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VOLUME 22 ISSUE 14

JANUARY 9, 2013

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Alumni to be remembered

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A ton of music and film reviews 8

Athletics expands CIS presence 10

#IdleNoMore explored

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January 9, 2013

Feature Another movement afoot: Idle No More

The latest exploration in democratic resistance and the resistance to that resistance Mike Davies

Ω Editor-in-Chief The rhythm of the drums and the emotion of the chanting that rose from the block-long procession on Victoria Street in downtown Kamloops, B.C. on Dec. 21 was infectious. You could feel there was something larger and deeper going on than just these 100 or so people with their signs and their music, but what exactly that was has yet to be established. What had been established is that yet another movement was (and is) upon us — one that possibly gets to the core of how we, as Canadians, feel about what it is to be Canadian — and the health of one woman who was outside the front door of Parliament in Ottawa was in serious jeopardy. She was starving herself until Canada’s Prime Minister came out to have a chat and the attention of the country was upon her. “She sits below Parliament Hill prepared to die for our children, and for our children’s children,” said Michelle Good, one of the many who came out to Coopers Foods on Landsdowne Street that day. “Her stand is about more than Attiwapiskat — it’s about stopping the pain.” The woman she was talking about is, of course, Chief Theresa Spence of the now famous Attiwapiskat community in northern Ontario. Attiwapiskat made national headlines in late 2011 when it was declared to be in a state of emergency. The rest of Canada was exposed to how the people of that community had been living and the uproar soon followed. For some the uproar came in the form of attacks on the people for what the accusers assumed was misuse or misappropriation of government funding allowing their own community to crumble into such a sorry state. For others the assessment was that the Canadian government wasn’t doing enough to ensure its citizens weren’t living in such a ruinous situation. “Let’s acknowledge very clearly, there is no easy answer for the challenges that First Nations people continue to face in this country,” said CBC’s Jian Ghomeshi on Dec. 19, 2012 in the opening essay for his national radio show. Nine days into Chief Spence’s hunger strike, the national media was (some say finally) fully absorbed. “That it takes a crisis like Attiwapiskat to focus our attention on the situation is highly problematic and should be a major source of concern for all Canadians,” Ghomeshi continued. “And even then, of course, the national media and the general

people waiting for the march to begin. “Given the time of year, a few days before Christmas, the middle of winter — and there’ll probably be more before we walk.” “For me, Bill C-45 is one of #IdleNoMore the worst pieces of legislation The general consensus is that our federal government has the Idle No More movement ever passed,” he said. “As far began when a few First Nations as protected waterways going women in Saskatchewan were from millions to thousands… talking via email about certain it’s a pretty remarkable step pieces of federal legislation (most backwards, so that’s why I’m notably Bill C-45, dubbed the here.” The protest has gained the “Omnibus Budget Bill”), and getting angry about the perceived support of all three national lack of consultation with First opposition parties, and though it Nations peoples and communities. could be claimed that anything They started a Facebook page to bad for the ruling party is good discuss these matters, and when for the opposition, there seems to be an unusual level of unilateral support amongst politicians not affiliated with the federal Conservatives. “A lot of indigenous people are really tired of the way they’ve been treated … it’s not too surprising that this is building and —Michelle Good, Idle No More activist momentum people are coming the hashtag #IdleNoMore started forward who have been silent for to circulate on Twitter, the growth a long time,” said Cavers, clearly of the discussion was meteoric and wanting to mingle with the assembled people. I let him go unexpected. According to many First Nations, join the mass as I watched those Bill C-45 is not merely a 400-page assembled being cleansed with document that implements the the smudge bowl, a tradition and federal government’s most recent cultural nuance that I could never budget, it also makes significant understand — but watching them and worrisome changes to the employ this tradition brought Navigable Waters Protection Act forth even more respect and as well as altering the Indian Act, appreciation for the gathering negatively effecting the people itself. Assembly of First Nations living on treaty lands and their ability to make decisions about (AFN) Chief Shawn Atleo told those lands and the resources the Globe and Mail his view on the movement in contained within them. Yes, Chief Theresa Spence was an interview midkilling herself over a “budget bill,” December. “I think we but many think Spence’s hunger going to strike and the movement that has are grown from it is about so much see a continued more than any one document expression of this — it’s about opening lines of frustration in an communication and taking charge effort to break a very of our own situation as Canadians. toxic system that, As Ghomeshi said, “Idle No in fact, in my view, More is a way of reframing is life or death,” he the debate. A way for people, said. “The cycle heartbreaking especially young people, taking of initiative and taking action and tragedies has to end making their voices heard to affect and that’s what our change in our country — to get people are saying.” That “cycle of heartbreaking the notice of those in power and to tragedies” refers to the treatment send them a message. continual neglect and “Hey, it might be unfocused, it of might be messy, but it is the way abandonment felt by the First Nations communities in this we should want our democracy.” country. Some of that treatment What are they complaining results in the Aboriginal about? Peoples demographic making “I think it’s pretty amazing,” up a mere three per cent of the said former two-time federal Canadian population but 20 per Green Party candidate and cent of Canada’s population of current Kamloops city councillor incarcerated prison inmates. That neglect results in a Donovan Cavers as he surveyed the numbers and watched the country with the largest supply breath rise over the gathering of of freshwater on the planet also public do tend to lose interest in a situation like Attiwapiskat after a week or two.” That last sentiment was about to change.

“She sits below Parliament Hill prepared to die for our children, and for our children’s children.”

Protestors gather outside Cooper’s Foods on Landsdowne Street in Kamloops Dec. 21 and celebrate the movement that is Idle No More before heading up Victoria Street to MP Cathy McLeod’s office. —PHOTO BY MIKE DAVIES

having more than 100 First Nations communities living under a continual boil water alert. That abandonment often comes about when the Crown takes small First Nations communities to court over oil reserve royalties. During the process, the Crown often ignores treaties signed by First Nations and British colonists.

But is that true? Are we really coming together on this issue? So much hate

Not everyone agrees with First Nations’ assertion that their rights and treaties are being infringed upon, or with The Guardian’s assessment that the movement is uniting Canadians. In fact, based on the commentary below many articles regarding the movement, some would say it is dividing Canada even more. As is the case with every uprising, Idle No More has its opponents. When the —Jian Ghomeshi, CBC national media had taken up the cause An article in The Guardian (and some say it took far too published Dec. 20, 2012, long for widespread coverage to entitled “Canada’s First Nations begin) the feedback on message protest heralds a new alliance,” and comment boards of the major proclaims the Idle No More national publications seemed movement to be uniting the First to be overwhelmingly negative Nations and non-First Nations towards the movement. “This movement hopefully will people of Canada, because, “After all, who would Canadians free Canadian taxpayers from the rather control enormous swaths scourge of providing large sums of rural, often pristine land: of cash with no accountability to foreign corporations who see the Chiefs and Councils,” said one it in only dollar signs over poster in the comment section of a the next financial quarter, or story by the National Post. aboriginal communities whose commitment to its sustainability is multigenerational?” EE ROTESTS p.

“Hey, it might be unfocused, it might be messy, but it is the way we should want our democracy.”

ON THE COVER:

A line forms for the smudge bowl before the march through downtown to MP Cathy McLeod’s office during the Dec. 21, 2012 Idle No More rally in Kamloops. — PHOTO BY MIKE DAVIES

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The Omega · Volume 22, Issue 14

THE

MEGA

www.theomega.ca

January 9, 2013

Volume 22, Issue 14

Published since November 27, 1991

editorialstaff EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Editorial/Opinions Start paying attention

Mike Davies

editor@truomega.ca

250-828-5069

@PaperguyDavies NEWS EDITOR

Devan C. Tasa

news@truomega.ca @DCTasa ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR

Brendan Kergin

arts@truomega.ca @roguetowel SPORTS EDITOR

Adam Williams

sports@truomega.ca @AdamWilliams87 ROVING EDITOR

Courtney Dickson

Editor’s Note

COPY/WEB EDITOR

Mike Davies Ω Editor-in-Chief

roving@truomega.ca @dicksoncourtney

Taylor Rocca

copy@truomega.ca @manovrboard

omegacontributors Travis Persaud, Kassandra Mitchell, Mark Hendricks, Karlene Skretting

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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF * Mike Davies BUSINESS MGR * VACANT INDUSTRY REP * Mike Youds FACULTY REP * Charles Hays STUDENT REP* Sadie Cox

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Literary and visual submissions are welcomed. All submissions are subject to editing for brevity, taste and legality. The Omega will attempt to publish each letter received, barring time and space constraints. The editor will take care not to change the intention or tone of submissions, but will not publish material deemed to exhibit sexism, racism or homophobia. Letters for publication must include the writer’s name (for publication) and contact details (not for publication). The Omega reserves the right not to publish any letter or submitted material. Opinions expressed in the Letters & Opinion section do not represent those of The Omega, the Cariboo Student Newspaper Society, its Board of Directors or its staff. Opinions belong only to those who have signed them.

Whether it’s the Idle No More movement (see article page opposite if you somehow don’t know what that is), the Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipeline or the Ajax Mine project just outside of town, there are plenty of controversial and significant national and local issues surrounding you — and you need to start paying attention and forming a clear opinion on them based on facts and statistics. These are things you can’t avoid taking a side on. Sure, you could sit and watch them happen and take the outcome as inevitability, but you could also become informed and make decisions on how you’d like to see your country’s future and be a part of making that happen. “Seriously?” You ask. “These things have got nothing to do with me,” you say. After all, you’re an arts (or

All material in this publication is copyright The Omega and may not be reproduced without the expressed consent of the publisher. All unsolicited submissions become copyright Omega 2012.

(Correspondence not intended for publication should be labelled as such.)

Follow us on Twitter: @TRU_Omega “Like” us on Facebook. Do it. Seriously.

They post status updates (and share things via Twitter) about “news” articles they’re reading…and you’re bombarded with opinions and “facts,” but please don’t rely on the majority of your friends to tell you what to believe. It’s like when you’re using Wikipedia when doing your research for a paper. You know you can’t cite it as an academic source, but you go there first to find out the general ideas and concepts you’re exploring and use it as a launching pad to get your bearings about whatever it is you’re working on. How about this: the next time an article shows up in your feed that you want to check out, go read it, but click every link in the article you’re reading and click every link in every article those links take you to. Once you’ve explored all the links that person wanted you to take, find someone with the opposite view and do the same thing with their article. Form a decision based on the information available, not just the information provided. If you become informed about the things around you, you can more easily make decisions about the direction you want to take in life and more importantly, the direction you’d like the world around you to take. Don’t graduate and go out into a world that you only know certain sides of and had no hand in creating, when you could do the opposite of that. editor@truomega.ca

So fresh, so clean...

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Cariboo Student Newspaper Society (Publisher of The Omega) TRU Campus House #4 Box 3010, Kamloops, B.C. V2C 0C8 Phone: 250-372-1272 E-mail: editor@truomega.ca Ad Enquiries: managerofomega@gmail.com

other non-trades) student at Thompson Rivers University. “Just let me get my 120 credits and my piece of paper so I can join the workforce.” Shut up and listen for a second. If you have the “I’m just here to get my credentials and get out of here” mentality, you need a serious kick in the face. Do you think you’ll be getting your degree and going out into a world that is going to cater to you because you put in a few years at a school that didn’t have the word “secondary” in its name? You are the future of the Canadian landscape. You get to decide how we move forward as a nation. You need to start watching the world around you. It’s changing more quickly every day now that Twitter and Facebook exist. Being ignorant of the sociopolitical world around you is no longer an option. You have no excuse…but please don’t rely on what shows up in your feeds to make your decision on things. Okay, rely on those things, but use them to start your research — and research the sh*t out of everything! The articles in your news feeds are being shared by people who agree with what’s being shared in the articles they’re sharing. Get that? Good. Sure, sometimes people will post the “Can you believe this idiot said this?” article, but they’re still sharing their opinion on an issue by doing so.

TRUe Thoughts Taylor Rocca Ω Copy/Web Editor Welcome back to a fresh year, a fresh semester and a fresh start, folks. Big Boi and Andre 3000 of Outkast once sang, “so fresh, so clean.” Okay, so maybe they were talking about their attire, but let’s look at it in a metaphorical light for the purpose of this conversation. It’s the first week back to class, not even two weeks into 2013. You’ve got a fresh set of resolutions and goals and nothing is going to get in your way. Typically, I am not one for new year resolutions. I’ve always been of the opinion that new year resolutions are simply a set-up for disappointment and failure. For some reason, my take on new year resolutions has done a 180-degree turn in 2013. I know that this year I have set out a rough compilation of goals

and expectations for 2013. I plan on using these as a motivator and driving factor as I do my best to conquer 2013. A study conducted by the University of Scranton in Pennsylvania and published Dec. 13, 2012 revealed that 45 per cent of Americans make resolutions every year when the big ol’ ball falls once again in Times Square. On the f lip side of that coin, 38 per cent of Americans never make a resolution. Here is the kicker, which also happens to function as the primary reason why I have previously avoided making resolutions of my own: only eight per cent of Americans are ever successful in achieving their resolution. Is that demoralizing or what? Stop — don’t jump off the treadmill and go racing for that box of doughnuts just yet. There is still hope. What if I were to tell you that the same study also found the most successful group to achieve its new year resolutions falls within the demographic right here on our very campus? 39 per cent of people in their 20s are successful in achieving their new year resolutions while only 14 per cent of the 50-plus crowd will achieve their new year goals and aspirations. Our senior citizens think they know everything. Looks like the 20-something crowd can finally lay claim to a respectable victory in the on-going generational, parent-child battle.

If that isn’t encouraging enough, the study found another tell-tale statistic. Those who explicitly make resolutions are 10 times more likely to achieve their goals than those who don’t explicitly make resolutions. Essentially, if you tell yourself you are going to do something and you stick to your guns, there isn’t much that can get in your way. You might be sitting here reading this, saying to yourself, “Whatever, resolutions are all psychological anyways. I don’t need a new year to make changes,” or “new year resolutions won’t help me achieve my goals, they’re just a bunch of psychological hullabaloo.” I wouldn’t necessarily disagree with you. After all, this study was only published in the Journal of Clinical Psychology. But if the thought of a clean slate and new beginning helps motivate people to enjoy life and make the world around them better, why rain on that parade? All the power to them, as far as I am concerned. On that note, welcome back to TRU. Here is your clean slate — a new year full of exciting possibilities and unpredictable adventures. Whether they happen to be academic, personal or professional, 2013 is yours for the taking. Go out, grab a hold of it and make it your own. Don’t let any Pessimistic Pete or Paula stand in your way. Best of luck and I’m sure I’ll see you somewhere along the way. copy@truomega.ca

Marijuana legalization needed in Canada Erica Martin

The Martlet (UVic) VICTORIA (CUP)—The recent legalization of marijuana by the states of Colorado and Washington shows that attitudes towards the drug have been changing. A Canadian poll recently cited in the Toronto Star revealed that 65 per cent of Canadians support either legalization and taxation of the drug or decriminalizing it in small amounts. These aren’t just the votes belonging to your campus college liberal meme or peacenik hippie. As a whole, Canada is tuning in to the economic and societal benefits of legalizing or decriminalizing marijuana. The Huffington Post recently reported on a study that found that, between 2010 and 2011, California experienced a 20 per cent decrease in juvenile crime, bringing underage crime to its lowest level since record keeping began in 1954. According to the study, this improvement can be attributed to the punishment for possessing a small amount of marijuana being reduced from a misdemeanour to an infraction, which generally garners only a fine or a ticket. This incredible reduction in youth being sentenced and jailed for possession has helped them to stay out of the criminal justice system and pursue more positive lifestyle choices. The effect of those more positive lifestyles is clear: serious youth crime in California has decreased faster than in the rest of the nation. The Vancouver Sun also recently cited a study that found that 75 per cent of B.C. respondents favour taxation and regulation of marijuana possession as opposed to prosecuting marijuana users. Instead of adopting this approach, the Conservative party opts for mandatory prison sentences for non-violent marijuana offences. Even so, prohibition has been an epic failure. Despite marijuana’s illegality and the countless dollars spent on ineffective or incomplete law enforcement, British Columbians still buy, in total, about half a billion dollars’ worth of pot per year, according to a study published by University of British Columbia and Simon Fraser University researchers. Instead of solving the problems that the war on drugs set out to fix, government policy has created new ones. For example, one of the most prominent issues in B.C. is that various gangs are competing in the marijuana market, each seeking to gain full control over this immensely profitable plant. Instead of taking the money and power out of the hands of these gangs, the government chooses not to tax and regulate marijuana. Hey, why not keep the cash flowing to the gangsters? A coalition called Stop the Violence B.C. states that legalizing and regulating marijuana would reduce gang violence and convert criminal profits into tax revenue for the government. According to an Angus Reid poll published in 2011, 87 per cent of B.C. residents think that gang violence is linked to organized crime control of the marijuana trade. Data from Washington suggests the state could bring in $2.5 billion in taxes from the marijuana industry over five years, and by some estimates, they have approximately the same number of pot smokers as B.C. The Conservatives are making a mistake by not addressing this issue. They should take a page from some U.S. states’ book and reform Canada’s drug policies.


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January 9, 2013

News Report: TRU students tend to have no debt, or a lot Devan C. Tasa Ω News Editor

A survey released by a consortium of 37 universities indicates when TRU students graduate, they generally either don’t owe any money or owe more than $20,000. Of the 136 TRU class of 2012 graduates that answered the question about accumulated debt in the Canadian University Survey Consortium’s (CUSC) 2012 survey of graduating students, 40 per cent reported having no debt while 34 per cent reported owing more than $20,000. That’s on par with the answer provided by 15,109 graduates of the 37 universities, in which 41 per cent had no debt and 33 per cent owed more than $20,000. The average debt owed by those graduating at TRU is $18,334, which is $3,881 higher than the average of the 37 universities. “Average student debt at TRU is almost $4,000 more than the Canadian average,” stated a TRUSU ad in the Nov. 21 edition of The Omega, which cited the survey as its source. However, the 37 universities do not encompass the entire Canadian university sector. The most up to date figures can be found in Statistics Canada’s 2007 National Graduates Survey, which examined the class of 2005. Students graduating that year with a bachelor’s degree owed an average of $19,500. Dustin McInytre, TRUSU’s president, said the results of the CUSC survey were not a surprise to the students union. “Student debt is more of a symptom than the problem. The problem, we believe, is the cost,” he said. “We’re concerned that students are taking

Student debt at TRU

more and more debt due to an increase in tuition fees and a lack of provincial funding for post-secondary education. “What we need is a commitment for our institution to freeze tuition fees at the May 2013 board of governors meeting,” adding the students union wanted to work with the university to increase provincial funding. While the average student debt at TRU was higher than the 37 universities, the median student debt was lower. TRU students had a median debt of $6,432, equating to $568 lower than the median of the 37 universities. A median, like an average, is a way to generalize a set of numbers. For example, if there was a set of numbers containing 1, 2, 3, 5 and 100, the average, calculated by adding the sum of the numbers divided by the amount of numbers, would be 22.2 while the median, calculated by selecting the number in the middle, would be 3. This may indicate the number of average student debt is skewed, with a few students surveyed owing a large amount of student debt. The survey reported $600,000 as being the largest individual debt owed by the student interviewed. McInytre said comparing the average and the median may be missing the point. “It’s not about inflation, or the median or average debt, it’s about the fact that the cost is becoming so exorbitant at TRU,” he said. “Let’s not talk about the student debt, let’s talk about funding and the cost of TRU. That’s what’s important.” The graduating survey is conducted on behalf of the CUSC every three years. Along with student debt, it measures student satisfaction, experiences and future plans.

— GR APHIC BY DEVAN C. TASA

TRUSU health and dental TRU World Facebook reaches 100,000 Karlene Skretting coverage activated “Unfortunate errors” and technological learning curves to blame for health and dental plans’ payment issues Courtney Dickson Ω Roving Editor

During the fall 2012 semester, complaining about the TRUSU extended health and dental plan not being activated became an ordinary part of campus conversation. According to Dustin McIntyre, TRUSU president, health and dental this year was integrated into students’ myTRU accounts to make opting in and out more straight-forward. In early October the new system crashed and was not generating the correct files. “It was an unfortunate error,” McIntyre said. TRUSU had to create new files which proved difficult for them due to learning how to operate the new technology. On Dec. 10, 2012, McIntyre said, “Everyone is now active.” After visiting her life-long dentist in her hometown of Williams Lake, Pam Lawrence, third-year nursing, received numerous phone calls from the dental office saying the insurance didn’t “go through.” Lawrence was told she owed upwards of $300. “I’ve gone to this dentist my whole life and now I feel like I’m in bad standing with them,” Lawrence said. “I don’t even want to call them back because I don’t know what to say.”

Lawrence studied at TRU’s Williams Lake campus for the first two years of her degree. The William’s Lake campus is not unionized, therefore had no health and dental plan. To come to the Kamloops campus and not have activated health and dental coverage was “frustrating.” “We pay $248 for the year. It’s December. Health is important and we’re not getting covered,” Lawrence said. Lawrence contacted Nathan Lane, executive director at TRUSU, in early December. After learning about her situation, he contacted Green Shield, the TRUSU health insurance provider and had her file rectified. As of Dec. 4, Lawrence was reimbursed for the cost and her health and dental was fully activated. Any students who are still encountering difficulty with extended health and dental coverage are asked to contact the students union immediately. Reimbursements will be made for any medical claims backdating to Sept. 1, 2012. “We encourage students to talk to us about any issues with health and dental,” McIntyre said. “Many [students] have come to us with issues and we’ve been able to resolve them.” Costs students can claim include, but are not limited to, prescription drugs, oral surgery, vision care, physiotherapy, medical equipment and custom-made orthotics. For a full list visit the TRUSU office in the Independent Centre.

Ω Contributor

TRU World announced Dec. 17, 2012 that its Facebook page for international students reached 100,000 likes, making it the first educational institute in Canada to reach that mark. “We have worked hard over the past year to develop our social media,” said Mike Henniger, TRU’s director of marketing for international students. “Our strategy is to inform and entertain. We post helpful information like add/drop deadlines, but also fun pictures of the campus and community. “It is extraordinary we have been able to gather such a large group on Facebook. This is more than just a number, though, it is great to see the engagement that is taking place on our Facebook page.” Part of the page’s success can be attributed to the fact a large percentage of the content is student-led and a team of great ambassadors promotes TRU. The page is easy to understand. It is written from a student’s point of view. Individuals learn how to apply to TRU, gain information about residence options and can find mentors who have already taken the program and classes they may be interested in. Students have also used the page to find roommates and friends, purchase and sell used textbooks and to coordinate carpools to Vancouver for the weekend or to Sun Peaks for a day of skiing. “This is really what social media is about: sharing information and experiences with your peers,” Henniger said. “For many, Facebook is the first time they see TRU. The page provides immediate access to informed individuals.” Current staff, students and residents of Kamloops make up the page’s fans. The majority of the 100,000 fans are students from overseas.

“We monitor the page daily, so we were aware of the fact we were approaching the mark and kept a close eye on it,” Henniger said. Indonesia accounts for the most fans with 16,300. India represents another 16,000. Turkey (11,200), Colombia (11,600) and the Phillippines (10,700) round out the top five. There are currently 1,644 international students enrolled at TRU according to Henniger. “In order to gain followers we did advertising in countries like Indonesia and India where Facebook has a high adoption rate,” he said. TRU World launched its social media campaign last November in India in conjunction with the opening of its office in Bangalore. “The multimedia aspect was specifically planned and Premier Christy Clark launched the program,” Henniger said. “The big contributing factor to TRU’s success is the attention the page is given … The page is talked about weekly and in great detail. It is a persistent effort. “The page is also a great way to show pride in Canada and the university. Many students post pictures of them-

selves and friends on campus, skiing and around the community for other followers to view who want a glimpse of what it is like to live and study in Canada.” In comparison to other Canadian universities, the TRU World page greatly exceeds the followers of other institution pages. “The closest Canadian university is the University of Toronto with 73,316 likes … the biggest difference is the fact that we made the page more of a priority,” Henninger said. According to each respective Facebook page, McGill University has 28,526 likes, the University of British Columbia page has 26,296 likes and the University of Alberta has 16,958 likes. “It is a huge accomplishment. Some of the U.S. universities have huge followings. It is a valuable tool for prospective and current students alike,” Henninger said. That is the great thing about Facebook, it engages everyone, those looking to attend TRU, those enrolled, and alumni. In the future TRU hopes to attract more followers and engage those who currently follow the page through contests.


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The Omega · Volume 22, Issue 14

News TRU students educate peers about tobacco use

dents participated in a ‘butt count.’ Between 12:30 p.m. and 1:30 p.m. Ω Roving Editor students collected cigarette butts Eight second-year respiratory around campus. Prior to the count, therapy students at TRU are teach- students asked campus custodians ing others about the dangers of to- to avoid cleaning up after smokers on Monday morning. Counters bacco use. The TRU Tobacco Education found 11,090 cigarette butts in one Strategies Clinic functions to edu- hour. That is an estimated cost of cate patients about the immediate $4,990. 23.9 per cent of young adults in effects of tobacco use and provide them with support when they decide B.C. between the ages of 20 and 34, are considered smokers according to quit using tobacco. Adrienne Beley, a student work- to quitnow.ca. According to Beley, tobacco is ing at the clinic, has first-hand exthe only legal perience with product in Cansmoking. She ada that if used was once a as directed, smoker and will kill half of understands those who use the hardships it. of dealing with The area in quitting smokfront of Old ing. Main has be“It’s easier come an unofto make an exficial gathering cuse than to spot for onjust quit,” Becampus smokley said. ers. TRU has Beley added that though —Adrienne Beley, painted lines around the youth are bombarded Tobacco Education Strategies building indicating where with information about the Clinic students are not allowed to ill-effects of smoke. This smoking, they section is outare drawn to it side of the lines, so students are by curiosity. “It often becomes a long-term within their rights to smoke there. Because smokers are lighting-up so problem. “The longer you go, the harder it close to the building, it makes it difficult for those wanting to quit to do becomes to quit.” The clinic provides those who so. The temptation is always right wish to quit smoking with a variety there. On top of that, non-smokers are finding it difficult to pass of tobacco cessation techniques. Through counselling and moti- through the area. The University of British Columvational interviewing, the students teach clients about addiction and bia Okanagan built gazebos to achow to overcome the psychological, commodate its on-campus smokers, social and physical pressures tobac- which allows non-smokers to avoid second-hand smoke. According to co places on users. The B.C. government provides Drysdale, there has been talk of coverage for those with an active starting a petition to build someMedical Services Plan for 12 weeks thing similar at TRU. TRU is the only school in B.C. of non-prescription nicotine replacement therapy products, such that provides a respiratory therapy as nicotine gum or patches, or stop- program. Respiratory therapists devote smoking prescription drugs like butheir time to studying and assisting propion and varenicline. “There are chemicals in cigarettes patients with cardiopulmonary and that reduce hunger. We recommend associated illnesses and difficulties. The Canadian Cancer society that [smokers] replace smoking with healthy snacks. This way, they are has declared Jan. 20 to 26 National satisfying the need for the hand-to- Non-Smoking week. This is an anmouth action and being healthy,” nual event that encourages smoksaid Stephanie Drysdale, one of the ers to educate themselves about the negative effects of tobacco use and students working at the clinic. On Monday, Oct. 22, 2012, 30 stu- provide support to many.

Courtney Dickson

“The longer you go, the harder it becomes to quit.”

News Brief Tim Horton’s robbery still unsolved Courtney Dickson Ω Roving Editor

According to information obtained by The Omega via a freedom of information request, sometime between Nov. 2 at 5:20 p.m. and Nov. 5 at 7:00 a.m. the Tim Horton’s/ Extreme Pita in Old Main was broken into and robbed. $1,575.20 was stolen and total damages to the loca-

tion was an estimated $3,575.20. Two cash registers and their contents were stolen. RCMP reported there to be little evidence left behind, other than a knife under the sliding gate surrounding the counter, damage to the door handle and soft drinks on the counter. RCMP believe the point of entry was under the sliding gate, as there was no sign of forced entry.

International Intonation

Classrooms that help you learn just by how they’re designed, absolute zero called into question and more African unrest Mark Hendricks Ω Contributor

Designing higher grades A recent joint study between the University of Salford and architecture firm Nightingale Associates has found classroom design can improve a student’s learning by up to 25 per cent. The study rated classroom design on ten factors. Of those ten factors, six had a causal relationship to student performance. These six factors were colour, choice, connection, complexity, f lexibility and light. “This is the first time a holistic assessment has been made that successfully links the overall impact directly to learning rates in schools,” Peter Barrett, an architect and the study’s lead author told Wired magazine. “The impact identified is in fact greater than we imagined.” According to the study the difference between a well-designed classroom and a poorly-designed one can be equal to a year’s worth of progress a student would normally make. Where you can find out more: http://www.salford.ac.uk/homepage/news Below absolute zero Physicists from the Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich have broken the previously

thought lower limit of temperature, absolute zero. Using a potassium gas and a combination of lasers and magnetic fields, the scientists were able to rapidly shift the atoms from a low-energy state to a high-energy state and in the process reduce the temperature of the gas to below absolute zero. “It’s like walking through a valley, then instantly finding yourself on the mountain peak,”

that causes the universe to expand at an increasing rate. Scientists believe this may lead to the ability to create new forms of matter in labs. Previously unstable states may become stable at temperatures below absolute zero. Where you can find out more: www.nature.com Unrest in Africa

As rebels advance on the capital of the Central African Republic (CAR), President Francois Bozize makes desperate appeals to the U.S. and France for support. The rebel group, known as Seleka, have occupied several cities in the northern regions of CAR including the city of Bambari, the third largest in the country and are currently advancing towards the capital of Bangui. Seleka claims President Bozize is failing to honour a peace treaty from 2007 that was sup— IMAGE COURTESY CHRISTIAN FISCHER posed to compensate rebWIKIMEDIA COMMONS els who laid down their arms during the earlier conf lict and have vowed said Ulrich Schneider, a physi- to depose President Bozize uncist working on the project, to less he negotiates with them. The CAR government is saying Nature. Matter begins to act strangely the rebels are refusing to engage at temperatures below absolute in a ceasefire to allow for diazero. Atoms begin resisting the logue. President Bozize has asked for pull of gravity and f loat upwards instead of down and the cloud of help from the U.S. and France to atoms resist the normal tendency halt the rebel advance to allow to collapse inwards under the for talks to begin. France has denied the request force of attraction. These characteristics closely for aid. Where you can find out more: resemble dark energy, the as of yet not fully understood force www.bbc.co.uk

Independent Centre renos completed Devan C. Tasa Ω News Editor

The construction dust in TRUSU’s Independent Centre has mostly settled after three months of renovations. The students union has been expanding its building, adding a new boardroom, a study room and a series of individual study carrels. “We started construction in October,” said Dustin McIntyre, TRUSU’s president. “The new boardroom and the new study space and the carrels are fully functioning now. “As well, we are converting our old boardroom into a lecture hall that will fit up to 70 people for those larger movie nights that people want on campus.” The conversion is expected to be completed by the students union’s annual general meeting held on Jan. 24. By having a separate boardroom and lecture hall, TRUSU front desk staff won’t have to spend as much time setting up tables and chairs to switch between the two configurations. McIntyre said the rooms available in the building were popular with students, especially since it’s easy to book one online. “Students have a wide variety of things they need that room booking for, whether it’s a movie night for eight people or two people want to study together,” he said. The expansion is necessary because of

TRUSU president Dustin McIntyre shows off the new study spaces in the Independent Centre. —PHOTO BY DEVAN C. TASA

the steadily increasing demand for rooms to book. For example, Nathan Lane, TRUSU’s executive director, told the students union’s council in October that in September of 2012, students booked 414 hours of time, compared to 341 hours in September of the previous year. “Our room bookings every month go up,” McIntyre said. “We added a new room last year -- the red room -- and even with adding that new room our room bookings are still through the roof most of the time, if not all of the time. “The students are using these rooms pretty much to capacity, so we understand that students want more study

space, so we’ve created that space for them.” While using the study spaces, students won’t have to stop using their electronic gadgets. The individual study carrels have six easily accessible electrical outlets right at the top. “The new study spaces, like our old study spaces, will have full multimedia functionality, [with] the ability to pull your computers in, conference calls and things of that nature,” McIntyre said. The new additions will be run by the students union and considered a part of the Independent Centre, not the Campus Activity Centre.


6

January 9, 2013

Life & Community #IdleNoMore

SLIDERS ARE ONLY GOOD FOR BASEBALL AND CURLING

Protests...from p. 2

“I think we are going to see a continued expression of this frustration in an effort to break a very toxic system that, in fact, in my view, is life or death.”

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MC117267

“Stick to your position Harpo, govern Canada, don’t give in to this nut,” said another, adding, “By the way, how is it that those Canadians who live in Attawapiskat are not entirely responsible for the condition of their homes and community? Especially as I understand that they are a superior class of Canadian citizen that for no real reason other than racism gets more government money than the rest of us.” That reader’s analysis garnered an even more detailed and negative response regarding First Nations “entitlements” and perceived The Idle No More protest Dec. 21 in Kamloops aproaches its accountability issues: “Remember your mortgage, in- destination: Cathy McLeod’s office on Victoria Street, where surance, maintenance costs when it would go on to occupy the parking lot. you realize they do not pay a pen- —PHOTO BY MIKE DAVIES ny. Plus they receive a monthly stipend, how much I do not know. f looding, given its location on the One native friend in Nova Scotia were rampant. The attitude from the public that James Bay plain, but it refused to told me his reserve PAYS $4,000 per month to each PERSON over First Nations people should not be consider moving farther upriver or near Timmins, where there 18 years of age. Hard to believe? “entitled” to anything rages on. “Within our lifespan, what have might be employment opportuniGet after your MP for details. Remember when your child pays I taken from you? Oh that’s right... ties.” He concludes his column with university and its ancillary costs- don’t let a little thing called real--the native child pays NOTH- ity take you away from blaming the statement, “To imagine that ING. Why anyone prefers to live the white man for all your prob- isolated communities of a thouin Bands like Attawapiskat is hard lems. Laying back and blaming sand or so people can be vibrant to fathom? It is isolated, surround- me for everything is soooooo and self-sustaining, capable of ed by mosquitoes and muskeg. much easier than growing up and discharging the panoply of rePS. One chief of an 87 person, taking responsibility for your ac- sponsibilities of ‘sovereignty,’ is yes eighty-seven people reserve tions, [sic]” seems to be the gen- to live within the dream palace of memory,” confirmin NS, received ing his implied as$250,000 tax free. sertion throughout Plus one relative the piece that First Councillor received Nations people of almost one million Canada should just tax free, including suck it up, move eight hundred thousomewhere they sand for work down can get a job and on the reserve from assimilate into the his company. It capitalist culture was never revealed that is the driving what he did for the force of this great money. The Native nation. Councils of Canada As of the writing must be held to acof this piece, Chief count for the actions Spence is still of those Chiefs who awaiting a meeting make a mockery of with Prime Ministhe system. [sic]” ter Harper, hungry These feelings are —Shawn Atleo, Assembly of First Nations Chief and cold in her teechoed all over the pee on a small iscomment sections land in the frozen of the online coverage of Idle No More — from CTV, eral feedback on mainstream Ottawa River below Parliament CBC, the Globe and Mail and the media articles from national pub- Hill, though a meeting has been Toronto Star — often (though lications — whether that’s just scheduled between Prime Minisnot always) by people who admit because the pro-Idle No More ter Harper and the AFN for Jan. within their own posts that they people are busy rallying (or for 11, which Chief Spence has said have no first-hand experience, whatever reason aren’t engaging she will attend. Shopping centres, ferry termidocumentation or statistics to on comment boards) or if it’s the back up their claims. A seemingly general feeling of the Canadian nals, railways and border crossings are still being overrun and very large percentage of people public remains to be seen. Although, as if spurred on by disrupted, banners are still being are engaging with this topic basing their opinions on hearsay, ru- the feedback being received, more f lown and Twitter and Facebook and more national publications are are still being f looded with supmour and long-held assumptions. Obert Madondo, who used a starting to publish pieces them- port or resistance, promotion or hunger strike to personally protest selves that come from that side of frustration. While the fallout from the Bill C-10 in March 2012, penned the argument. Articles and columns like the movement will be seen in time, an article for the Huffington Post. “What Chief Spence’s Hunger Jan. 5, “Too many first nations it is certainly not accurate to say Strike Says About Canada” pro- people live in a dream place,” that the uprising is bringing Canavides a realistic and accurate written by Globe and Mail col- dians together. The only thing that is certain to expression and interpretation of umnist Jeffrey Simpson, which the history of hunger strikes as a implies the desired world (and come of this is that Canada will negotiating tactic in Canada and relationship with the Canadian change because of this. The direction and extent of that abroad. It is a first-hand account government) described by the of what it’s like to devotedly pro- pro-Idle-No-More community is change depends on too many evertest for a cause in this country and unattainable and they should just changing factors to even hazard a guess at this point, but there’s has garnered many responses sim- move on and join the real world. “[T]oo many communities re- action being taken, a discussion ilar to those seen on the National main within the dream palace, brewing around that action and Post boards. Responses like, “Let’s cut off hungering for a return to a more the attention of the nation is behydro, water and sewer. Don’t separate existence, even if the ing held. As Ghomeshi said, this is the build any roads, stop selling gaso- lands on which they sit are – and line… No schools, no hospitals, likely always will be – of mar- way we should want our democno department stores… Let them ginal economic value,” he wrote. racy. Here’s hoping it changes for the live the life of real native peo- “Attawapiskat, Chief Spence’s ple… if this is what they want,” community, is subject to severe better when all is said and done.


7

The Omega · Volume 22, Issue 14

Life & Community Closest place to vote in election four kilometres away

Concert previews: January

Devan C. Tasa

Kamloops Burlesque does Time Travel

TRU students and staff will have to go off campus to vote in the May 14, 2013 provincial election, according to plans from Elections B.C. The polling station closest to the university would be located at Dufferin Elementary School, approximately four kilometres southwest of the university, wrote Doug Gibson, the electoral district officer for Kamloops – South Thompson, via email. “For a variety of reasons, polling stations consist of a number of voting areas and we try our best to locate the polling station centrally within the voting areas,” he wrote. This plan does not mesh well with a lobbying effort by TRUSU that began in May 2012 advocating for a place to vote on campus both during and before election day. The students union will continue to talk with Elections B.C. in January 2013 in an effort to have a polling station on campus, Dylan Robinson, TRUSU’s vice-president external, wrote in an email. When asked in an interview if the students union had looked at trying to get support from the local branches of the B.C. Liberals and New Democrats in their lobbying effort, Robinson said that was something that hasn’t been considered. “If it’s something that will get the ball rolling on this polling station, I’ll definitely investigate every option that’s available to make that happen,” he said. While the political parties have no say in where a polling station is located, they are in

Jan. 10, The Blue Grotto, doors at 8 p.m., $5 regular, $10 advance VIP seating. The gals of Kamloops Burlesque do it up again with a variety show exploring time. With door prizes, singing, dancing, prancing and more it’s always a unique time. While the performers will be in their best time travel duds, they encourage the crowd to participate and dress up as well. A professional photographer will be snapping everyone in his or her finery.

Ω News Editor

Lornaco

Here’s how you’ll need to get to the nearest polling station in the next provincial election (assuming you start from campus).

—IMAGE BY DEVAN C. TASA

constant contact with the electoral district officer in the leadup to the election. The effort to get a polling station on campus is part of the students union’s Vote Education campaign, a non-partisan effort to register students to vote and educate them about the post-secondary education issue. To inform students about the upcoming vote, Elections B.C. is planning to hold an information and registration booth at the university for two days sometime in March, Gibson wrote. “The students and staff would be able to receive information about the election and also would have an opportunity to register as a voter if they are eligible,” he wrote.

Robinson was pleased to hear about the booth. “Voter registration and voter education is a big aspect of the Vote Education campaign, so any effort by Elections B.C. to supplement our own voter registration efforts is really awesome and I’m really excited about that,” he said. As for the future activities of the campaign, Robinson expects to make announcements in the new year as the political parties ramp up their campaigns and more students become aware of the election. “I think once that starts happening, it’ll be full steam ahead for Vote Education,” he said. “It’ll be a pretty exciting time around here.”

TRU alumni killed on highway 5 Memorial scholarship to be established for Skye and Courtney in ceremony Jan. 12 Adam Williams Ω Sports Editor

Snowed In Comedy Tour Jan. 18, Kamloops Convention Centre, doors at 7 p.m., $40 A quartet of highly-regarded comedians is traveling B.C. this winter in the fifth-annual Snowed In

The Tragically Hip w/ The Arkells Jan. 20, Interior Savings Centre, doors at 8 p.m., $33.75 - $113.25 Legends of Canadian rock are returning to Kamloops. This will be the second date on a Canada-wide tour and is one of only two in the interior of B.C., so if you’re going to catch this quintessentially Canadian band, better get on it. They’ll be coming around with The Arkells, a more common sight in Kamloops, but enjoyable every time. Proud Animal Feb. 2, The Art We Are, show at 8 p.m., to be determined A folksy duo (and sometimes trio) out of Vancouver will be coming up for a quick show at the Art We Are. The young band released six songs last year, creating an EP of melodic tunes created by guitars, keyboards and their own voices. It will be a good evening out for those into the West Coast brand of folksy pop.

19% did it multiple times per day. Do it your way. Enrol anytime, study where and when you want and transfer credits back to your on-campus program.

www.truopen.ca/yourway Skye Buck and his wife Courtney.

year here, we hosted the National Championships and he was a sight to behold. My kids still talk about his performance and that was in 2004.” Skye and Courtney were both teachers in Clearwater, Skye at the high school and Courtney at the elementary school and were heavily involved in the sports

—SUBMITTED

community in Clearwater. Courtney was seven months pregnant at the time of the accident. Skye and Courtney will be remembered on Jan. 12, 2013 at the TRU Gym, as a part of TRU’s first annual basketball alumni event. A memorial scholarship has been established in Skye and Courtney’s memory.

MC117213

The TRU athletics community continues to mourn the loss of one of its alumni and his wife. Skye Buck and his wife Courtney passed away Dec. 9, 2012, when their vehicle went off Highway 5 just north of Clearwater and became submerged in the North Thompson River. Skye, who played for the University College of the Cariboo Sun Demons from 1999 to 2004, had an illustrious basketball career in Kamloops. He was a Canadian College Athletic Association all-Canadian, a perennial all-star and was named the B.C. College Athletic Association’s Men’s Basketball Player of the Year in 2003-2004. “People came to watch Skye Buck play,” TRU athletic director Ken Olynyk said in an athletics press release. “He was a tremendous shooter, had great range and was an attraction on the f loor. In my first

Jan. 17, TRU Alumni Theatre (Clock Tower, room 200), show at 12:30 p.m., free. Fusing Mexican music with folk, pop and more, the Paperboys frontman Tom Landa is bringing some warmth to the cool TRU campus. While the Juno award-winning Paperboys leans more towards Celtic styles, Lorcano is much more Latino sounding, like a folksy Manu Chao or Ozomatli.

Comedy Tour. This year’s batch of internationally-recognized Canadians and imports includes Arj Barker (who played Dave on Flight of the Conchords and has an Edinburgh Fringe Festival Perrier Award) and Dan Quinn (who was a winner of the Canadian Competition at Just for Laughs).

Flexible • Credible • Online and Distance


8

January 9, 2013

Arts & Entertainment

The five albums of 2012 most worth a listen

Taylor Rocca

Ω Copy/Web Editor Each and every year sees the charts hit with a barrage of albums and new releases, some good and some just downright awful. With 2012 now in the books and a new year of music quickly approaching, here is my top-five list of favourite albums from the past year. 5. Stomping the Phantom Brake Pedal by Angels & Airwaves 2012 marked a year of change for Angels & Airwaves. With the passing of long-time sound engineer Jeff Newell on New Year’s Eve 2011 and the departure of drummer Adam Willard, uncertainty was in the air for a band coming off the release of a double album and accompanying full-length feature film. After adding new percussionist Ilan Rubin, formerly the touring drummer with Nine Inch Nails, Angels & Airwaves released a double EP, Stomping the Phantom Brake Pedal. 4. The Sticks by Mother Mother Mother Mother returned to the Canadian music scene in September 2012 and while The Sticks may have been darker than previous efforts from the Quadra Island indie rockers, the reception was no less positive. Still maintaining certain elements of the classic Mother Mother indie dancepop the band has become known for, lead singer Ryan Guldemond and his

four band mates displayed versatile song-writing and the ability to step outside their own norm. Mother Mother has been on the rise since the release of 2008’s O My Heart and The Sticks contributes to the groups continuing upward trend. 3. Dogs Eating Dogs by blink-182

It might have snuck in under the wire with its release on Dec. 18, 2012, but blink-182’s Dogs Eating Dogs EP makes the cut nonetheless. Not only that, but despite only being a five-song EP, it manages to crack the top three on this list. Quality over quantity, my friends. The California rockers returned with a vengeance, looking to stake a claim to the part of the rock world that once belonged to them. After going on a lengthy hiatus, 2011’s Neighborhoods was met with mixed reviews. Dogs Eating Dogs has already received numerous five-star reviews and for the first time in a decade, blink-182 is once again relevant in the music industry. A split with Interscope Records likely allowed the group a bit more creative freedom and that can certainly be heard on Dogs Eating Dogs as the band experiments with sounds unconventional when lined up with blink-182’s previous recordings. They say you can’t teach old dogs new tricks, but it certainly seems as though the aging blink boys have utilized freedom from a major label to teach themselves a few new tricks.

2. Is by Hey Ocean

Mother Mother isn’t the only band loaded with potential to come out of B.C.’s West Coast music scene. Hey Ocean has been around since 2006, longer than Mother Mother, but has yet to have the same critical success of its Quadra Island counterpart. 2012 was kind to Hey Ocean as the band’s latest release, Is, was met with positive reviews. With an upbeat and inspiring dancepop sound while managing to maintain a soft indie rock soul, Is doesn’t just cater to one audience and that brings about a significant contribution to its success. The group’s energetic and passionate live performances help pull in love and adulation from fans across Canada. After a successful Kickstarter campaign to help fund an international tour, it seems as though global fans will also get to experience the same positive vibes as those of us in Canada have already been so fortunate to soak up. 1. Handwritten by The Gaslight Anthem The Gaslight Anthem has steadily been on the rise in the alternative rock scene. Bringing an energetic blend of upbeat modern rock and classic folkstyle Bruce Springsteen, the New Jersey group hit its first true homerun with 2012’s Handwritten. From start to finish, Handwritten is an absolute masterpiece. Listening from one end of the album to the other, most listeners will be hard-

—IMAGE COURTESY MERCURY RECOR DS

pressed to find a weak link within the 14-track set. From the opening track and lead single, “45,” to the quiet yet passionate love ballad “National Anthem,” lead singer Brian Fallon is quickly establishing himself as the next strong American singer-songwriter. Handwritten hit number one on the U.S. Rock chart, U.S. Alternative chart and U.K. rock chart. It peaked as high as number three on the U.S. Billboard 200 and soared as

high as number five on the Canadian charts. The deluxe edition of the album includes the bonus track “Blue Dahlia” as well as covers of Nirvana’s “Sliver” and Tom Petty’s “You Got Lucky.” The Tom Petty cover is arguably one of the best cover songs to be recorded in years. For an extended top-10 list including track recommendations, visit theomega.ca.

Film review: Django Unchained Kassandra Mitchell Ω Contributor

Canadian Music Corner Travis Persaud

Ω Resident Music Guy More and more these days a trip home isn’t quite complete until I sit myself down in a narrow, rustic, dimly-lit bar to let the sounds of some of Ontario’s finest folk musicians wash over me. On my trip home for the holiday season I was treated to Dear Sister, a Toronto-based trio. Upon taking the stage, lead vocalists Bri Salmena and Raven Shields quickly welcomed me home, blanketing the audience with heart-warming harmonies paired perfectly with the golden hue of the house lighting. From the live performance

Brendan Kergin

Ω Arts & Entertainment Editor One might not connect the worlds of punk/metal and traditional country, but Corb Lund has done that. While he may have started off as part of the Smalls, a group which formed in 1989 and toured until 2001, he’s mellowed over the past decade. The Smalls was actually banned from Kamloops for a while due to the ruckus they caused. Now he’s gone back to his roots. Originally from near Taber, Alta., he’s becoming one of the biggest names in music for fans of the more traditional country music, akin to Hank Williams or Willie

to the record, Dear Sister made some notable changes. Most prominently, the swapping of a banjo for a full-throttled Telecaster electric guitar in the very capable hands of Aaron Comeau transformed the live performance to a rowdy happening compared to the easy-listening album. For me the highlight of the album was also the highlight of the live performance. Dear Sister played “Hallelujah,” the closing track on the album, as a mid-set slowdown. Interestingly, the album version of “Hallelujah” is a recording of a live performance. Front to back, Dear Sister’s self-titled album is a smooth listen fans of Kathleen Edwards and Feist would enjoy. Nelson. He works with a regular band, sometimes called the Corb Lund Band or Corb Lund and the Hurtin’ Albertans. While the Smalls did well, it’s Lund’s roots work that has garnered him a long list of critical claim in Canada and the U.S. He started it while still with the Smalls, his first release of this style was back in 1995. In more recent years he’s produced more material and received Juno awards, French Association of Country Music awards, Canadian Country Music Association awards and many more, including awards from Australia and the U.S. Check out “Horse Soldier, Horse Soldier” for an example of his work.

Released on Dec. 25, 2012, Django Unchained is an American western film by Quentin Tarantino starring Jamie Foxx, Leonardo DiCaprio, Samuel L. Jackson, Kerry Washington and Christoph Waltz. Set in the deep south, recently “unchained” slave Django (Foxx) is freed from his captives by Dr. King Schultz (Waltz), a highly-skilled bounty hunter looking for three criminal brothers. In order to capture them – dead or alive – Schultz needs Django to help identify them. They soon come to an agreement – they will work together as bounty hunters and when the winter ends, Schultz will help Django rescue his wife (Washington) from the tightlyguarded plantation of “Candyland.” The pair thus begins their bloody, bullet-ridden adventure; finding the villainous brothers Schultz has been looking for and developing what they believe to be a fool-proof plan for entering the infamous Candyland and freeing Django’s wife. When they arrive, plantation owner Calvin Candie (DiCaprio) and his trusted house slave, Stephen (Jackson), soon become suspicious of their new guests and the battle begins. The follow-up to his criticallyacclaimed film Inglorious Basterds, Tarantino tackles yet another controversial subject from humanity’s dirtied past – this time choosing the topic of American slavery. Tarantino has become notorious for his ability to take highly sensitive subject material and provide stylized, yet intelligent commentary. He successfully adds another film to his roster with Django Unchained. From DiCaprio’s humorous depiction of Candyland’s owner to Foxx’s solid delivery of the enslaved Django, all the flick’s stars do a good job. Washington’s role as Django’s wife could easily have used more character

development – at some points you’re left wondering why all the fuss over a woman who has barely uttered a word. However, the film’s true star is Waltz. From the first scene, where he frees Django, to the very end, when he duals Candie, Waltz ensures his character is believable, hilarious and instantly likeable. Tarantino’s famous style is clearly evident and each actor delivers a strong take on their individual roles – tackling sensitive issues like racial ignorance and bigotry, while still producing an exciting tale of adventure. Racial slurs are dropped at will and

although at times it feels redundant, Tarantino does a solid job of navigating through. In true Tarantino fashion, blood, guts and gore are sure to be seen, with Django rifling through dozens of men in mere seconds. In the end, fans looking for the same witty dialogue and bloodied gun scenes that Tarantino is known for are sure to be impressed. Those wondering if the film holds a flame to its predecessor Inglorious Basterds can be assured that it indeed does. Overall, it’s an actionpacked film with a clever script and an excellent cast.

—IMAGE COURTESYWEINSTEIN COMPANY


9

The Omega · Volume 22, Issue 14

Arts & Entertainment

Hollywood offerings in 2013 Brendan Kergin

rising star Benedict Cumberbatch. Cumberbatch Hollywood is aiming for another big year. According to Hol- also battles Bilbo lywood.com, a website covering Baggins as the the film industry, 2012 might voice of a dragon have broken the box office earn- in the second of ings record and 2013 might break three films based the US$11 billion mark for the on one book. While The first time ever. So, how are they going to do it? Hobbit: The Des—IMAGE COURTESY CHERNIN ENTERTAINMENT olation of Smaug What are the big films of 2013? As always, two common types (Dec. 13) may World War Z (June 13) gives of films will be coming out this seem more like part of a miniseyear: sequels and superheroes. ries, it will still be bright, f lashy Brad Pitt a chance at zombies. Warm Bodies (Feb. 1) takes and popular with a huge audiSome films will even be both. a different tack on zombies and Iron Man gets a third film May ence. The Hunger Games: Catching could be a sleeper hit with a rela3 and Thor (the one of Avengers fame) is back to battle dark elves Fire will see another book-based tively low-key cast but charming concept. franchise return on Nov. 22. Nov. 8. R.I.P.D. (July 19) includes a Both films are the middle film Both have new directors but the in a trilogy, so it’d be good to re- few undead creatures and pairs same cast with some additions. Jeff Bridges and Ryan Reynolds, Both will contain lots of loud view the first parts in advance. The Fast and the Furious will which could lead to more humour action, some clever writing, nods to their comic book origins and a get a sixth piece May 24, bring- than expected. All three are ing back most of the cast of the based on previously published simple plot. last five as well work. Big projects are rarely based on as director Justin completely original stories these Lin. This has be- days, but there are a couple comcome a con- ing up this year: Zero Dark Thirty (Jan. 11) will sistent movie series, with car- be good, period. Director Kathbased action, ryn Bigelow had a critically acbright colours claimed hit with 2008’s The Hurt and smashing Locker and she’s tackling similar metal every two material. Expect a lot of James Franco in years. Die Hard 2013, as he’s starring in Wizard —IMAGE COURTESY DMG ENTERTAINMENT will do the same with its fifth part of Oz prequel Oz: The Great and Powerful (March 8). on Feb. 14. Sequel Anchorman: The LegMan of Steel reboots the Superman franchise with director end Continues (Dec. 20) arrives Zack Snyder (300, Watchmen) at nearly 10 years after the original. With cult status and big names the helm. Nerds and sci-fi action fans involved it will hopefully live up will rejoice with Star Trek Into to expectations. Sin City: A Dame to Kill For Darkness arriving May 17 with the enterprising J.J. Abrams (Oct. 4) is in a similar situation, with survivors of 2005’s Sin City again at the helm. Captain Kirk and crew will venturing back out into the black take on a new enemy played by and white city.

Ω Arts & Entertainment Editor

—IMAGE COURTESY APATOW PRODUCTIONS

More importantly, though, is the comedy This is the End (June 14). It will feature Seth Rogen, Jay Baruchel, Jonah Hill and close to a dozen other comedic actors all working off of a script and direction from Rogen and his writing partner from Superbad and Pineapple Express. Finally, another comedy is taking on the apocalypse; The World’s End (Oct. 25) reunites writer/actors Simon Pegg and Nick Frost with director Edgar Wright. This team was behind British hits Shaun of the Dead and Hot Fuzz. A pair of action films based on apocalypses will get a huge amount of advertising: Tom Cruise stars in Oblivion (April 19) and After Earth (June 3) will give Will Smith and son Jaden Smith some more screen time together. A few others to keep an eye out for: Leonardo DiCaprio-led The Great Gatsby (May 12), Charlie Sheen playing a crazy guy in A Glimpse Inside the Mind of Charles Swan III (Feb. 8), the remake of Korean action hit Oldboy (Oct. 11) and Guillermo del Toro’s Pacific Rim (July 12).

Albatross blends old Big Wreck, old Soundgarden to produce, well, new Big Wreck Mike Davies

Ω Editor-in-Chief I was in my car one day late last year, when I had a sudden thought, “You know who was great,” came the unexpected consideration, “Big Wreck.” Like the universe heard that thought and was going to do me a favour for some reason, the station my radio was tuned to chose to play “Wolves” from the first Big Wreck release in a decade. It then announced the band was currently on a Canadian tour with Theory of a Deadman to promote that album. Apparently, the album had been around for months, but I was just about to experience it for the first time. I was lucky enough to have had the chance to speak with frontman Ian Thornley briefly before doing so. I asked him what brought them around to reuniting, what they thought about where they had come to musically over the years and where they thought they were headed. “It wasn’t really a reunion, per se,” Thornley said. “I had called Brian [Doherty] on a Sunday afternoon — we hadn’t spoken in years — and I missed my friend...it turns out that we were in similar places in our personal lives so we started hanging out again.” Thornley had been off working with his band Thornley since the breakup of Big Wreck. After that call to Doherty, they headed back into the studio to see what they could come up with. They came up with Albatross. The opening track of Albatross, “Head Together,” is definitely reminiscent of the old Big Wreck of the late 1990s, including the palm-muted power-chord-driven verse utilizing guitar pedal effects to change tone in places where many would change the actual structure, which produces a strong, simple song construction. Nice harmonies abound, especially in the intro, during which the melodic, chantfeel underneath the guitar melody that will continue to appear throughout the song guiding the listener nicely into the album itself, welcoming old fans while acquainting new listeners to the old sound. The album then introduces returning fans to the fact Big Wreck will be throwing back to old Soundgarden efforts like Superunknown starting with their second track, “A Million Days.” Though Thornley doesn’t have the vocal range or power Soundgarden frontman Chris Cornell has, the energy and melodic concepts are solid, if not quite as dark as the Seattle band’s. Doherty is no Kim Thayil (lead guitarist for Soundgarden during the Super-

unknown days), but he certainly holds his own on this track. “Wolves” is the second single released off Albatross, after the title track “Albatross,” which was released in late 2011, months before the March 2012 release of the album. While “Albatross” is the most Soundgarden-sounding effort on the album, “Wolves” brings listeners back to the traditional Big Wreck sound. It’s easily the most mainstreamsounding track on the album and demonstrates the vocal range and power Thornley can harness when he’s at his best. “Wolves” is Albatross’ “Blown Wide Open,” (the third single off 1997’s In Loving Memory of…, the debut album that propelled Big Wreck into the North American spotlight) which is a compliment. “Control” (track seven on the album) is definitely not a safe pick for those betting on the next single to be released from Albatross (can you even bet on that?), though it is certainly the most interesting, if only for its sudden departure from the tone and style of the rest of the album. It slows the album down right where it needs to and leaves the ‘90s grunge sound behind for a while. What could be taken as a poignant message about mental illness, the track uses subtle effects and melodic changes to imply a forlorn, regretful tone and pays homage to old Doors and Pink Floyd jam-style midsong breaks, which not all listeners will appreciate, but adds a nice, previously unexplored dimension to the work. “You Caught My Eye” is basically Thornley doing his Chris Cornell impression mixed with Chad Kroegerquality lyrics about hooking up at a bar, using a Big Sugar-type blues riff as the driving melodic force. The track is unwelcome on an album that otherwise provides a high-quality hardrocking blend of the old and new Big Wreck sound. Interesting, I suppose, but superficial and unnecessary. Albatross closes with “Time,” which is a fun, retrospective, nostalgicsounding tune, serves as a perfect end to the album, bridging the band’s old and new — reaching back while looking forward both in tone and content. “I think that the music is more focused and a little more brave than back then because we’ve all grown and been through a lot,” Thornley said of the album and he wasn’t lying. Big Wreck has certainly developed its sound, even if it did turn into a blend of late ‘90s Big Wreck and early ‘90s Soundgarden. That’s a pretty solid combination.


10

January 9, 2013

Sports WolfPack Athletics introduces new CIS programs, including swim team Adam Williams Ω Sports Editor

Changes are on the horizon for the TRU athletics department – September 2014 will bring with it the transition of six of TRU’s teams to the Canada West Universities Athletic Association (CWUAA) of the Canadian Interuniversity Sport (CIS) governing body. Men’s and women’s soccer and cross country running will be TRU’s latest additions to CIS, joining TRU’s current CIS sports – men’s and women’s basketball and volleyball. TRU will also add men’s and women’s swimming to its list of CIS teams when the swimming program begins in 2014. “It narrows what we have to do as a division because we’re not in multiple conferences,” said Ken Olynyk, director of athletics and recreation at TRU. “It brings what TRU is doing to the same level as what other institutions are doing that we benchmark ourselves against.” The CWUAA is western Canada’s regional athletics association and co-ordinates member schools in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. The CIS governs CWUAA and is the university equivalent of the Canadian Collegiate Athletics Association (CCAA) where a number of WolfPack teams currently compete. The CCAA primarily governs athletics for colleges in Canada. Though the CIS is not advertised as a league for higher-level athletics, the size of its member institutions and their financial support, recruiting abilities and national reputations have led to that being the case. “The CIS overall is a higher-calibre league,” said men’s soccer cohead coach John Antulov. “The top one or two teams in the CCAA can give some of the lower CIS teams a good game but overall the level of play is much superior [in the CIS].” As a B.C. research institution, TRU competes with many of the

CIS’s member schools in academics and now hopes it can do the same across athletics. With this transition completed, the athletics department will close the book on moving teams to the CIS. Golf, badminton and baseball are not recognized CIS sports, leaving only hockey with a CIS counterpart. Don’t expect that transition to come any time soon. “I don’t see hockey going CIS,” Olynyk said. “I think that the group that we work with, that we partner with for hockey, that isn’t their goal either so right now there’s no intention at all of putting hockey in the CIS. It’s also very expensive, much more expensive than probably the other sports combined that we’re putting in.” Positives and Negatives

The transition to the CIS brings many benefits with it, though it’s not without its pitfalls as well, according to Olynyk. He acknowledged that bringing successful teams, like the men’s and women’s soccer teams, into the more competitive CWUAA of the CIS is certainly a risk. It’s something the athletics department dealt with when its other teams made the transition. TRU’s volleyball and basketball teams enjoyed more success in their days in the CCAA. “Women’s soccer has had tremendous success at this institution, been to a number nationals, won national championships,” Olynyk said. “Men’s have been to nationals in soccer and won national championships and can we sustain that at the next level? That is a concern.” Olynyk believes that recruitment of athletes is one area where TRU stands to gain the most from transitioning to the CIS. In his opinion, there may be a perception among recruits that it’s better to play for a middling CIS team than a perennial championship team in the CCAA. Moving to the CIS will also help TRU retain more local athletes who might be tempted by CIS athletics

Captain Rolena Debruyn and the rest of the cross country team will be among those moving to the CIS in 2014. —PHOTO BY KEVIN MUR R AY

programs elsewhere. “We’re not going out to try and change that perception but we would like to be able to recruit on the same level,” Olynyk said. “From my standpoint I see it as being advantageous in some respects to be in CIS because if I’m recruiting you as a CCAA program in soccer versus a CIS program in soccer, your perception could well be that CIS is a higher level so you want to go there. That’s what we want to try and avoid [by moving into the CIS].” Antulov confirmed that not being a part of the CIS limits the pool of players his team is able to choose from when it comes to recruitment. Being a CCAA team brings with it some unusual challenges and it can even be difficult to retain athletes who were once part of the program. “We have been very fortunate as

we do believe we have some CIScalibre players in our program and other CIS programs are noticing these players and as coaches we are pushing those players on to those programs -- as we should -- but to the detriment of our program,” Antulov said. “They would stay if we were CIS.” WolfPack Swim Team As the athletics department transitions to the CIS in 2014, TRU will also be adding both a men’s and women’s swim program to the department, a project that athletics director Ken Olynyk said has been in the works for approximately five years. Currently, the Kamloops Aquatics Club has a number of TRU students on its team and while these athletes

2013 NHL Game On: Two fans, two opinions Adam Williams Ω Sports Editor

The NHL is a business, not a right I wore my Mike Richards jersey today; it’s the first time it has seen the light of day since the end of last season. There’s a part of me that would like to say I’m going to make the NHL and the NHLPA “pay” for what they’ve done to hockey fans and the game, but to be honest I don’t really care. I woke up today with a smile on my face and the knowledge that NHL hockey will be returning in just a few short weeks, there’s no point in holding on to anger. Over the next few weeks I will yet again pay for the NHL Centre Ice package, I will wear NHL merchandise, watch games on TV and buy into hockey pools with my friends. I have no delusions that I will boycott the game. If someone offered me tickets to an NHL game next weekend I would be there before warm-ups started. I don’t see the point to ignoring the NHL now that it’s back. For months I’ve complained about the NHL hiatus, which has only been compounded by hours of NBA highlights taking

over SportsCentre. Why would I continue to punish myself now? The NHL is a business and as unfortunate as it may be, fans need to remember that — it would help them to take all of this less personally. B.C. has seen its share of labour disputes over the last few years (even on our own campus last semester), and few people complain about that. Sure the situations tend to be different, the money involved and the issues at hand aren’t comparable, but the principle doesn’t change: players are employees who want what they’ve earned and been promised; owners want to maximize their revenue and own thriving businesses. Can anyone blame either of them for that? In the hours following Sunday’s settlement, players and league executives have spoken about their desire to make things right with fans — call me naive but I believe them. The fact is, they were just doing their jobs and, like it or not, all of us were caught in the crossfire. The endgame of the lockout wasn’t to punish fans, it was the unfortunate side effect. So when the NHL starts up in a few weeks I will be watching, as faithful as ever. Sure, I was put out by the lockout but I understand that the reali-

ties of running a professional sports league can’t always jive with what makes fans happy. People will get over the lockout, whether they’re able to recognize that right now or not. Like the negotiations it will just take a little time.

Taylor Rocca

Ω Copy/Web Editor Don’t forget about the little guy Here we are. It is Jan. 9 and if NHL training camps haven’t already begun, they are just about to. I would like to take a brief moment to do my best Roberto Luongo impression and pump my own tires. Rewind back to Sept. 17, 2012, as the NHL lockout tip-toed into what would eventually become a 113-day drama fest for fans, players, owners and sponsors alike. In my half of The Omega’s “2012 NHL Lockout: Two fans, two opinions,” I stated my prediction for the 2012-13 NHL season: “I hate to say it, but I don’t expect to have NHL hockey back on my calendar until January 2013.” Hold the applause. No, please, you’re too kind.

Okay, let’s be real. NHL hockey is back, which is great. Why? Here is something the casual fan has probably not realized. While we witnessed months of back-and-forth, child-like bickering on the part of billionaire NHL owners and millionaire NHL players, there was a much more significant group of individuals impacted by the NHL lockout. I like to refer to them as the “little guys.” Support staff, arena employees and the food and beverage industry were hit harder by this lockout than any player or owner could ever fathom. In places like Florida, the Panthers were forced to lay-off employees, leaving many jobless. Sports bars and restaurants all over the nation were left empty. In an article written by James Brooks for the Boston Business Journal on Sept. 10, 2012, Pat Moscaritolo, CEO of the Greater Boston Convention and Visitors Bureau stated that each Boston Bruins home game is worth $850,000 to $1 million in money generated outside of the arena itself. These types of losses resulted in the cutting of numerous shifts and decline of tips for servers coast-to-coast on both sides of the border. Whether you do or don’t live in an NHL city, I would like to encourage you to go out and support the little

are not considered TRU student athletes at the moment, the addition of the CIS program would bring them into the WolfPack family. The athletics department has already agreed on a partnership with the Kamloops Aquatics Club that would have TRU supporting student athletes and contributing a portion of head coach Brad Dalke’s salary. Dalke and the Kamloops Aquatics Club could not be reached for comment. Olynyk said that athlete demand for a swimming program is certainly present and would help to keep a number of local athletes in Kamloops. “The whole thought is that we can build and have some of those kids that are in the Kamloops club, rather than go away, stay here and continue to swim and represent Thompson Rivers University,” Olynyk said.

guy instead of forking over hundreds of dollars for a big-league ticket. Drop a greenback and have a beverage and plate of wings at your local sports pub. The student servers working in those establishments will thank you. I can guarantee the million-dollar athletes and billion-dollar owners won’t thank you for coming through their turnstyles. Okay, maybe they will. But it will be superficially painted on the ice and you won’t have any face-to-face conversation that communicates that superficial appreciation to you. Let’s jump back to Sept. 17, 2012 once again. Despite losing NHL hockey, I had a plan to quench my thirst for Canada’s beautiful game. “In the meantime, I plan on fulfilling my thirst for Canada’s game by checking out my local Canadian Major Junior club, my campus’ varsity hockey team and the local junior B squad that doesn’t get as much attention as it deserves.” Don’t forget that. Just because the world’s best players have returned, doesn’t mean great products don’t still exist at the more pure levels of our nation’s sport. Be happy the NHL is back. Soak it up and breath it in. But don’t forget about the little guy just because the big guy is back.


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The Omega · Volume 22, Issue 14

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Across 1. More than some 5. “___ Smile” (1976 hit) 9. Spray setting 13. Lou Gehrig, on the diamond 14. Donnybrook 15. Knowing about 16. Artist Bonheur 17. Be part of the cast 18. Brought into play 19. Simple addition 22. Elton John, e.g. 23. ___ souci 24. Mozart’s “L’___ del Cairo” 27. Like a bunch 29. Debonair 32. Undergrad degs. 33. Catches 36. Whole alternative 37. Ecstatic 42. Old German duchy name 43. Ready for anything 44. Wrath 45. Layers 47. It’s found in banks 49. Blonde’s secret, maybe 50. Vex, with “at” 52. Word from the decks 54. Literary homeowners 62. Shades 63. Roundish 64. Christiania, now

65. Tropical fruit 66. Rewards 67. Simpleton 68. Some beans 69. “___ quam videri” (North Carolina’s motto) 70. Chops Down 1. Big do 2. “Crazy” bird 3. Yorkshire river 4. Snares 5. Jiffs 6. Karen Carpenter, for one 7. Checks, with in 8. Trojan hero 9. Greek dish 10. Acad. 11. Potpourri 12. Big deal 14. Gibb brother 20. Ceiling 21. Occupied, as a lavatory 24. ___-Wan Kenobi 25. Art able to 26. Very, in music 28. Australian rock band 30. Clear 31. File material 34. “Harper Valley ___” 35. Jerk

38. Textual interpretation 39. “From the Earth to the Moon” writer 40. Signals 41. Society page word 46. Strauss opera 48. Storm part 51. Other halves 53. Age 54. As a result 55. “The Hunchback of Notre Dame” writer 56. Bank 57. “Little piggies” 58. All alternative 59. “Cast Away” setting 60. Worm or lamp 61. Creates a lawn

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LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

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MYLES MELLOR AND SALLY YORK

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“It’s a Numbers Game”


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January 9, 2013

TRUSU Membership Advisory Jan 17 NIGHTS at 7PM Free Pre-Screening enter to win tickets at trusu.ca

Clubs Day INTERNATIONAL BUILDING

JAN 15th 11AM - 3PM ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING 1.0) 1.1) 1.2) 1.3) 1.4) 1.5) 1.6) 1.7)

Call to Order Approval of the Agenda Presentation of the Annual Report Presentation of the 2011-12 Audited Financial Statements Presenation of the 2012-13 Budget Appointment of the Auditor Special Resolutions (details at trusu.ca) Adjournment

JAN. 24, 7PM, TRUSU Lecture Hall

Post-Secondary Education Fact: Since the creation of the TRUSU Student Caucus student representation vacancies have decreased from 50% to 9%

This Week:

• Clubs Day • Council Meeting Check out the Events Calendar at trusu.ca for details!

Log on to trusu.ca and get connected! • Subscribe to the Newsletter • Join us on facebook • Follow us on Twitter

Advocacy | Services | Entertainment


January 9, 2013  

The January 9, 2013 edition of The Omega

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