Those brochures will U.S. Poultry & Egg Asbe combined with ads sociation Foundation. in high school newsThe grant will support the papers and posters for college’s new articulation their guidance counagreement with N.C. State selor offices,” said University which allows Special McInnis. graduates of RCC’s asso- Check presentation: The U.S, Poultry & Egg The USPOULTRY ciate in science program Association Foundation recently awarded a Foundation board to transfer as juniors into student recruiting grant to the Richmond approved student reCollege in Hamlet, N.C. Accepting the NCSU Poultry Science Community the check on behalf of the program are, left cruiting grants toprogram. to right, Richmond Community College presitaling more than Accepting the check on dent Dr. Dale McInnis; Kelsey Stutts, student; $180,000 to the six behalf of the program were and RCC Arts and Science Division chairman Kevin Parsons. U.S. universities Dr. Dale McInnis, RCC with poultry science president; Kevin Parsons, departments and 14 RCC Arts and Science Di“High school students are a other institutions with vision chairman; and Kelsey pretty sophisticated group and poultry programs. The founStutts, student from Ellerbe. expect polished materials. The dation provides annual reStutts is planning on using the program to pursue a poul- funds from the USPOULTRY cruiting funds to colleges and try science degree through the Foundation will allow us the universities to attract students opportunity to develop print- to their poultry programs. new agreement with NCSU.

Five companies recognized for long-term exhibiting at IPE ATLANTA — At the 2012 International Poultry Expo, the U.S. Poultry & Egg Association recognized five companies that have been exhibiting for 50 or more years at the Expo. Gary Cooper, outgoing chairman of USPOULTRY and COO of Cooper Farms, presented plaques to each

company in acknowledgment of their long-term exhibiting tenure. Those recognized were: l 60 years: Chick Master Incubator Co. Merck Animal Health l 50 years: Bright Coop Inc. Marel Stork Poultry Pro-

cessing Pactiv Corp. “Thank you for your continued support in the International Poultry Expo,” Cooper said. “Your support of the Expo has allowed the industry to grow and advance, as we have invested show revenues directly back in the industry.”

More young people see opportunity in farming The Associated Press

MILWAUKEE — A Wisconsin factory worker worried about layoffs became a dairy farmer. An employee at a Minnesota nonprofit found an escape from her cubicle by buying a vegetable farm. A nuclear engineer tired of office bureaucracy decided to get into cattle ranching in Texas. While fresh demographic information on U.S. farmers won’t be available until after the next agricultural census is done next year, there are signs more people in their 20s and 30s are going into farming: Enrollment in university agriculture programs has increased, as has interest in farmer-training programs. Young people are turning up at farmers markets and are blogging, tweeting and promoting their agricultural endeavors through other social media. The young entrepreneurs typically cite two reasons for going into farming: Many find the corporate world stifling and see no point in sticking it out when there’s little job security; and demand for locally grown and organic foods has been strong enough that even in the downturn they feel confident they can sell their products. Laura Frerichs, 31, of Hutchinson, Minn., discovered her passion for farming about a year after she graduated from college with an anthropology degree. She planned to work in economic development in Latin America and thought she ought to get some experience working on a farm. She did stints on five farms, mostly vegetable farms, and fell in love with the work. Frerichs and her husband now have their own organic farm, and while she doesn’t expect it to make them rich, she’s confident they’ll be able to earn a living. “There’s just this growing consciousness around locally grown foods, around organic foods,” she said. “Where we are in the Twin Cities there’s been great demand for that.” Farming is inherently risky: Drought, flooding, wind and other weather extremes can all destroy a year’s work. And with farmland averaging $2,140 per acre across the U.S. but two to four times that much in the Midwest and California, the start-up costs can be daunting. Still, agriculture fared better than many parts of the economy during the recession, and USDA predicts record profits for farmers as a whole this year. “People are looking at farm income, especially the increase in asset values, and seeing a really positive story about our economy,” said USDA senior economist Mary Clare Ahearn, citing preliminary statistics. “Young people are viewing agriculture as a great opportunity and saying they want to be a part of it.” That’s welcome news to the government. More than 60 percent of farmers are over the age of 55, and without young farmers to replace them when they retire the nation’s food supply would depend on fewer and fewer people. “We’d be vulnerable to local economic disruptions, tariffs, attacks on the food supply, really, any disaster you can think of,”

See Farming, Page 13


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POULTRY TIMES, January 30, 2012

•Farming (Continued from page 12)

said Poppy Davis, who coordinates the USDA’s programs for beginning farmers and ranchers. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack has called for 100,000 new farmers within the next few years, and Congress has responded with proposals that would provide young farmers with improved access to USDA support and loan programs. One beginning farmer is Gabrielle Rojas, 34, from the central Wisconsin town of Hewitt. As a rebellious teen all she wanted to do was leave her family’s farm and find a career that didn’t involve cows. But she changed her mind after spending years in dead-end jobs in a factory and restaurant. “In those jobs I’m just a number, just a time-clock number,” Rojas said. “But now I’m doing what I love to do. If I’m having a rough day or I’m a little sad because the sun’s not shining or my tractor’s broken, I can always go out and be by the cattle. That always makes me feel better.” Rojas got help in changing careers from an apprenticeship program paid for by the USDA, which began giving money in 2009 to universities and nonprofit groups that help train beginning farmers. The grants helped train about 5,000 people the first year. This year, the USDA estimates more than twice as many benefited. One of the groups that received a grant is Midwest Organic and Sustainable Education Service, or MOSES. The Spring Valley, Wis., chapter teaches farming entrepreneurs how to cope with price swings and what to do in cases of catastrophic weather. MOSES also organizes field days, where would-be farmers tour the operations of successful farms to learn and share tips. Attendance is up 20 percent this year, director Faye Jones said, and some outings that used to attract 30 or 40 people have drawn as many as 100, most between the ages of 18 and 30. “I think for many people, farming has been a lifelong dream, and now the timing is right,” she said. Among the reasons she cited: the lifestyle, working in the fresh air and being one’s own boss. If farming is beginning to sound like an appealing career, there are downsides. The work involves tough physical labor, and vacations create problems when there are crops to be harvested and cows to be milked. In addition, many farmers need second jobs to get health insurance or make ends meet. As the USDA notes, three-fifths of farms have sales of less than $10,000 a year, although some may be growing fruit trees or other crops that take a few years to develop. None of those factors dissuaded 27-year-old Paul Mews. He left a high-paying job as a nuclear engineer last year to become a cattle rancher in Menard, Texas. His wife’s family has been ranching for generations, and Mews decided he’d much rather join his in-laws and be his own boss than continue shuffling paperwork at the plant. “When you’re self-employed it’s so much more fulfilling. You get paid what you’re worth,” he said. “It’s really nice that what you put into it is what you’re going to get back out.”

13

University of Arkansas receives recruiting grant TUCKER, Ga. — The U.S. Poultry & Egg Association Foundation recently awarded a $19,043 student recruiting grant to the University of Arkansas’

“More students are going to college in the U.S. than ever before. The only problem is that the majority of students choose majors outside the science, tech-

Special

Award presentation: Wes Morris, right, group vice president of Retail Poultry and Prepared Foods for Tyson Foods and U.S. Poultry & Egg Association board member, presents a USPOULTRY Foundation student recruiting fund check to Dr. Michael Kidd, director of the Center of Excellence for Poultry Science at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville.

Poultry Science Department. Wes Morris, group vice president of Retail Poultry and Prepared Foods for Tyson Foods and USPOULTRY board member, presented the check to Dr. Michael Kidd, director of the Center of Excellence for Poultry Science, University of Arkansas-Fayetteville.

nology, engineering and math (STEM) fields, and those majors typically have lower economic potential and do not drive the U.S. economy. Many other degrees outside of STEM are oversold to students, saturating those career fields to the point of limiting job availability and potential career growth,” com-

mented Kidd. Most students don’t understand the career potential of STEM fields, much less the poultry industry, explains Kidd, who emphasizes that funds from the USPOULTRY Foundation are vital in the university’s outreach to K-12 youth and community college students. Kidd continued, “These funds give us the means to develop forums to attract and explain the vast and lucrative career possibilities that a poultry science major can provide. Moreover, it’s a testament that the U.S. poultry industry wants to help us recruit today’s youth, contribute to their education and develop future leaders in these careers. The funds from the USPOULTRY Foundation allow us to tell our story to youth.” The USPOULTRY Foundation board recently approved student recruiting grants totaling more than $180,000 to the six U.S. universities with poultry science departments and 14 other institutions with poultry programs. The foundation provides annual recruiting funds to colleges and universities to attract students to their poultry programs.

USPOULTRY awards Iowa State $1,600 TUCKER, Ga. — Iowa State University received a $1,600 student recruiting grant from the U.S. Poultry & Egg Association Foundation. The check was presented to Dr. Michael Persia, assistant professor, Poultry Nutrition, Department of Animal Science, Iowa State University, by Dr. Kenton Kreager, technical service director, Hy-Line International and USPOULTRY board member. Persia summarized how the grant will assist the students at ISU. “The grant will be used to offset some of the student travel costs associated with the development of a new poultry class at Iowa State University. This class is being developed to

provide students that have demonstrated interest in poultry further contact with the diverse industry working with and supporting poultry production in Iowa and will also include leadership training,” said Persia. “The second area will be to help support the newly formed Poultry Interest Group in the Iowa State Block and Bridle Club. The Poultry Interest Group allows students across the university with an interest in poultry to gather to discuss common topics of importance to poultry production,” Persia

See Iowa, Page 14


14

POULTRY TIMES, January 30, 2012

Role and function of enzymes in poultry diets By Dr. Terri Parr

Special to Poultry Times

ST. PAUL, Minn. — The growing use of enzymes in animal nutrition has become an exciting, if not somewhat challenging opportunity for producers. The ability to incorporate a wider selection of feedstuffs into nutritional formulations offers more flexibility as ingredients begin to escalate in price. Alternative feedstuffs are now a more viable option as improved enzymes have been developed and more research on their use becomes available. With the proper inclusion of enzymes into the diet, adequate nutrient release Dr. Terri Parr is director-product development with Prince Agri Products in Quincy, Ill. This article is drawn from a presentation given at the 2011 Midwest Poultry Federation Convention in St. Paul, Minn.

can be obtained from feedstuffs previously not considered for use in poultry diets. As with all technology, however, there is no “one” hard and fast rule for the use of these enzymes. Consideration must be given to the multiple factors that surround enzyme usage.

Enzymes/Ingredients Enzymes are generally classified as either a phytase or a non-starch polysaccharide (NSP) enzyme. The general improvement in productive value of using these enzymes occurs in one of four ways: (1) release of available nutrients from phytate hydrolysis, (2) elimination of the encapsulating effect of the cell walls and therefore improved energy and amino acid availability, (3) hydrolysis of certain types of carbohydrate-protein linkages and therefore improved availability of amino acids, and (4)

•Iowa (Continued from page 13)

added. The USPOULTRY Foundation board approved student recruiting grants totaling more than $180,000 to the six U.S. universities with poultry science departments and 14 other institutions with poultry programs. The foundation provides annual recruiting funds to colleges and universities to attract students to their poultry programs.

Special

Grant award: The U.S. Poultry & Egg Association Foundation recently presented a check for student recruiting to Iowa State University. Dr. Kenton Kreager, left, technical service director, Hy-Line International and USPOULTRY board member, presented the check to Dr. Michael Persia, assistant professor, Poultry Nutrition, Department of Animal Science, Iowa State University, and Emily Smith, president of the Poultry Interest Group at Iowa State.

elimination of the anti-nutritive properties of certain dietary components, including NSP and phytate (Slominski, 2010). No common feed ingredient is digested 100 percent in the animals’ gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Although the digestive system is amazingly efficient at breaking down ingested food to its basic components by means of chemical and mechanical action, sometimes the inherent systems need a little “boost” in capability. In order to properly select the enzyme desired for a specific outcome, one needs to understand the concept of a substrate, as this is one of the most important factors required to successfully employ an enzyme regime in your nutritional program. A “substrate” is the portion of the feed that the enzyme will break down to release the nutrients bound to it. It is similar to a “lock and key” concept, where the substrate is the lock, and the enzyme is the key. If there is no lock, then it becomes absolutely pointless to buy a key! Therefore, it is important to consider what substrates (i.e. ingredients) are prevalent in your diets to best determine which enzyme(s) you should include for optimal results.

Phytase enzymes The use of exogenous phytase has become widely accepted and is currently used in the majority of poultry diets. Phytase has predominantly been shown to improve dietary phytate phosphorus (P) utilization as well as to decrease the excretion of P in manure (Applegate et al., 2003; Angel et al., 2006). Although phytase was originally utilized to improve the availability of dietary P (Bedford, 2000) and other minerals, it has more recently become an accept-

ed strategy employed to demonstrate improved performance of broilers through the liberation of dietary energy and amino acids (Cowieson et al., 2006; leslie et al, 2007; Ravindran et al., 1999; Selle et al., 2006). Establishing the mode of action by which energy and amino acid benefits are seen is not as simple as conducting a digestibility assay, due to the shifting of nutrient needs within the body. When phytate is present in the diet, it causes tremendous irritation in the lining of the gut, resulting in increased mucin production and sloughed cells. This translates into a greater endogenous loss of nutrients (energy and amino acids). The body must then utilize it’s nutrients for maintenance of the GI tract, preventing optimal performance from occurring (Cowieson et al., 2003). The inclusion of phytase in the diet can reverse the antinutritional effects of phytate, providing a healthier GI tract, and as such — allow those nutrients to be repartitioned back into growth, instead of maintenance. Phytase enzymes were originally fungal in nature, whereas the more recently developed ones are bacterial. While there is no “right” or “wrong” phytase to use, it is important to understand that although they are all effective, the capabilities of fungal versus bacterial phytases tend to differ. The matrices (level of nutrients expected to be liberated from use of the enzyme, thus decreased in the formulation of the diet) are often slightly more rigorous for the bacterial phytases. Thus a thorough understanding of the enzyme’s capabilities and recommendations for use are vital when selecting the ideal phytase enzyme for your feeding program.

NSP While most animal-based ingredients can be easily digested by poultry, plant material is composed of more fibrous material which is not as easily broken down by the bird. These fibers negatively affect poultry in two ways: (1) they comprise the cell walls which prevent the bird from accessing the nutrients encapsulated within, and (2) they increase the viscosity of the digesta. The addition of exogenous NSP enzymes break open the intact cell walls, denature the chemical bonds, and thereby increase the availability of starch and proteins to the animal. Viscous digesta not only prolongs gastric emptying and slows the transit time through the gut (Malkki, 2001), but results in less efficient nutrient absorption by hindering the ability of endogenous enzymes to gain access to their respective substrates (Choct, 2001.) Although NSP enzymes have historically been used more in wheat and barley-based diets to degrade arabinoxylans and ßglucans, there has been a significant amount of recent work demonstrating that NSP enzymes are effective in the more traditional U.S. corn-soybean meal based diets (Rutherfurd et al., 2007; Francesch and Geraert, 2009; Romero et al., 2010). The starchy endosperm of corn is constructed mainly of small amounts of cellulose encrusted with hemicellulose, the bulk of which is arabinoxylan with lesser amounts of ß-glucans and mannans (Stone, 2004). Utilizing enzymes that target these substrates will allow the animal to effectively degrade the cell walls and release encapsulated starch

See Enzymes, Page 21


POULTRY TIMES, January 30, 2012

15

California State, Fresno, gets recruiting grant TUCKER, Ga. — California State University, Fresno, recently received a $7,000 student recruiting grant from the U.S. Poultry & Egg Association Foundation. The check was presented by Richie King, vice president of chicken plant operations for Foster Farms and USPOULTRY board member, to Dr. Michelle Ganci, lecturer, poultry instructor and internship coordinator, Animal Sciences and Agricultural Education Department, California State University, Fresno. “The funding provided by USPOULTRY will help support a number of educational programs at Fresno State,”

said Dr. Charles Boyer, dean, Jordan College of Agricultural Sciences and Technology, California State University, Fresno. “The support provides partial funding for supplies and educational materials for the FFA State judging contest including bird cages and egg candlers, as well as lab coats for the poultry inspections we do. In addition, research supplies for a few student projects will be provided by the gift.” “These activities allow us to be out in the community doing hands-on activities and for showcasing the way we teach hands-on applied science at Fresno State. As a result, we

continue to have great transfer students from other schools, as well as full classes in poultry. Likewise, community awareness of poultry science is improved through the visibility of our students on the farm and with research,” added Boyer. The USPOULTRY Foundation board approved student recruiting grants totaling more than $180,000 to the six U.S. universities with poultry science departments and 14 other institutions with poultry programs. The foundation provides annual recruiting funds to colleges and universities to attract students to their poultry programs.

Special

Check presented: Richie King, right, vice president of chicken plant operations for Foster Farms and a U.S. Poultry & Egg Association board member, presents a $7,000 USPOULTRY Foundation student recruiting check to California State University, Fresno. Accepting is Dr. Michelle Ganci, lecturer, poultry instructor and internship coordinator for the university’s Animal Sciences and Agricultural Education Department.

SUBSCRIPtIOn ORDER FORM

Modesto Junior College receives USPOULTRY Foundation funds

Special

Foundation grant: The U.S. Poultry & Egg Association Foundation recently presented a $6,500 student recruiting check to Modesto Junior College in California. Taking part in the check presentation were, left to right, Dr. Mark Anglin, dean, and Marlies Boyd, professor, Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, Modesto Junior College; and Richie King, vice president of chicken plant operations for Foster Farms and a USPOULTRY board member.

TUCKER, Ga. — Modesto Junior College in California received a $6,500 student recruiting grant from the U.S. Poultry & Egg Association Foundation. Richie King, vice president of chicken plant operations for Foster Farms and a USPOULTRY board member, presented the check to Dr. Mark Anglin, dean, and Marlies Boyd, professor, of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences at the college. “The funds provided by the USPOULTRY Foundation will be used to improve the networking ability of our poultry program through the use of social media,” said Anglin. “The grant will allow the poultry science program to develop and maintain a web page and a Facebook account. We also plan to purchase some chicken and egg costumes that will be used at various events to promote our program,” added Anglin. The USPOULTRY Foundation board approved student recruiting grants totaling more than $180,000 to the six U.S. universities with poultry science departments and 14 other institutions with poultry programs. The foundation provides annual recruiting funds to colleges and universities to attract students to their poultry programs.

Poultry Times

JAnUARY 30, 2012

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16

POULTRY TIMES, January 30, 2012

International Poultry Expo & International Feed Expo 2012


POULTRY TIMES, January 30, 2012

17

. . . people, places & things

Photos by David B. Strickland


18

POULTRY TIMES, January 30, 2012

Miss. State awarded Foundation grant TUCKER, Ga. — The U.S. Poultry and Egg Association Foundation has awarded a $17,418 student recruiting grant to Mississippi State University’s Poultry Science Department. Mark Waller, sales and processing director for Ingram Farms and vice chairman for the USPOULTRY board of directors, presented the check to Dr. David Peebles, professor and interim head of the university’s Poultry Science Department at Mississippi State University. Mark Leggett, president of the Mississippi Poultry Association, assisted in the check presentation. “The funds will be used for student recruitment on the Mississippi State University campus and at secondary schools and junior colleges in Mississippi and Tennessee as part of the Academic Common Market program. Recruitment workshops on campus will be given to high school students, 4-H groups, FFA groups, students from the Choctaw reservation and immigrant organi-

zations. The Department of Poultry Science at Mississippi State University expresses appreciation for the continued support from the USPOULTRY Foundation, because these funds are instrumental for our recruiting efforts,” remarked Peebles. “It is critical that we continue to draw bright, young people for careers in the poultry and egg industry. We are aware that these youth are the future leaders of our industry, and USPOULTRY Foundation recruiting grants play an important role in encouraging these students to enroll in poultry and egg studies,” said Waller. The USPOULTRY Foundation board recently approved student recruiting grants totaling more than $180,000 to the six U.S. universities with poultry science departments and 14 other institutions with poultry programs. The Foundation provides annual recruiting funds to colleges and universities to attract students to their poultry programs.

Special

Check presentation: Mark Waller, right, sales and processing director for Ingram Farms and vice chairman for the USPOULTRY board of directors, presents a USPOULTRY Foundation grant check to Dr. David Peebles, professor and interim head of Mississippi State University’s Poultry Science Department, to be used for student recruiting. Joining in the presentation is Mark Leggett, president of the Mississippi Poultry Association.

Farbest Foods invests $69 million in new plant VINCENNES, Ind. — Indiana Governor Mitch Daniels has announced that Farbest Foods Inc., one of the nation’s largest turkey companies, will locate a new plant here, creating up to 600 new jobs over the next few years. The Huntingburg-based company will invest $69.2 million to build a 220,000 square-foot processing plant on 100 acres of land in the U.S. Highway 41 Industrial Park in Vincennes. The new facility is expected to open its doors in January 2014. “Farbest’s decision to locate another facility in Indiana reaffirms the confidence that flourishing companies have in our prosperous business climate,”

said Daniels. “Thanks to our expansive infrastructure combined with the ability to reach 80 percent of the nation’s population within a day’s drive, Indiana is continually winning opportunities to bring more jobs to hardworking Hoosiers.” Farbest currently employs approximately 850 Hoosiers at its two Indiana locations in Huntingburg and Dubois. The company has already begun hiring engineering, administrative and maintenance associates for the new Vincennes plant and plans to begin hiring manufacturing associates in 2013. Once operational, the plant will initially employ 360 associates and will later grow to up to 600 employ-

ees with the anticipated addition of a second shift. “Our current facilities for turkey processing, feeding and growing are near full utilization after completing the second shift of operations started in 2007,” said Ted Seger, president of Farbest. “We have been investigating alternatives for our planned growth for more than a year in an effort to meet growing global customer demand for our products. Indiana is the perfect home for growth due to its abundant supply of grain, proactive stance on development of agriculture and our ability to leverage the strengths of our current turkey grower base and employees.”

A family-owned operation since 1982, Farbest supplies more than a million pounds of raw, fresh and frozen turkey products per day to food processors who prepare and package their own brand-name foods. The company currently oversees the production of more than 10 million turkeys per year through approximately 170 contract growers in Indiana, Illinois and Kentucky. With customers in more than 20 countries, Farbest exports 20 percent of its products internationally. The Indiana Economic Development Corp.offered Farbest Foods Inc. up to $2.8 million in conditional tax credits

and up to $200,000 in training grants based on the company’s job creation plans. These tax credits are performance-based, meaning until Hoosiers are hired, the company is not eligible to claim incentives. Knox County has approved additional tax abatement at the request of the Knox County Development Corp. “We are very pleased that Farbest has chosen Vincennes,” said Vincennes Mayor Al Baldwin. “We are equally confident that Farbest will prosper with the continued efforts of the state of Indiana, Knox County and Vincennes to support our business communities in the best ways possible.”


POULTRY TIMES, January 30, 2012

19

Sunn hemp shows promise as biofuel source By Ann Perry

Special to Poultry Times

BELTSVILLE, Md. — Work by scientists at USDA suggests that farmers in the Southeast could use the tropical legume sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea) in their crop rotations by harvesting the fast-growing annual for biofuel. The study, which was conducted by Agricultural Research Service scientists in Florence, S.C., supports the USDA priority of finding new sources of bioenergy. ARS is USDA’s chief intramural scientific research agency. ARS agricultural engineer Keri Cantrell, agronomist Philip Bauer and environmental engineer Kyoung Ro all work at the ARS Coastal Plains Soil, Water and Plant Research Center in Florence. They compared the energy content of sunn hemp with cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), another common regional summer cover crop, in 2004 and 2006. Both crops were grown in experimental plots near Florence and were harvested on the same day three times in each study year. The last harvest for both years was conducted right after the first killing freeze of the season. The scientists mea-

sured potential energy production of both feedstocks via direct combustion. This provided the feedstocks’ higher heating value (HHV), which indicates how much energy is released via combustion. In 2004, when there was ample rainfall, the resulting sunn hemp biomass yield totaled more than 4.5 tons per acre. This is equivalent to 82.4 gigajoules of energy per acre, close to the energy contained in 620 gallons of gasoline and well in the ballpark of other bioenergy crops, which have yields of anywhere from 30 to 150 gigajoules per acre. The HHV for sunn hemp biomass exceeded the HHV for switchgrass, bermudagrass, reed canarygrass and alfalfa. Although reduced rainfall resulted in lower hemp biomass yields in 2006, sunn hemp’s HHV for both study years was 4 percent to 5 percent greater than the HHV of cowpeas. Results from the study were published in 2010 in Biomass and Bioenergy. Ann Perry is a public affairs specialist with USDA’s Agricultural Research Service in Beltsville, Md.

Subscribe to Poultry Times 770-536-2476

Huguenot Torte (Apple-Pecan Torte) American Egg Board Servings: 16 Prep time: 35 minutes Cook time: 30-45 minutes

Huguenot Torte is one of Charleston, S.C.’s most famous desserts. It was originally adapted from an Ozark apple pudding from the Mississippi Delta and served at Charleston’s Lowcountry-style Huguenot Tavern in the 1940s. Ingredients: 3/4 cup all-purpose flour 2 tsp. baking powder 1/4 tsp. salt 5 eggs, room temperature 1 1/2 cups sugar 1 tsp. vanilla 1 1/2 cups finely chopped peeled tart apples (about 2 medium) 1 1/2 cups finely chopped pecans or walnuts (6 oz.) Directions: Heat oven to 325 degrees F. Coat bottom and sides of two 8- or 9-inch round cake pans with cooking spray. Line bottoms with waxed paper or parchment paper; spray paper. Dust bottom and sides of pans with flour; tap out excess. Sift 3/4 cup flour, the baking powder and salt into medium bowl; set aside. Beat eggs in mixer bowl with whisk attachment on high speed until thick, pale lemon-colored and triple in volume, 5 to 10 minutes. Reduce speed to medium. Beating constantly, add sugar, 1 to 2 tbsp. at a time, beating after each addition until sugar is dissolved before adding the next. (Rub a bit of the mixture between

thumb and forefinger; it should feel completely smooth.) Beat in vanilla. Add apples and nuts to flour mixture; toss to mix. Sprinkle evenly over egg mixture. Fold gently but thoroughly until no streaks remain. Do not stir. Pour into prepared pans; spread even. Bake in 325 degrees F oven until cakes begin to pull away from sides of pans and wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean, 30 to 40 minutes for 9-inch pans; 35 to 45 minutes for 8-inch pans. Cool on wire racks. Loosen cakes from sides of pans with thin knife. Gently shake cakes out of pans onto racks, taking care not to crack the meringue tops. Remove waxed paper carefully; turn cakes right-side up. Serve warm or cool completely. Serve cakes with whipped cream. Garnish with apple slices, pecan halves and fresh mint. Added tips and suggestions: lAdd sugar gradually — For optimum volume and smoothest texture, sugar should be added gradually, beginning only after the eggs have been beaten to triple in volume. Adding sugar sooner will result in less volume. l Check if sugar is dissolved — After each addition, eggs should be beaten until the sug-

See Torte, Page 23


20

POULTRY TIMES, January 30, 2012

Government issues revised trucking rules WASHINGTON — The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration has issued a revised hours of service (HOS) rule for commercial vehicle drivers. The FMCSA’s new HOS final rule revises an earlier proposed 34-hour restart provision, which the poultry and egg industry had opposed in a comment letter. Under the revised rule a driver must have 34 consecutive hours off-duty following a 60 hours in seven days or 70 hours in eight days maximum work

week. Effective July 1, 2013, the revision requires that the 34-hour restart period include two 1-5 a.m. periods based on FMCSA’s assertion that nighttime rest is more restorative than daytime rest. The U.S. Poultry & Egg Association said the final rule is an improvement over the original proposal, which required two midnight-6 a.m. periods but may require as little as 34 hours or as much as 48 hours off duty depending upon when driving week ends.

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“Since the current hours of service regulations were introduced in 2003, truck related fatalities have dropped 33 percent to the lowest levels ever recorded,” said Paul Pressley, USPOULTRY’s executive vice president of industry programs. “The poultry industry remains committed to safely operating its truck fleet and have organized their schedules and routes around the existing regulations. “The new rule will restrict the on-duty hours available for many drivers and in-

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POULTRY TIMES, January 30, 2012

21

•Enzymes (Continued from page 14)

and protein. Mannanases and pectinases typically target the soy fraction of the diet, but with the same endpoint in mind (Jackson et al, 2004). It has been demonstrated by Parsons (2004) that nutrient digestion, rather than the ability to absorb nutrients, seems to be the primary limiting factor in young chickens. It is suggested that until the bird reaches 8 days of age, the output of pancreatic enzymes may well be the limiting factor digestion (Lindemann et al., 1986; Krogdahl and Sell, 1989; Nitsan et al., 1991; Dunnington and Siegel, 1995). The addition of a relevant exogenous enzyme is, therefore, likely to supplement the digestive capacity of the younger bird (Bedford, 2000). In addition to the increasing the diversity of feed ingredients that can be included in diets, NSP enzymes significantly reduce the variation in nutrient quality of ingredients. The response to the use of enzymes is greatest on the poorest quality raw materials (Classen et al., 1995; Scott et al., 1995, 1998a; Bedford et al., 1998). As a result, variation in subsequent bird performance is reduced, which translates not only to a more uniform flock but also more uniform production from flock to flock. These enzymes are marketed in a variety of ways. They can be included in diet formulations as a single enzyme, or as either mixtures or cocktails of carbohydrate-degrading enzymes. Alternatively, they can be offered in combination with protein and/or phytate-degrading enzymes. These NSP enzyme cocktails are generally marketed with an energy replacement value, and sometimes include amino acid replacement values if the combination of enzymes incorporated target both cell-wall degradation and release of bound protein. With the potential cost savings they offer as an energy replacement, and current research targeting the effects of NSP enzymes in corn-soy-based diets, the end user is beginning to more willingly consider this application.

Combining The combined use of phytase and NSP enzymes in corn-soy based diets has become the focus of much more interest and significantly more research recently (Preynat, et al., 2010; Gomez and Angeles, 2010; Plumstead et al., 2011; Arce et al., 2010; Romero et al., 2010). Although it is now understood that phytases and NSP enzymes target different substrates, release different nutrients, and are active in different regions of the gastro-intestinal tract, it has been shown that some of their indirect benefits actually

overlap (Wyatt et al., 2008). As such, one must be careful not to over-predict the nutrient replacement that can be obtained from a combination of enzymes. In particular, only partial additivity of metabolizable energy (ME) should be expected. For example, if 1kcal of ME is expected from a phytase and 1kcal of ME is expected from an NSP enzyme — when fed together they may only result in 1.6 kcals of ME as opposed to 2 kcals. Giving proper attention to these details when formulating diets will greatly increase the likelihood of success using enzymes in your system.

Supporting science Science should support use. In addition to making sure the enzyme(s) employed match the substrates in your poultry diets, it is important to remember there are other factors to consider as well. Be certain that the data supporting the product you are considering shows a benefit in the animal you intend to feed it to. As often is the case when considering new products and new applications, the first step a company will employ is to conduct in vitro testing. While it is quicker and easier to run a benchtop assay as a means to determine efficacy, that response cannot always be carried over into the animal. As a first step, it is a tremendous screening tool, but it is imperative that it then be shown to be a viable alternative in vivo to verify the same response within the animal itself. Additionally, it is often assumed that if a response has been generated in a chicken, one can extrapolate that the same response will also be seen in a pig. While this is true in some cases, it is not always a guarantee, thus verifying the response in the target animal will lend confidence in the enzyme combination being considered. Conclusions Recent increases in the price of feed ingredients and dietary energy has resulted in renewed interest in the use of enzymes in feed formulations. Various combinations of enzymes are being more widely employed, as the inclusion of alternative feedstuffs with their problem substrates becomes more prevalent. Understanding ingredient variability, the anti-nutritive properties of raw feedstuffs, target substrates of different enzymes and the benefits of each enzyme class will allow the end user to more strategically utilize the options available.

USDA to conduct economic survey

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. their operations.” — USDA’s National AgriNASS conducts ARMS cultural Statistics Service jointly with USDA’s Ecowill spend the next several nomic Research Service. In months contacting farmers an effort to obtain the most and ranchers across the na- accurate data, the federal tion to conduct the Agricul- agencies will reach out to tural Resource Management nearly 35,000 producers naSurvey (ARMS). The results tionwide, including 1,3583 in of this survey will serve as a Arkansas, between February baseline for numerous feder- and April 2012. The survey al policies and programs that asks the producers to provide affect U.S. farms and farm data on their operating expenfamilies. ditures, production costs and “ARMS is our primary household characteristics. tool for gauging the financial “Decision makers from all condition and production facets of U.S. agriculture will practices on American farms use the collective informaand ranches,” said Becky tion from ARMS to answer Cross, director of the NASS questions and make imporArkansas Field Office. “By tant decisions concerning the participating in this survey, economic viability of AmeriArkansas farmers directly can agriculture, the rural impact the decisions that affect them, their families and See Well-being, Page 23

Regional Sales Manager Travel: 60% or more of working days Territory: Iowa, Dakotas, Minnesota, Nebraska, Missouri Duties and Responsibilities: Promote Big Dutchman products and services in the area of floor equipment (broilers, breeders, and turkeys). Support and develop distribution within the designated territory. Provide market intelligence in general, including feedback on price competitiveness in the field. Identify product opportunities and deficiencies. Implement sales programs to increase sales, product mix, and market penetration. Work cooperatively with floor customer service and other BD departments. Assist in collection. Other tasks assigned by the Director of Floor Sales. Qualifications: Minimum of 5 years of sales experience or a combination of background and personal skills strong and convincing enough to wave this requirement • Good knowledge of broilers and/or turkey industry • Sales Experience • Excellent computer skills Good written and oral communication skills • College degree preferred, but not required Big Dutchman offers a competitive compensation package, along with great company benefits and car allowance program. Benefits package include: Health/Dental Insurance, Life and Disability Insurance, 401K Program with company match, along with Vacation/ Holiday days Please send resume and salary expectations to: Beth Velderman/HR Manager 3900 John F. Donnelly Drive • Holland, MI 49424 bvelderman@bigdutchmanusa.com • Confidential Fax 616-392-5839


22

POULTRY TIMES, January 30, 2012

Markets Compiled by David B. Strickland, Editor 770-718-3442 dstrickland@poultrytimes.net

N at’l. Broiler Market: (Jan. 17): Whole broiler/fryer prices

the Midwest, 2¢ higher in the East and unchanged in the West, when compared to the previous week’s prices. Offerings were light to moderate for current trade needs. Retail demand was light to good, mostly light to moderate, best where ads

are trending steady to firm in the East, steady to barely steady in the Midwest, and steady in the West. Final majority prices are 2¢ lower in

are in progress. Foodservice demand was light to moderate. Floor stocks covered the full range, but mostly moderate. Market activity was moderate to active. In the parts structure, movement was mostly moderate for early week business. Prices were firm to higher for wings and bonein breasts, steady to firm for dark meat cuts and generally steady for remaining parts. Offerings of wings were light with good movement, bone-in breasts were light to moderate and all other parts were moderate. Market activity was moderate to active. In production areas, live supplies were moderate at mixed, but mostly desirable weights.

P arts: Georgia:

The f.o.b. dock quoted

prices on ice-pack parts based on truckload and pool truckload lots for the week of Jan. 18: line run tenders $1.96; skinless/boneless breasts $1.52; whole breasts 88¢; boneless/ skinless thigh meat $1.23½; thighs 71¢; drumsticks 66½¢; leg quarters 53½¢; and wings $1.82.

F owl: Jan. 13: Live spent heavy fowl

Final prices at Farm Buyer Loading (per pound): range 8¢-16¢

N ational Slaughter: Broiler: Estimated slaugh-

ter for week ending Jan. 21 is 147,931,000. Actual slaughter for the week ending Jan. 14 was 154,989,000.

The following chart provides an annual high and a comparison of recent activity of major poultry company stocks.

USDA Shell Eggs

AMS weekly combined region shell egg prices Average prices on sales to volume buyers, Grade A or better, White eggs in cartons, delivered warehouse, cents per dozen.

Annual High

Cal-Maine Campbell Soup ConAgra Hormel Pilgrim’s Pride Sanderson Farms Seaboard Tyson

37.67 35.66 27.16 30.50 8.61 53.22 2705.00 21.06

Jan. 11 36.06 32.27 26.88 29.18 5.54 47.41 1896.00 19.74

Jan. 13

Jan. 18

Extra Large Regions: Northeast 109.00 Southeast 114.50 Midwest 108.50 South Central 117.50 Combined 112.62

36.95 32.01 27.12 29.25 5.95 51.62 1907.22 19.46

Large

Medium

108.00 85.00 112.50 87.00 106.50 82.50 117.50 90.50 111.45 86.44

Computed from simple weekly averages weighted by regional area populations

Grain Prices OHIO COUNTRY ELEV. Jan. 5 Jan. 12 Jan. 19 No. 2 Yellow Corn/bu. $6.58 $6.48 $5.89 Soybeans/bu. $11.90 $11.60 $11.42 (Courtesy: Prospect Farmers Exchange, Prospect, Ohio)

(Courtesy: A.G. Edwards & Sons Inc.)

Broiler Eggs Set/Chicks Placed in 19 States EGGS SET (Thousands)

Ala Ark

Ca,Tn,Wv

Del Fla Ga Ky La Md Miss Mo. N.C. Okla Pa S.C. Tex Va

19 States Total Prev. year % Prev. yr.

CHICKS PLACED (Thousands)

Dec. 24

Dec. 31

Jan. 7

Jan. 14

Dec. 24

Dec. 31

Jan. 7

Jan. 14

27,704 20,121 11,126 3,126 1,349 31,679 7,568 3,333 7,483 18,266 7,945 20,094 6,710 3,769 5,362 14,054 6,041

27,549 20,287 10,709 3,232 1,347 31,839 7,550 3,348 7,447 17,763 7,433 19,927 6,268 3,812 5,164 13,887 5,909

27,127 20,082 10,619 3,265 1,351 31,430 7,635 3,364 7,364 17,573 7,853 19,772 6,585 3,662 5,250 14,089 5,694

26,905 20,085 10,814 3,257 1,351 31,350 7,571 3,379 7,098 17,475 7,623 20,010 6,787 3,785 5,348 13,652 5,939

20,588 19,333 10,689 3,355 964 27,617 6,015 2,972 6,667 15,590 5,734 15,729 4,264 3,196 4,183 11,667 4,624

20,811 20,378 10,339 4,385 1,160 26,917 6,378 2,943 5,968 15,407 5,004 15,635 3,746 3,134 4,115 11,848 4,710

20,132 19,296 9,569 3,952 1,160 26,997 6,098 2,987 5,474 15,542 5,554 15,439 4,042 3,196 4,828 11,941 5,698

19,899 18,017 10,872 4,220 1,166 27,329 6,021 2,992 5,213 15,610 6,087 15,812 4,693 3,290 4,435 11,772 4,693

195,730 205,240

193,471 203,224

192,715 205,419

192,429 205,099

163,187 168,134

162,878 168,813

161,905 168,417

162,121 168,220

95

95

94

94

97

96

96

96

1/Current week as percent of same week last year.

Estimates: The estimated number of broilerfryers available for slaughter the week ending Jan. 21 is 152.9 million head compared to 165.6 million head slaughtered the same week last year. For Jan. 28, 153.3 million is estimated, notes USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service.

Broiler/Fryer Markets

Industry Stock Report

Company

Heavy-type hen: Estimated slaughter for the week ending Jan. 21 is 1,620,000. Actual slaughter for the week ending Jan. 14 was 1,492,000. Light-type hen: Estimated slaughter for the week ending Jan. 21 is 1,749,000. Actual slaughter for the week ending Jan. 14 was 1,742,000. Total: Week of Jan. 21: 151,300,000. Week of Jan. 14: 158,223,000.

USDA Composite Weighted Average For week of: Jan. 16 80.84¢ For week of: Jan. 9 81.33¢ Chi.-Del.-Ga.-L.A.-Miss.-N.Y.--S.F.-South. States For delivery week of: Jan. 9 Jan. 17 Chicago majority 72--76¢ 70--74¢ Mississippi majority 82--86¢ 82--86¢ New York majority 76--79¢ 78--81¢ For delivery week of: Jan. 11 Jan. 18 Delmarva weighted average 66--96¢ 71¢--$1.00 Georgia f.o.b. dock offering 90.25¢ 90.50¢ Los Angeles majority price 99.00¢ 99.00¢ San Francisco majority price 99.50¢ 99.50¢ Southern States f.o.b. average 56.03¢ 56.88¢

Turkey Markets Weighted avg. prices for frozen whole young turkeys Weighted average (cents/lb.) F.O.B. shipper dock National Week ending Jan. 13 Last year Hens (8-16 lbs.) 97.67 86.81 Toms (16-24 lbs.) 95.71 86.78 Week ending Jan. 6 Dec. avg. Hens (8-16 lbs.) 101.15 106.54 Toms (16-24 lbs.) 101.27 107.01

Egg Markets USDA quotations New York cartoned del. store-door: Jan. 11 Jan. 18 Extra large, down 1¢ $1.04--$1.08 $1.03--$1.07 Large, down 1¢ $1.02--$1.06 $1.01--$1.05 Medium, no change 88--92¢ 88--92¢ Southeast Regional del. warehouse: Jan. 11 Jan. 18 Extra large, down 12½¢ $1.08--$1.43 95½¢--$1.09½ Large, down 14¢ $1.08--$1.39 94¢--$1.05½ Medium, down 5½¢ 83--98½¢ 77½--85¢


POULTRY TIMES, January 30, 2012

AMERICAN EGG BOARD HOTLINE

23

•Torte (Continued from page 19)

ar has dissolved before adding more. To test, rub a bit of mixture between thumb and forefinger. If sugar is dissolved, it will feel completely smooth. If it feels grainy or sandy, continue beating. l Gentle folding is the key to maintaining volume — Combining heavier mixtures with beaten

eggs can knock the air out of the them. Add the flour mixture to the beaten eggs, not vice versa. Fold with a light touch, rather than stirring. Using a rubber spatula, start with a downward stroke into the bowl, continue across the bottom, up the side and over the top of the mixture. Come up through the center every few strokes and rotate the

•Well-being (Continued from page 21)

economy and other emerging issues,” Cross said. “That’s why it is imperative for all farmers contacted by NASS to provide responses and help shape the future of U.S. agri-

culture.” As will all NASS surveys, information provided by respondents is confidential by law. NASS safeguards the confidentiality of all responses, ensuring no individual respondent or operation can be

bowl often as you fold. Fold just until no streaks remain. l Use two 8-or 9-inch springform pans (or one of each) if you have them. You won’t have to worry about cracking the tops when unmolding cakes. More recipes can be obtained from the American Egg Board at http://www.incredibleegg. org.

identified. The economic data gathered in ARMS will be published in the annual Farm Production Expenditures report on Aug. 2, 2012. All NASS reports are available online at http://www.nass.usda.gov.

Index of Advertisers Acme,12L. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .918-682-7791; www.acmeag.com Agrifan, 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-236-7080; www.envirofan.com Ag Motion, 12B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 612-486-3854 AgSeal, 12J . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 870-741-9269 American Proteins, 12D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.americanproteins.com B&M Metals, 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-340-2435www.qualitymetalroofing.com Big Dutchman, 12I, 21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 616-392-5981; www.bigdutchman.com Biomin, 12J . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210-342-9555; www.pep.biomin.net Biomune, Cover III. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-846-0230; www.biomunecompany.com Cenzone, Cover B. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 760-736-9901; www.cenzone.com Chickmate, 12O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-331-7509; www.chickmate.com Clear View Enterprise, 12L . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-361-4689 CID Lines, 12D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.cidlines.com Cobb Vantress, 12E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.cobb-vantress.com Continental Agra Equipment, 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 316-283-9602; www.continentalagra.com DSM, Cover C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.unlimitednutrition-na.dsm.com Elanco, 12D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-428-4441; www.elanco.com Farm Alarm, 12B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-407-5455; www.farmalarm.com Flame, 12N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-255-2469; www.flameengineering.com FPM, 12N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 402-729-2264; www.fpmne.com Gasolec, 12B. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-628-4588; 800-628-4588 High Performance Systems, 12B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-928-7220; www.highperfsystems.com Jackson Lumber, 8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 715-926-3816; www.jacksonlbrharvester.com Jones Hamilton PLT, 12P . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.joneshamiltonag.com Koechner, 12L. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .660-433-2178; www.turkeycoops.com Lee Energy, Cover D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.leeenergysolutions.com Lubing, 12A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .423-709-1000; www.lubingusa.com McNeely, 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-433-8407 Merck, 12C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-356-7470; www.merck-animal-health-usa.com Motomco, 12G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-237-6843; www.motomco.com Pfizer Animal Health, Cover IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.pfizerglobalpoultry.com Port-A-Kuul, 12O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 936-598-5651; www.kuulpads.com Preserve, Cover II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-995-1607 Prince Agri Products, 12N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-677-4623; www.princeagri.com Randy Jones, 12H . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-648-6584 Reeves, Cover A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-854-5221; www.reevessupply.com RMX Global Logistics, 11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-824-7365; www.rmxglobal.com Smithway, 12O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 828-628-1756 Star Labs, 12I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-894-5396; www.primalac.com US Cold Storage, 12K . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 856-354-8181; www.uscoldstorage.com Water Cannon, 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-333-9274; www.watercannon.com WeighTech, 12I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-457-3720; www.weightechinc.com


24

POULTRY TIMES, January 30, 2012

EPA issues 2012 renewable fuel standards WASHINGTON — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has announced the 2012 percentage standards for four fuel categories that are part of the agency’s Renewable Fuel Standard program (RFS2). The final 2012 overall volumes and standards are: Biomass-based diesel (1.0 billion gallons; 0.91 percent) Advanced biofuels (2.0 billion gallons; 1.21 percent)

•Waller (Continued from page 1)

joining Ingram in 1998, he was with Tyson Foods for 19 years, serving as a plant manager and complex manager. Waller is now sales and processing director for Ingram Farms. He is also a past president of the Alabama Poultry & Egg Association. He has served on the USPOULTRY board of directors since 2005.

Vice chairman James Adams, Wenger’s Feed Mill, Rheems, Pa., is the new USPOULTRY vice chairman. A native of Pennsylvania, he received his bachelor of science degree in poultry technology and management and a masters degree in business administration, both from Pennsylvania State University. Adams joined Wenger Feeds in 1980 and has worked in a variety of responsibilities in egg production, feed manufacturing, transportation, purchasing, and sales and marketing. He is currently president and CEO of Wenger Feeds. Treasurer Elton Maddox, Wayne Farms, Oakwood, Ga., was named USPOULTRY treasurer. A native of Georgia, he received his bachelor of science degree in engineering from the University of Georgia. Maddox joined Wayne Farms in 1974 and has worked in a number of management positions within the company. He is currently president and CEO of Wayne Farms.

Cellulosic biofuels (8.65 million gallons; 0.006 percent) Total renewable fuels (15.2 billion gallons; 9.23 percent) The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) established the RFS2 program and the annual renewable fuel volume targets, which steadily increase to an overall level of 36 billion gallons in 2022. To achieve these volumes, EPA calculates a percentage-based standard for the following

In addition, he is a past president of the Georgia Poultry Federation and the Georgia Poultry Processors Federation, as well as a past chairman of the Georgia Improvement Association and National Chicken Council.

Secretary Sherman Miller, Cal-Maine Foods, was named USPOULTRY secretary. A native of Mississippi, he received his bachelor of science degree in poultry science from Mississippi State University. Miller joined Cal-Maine Foods in 1997, where he has worked in a variety of positions. He is currently chief operating officer for CalMaine Foods.

year. Based on the standard, each refiner and importer determines the minimum volume of renewable fuel that it must ensure is used in its transportation fuel. Last spring EPA had proposed a volume requirement of 1.28 billion gallons for biomassbased diesel for 2013. EISA specifies a 1 billion gallon minimum volume requirement for that category for 2013 and beyond, but enables EPA to increase the volume requirement after consideration of a variety of environmental,

Lyman Campbell, Koch Foods of Alabama LLC, Montgomery, Ala.; Alan Duncan, Mountaire Farms, Little Rock, Ark.; Charles George, George’s, Springdale, Ark.; Tom Hensley, Fieldale Farms, Baldwin, Ga.; Mark Hickman, Peco Foods, Tuscaloosa, Ala.; Paul Hill, West Liberty Foods, West Liberty, Iowa;

market and energy-related factors. Overall, EPA’s RFS2 program encourages greater use of renewable fuels, including advanced biofuels. For 2012, the program is implementing EISA’s requirement to blend more than 1.25 billion gallons of renewable fuels over the amount mandated for 2011. More information on the standards and regulations can be found at http://www.epa. gov/otaq/fuels/renewablefuels/regulations. htm

Greg Hinton, Rose Acre Farms, Seymour, Ind.; Jay Houchin, Farbest Farms Inc., Jasper, Ind.; Richard King, Foster Farms, Livingston, Calif.; Dr. Kenton Kreager, Hy-Line International, Dallas Center, Iowa; Don Mabe, American Proteins, Cumming, Ga.; Pete Martin, MarJac Poultry, Gainesville, Ga.; Wes

Morris, Tyson Foods, Springdale, Ark.; Jerry Moye, Cobb-Vantress, Siloam Springs, Ark.; Shawn Nicholas, Baader-Johnson, Kansas City, Mo.; John Prestage, Prestage Farms, Clinton, N.C.; Clint Rivers, Perdue, Salisbury, Md.; and Walt Shafer, Pilgrim’s Corp., Pittsburg, Texas.

Past chairman Gary Cooper, Cooper Farms, Oakwood, Ohio, is immediate past chairman. He began his career more than 30 years ago at Cooper Farms, which produces turkeys and turkey products, eggs and pork. In the third generation at the family-owned operation, he serves as chief operating officer. Cooper is a past president of the Ohio Poultry Association and is a member of the Midwest Poultry Consortium board. Board of directors Serving on the board of directors of USPOULTRY will be: Brian Barrett, Feather Crest Farms, Bryan, Texas; Bill Bradley, CCF Brands, Rogers, Ark.;

Photo by David B. Strickland

USPOULTRY 2012 officers: New officers of the U.S. Poultry & Egg Association were elected at the group’s annual meeting Jan. 23, in conjunction with the International Poultry Expo in Atlanta, Ga. The 2012 executive committee is, left to right, Gary Cooper, Cooper Farms, immediate past chairman; James Adams, Wenger’s Feed Mill, vice chairman; Mark Waller, Ingram Farms, chairman; Elton Maddox, Wayne Farms, treasurer; and Sherman Miller, Cal-Maine Foods, secretary.


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Have you thought about tomorrow?

The animal health industry has a key role to play in re-thinking the way we approach the world’s health. Whether it’s serving the needs of a pet owner in a growing city or working on ways to feed a global population of nine billion by 2050, our industry is an essential part of addressing global issues. At Ceva, we’re committed to meeting these challenges and together – with you – we will help build a healthy new world.

Together, beyond animal health

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Poultry Times January 30 Issue  

Poultry Times January 30 Issue

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