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AUGUST 8-14, 2019 | TREND-SETTING SINCE 1993

THE FASHION ISSUE

VINTAGE NEVER FADES What to wear this season PAGE 22

HOW SAFE IS OUR WATER? 20 IDAHO’S FOOD TRUCKS 38 GLEASON FEST 47


A FUTURE YOU IS TEXTING.

SHE WANTS TO TALK ABOUT RETIREMENT. Tips and articles at BeFinanciallyAwesome.com Be Financially AwesomeTM

2 INLANDER AUGUST 8, 2019


INSIDE

IE

VOL. 26, NO. 43 | COVER PHOTO: YOUNG KWAK

COMMENT 5 NEWS 13 COVER STORY 22 MILLER CANE 31

CULTURE FOOD FILM MUSIC

33 38 42 47

EVENTS 52 I SAW YOU 54 ADVICE GODDESS 56 GREEN ZONE 58

EDITOR’S NOTE

I

’m again left this week struggling to make sense of the DOMESTIC TERRORIST ATTACKS in El Paso and Dayton. Adding insult to injury is the sense that so many of us are numb, that the depth of our grief and outrage has been reached, that we’ve surrendered, that our leaders are impotent or unwilling to fight, and that the homegrown terrorists have won by virtue of our collective forfeit. For comparison, imagine our national response to these terror attacks had they been carried out by foreigners. We’d demand answers. How did they get the weapons? Who trained and radicalized them? Why does America’s melting pot so frighten and offend these extremists that they’re called to kill indiscriminately? We’d bomb things, we’d torture, we’d declare war, we’d imprison suspected actors without trial, and we’d suspend our better judgment, the Bill of Rights and our moral code for the fleeting sense that we were doing something. We would answer unspeakable tragedy with action. Our patriotism requires it, we’d tell ourselves, even when it drove us to shameful lengths. And yet, when the attackers come from our own ranks, from our fellow Americans, we’re left dumbstruck. Incredibly, many people seem to be offended by the mere suggestion that anything be done in response, or that these endless attacks be viewed as anything other than totally random, unpreventable outbursts of madmen acting alone. Let’s not pretend to be dumb. And let’s not pretend that we have no choice here. Inaction is a choice. We are choosing to let terrorists kill our fellow Americans and, to date, we’ve done very little about it. For more, revisit our 2018 special report on combating gun violence at Inlander.com/guns. — JACOB H. FRIES, editor

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MAKING IT WORSE PAGE 13

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THE INLANDER is a locally owned, independent newspaper founded on Oct. 20, 1993. It’s printed on newsprint that is at least 50 percent recycled; please recycle THE INLANDER after you’re done with it. One copy free per person per week; extra copies are $1 each (call x226). For ADVERTISING information, email advertising@inlander.com. To have a SUBSCRIPTION mailed to you, call x210 ($50 per year). To find one of our more than 1,000 NEWSRACKS where you can pick up a paper free every Thursday, call x226 or email justinh@inlander.com. THE INLANDER is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsmedia. All contents of this newspaper are protected by United States copyright law. © 2019, Inland Publications, Inc.

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COMMENT STAFF DIRECTORY PHONE: 509-325-0634 Ted S. McGregor Jr. (tedm@inlander.com)

WHAT IS A FASHION TREND YOU THINK SHOULD MAKE A COMEBACK?

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J. Jeremy McGregor (x224) GENERAL MANAGER

EDITORIAL Jacob H. Fries (x261) EDITOR

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BECKA SHELLEY Well, velvet already kind of has. I’m digging the bell bottoms that are coming back. What about one that should never make a comeback? Socks with sandals.

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Read THE FINAL INSTALLMENT IN THE AUGUST 15TH ISSUE OF THE INLANDER

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I think maybe wearing collars up. What about one that should never come back? Super baggy jeans — the ones where you cinch in with the belt.

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Before and After

CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

What was once radical becomes incremental BY JOHN T. REUTER

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W

hen each new generation comes of age, there is a common recognition (at least among a certain activist class): Our world is woefully unjust. We are failing too many people, polluting too much, and bold action is required. Simultaneously, another group of activists are preparing to wrap up their generation’s struggle. They often recognize the work that lies ahead, but they also want to celebrate the progress that’s been made. Not all of their dreams have been realized and yet real changes have happened to improve lives — including those of the new generation whose attention is focused on what has fallen short, rather than what has been achieved. To the degree that both of these generations share the field for a time, their most active and successful leaders often (although not always)

clash about the next steps towards continued progress. Often the earlier generation urges incremental progress. Experience, they say, shows that dramatic proposals are rarely realized and when they are, they don’t always work out as intended. On the other hand, new generations urge transformative change. We have tried incremental steps, they point out, and yet for too many, too little has changed. Perhaps things are better, but if we keep moving at this pace, it will simply take too long — too many more generations — to realize a just world. Obviously, these generational stereotypes are

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generalizations. It’s true that older political actors include both Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders. There will always be a range of ideological perspectives and beliefs about the correct pace of change in every generation. But I think looking at the respective demographics of Biden’s and Sanders’ constituencies provides general evidence of how this divide functions.

Is it simply that slowly turning the gears of progress wears people out? And yet, most generational leaders who seek to drive change start from the same relatively radical place in relation to those who came before. So why does the alleged radicalism of the 1960s fizzle into bland moderation? Why do young activists critique the feminism, civil rights efforts and progressivism of those who came before? Is it simply that slowly turning the gears of progress wears people out till they lose sight of the ideals with which they started? Maybe that’s sometimes true, but generally I think something else is at work and recognizing it can help us more effectively push for a better world. When ideas eventually become realized in policy (particularly in cases where they are effectively implemented), they are almost always arguably incremental — no matter how much those who oppose them may object. However, these ideas rarely start as incremental proposals, but rather the propositions of bold dreamers. Take marriage equality, for example. A broadly supported policy, which not that long ago was radical, increasingly is taken almost for granted by an emerging generation of activists. The progress is still new enough that many can see the change, but the equally radical shift forward of legalizing interracial marriage (which only happened nationally in 1967) has been completely internalized as so obviously right that few would dare object to it in polite company. This is a normal progression of many radical visions. A public option in health care was a left-wing position only a few years ago; now it is a mainstream Democratic approach to the next incremental step. The process of progress is taking the bold and normalizing it — making what was once a huge leap, merely one small step. The impact on lives is real, but also incomplete. There is always more to do. Improving the human condition will always be forever work, as we continually recognize the next bold challenge ahead of us and then figure out how to make it manageable. The truth is no generation alone can perfect the world. We will always rely on those who come before us — and equally on those who come after. n John T. Reuter, a former Sandpoint City Councilman, has been active in protecting the environment, expanding LGBTQ rights and Idaho’s Republican Party politics.

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AUGUST 8, 2019 INLANDER 7


COMMENT | NEWSMAKERS

Q&A KEVIN BROWN The music director of the Blue Waters Bluegrass Festival talks the appeal of the genre and how it takes a village to tune a banjo BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

F

or 18 years, the Blue Waters Bluegrass Festival has brought the sounds of one of the quintessentially American musical genres to the shores of Medical Lake. It now draws between 800 and 1,000 people, who return annually to camp out over the weekend and hear bands like the Steep Canyon Rangers, Della Mae and Chatham County Line. Kevin Brown, the festival’s music director, has been putting together the lineup since day one. He’s also a singer-songwriter and the host of the Spokane Public Radio show Front Porch Bluegrass, and he spoke to the Inlander about the process of growing the festival, the intimacy of the event and what’s so great about bluegrass. Responses have been edited for clarity.

Wintergrass, which is a national festival that takes place in Bellevue. How has the festival evolved over the last 18 years? It felt like there were 20 people in the audience the first year, this big park with a few scattered chairs out there. Now it’s a park full of people, and we have a real stage. People have discovered that it’s a great family event, no matter what your age group is.

INLANDER: What differentiates Blue Waters from other festivals? BROWN: It’s a great setting for it, because it’s in the pine trees, by the lake. It’s really a great summertime location for it. And we’ll get bands commenting on it, stopping in between songs like, “Wow, this is great.” After the stage shuts down, people stay up all night jamming. It’s fun to watch and participate in it. Sometimes you’ll see the headlining bands out there picking after hours with people in the parking lot. That’s one of the great things about bluegrass festivals: There are no walls between performer and audience. You have access to talk to these people, to get them to show you the guitar lick that they were doing on stage or whatever. And that fits with the folky element of the music, too. What’s the process of putting the festival together? It’s a year-round job, and there’s a full board [of directors] that’s doing this all year, too. We’re a 100 percent volunteer organization. It definitely takes a village to tune a banjo. I start looking at the next year’s lineup about a month after the festival ends. And that’s when a lot of bands are starting to book because summertime is a big season. September, October and November is a time where we say, “What’s the budget, and who can we get within that budget?” We have the lineup solidified by the early part of the year, in time to announce at

Who are some of the artists you’re excited about in this year’s lineup? I approach this like a radio show or an album. It’s got to have an arc. It’s got to have some variety. You can’t go full throttle bluegrass through the whole [lineup]. Every year, I look at that palette — how are we going to give them a breadth of music there? Wood & Wire is the full-on bluegrass band. They were nominated for a Grammy last year, and they’re out of Austin, Texas. Real high energy, good songwriting; has a bit of that Texas attitude. On the complete flip side of that is Ashleigh Caudill, a songwriter that I’ve been playing on my radio show for years. And I’m real excited about High Fidelity. They’re still in their 20s, and they sound like they’re pulled straight out in 1968. It’s not a retro shtick; they really sound like an old, old band. What is the appeal of bluegrass? People are surprised sometimes when I liken it to jazz. There’s a virtuosic and improvisational element to it that country music doesn’t have, that folk music doesn’t have. There’s a canon of songs, fiddle tunes or standards or whatever, that you can play in a gazillion ways, just like jazz standards. I think there’s something about connecting with something that’s not electric, especially when you’re seeing it live. It’s a formidable music to listen to, especially in this age of musical wallpaper, where people turn on Spotify as sort of background music. You watch a bluegrass band play live, and it’s in your face. n Blue Waters Bluegrass Festival • Fri-Sat, Aug. 9-11 • $25-$55 • All ages • bluewatersbluegrass.org

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10 INLANDER AUGUST 8, 2019


COMMENT | FROM READERS

CONNECT THE HATE DOTS ass measures to curb the horrifying carnage from weapons of mass

P

destruction used by hateful domestic terrorists. Rampant mass murder is a symptom of hate and should not happen. I want leaders willing to stand against hate to halt the occurrence of these reprehensible incidents. However, I’m not holding my breath. The one occupying the White House is wrong. Hate has an entrenched history in our nation, since even before its founding and then codified in its laws. Currently, hate has a more prominent place in the nation; one of its most vocal instigators uses his national and international platform LETTERS to spread hate as the Twitterer and Send comments to Blusterer in Chief. He references editor@inlander.com. mental illness behind this act of hate, yet the predictable outcome is but a mirror reflecting his own distorted perspective toward humankind. The POTUS regularly fuels hatefulness with seeming impunity toward many individuals and various groups. Perhaps it’s possible to charge the POTUS in civil court for providing material support to domestic terrorism, civil rights violations, and being an accessory to crimes against humanity. It’s no great stretch to connect the hate crime dots with the rise of hate crimes to his term in office. If he can’t be banned, then at least pass legislation to ban the manufacture, import, and sale of automatic weapons and outlaw use of bump stocks, gun accessories and bullets known to cause mass, severe casualties. MARILYN DARILEK Spokane, Wash.

Ben Stuckart and Nadine Woodward

Readers respond to a story about the personality and management styles of Spokane mayoral frontrunners Ben Stuckart and Nadine Woodward (“The Bully Pulpit,” 8/1/19):

TIM MARTIN: “Nice to work with” is now a top qualification to be mayor? CHARMAINE RAE: I know a few people who’ve worked with Nadine. Not one had anything positive to say. I’ve heard mixed with Ben. ERIC CIFERRI: Haven’t met Woodward in person, but Stuckart is a class-A jerk. JESSE QUINTANA: Ben has leadership abilities. Nadine, well, that is yet to be proven. TARA L SMITH: Will someone who actually cares about this city and the people run? Please, anyone? n

AUGUST 8, 2019 INLANDER 11


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t’s a funny thing about emergencies. You don’t know they’re coming... but you kind of do.

Illness. Injury. Damage to your home or car. Veterinary bills. Job loss. It’s just a matter of time before a costly event comes your way. And 60% of people in the U.S. lack the savings to handle an unexpected $1,000 expense, according to a January survey by Bankrate.

“There will be setbacks when you have to pull out money for emergencies,” Sherry says. “So be patient with yourself as you fill the account back up.” Still having trouble? Sherry recommends these strategies to free up some cash.

Why does it matter? Because financial security means more than paying your bills and saving for big purchases. It also means anticipating the unanticipated by building up a cash reserve to cover emergencies. So when the transmission falls out of your car, you don’t have to put the repair on your credit card and start racking up interest charges. Financial experts often recommend stashing enough in an emergency fund to cover three to six months’ worth of living expenses.

• Plug your spending leaks. Devote a couple of weeks to tracking what you spend, looking for unnecessary costs. • Scrutinize your monthly bills. You may decide to cancel or downgrade pricy phone plans, gym memberships, video streaming services, and other plans you’re not fully using. • Call your insurance agent or go online to search for better rates. • Call your financial institution and ask if you qualify for a lower credit card rate.

“That’s a lot of money, so set smaller milestones, starting with $500. Then a month’s worth of living expenses. Then two months’ worth. And so on,” says Sherry Wallis, an STCU financial educator.

• Find cheaper ways to treat yourself. Cook a fancy meal at home instead of going to a pricy restaurant. Trade babysitting with other families. Go on a bike ride instead of to a movie.

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Your financial institution can help you set up a separate savings account that you can use for your emergency fund – separate from your other checking and savings accounts.

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Set up automatic transfers to the account every time you get paid. If money is tight, you may have to start with small contributions, and increase the size of those deposits over time. Remember, your ultimate goal is to maintain a fund that can cover three to six months of expenses.

Just remember you’re creating something you’ll be glad to have: a measure of protection against the emergencies that surprise us … but that really shouldn’t.

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MENTAL HEALTH

MAKING IT

WORSE

A local girl’s experience at a since-shuttered Montana facility highlights difficulties for teens seeking mental health care BY WILSON CRISCIONE

A

bby Baker stepped into the backseat of her mom’s Honda Civic and felt safer than she had in a long time. She was away from the other girls who threatened to beat her up. Away from the cafeteria that felt just like those prison shows on TV. Away from the staff members who’d inject the girls with chemicals to subdue them. Abby, 15, had never been more grateful to see her mom that day, March 2. She’d only been staying at Acadia Montana, a youth treatment center in Butte, for two weeks. But it felt longer. She was allowed virtually no contact with her family, her friends or the outside world while she was there and she was desperate to see a familiar face. But as soon as she closed the car door, Abby was gripped by a terrifying thought: She’d soon have to go back into the treatment center. She burst into tears. “I felt like it wasn’t fair that I had to go back,” Abby tells the Inlander. “I just wanted to leave so badly.” Megan Riggs, seeing her daughter Abby crying, promptly decided Abby would never go back to Acadia Montana and brought her home to Spokane. Since she left, Acadia Montana has become part of a string of treatment facilities across the country that have been exposed for mistreatment of vulnerable youth. Shortly after Abby left, new reports claimed that a 9-year-old girl from Oregon had been drugged at Acadia Montana in an effort to calm her down. Further reports in a series of stories from the Montana Standard revealed this was a common practice and that the facility faced a litany of other allegations of mistreatment over the years. In June, the 108-bed facility, owned by Acadia Healthcare, announced it was closing. (Acadia Healthcare did not respond to Inlander requests for comment.) Abby stayed at Acadia for a relatively short time and didn’t experience the worst of the allegations Acadia has faced. But it was still traumatic, she says. She chose to speak to the Inlander in hopes of raising awareness of what can happen when a child needing mental health treatment has nowhere else to go. “Oftentimes, facilities like that are your only option,” Abby says. “And I think it’s important to say something because there needs to be better options for kids who have mental health problems.” ...continued on next page

Abby Baker, 15, spent two weeks at Acadia Montana, which is now closing following allegations of mistreatment of kids. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

AUGUST 8, 2019 INLANDER 13


NEWS | MENTAL HEALTH “MAKING IT WORSE,” CONTINUED...

T

he last time the Inlander spoke to Abby was in spring 2018. Then, Abby was a student at Sacajawea Middle School preparing a speech for a walkout that would call for lawmakers to do something to end school shootings. By the time the walkout actually happened, however, Abby was in the hospital. It was one of five times over the past two and a half years that she went to the hospital because she felt suicidal. Each time, she stayed there for about a week and was stabilized. She was treated through the Providence RISE program, which provides intensive outpatient treatment. She was diagnosed with bipolar disorder, and the way Abby describes it, her depression “kind of comes in swings.” It came back in February of this year, and Abby ended up back at Kootenai Behavioral Health. There, Abby’s case manager and therapist recommended a residential facility where she could get intensive inpatient treatment for a longer period of time. Riggs, her mom, says it was described as a sort of “reset”: Abby might have a difficult couple of months but come out better for it. But there were few choices available. Tamarack Center in Spokane was the closest option, but it had a long wait list. That left Acadia as the best available option. “They really didn’t know much about the facility there,” Abby says. Abby was immediately intimidated when she got to Acadia Montana. The fences were really tall. She gave them her mental health history during intake, and staff told her when she got to the girls hall that it would be a “little rowdy.” She was pointed to a room where she told a group of other girls her name. She felt a bit disoriented.

Suddenly a fight broke out in the hall. And then a girl came up to Abby and told her that someone wanted to beat her up. “And at that point,” Abby says, “I had been there for like five minutes.” She saw things that disturbed her over the course of the two weeks there. She says her roommate had psychotic episodes, and a nurse would come to take her to the “quiet room,” which Abby says is basically like

“In the two weeks that I was there, I didn’t meet with a therapist or psychiatrist once.” solitary confinement. When Abby’s roommate returned, “she would be like a vegetable.” Abby didn’t know what was happening at the time, but after reading reports about Acadia injecting kids with Benadryl and other antihistamines, Abby now suspects her roommate was being drugged. Other times Abby says the staff was negligent. Once, her roommate repeatedly was banging her head against the wall and staff failed to act, leaving it to the other girls to put their hands in between the wall and the girl’s head. For Abby, every day was the same routine. She’d wake up and ask to take a shower, line up for breakfast, stay quiet in line, eat at the cafeteria, go to the facility’s school, go to lunch, go back to school, sit in the community room, go to dinner, gather around for a movie, brush her teeth, then go to bed. Not a part of her day? Actual mental health treatment.

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“In the two weeks that I was there, I didn’t meet with a therapist or psychiatrist once,” Abby says. Her mom planned a visit two weeks into Abby’s stay, but Acadia initially told Riggs that nobody was allowed to visit Abby “because she hasn’t met with a therapist or psychiatrist yet,” Riggs recalls. Riggs was outraged. “What has she been doing for two weeks?” she asked. Eventually, they allowed her to come visit. Riggs won’t forget how Abby was shaking and crying as soon as she got into the car that day on March 2. “She was just so traumatized,” Riggs says. “We called Acadia from the hotel and said she’s not coming back.”

T

hese kinds of experiences are not rare in the United States. Suicide and depression among teens is rising, including in Washington, and access to treatment can be difficult. Simultaneously, big residential treatment facilities like Acadia are being shut down due to mistreatment of kids. Sequel Youth and Family Services runs many of these facilities throughout the country, including Clarinda Academy in Iowa. Foster kids from Washington in recent years have been sent to Clarinda when the state of Washington couldn’t find a home for them. A report released last year from Disability Rights Washington, a nonprofit advocacy group, revealed dismal conditions and inappropriate restraint practices there, so the state stopped sending kids to Clarinda. Recently, two other Sequel facilities in Utah have been shut down. Susan Kas, the staff attorney with Disability Rights Washington who has investigated Clarinda, worries that when states send kids to facilities far away, the state’s ability to monitor the treatment is diminished. Other states


may have different laws when it comes to what kind of treatment is acceptable for kids, for instance. And while not every facility mistreats teens, there are some who argue residential treatment for teens shouldn’t be an option at all. “I think segregating young people from their families and their communities in any institution setting should be something done only if absolutely necessary, and when there’s a process to reliably determine that it’s necessary,” Kas says. On the other hand, there are those who see the need for more residential treatment facilities in order to provide additional options for teens struggling with substance use and/or mental health. Tim Davis, executive director at Tamarack Center, a 16-bed intensive inpatient program in Spokane, says stories like Abby’s — in which she has a bad experience at a facility when everything else is full — are “very common.” He argues there’s a lack of funding from the state for residential facilities, and that is causing a shortage of beds. “What I see are fewer options and opportunities for these kids,” Davis says. “There’s not much out there in the landscape to help them.” Davis says there’s a need for more mental health treatment programs across the board, including residential inpatient treatment facilities. But he acknowledges some of those programs have proven problematic. “It’s hard to babysit these places,” Davis says. The consequence, however, can be further traumatizing to vulnerable young people. For Abby, it took awhile for her to recover from her time at Acadia Montana. She enrolled back in the RISE program, and since finishing, she says she’s felt “wonderful.” She felt compelled to share her story to prevent other teens from enduring any harm. “Having mental illness is difficult enough as it is,” Abby says. “And being given poor care is detrimental.” n wilsonc@inlander.com

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AUGUST 8, 2019 INLANDER 15


NEWS | DIGEST

ON INLANDER.COM

THE VERNER WAY Last week we had an in-depth dive into the frustrations of some of the current and former co-workers of mayoral frontrunners Ben Stuckart and Nadine Woodward. On Inlander.com, we featured an interview with former Mayor MARY VERNER about the importance of strong employee relationships in getting things done. Verner, who was criticized for her consensus-focused style while in office, says it’s not just a matter of being strong-willed enough to push things through. “It’s one thing to be strong-willed,” Verner says. “And it’s another to be strong. That office requires a tremendous amount of strength. It requires strength without dominance.” (DANIEL WALTERS)

16 INLANDER AUGUST 8, 2019

FEATURING NATIONAL NEWS FROM THE NEW YORK TIMES

TOO LITTLE, LITTLE SPOKANE As the hottest part of summer arrives, stream flow rates in the Little Spokane River are dropping below the minimum amount needed to PROTECT FISH and senior water rights users, so the state has warned 172 junior water rights holders they might have to curtail their usage. The irrigators, many of whom pull water from the river for lawns in Spokane, Stevens and Pend Oreille counties, will have to restrict their usage if the river flow drops below 115 cubic feet per second for more than a week. Ecology will maintain a hotline so the users can know whether and when they’re allowed to pull water from the river. This is the first time since 2015 the state has had to issue curtailment warnings, as the river flows were healthier in recent years. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

NOT IN THEIR BACKYARD When the city of Spokane expanded on its vision to put a SHELTER next to a disability center last week, an audience of some 500 people pushed back. There were more than four hours of sometimes heated comments from neighbors and people affiliated with Project ID, the center that serves adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. In short, most of the speakers said something to the effect of: Go ahead and add a new homeless shelter, just not here. “This is a very vulnerable population,” says Project ID Executive Director Bob Hutchinson, speaking about his organization’s members. “Project ID isn’t against the homeless... the concern we have mostly is the ancillary stuff that will be going on when somebody can’t get into the building.” (WILSON CRISCIONE)


NO RACISM HERE Roughly two weeks ago, several elected leaders at a Spokane Valley City Council pushed back on a proposed RACIAL EQUITY resolution, arguing that it was unnecessary and that there isn’t discrimination in Spokane Valley. Specifically, council members Pam Haley, Arne Woodard, and Mayor Rod Higgins said that the city already has an “inclusive city” resolution that was passed in 2017. Woodard reportedly said that the resolution sought to “make a problem where there isn’t one.” In response, the Spokane NAACP released a statement calling on the council to pass the resolution. “Racial equity is about addressing the impact of biased beliefs on communities of color and how those biases, both implicit and explicit, manifest on our sense of safety and well-being,” the statement reads. “When city officials denigrate people of color’s lived experiences, they are speaking out of turn.” (JOSH KELETY)

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AUGUST 8, 2019 INLANDER 17


NEWS | BRIEFS

Back to the Drawing Board Spokane Public Schools looking for new security chief… again

S

pokane Public Schools’ new director of campus security, transportation and risk management SANTOS PICACIO resigned last week, just weeks into the job, when his alleged history of abuse surfaced. Brian Coddington, spokesman for Spokane Public Schools, says both the school district and the SpokesmanReview received an anonymous tip last week containing divorce records alleging abuse by Picacio, who is 46. Those documents included allegations that he threatened to kill his wife and a divorce decree claiming that Picacio had a “history of domestic violence,” the Spokesman-Review reported. The school district — just months after its hiring practices were criticized for missing previous allegations of excessive force by one of its school resource officers — was not aware of Picacio’s alleged abuse when it initially hired him. Coddington says the district was in the process of confirming the authenticity of the claims when Picacio resigned. Now, Spokane Public Schools is finding someone to fill the role on an interim basis as it once again searches

for a permanent replacement, Coddington says. Last school year, former district director of communications Kevin Morrison served as the interim security chief when Mark Sterk retired from the job. Coddington says it could take a few months to find a permanent replacement. Coddington says all applicants go through background checks that would find any criminal offenses. In Picacio’s case, they did not find any arrests or police reports or convictions. But the district’s hiring process does not include a review of civil matters like divorce records. Right now, it’s unclear if that process will be amended in the district’s search for a new security chief. “We’re still discussing that,” Coddington says. (WILSON CRISCIONE)

POLE POSITION

Remember the tall totem pole in RIVERFRONT PARK? The one carved way back in 1976, by artists from the Colville and Algonquin tribes? In March, a city press release claimed that the pole, commissioned by the Inland Northwest Wildlife Council, would be removed from Riverfront Park, and returned to the council’s offices, where it would be installed “for all to see and enjoy.” Yet, as the Spokesman-Review first reported, it went to the parking garage of developer Kent Hull instead. A spokesman for the Spokane Parks Department, Josh Morrisey, says that the Inland Northwest Wildlife Council sent an email alerting the department that, since they didn’t have a trailer available for the pole, Hull would come by in order to pick it up. Hull was on the council when the carving was commissioned. He says he’s had multiple conversations with the leadership of the Wildlife Council, and agreed to take

The totem pole removed from Riverfront Park.

the pole instead. “The Wildlife Council really didn’t want it,” Hull says. “They didn’t want to see it [destroyed] either. The last couple of years they were trying to figure out what to do with it.” But resurrecting the pole to its standing position could be a challenge. The pole was cut off at the stump. He can’t plug it into a base without losing a significant portion of the carving. “The Parks Department had the contractor saw the dang thing off,” Hull says. He says he’s trying to figure out a way to build a steel structure to support the pole at his Iron Bridge property near the Centennial Trail. His intent is to create a small interpretive center, focusing on the war between Col. George Wright and local tribes, that includes the totem pole, a fountain and a stainless steel teepee. While the Spokane Tribe did not historically carve totem poles, Hull says that the coastal tribes the Spokane traded with did. (DANIEL WALTERS)

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FOOTING THE BILL

Washington state will use its own money to cover low-income FAMILY PLANNING services typically covered by federal funds while the courts determine whether a new “gag rule” on talking about abortion can move forward. The Health and Human Services (HHS) Department under Trump is returning to a Reagan-era rule that restricts doctors who receive federal Title X family planning money from mentioning abortion or referring patients elsewhere for one. Abortion is already not covered by federal money. But the rule goes further, requiring not only financial but physical separation between offices that use Title X money and those that offer abortion services, a move largely seen as aimed at Planned Parenthood. In Washington, Planned Parenthood serves 88 percent of the state’s Title X patients. Other family planning clinics have said they could not pick up the extra patients if those facilities can’t take them. “This is a reckless and dangerous rule that runs counter to the intent of the program, counter to our state’s Reproductive Parity Act, and counter to the obligation for every doctor to care for their patients based on sound medical practice — not ideology,” Gov. Jay Inslee said in a news release. “We will not allow any woman in Washington to be denied full and accurate information about her medical care.” While the state initially got a federal judge to block the rule from taking effect, a panel of judges for the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals said it could move forward based on the likelihood the federal government will win. Now the state is waiting for the full Ninth Circuit to weigh in. Meanwhile, the state Department of Health notified HHS in a July 30 letter that it’s been using state money since at least July 15 to reimburse Title X claims and will continue to do so until an injunction is restored or the case is resolved. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

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AUGUST 8, 2019 INLANDER 19


NEWS | WATER QUALITY

Vital Resource

the public about the E. coli tests. While personnel began chlorinating the containment area, no press release went out. In justifying the city’s decision not to disclose the initial positive hits for E. coli, Feist says that sufficient water usage restrictions were already in place: “We already had a very protective order in place,” she says, adding that a “do not drink” order is above and beyond what is technically required for a possible E. coli contamination. Back at Easy Acres Mobile Home Village, McWain felt blindsided by the lack of communication about the E. coli findings. She didn’t find out about the test results until the afternoon of July 30. “I wish they had said something in the beginning,” she says. “It was simply, ‘Don’t drink the water. You can shower in it.’ And it’s like, kids drink water in the shower.”

Hundreds of Hillyard residents were without clean water for days due to contamination, raising concerns about the vulnerability of the city’s water supply

A

BY JOSH KELETY

F

or roughly a week, tenants at the Easy Acres Mobile Home Village in Spokane’s Hillyard neighborhood had been without clean tap water due to reports of contamination. And one of the property managers, Kaylee McWain, is frustrated. In addition to supplying tenants with clean water and working with city staff to get water flowing again, her family has been commuting with their five children to a relative’s home in Airway Heights to take showers. “We’re living it as well,” Kaylee says on the front porch of her mobile home. “It’s been like you’re camping for a week.” Alice May, a 69-year-old Easy Acres resident, tells the Inlander that she’s been taking “sponge baths” using bottled water: “We have no [running] water at all,” she says. The water crisis, which affected around 300 people in Hillyard — including Easy Acres tenants — was first discovered in the mobile home park. Early in the morning on July 26, one of the managers received reports from tenants that their tap water was green. After they reported it to the city and shut off the water at the property, a manager personally took samples to city officials. The information kicked off a mobilization of city workers to address a possible contamination and a “no drink” order in the neighborhood. It was eventually revealed that water samples taken on July 26 tested positive for E. coli, a bacteria that can cause diarrhea and vomiting. The alleged culprit? Backflow from an unidentified commercial hydroseed truck that used a city fire hydrant on East Wellesley Avenue. As proof, city officials say that remnants of hydroseed material were found surrounding the fire hydrant: “We found large quantities of what appears to be hydroseed all around that hydrant,” says Dan Kegley, the city’s director of water. Almost a week later, the “no drink” restriction was lifted on July 31 and water access restored to Hillyard residents. Officials framed the situation as extremely rare. But the short-lived water crisis raises questions about the vulnerability of the city’s critical municipal water infrastructure. And while officials are investigating the incident, the hydroseed truck responsible for the contaminated backflow hasn’t yet been identified. For now, the city will bear the cost of responding to the crisis, which Marlene Feist, a spokeswoman for the city, says is upwards of $50,000 in personnel overtime and other expenses. “We don’t believe it was nefarious in nature, but it definitely leaves us with a huge, huge question of how we’re going to move forward with securing our water system in the future,” says Mike Fagan, a Spokane city

20 INLANDER AUGUST 8, 2019

Hillyard residents discovered their water was green on July 26. councilman who represents Hillyard. “If something like this can happen in an innocent situation, just think what someone could do with nefarious intent.”

H

ere’s how the crisis played out: After the city Water Department responded to the Hillyard neighborhood following reports, they worked to contain potentially contaminated water on July 26. Kegley says that they had the area quarantined by 10 am by closing off pipe valves to keep water from spreading outside of the area of roughly 100-120 properties. Then, in the early afternoon, the “no drink” restriction notice went out, which city officials say was highly precautionary given the fact that they had no hard evidence of possible contamination at that point. By late afternoon on July 26, Water Department personnel were personally notifying neighborhood residents of the issue and working to replace residential water meters — which were clogged with material that reportedly came from the hydroseed truck — and delivering bottled water. Water samples were also sent off to Anatek Labs to test for possible contaminants. But even before the test results came back, workers were orchestrating a unidirectional flush, a technique in which clean water is fed through pipes from one direction in an effort to clear sediment and contaminants. (The water is flushed out onto the street.) “We finished the flushing early Saturday [July 27] morning,” Kegley says. On the morning of July 27 the test results from the initial samples came back: Three spots tested positive for E. coli. Subsequent samples taken later that day tested by the city’s own lab showed a reduction in the potential contamination, with no hits for E. coli but several readings of coliform bacteria, which can indicate that E. coli is present. Notably, the city didn’t give any additional notice to

dditional samples taken on July 29, after the chlorination process, didn’t show any hits for E. coli or coliform. But the city opted to take another 10 samples the next day before lifting the “no drink order.” After sharing the results with officials from the state Department of Health, they lifted the restriction, advising affected residents to run their faucets for five minutes before drinking the water. But the ordeal wasn’t over yet. Given that the mobile home park used a private water system, the city’s chlorination efforts didn’t extend to the park’s piping. And after finding out about the E. coli results, the managers wanted to do a full chlorination. But city officials allegedly said that they couldn’t go in and unhook all of the mobile homes from the piping — a step required for the chlorination process. Kegley says the city went “over and above” what they were technically required to do with the mobile home park after hearing concerns about the Easy Acres water supply. He says that city personnel couldn’t go in and unhook each mobile home from the system because it was private property and not every tenant could grant access. “In this instance we pulled their meters, their backflow device, flushed their system, chlorinated their system, and sampled it,” he says. “They’re all clean.” The inquiry into who caused the incident is ongoing. Currently, there are around 100 commercial outfits who are licensed to use city fire hydrants, but none have come forward to take responsibility. “We’re working with SPD to try and gather any kind of photographic or video or any evidence that we might have that would indicate who would be responsible,” Feist says. But questions remain about how the city can prevent a similar contamination in the future. While city officials do operate a permitting process for hydroseed companies that wish to use water from city fire hydrants — this involves inspections of backflow prevention gear by trucks and proof of trainings in operating said equipment — anyone can theoretically access a fire hydrant with a special but widely available wrench. “I’ve been with the Water Department for over 28 years and we’ve never had an incident like this,” Kegley says. He adds that his department has been exploring acquiring hydrant locks to secure the city’s water infrastructure over the past year — due in part to “system vulnerability.” However, none of the products on the market are “100 percent foolproof,” and fire officials are wary of equipment that might make it harder to access hydrants during emergencies. “If somebody wants access to a hydrant that bad, I don’t know if there’s anything we’ve seen on the market that you can’t defeat,” Kegley says. n joshk@inlander.com


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THE FASHION ISSUE

PHOTOS BY YOUNG KWAK

WHAT TO WEAR No matter what’s trending in fashion — including current throwbacks to the 1990s, animal prints and looser-fitting pieces — the first thing to keep in mind when adding to your wardrobe and getting dressed each day is deceptively simple: Wear what you like. Wear what feels good. Wear what makes you stand out, or blend in. Wear pieces that tell a story. These and more are the philosophies of local vintage resellers profiled in this special fashion-focused issue, who specialize in everything from repurposed streetwear to well-worn workwear; funky old graphic T-shirts to women’s styles from the ’50s through the ’90s. Plus, find stories on a local streetwear brand, successful local boutiques and more. — CHEY SCOTT, section editor

22 INLANDER AUGUST 8, 2019


Fay Ripley (front)

Red Leaf Vintage Fay Ripley’s vintage fashion aesthetic encourages women to stand out and embrace an original look by mixing different styles and eras By Chey Scott FAY RIPLEY KNOWS how to make vintage fashion look really good. By using models of diverse sizes and body types to style her latest finds in mini photoshoots around town, Ripley’s Red Leaf Vintage brand shows existing and would-be customers that donning vintage clothing is fun and, most importantly, fashionably timeless. A scroll through the Spokane reseller’s Instagram feed (@redleafvintage) may also make fellow vintage enthusiasts a bit envious — especially if they see a oneof-a-kind piece not in their size or that’s since sold — but also itching to shop Ripley’s current inventory at two Spokane shops, Chosen Vintage and Boulevard Mercantile. “What I say on my Instagram is unique, bold, timeless, colorful — that is what I’m going for,” Ripley says, seated on a midcentury sofa inside her 1954 North Spokane rancher’s living room, entirely decorated in ’50s, ’60s and ’70s furnishings. She’s sporting a favorite piece from her personal vintage collection, a late ’60s/early ’70s green polyester dress with a large, pointed collar and an orange and chartreuse circular pattern running its length. “Something that you’re going to stand out in, which

is hard because not everyone wants to stand out,” she continues. “That’s why I push a lot of vintage mixing. You can still wear a cool ’60s, ’70s top and modern jeans and shoes. There’s no rules.” Ripley got her start in vintage fashion by way of studying photography and discovering an appreciation for 1920s fashion and portrait photography. Before launching Red Leaf, she collected textiles and clothing from the ’20s, yet found it difficult to showcase the delicate pieces on models because of the fabrics’ age and often deteriorating condition. Eventually Ripley transitioned to buying, selling and collecting longer-lasting and wearable clothing from the latter half of the 20th century. She’s been selling women’s vintage pieces at Chosen Vintage for three years, and added a second large space in the basement of Boulevard Mercantile in January. At Chosen, her inventory is tucked away in a cozy back room, and encompasses the 1950s through the ’90s. She stocks her higher-end pieces, like vintage wedding gowns, formalwear and higher-end labels, at Boulevard. While other vintage resellers may buy and sell as a side gig or hobby, Red Leaf Vintage is full time

for Ripley. “I couldn’t do this as a hobby,” she asserts. “I’ve gone out at midnight to meet clients. I’ve seen the craziest things. With this, you see a lot of hoarding and it’s really sad. When I do meet people, I make sure that they know I’m appreciative and everything they give me is going to go to good homes. Part of the reason is that I’m saving vintage from going into the trash.” Rather than scouring thrift store racks in the increasingly competitive vintage market, Ripley maintains lots of local connections who alert her to estate sales and other sources looking to offload stashes of old clothing. Even though the work is often mentally and physically exhausting, Ripley always enjoys connecting with people she buys from, and the people who buy from her. “It’s rewarding when someone finds something that is really unique and they’re super happy, and people send me pictures and repost it, and get so many compliments on their outfit because it was unique and stood out.” n Shop Red Leaf Vintage at Boulevard Mercantile, 1905 N. Monroe; Chosen Vintage, 7 W. Main Instagram: @redleafvintage

AUGUST 8, 2019 INLANDER 23


THE FASHION ISSUE

AUDREY’S BOUTIQUE CELEBRATES 50 YEARS In a city like Spokane, it’s quite a milestone for a small, locally owned business to stick around for a half-century. For Audrey’s Boutique, however, whether it would be serving women for that long was never questioned. When it opened in the late 1960s, Audrey’s was a specialty lingerie shop with a focus on bra fittings for post-mastectomy women. “We go through their life journeys with them, with breast prosthesis and bra fittings and everything else,” says Victoria Zvoncheck-Ferro, the boutique’s fourth and current owner. This dedication hasn’t faltered, and the store has since expanded to dressing women over their undergarments with collections in casual, business and formal wear. “My philosophy for the store is ‘Every woman is beautiful, they just don’t know it,’” says Zvoncheck-Ferro, who’s also known around town as “The Bra Whisperer.” In addition to making women feel beautiful, Audrey’s Boutique also seeks to empower them. “It’s an all-female-owned business,” Zvoncheck-Ferro says. “Started by a woman and maintained by women.” She credits the boutique’s 50 years of success to the level of care given to each woman who walks in. “We develop relationships with these clients and especially the mastectomy clients because you’re going on such a personal journey with them,” she says. — MORGAN SCHEERER

MODELS IN THIS SECTION: (page 22) Tierra Duke, Gianna Bardelli and Elyse Sawyer; (page 24) Brandon Martell, Paul Forster and Ben Fife; (page 25) Tancie Doruth, Raleigh Brown and Forrest Kuharski.

24 INLANDER AUGUST 8, 2019

Tony Brown (center)

Vagabond Soundtrack Worn, storied denim and workwear for men and women is the focus of Tony “Breezy” Brown’s vintage fashion offerings By Morgan Scheerer TONY “BREEZY” BROWN RUNS his fingers over the sleeve of a denim jacket, lingering where the fabric has been sunwashed. “This is what gets me out of bed in the morning,” he says. “This is beautiful to me.” Brown explains that this jacket, now for sale in his basement booth inside Boulevard Mercantile, was probably worn by someone who rode horses. He can tell by the places where the denim has been washed out; by sections that are more dirt-stained than others, by the lines that have yet to fade in the sleeves, showing they were often worn rolled up, with the elbows at a 90-degree angle. Pieces like this, those with a storied past, are what get Brown excited. Brown is a Spokane-based vintage clothing curator who specializes in denim, although workwear from the 1940s and ’50s is his true love. He sells these worn wares under his brand Vagabond Soundtrack at Boulevard and at JUNK in midtown Coeur d’Alene. “I like rugged, distressed clothing, which a lot of people don’t even touch,” he says. “For me, the more distressed, the more worn out, the better story it tells.” Denim jackets of all washes with varying degrees of distress, some lined with Sherpa, others with patches, line a whole side of his booth, while “grandma” sweatshirts line another. Overalls have their own section, and a glass case filled with silver and turquoise jewelry sits in the middle. Cutoff denim shorts, one of his more popular items, are hung, folded and stacked in multiple places, sorted by waist measurement. “It’s American, it’s classic, and it’s timeless,” Brown says of the denim he works with. “It looks good on everyone, it’s stylish.”

Brown has always been a fan of things past. After closing his former Spokane record shop, he turned to what he does best: shopping. He hits thrift stores and garage sales to find his pieces, along with having connections with pickers. Brown delivers to his spaces at least three times a week, a testament to his dedication to finding new inventory. “I think of all the people in Spokane I’m the most aggressive picker,” he says. Brown has been “hardcore” curating and selling vintage for about six years. In this time, he’s seen a rise in the popularity of vintage clothing, with more shops opening, and a wider variety of shoppers walking through the doors of the shops. While he sees dressing vintage as a trend, he also thinks the popularity of it is here to stay. “In this style, [the pieces are] one-offs,” he says. “They’re wearing something that they’re not going to run into someone else wearing at a party. It’s unique; it can be artful and artistic. It’s an expression.” In addition to the uniqueness of his pieces, Brown says the fact that each has a past contributes to the popularity of vintage. “When you go to a store and get a pair of distressed jeans, they’re distressed in a factory,” he says. “My distress is because someone worked in it, or wore it forever, or just loved it until it’s threadbare. And I think there’s a lot of people who don’t want their clothes to look new, I’m one of them. I want my clothes to tell a story.” n Shop Vagabond Soundtrack at Boulevard Mercantile, 1905 N. Monroe; JUNK / Midtown Market, 811 N. Fourth St., Coeur d’Alene Instagram: @vagabond_soundtrack


Do It With Soul

Erin Corder-Brown (ce nter) and Emily Stone (righ t)

For sisters Erin Corder-Brown and Emily Stone, fashion and family are forever intertwined By Dan Nailen LOOKING BACK NOW, three years after forming Do It With Soul, it’s easy to see how sisters Erin CorderBrown and Emily Stone would become entrepreneurs behind a vintage clothes company that blends classic looks with rock ’n’ roll flair. Their grandmas were both incredibly stylish, they say, and some of their earliest memories were going thrifting with their mom, and “upcycling” pairs of jeans with blown-out knees into new skirts and purses. “We just have a big background in being thrifty and unique with style,” says Stone, while Corder-Brown adds, “Fashion seriously runs in our blood.” While they are sisters, they’re not twins. Stone, 32, handles a lot of the business tasks. She has a business degree from the University of Idaho, and a personal style that, her sister says, she “kind of just falls into the closet and then comes out and looks good.” CorderBrown, 34, is a mother of three and the artistic visionary of Do It With Soul. She has a design degree from Washington State University and was selling vintage furniture with her mom before deciding to focus on fashion. “It’s always nice to have a healthy balance in your

closet of new and vintage,” Corder-Brown says, “and that is kind of how we’ve evolved.” If they had to put a label on Do It With Soul’s style, “grunge” comes to mind. The company sells original-design printed tees, as well as upcycled denim and leather jackets they’ve recreated by painting designs on them, and T-shirts they’ve distressed with bleach or by adding holes, or swapping sleeves. “I’m obsessed with street fashion,” Corder-Brown says. “You see people who maybe started the day with a pair of tights on and just snagged them. ‘Well, OK, I’m going to snag them up and down, and I’m going to embrace the chaos.’ That is how trends turn. That’s where I thrive.” The sisters and their extended family will hunt down clothes to work on at yard sales and thrift stores — “I like to say we’re female-owned, but we are family-operated,” Corder-Brown says — and see the vintage scene in Spokane as a friendly one. Stone says the different vintage resellers tip each other off to sales and are on a group text together. And working in vintage threads is something that won’t go out of style even as, say, trends leaning on ’90s looks or camouflage inevitably move on.

“You’re always going to have those people who believe they were part of a different generation, like an old soul,” Stone says. “They connect with something in the past that makes them want to wake up and put on a flapper skirt and a little crop, and they look good and they feel good in what they’re wearing.” Comfort is key with Do It With Soul’s clothes. They want people to feel good in what they wear, and bring customers the confidence that comes with knowing they have a good look happening. One advantage of working in vintage, reclaimed clothes, they say, is that the sizes are usually worn off, so people just have to try clothes on and see how they feel. And that goes for men and women. “I love it when people come in and are like, ‘Where’s the guy section?’” Corder-Brown says. “I’ll be like, ‘There are no genders in fashion!’ If it feels comfortable and you feel confident in it? Rock it.” n Shop Do It With Soul online at doitwithsoul.com; at Chosen Vintage, 7 W. Main; and Kiss and Makeup, 920 W. Garland Instagram: @doitwithsoul

AUGUST 8, 2019 INLANDER 25


THE FASHION ISSUE

MILLIANNA JEWELRY ADDS FUN FEATHERS AND DO-GOOD BRACELETS Spokane-based jewelry house Millianna continues to set trends in the ever-changing fashion and accessories world. Late last year the company — which hires refugee women living locally to hand-make its cut crystal beaded pieces — launched a line of versatile feather accessories that have since been spotted on celebrities and become an online bestseller. The ostrich feather and leather tie-on pieces can be worn as bracelets, chokers, anklets and even as a hair accessory, says Millianna spokeswoman Jessica Brooke. Retailing for $62 each, the pieces come in a range of colors. “They’ve really been going strong since spring, and since it’s still summer it’s really easy to put them on with heels and sandals,” Brooke says. “They’re fun and fluffy and whimsical and very on point this season in fashion. In Vogue you see ostrich feathers all over the place.” In addition to an evolving collection of earrings, cuffs, necklaces and other pieces designed by owners Arianna Brooke and Sharmilla Persaud, Millianna has a new line of special bracelets that give back. Priced at $25 and $50, the beaded bracelets’ proceeds support Ronald McDonald House Charities of the Inland Northwest in Spokane, as well as the national nonprofit’s branch in Connecticut, where Persaud is based. Customers can choose which location they’d like their purchase to support during checkout. Find them at millianna.com/pages/rmhc. — CHEY SCOTT

MOVING OUT AND ONLINE

TEDDI JOELLE RELAUNCHES HANDBAG LINE IN ITALIAN LEATHER After rebranding last fall from Hustle & Hide to Teddi Joelle, another big change for this Spokane-based maker of leather purses, totes, clutches, wallets and other bags came in July, when it relaunched its signature collection of bags in Italian leather. While the company’s products are still designed at its Spokane headquarters, Teddi Joelle’s bags are now being manufactured in Italy. “[The collection] is made from Italian vachetta vegetable-tanned leather and are meticulously crafted to perfection,” explains founder Teddi Cripps. “As for our team and Spokane studio, we will be focusing on new bag design and product development and will be expanding our in-house clothing line, which we are very excited about.” Cripps says the primary reason behind the change in manufacturing was to increase the craftsmanship and quality of its products in order to maintain its core mission, to create timeless and long-lasting pieces that buck fast fashion trends. With the relaunch, Teddi Joelle’s previous line of best-selling bags were slightly updated to feature a more refined silhouette, while other new designs were introduced. “Last year we came to a point in our company where we had to make some big decisions around growth and sustainability,” Cripps reflects. “We knew that we wanted to take our work to a whole new level of craftsmanship and design, and it became very clear that seeking out artisans with extensive experience and knowledge was the next step for us.” Shop the new line at teddijoelle.com, and watch for the launch of the company’s new clothing line soon. — CHEY SCOTT

26 INLANDER AUGUST 8, 2019

Coeur d’Alene-based women’s boutique NanaMacs finds big success transitioning from brick-and-mortar to the web By Arcelia Martin

I

t’s risky business opening up a brick-andmortar women’s clothing boutique in the midst of an online shopping revolution. But for NanaMacs owners Suzy and Jeremy Shute, their small Coeur d’Alene boutique was defying odds six years ago. The store grew 10 percent month over month. The couple opened the boutique in tribute to Suzy’s grandmother, Nana, whose fashion always inspired her, and her grandfather, Mac, who was a successful San Francisco businessman. By the end of their three-year lease, however, the Shutes decided they’d outgrown their storefront in Coeur d’Alene’s Riverstone district. So, they moved out and online. In their first year of online-only sales, NanaMacs (nanamacs.com) more than doubled in growth, going from about $2 million in revenue to $6 million. The following year, they

doubled again. Jeremy Shute soon realized that the money and effort they’d spent operating the physical storefront wasn’t cost-effective. “We took that same product, and [in] that same time, and put it into the dot com, and that’s just how much more it grew,” he says. NanaMacs’ inventory appeals mostly to women ages 18 into their 30s. Fifteen percent of its sales come from Washington, California and Idaho. The online boutique curates its inventory from 500 vendors across the country, from Los Angeles to the East Coast. NanaMacs also offers original pieces, designed in-house and manufactured in the U.S. The NanaMacs Originals line offers a variety of flirty sundresses, tops, bodysuits, bottoms and jumpsuits that have either a romantic or streetstyle flair. These originals can be inspired by pieces that NanaMacs’ staff saw, like or previ-


Discover Some of the flirty pieces to be found at the online boutique.

FALL FASHION TRENDS FOR WOMEN Satin skirts: These transition well from summer to fall. Instead of pairing a summer skirt with a cami, try sporting it with a chunky sweater. Animal prints: They’re here to stay. Cheetah, zebra, leopard print; the whole zoo, really. Leather: And not just a leather jacket, but a leather jacket with leather pants. Darker florals: Maybe leave behind the whites and pinks, and opt for moodier red and black florals. Abstract graphics: Add an extra element to your classic fall sweater by choosing one with more dimension. Cargo pants: They’re cute and efficient. So. Many. Pockets. Saffron: One of the “it” colors of the season. If you’re a big fan of the golden honey yellow that’s dominated summer, here’s your fall rendition. Cowl neck slips: This neckline is not only classy, it’s mildly provocative. So it’s perfect.

NANAMACS PHOTO

ously stocked, but that maybe needed improvement. Whether it’s changing color, adding pockets, adjustable straps or reversibility, these designs aim to offer better pieces for customers. Best-selling pieces from other vendors can also be tweaked and added to this collection. “With our NanaMacs Originals, we try to do something different,” Shute says. “Part of that boutique experience is having something that nobody else does.” To make sure these originals and any other items in their inventory fit right, NanaMacs hosts Facebook Live feeds Monday through Friday at 4 pm, and on Sundays at 10 am. “We’ve got a lot of new product rotating through the system very rapidly. So that makes us different than your Forever 21s, H&Ms — your big box stores,” Shute says. “They bring in a lot of product, but there’s only one or two you’ll find by the time you get to the store.” During each live feed, NanaMacs launches 20 new products, each worn by two of its six full-time models to show how the pieces look on different body types. “It’s created such a great shopping experience that our customer return rate is close to 70 percent,” Shute notes. While the retailer has found serious online success, local customers who’ve visited NanaMacs in Coeur d’Alene in years past also have been asking the Shutes to open up a storefront again. To that end, the couple allocated space in the new warehouse they’re building for a potential new storefront in Coeur d’Alene, just in case they decide to revisit a brick-and-mortar spot, of course this time paired with their successful online presence. n

YOUR style A lifestyle boutique for all occasions. Complimentary personal styling. 3131 N. Division St. Spokane, WA Mon- Fri 10 - 5:30pm Sat 10 - 4pm | 509.324.8612

AUGUST 8, 2019 INLANDER 27


THE FASHION ISSUE

8 25 2019 /

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Wear your city on your shoulders.

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Spokane fashion line City Chapters lets customers wear where they’re from

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28 INLANDER AUGUST 8, 2019

t’s one thing to be proud of the place you’re from, and it’s another to wear that place like a badge of honor. Bobby J. Hodge, founder of the local fashion company City Chapters, has taken that idea to its most logical conclusion. Inspired by hip-hop fashion and urban streetwear, Hodge makes custom jackets with the name of the wearer’s home city

emblazoned on the back in big block letters. “It connects with people because of the city aspect,” Hodge explains. “If they like streetwear fashion and they love their city, and they see one of my jackets, it’s going to connect with them.” Hodge, 30, was born in Denver and grew up in Medical Lake, and says he’s always been interested in fashion. In fact, he was voted Best


Summer to Fall

FALL FASHION TRENDS FOR MEN ’70s style: Vintage denim, knit turtlenecks, flared pants — they’re all back, baby. Aspire to look like either Leonardo DiCaprio or Brad Pitt from the Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood poster. Scarves: They’re not just for winter anymore. Scarves can bring a pop of color and texture to your ensemble, literally and figuratively tying the outfit together. Knitted sweaters: A versatile classic. The loose, cable-knit variety seems to be the most popular at the moment.

IN KENDALL YARDS 1184 W. Summit Parkway 509.473.9341

Fashions

Animal prints: Some of the world’s biggest fashion designers have jumped on this trend. Look for T-shirts and sweatshirts that are spotted, striped or any other kind of natural camouflage. Loose and comfortable: It wasn’t long ago that men’s clothes were skinny enough to cut off circulation, but that’s changing. Nylon sportswear jackets, puffy Patagonia down jackets, and flowy, comfy pants are all in fashion.

Dressed in high school. But he was often in trouble as a teenager and a young adult, and he spent six months in jail following a bar fight when he was 21. “I was gone for Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Year’s, my birthday. I missed all those important things in life in that six months, and I got a good taste of what it’s like to be locked away from the world,” he says. “I needed to go to jail. I needed to learn some lessons. And when I came out, everybody knew I was different.” In 2011, Hodge wanted to get his act together and launched a clothing line called 3rd Kind Apparel, with designs revolving around the number three. The idea for City Chapters came shortly thereafter, when Hodge read about a T-shirt line that featured graphics of Toronto subway stops. Hodge started City Chapters officially in early 2017, turning his customers into walking billboards for their hometowns. Ordering a City Chapters jacket is a simple process: Customers can currently choose between four different styles of nylon coach’s jackets, and then customize it with the name of any city they want. Hodge makes the jackets by request in the basement of his South Hill home, printing the lettering onto sheets of vinyl and then pressing them onto the jacket with an industrial iron. Each jacket runs $75 and can be ordered online at citychapters. com. Six months in, Hodge had already been contacted by the national skating apparel company Zumiez, commissioning a large order of jackets. He’s also had product stocked at local men’s clothing store Kingsley & Scout. Rapper Lil Jon has ordered an Atlanta jacket, which he’s worn in concert, and Chewelah-native R&B singer Allen Stone has a Spokane jacket. “I’ve sent a jacket to every continent except Antarctica,” he says. Hodge hopes to eventually give a portion of his profits to the same at-risk youth charities that helped him out when he was in dire straits. For now, though, he’s cranking out City Chapter jackets one at a time, in between his regular gig as a freelance graphic designer. The purpose of the line goes back to that idea of connection and hometown pride, Hodge says: What better way to advertise that “Spokane doesn’t suck” than repping it on your clothes? “For a long time, people were like, ‘I hate living here.’ And I dealt with that, too,” Hodge says. “But I see the potential of what Spokane can be. I just went to Ireland in November, and I was wearing one of my Spokane jackets over there, and I probably met 10 to 12 people just because I was wearing my jacket. It just causes that connection.” n

AUGUST 8, 2019 INLANDER 29


IT’S

what’s

THE FASHION ISSUE

underneath THAT

counts.

WHAT’S SUPPORTING YOUR GOWN?

It’s vintage graphic Ts galore for Wearlords.

JON SWANSTROM PHOTO

PUNK ROCK LIFER Jon Swanstrom’s decades in the Spokane vintage scene have taught him “the more unusual, the better” By Riley Utley

J

3131 N. DIVISION S T. SPOK ANE, WA 9 9207 MON - FRI 10 A M - 5:3 0 P M SAT 10 A M - 4 P M

30 INLANDER AUGUST 8, 2019

on Swanstrom has been collecting and selling vintage clothing for 30 years. It all started in the early ’90s when the owner of Spokane-based Wearlords Vintage found a trunk of old clothes inside a house he’d just bought. Inside was a World War II bomber jacket that he then sold to a vintage store for $400. He’s been collecting and selling classic vintage pieces ever since. “I just love vintage clothes,” Swanstrom says. “It was part of punk fashion and I’m an old punk rock guy, so back then I shopped at thrift stores.” Swanstrom primarily specializes in vintage T-shirts, but also collects old denim and military clothing, specifically from the 1940s and ’50s. “I really like classic American menswear. It could be anything from a cool 1940s suit to an ’80s T-shirt,” Swanstrom says. “I like stuff that’s really bold and beautiful.” Swanstrom searches all over Spokane to find his pieces, which he sells at Chosen Vintage in downtown Spokane under his Wearlords brand, as well as on eBay and Etsy. “Since I’ve been doing it a long time, I have people who bring me stuff who have been bringing me things for a while. Then I also go to estate and garage sales when I can, and thrift stores sometimes. I look all over the place,” Swanstrom says. As competition in the vintage market grows, however, it’s become rarer to find outstanding pieces. “There’s more competition now because everyone knows what vintage is,” he notes. “Now there are people who go out to the Goodwill Outlet all the time. Also finding true vintage stuff

is difficult. As years go by, it’s getting harder and harder.” It’s also become challenging for Swanstrom to find the types of pieces he really loves because those earlier eras of fashion are falling out of favor for current trends rebooting 1990s fashion. “There is this 20-year cyclical thing — like the ’90s is popular now,” he says. “So you just have to keep up with the trends and inevitably there will be customers who want it.” Because of this cycle, vintage fashion from any era hasn’t gone out of style, and probably never will, Swanstrom predicts. He also finds that his inventory sells well because each piece is one of a kind. “It’s always the unusual stuff that sells,” Swanstrom says. “The more unusual, the better, because there aren’t 8,000 of them online or 50 of them in store. That’s why people shop vintage. Because they want to have something unique.” And when Swanstrom says unusual, he means it. He has a whole laundry list of unique items he’s sold over the years: vintage underwear, a satin and silk jacket from the ’50s with a map of Alaska on the back, a pair of Converse tennis shoes from the 1920s and a military paratrooper outfit, to name just a few. To that end, Swanstrom tries to find and sell pieces that are unique, yet classic. He says he and other local vintage collectors’ ever-changing inventories offer great pieces for anyone. “Wear what feels good on your body, not what somebody else is going to like,” he says. n Shop Wearlords Vintage at Chosen Vintage, 7 W. Main Instagram: @wearlords_vintage


PREVIOUSLY…

Miller Cane has begun to look at houses, a permanent home for him and 8-year-old Carleen, in Missouri — not far from the site of America’s latest mass shooting. He and Carleen feel called to this place, to counsel and cry with survivors like Tammy and Fiona, and they have made real connections after spending months on the road together. The town is still swarming, though, with people Miller previously met working other massacres, including Heffner, whose grief and anger have found a target in Miller. And now Lizzie, Carleen’s mother, is in town, too, sprung from jail after making a deal with her estranged husband, Connor, to drop assault charges against her. They’re here to collect Carleen, and Miller’s plans for a normal life may just fall apart. Most important, though, is making sure Carleen is safe.

CHAPTER 8, PART 6

C

arleen was wearing her yellow bonnet when Miller picked her up, she and Fiona shaking Mason jars of milk on the patio out back. “They’re making butter,” Tammy said. The plan was to meet Lizzie at the coffee shop in Springfield, but it was still too early. “There’s pumpkin bread in the oven,” Tammy said, “if you have time.” Encouraging words were all over the kitchen framed in needlepoint, burned into wood, spelled out with refrigerator magnets — Hope, Gratitude, Dream, Believe. Tammy stood at the counter measuring dry ingredients into a bowl. Miller imagined other words bent out of rusted

ABOUT THIS PROJECT

Miller Cane: A True and Exact History, a new novel by Samuel Ligon, is being published for the first time in the pages of the Inlander. The latest installments of the book will always appear in print first, then on the web the following Wednesday MADE POSSIBLE BY and then on Spokane Public Radio, which is broadcasting audio versions of each installment. Visit MillerCane.Inlander.com for more details.

would be gone from him, that she’d fall into Lizzie’s metal — Quit, Surrender, Most Things Haven’t Worked Out, the arms and fly home, out of his life. The better plan would great Junior Kimbrough title. Maybe he wasn’t the right be the three of them driving back to Washington in the person to raise Carleen. Maybe all he was good for was motorhome, Carleen and Lizzie sharing his bed and keeping her on the road until her mom arrived worn out Miller sleeping in Carleen’s loft, almost like practicing for from jail. the future. Maybe Lizzie was right about the deal with “Carleen said you might be settling here,” Tammy Connor. But Miller would have to see him first, make a said. determination based on how desperate he seemed. Had he ever really thought that? The place was a di“Your mom sounded good,” he told Carleen, and saster, a ruin. Carleen would want to stay, but that wasn’t Carleen said, “Is she coming home?” going to happen. “Maybe,” Miller said. “Probably.” “There’s nothing left for us here,” TOAST TO MILLER CANE Carleen untied and retied her bonTammy said. She pulled the bread from The final installment of Miller Cane net strings, pulling the brim lower over the oven and placed it on a cooling will appear in next week’s issue of her eyes. “Are we going back to Mount rack. “We’re going to Wichita,” she the Inlander. And on Aug. 22, we’re Vernon?” said. “Blake’s got people there.” going to celebrate the occasion with “Maybe,” Miller said. “Is that what “Smart,” Miller said. a wrap party — with drinks, a short you want?” “I don’t know if it’s smart.” reading, a conversation between “I don’t know,” Carleen said. “I “Leaving isn’t quitting,” Miller said. Samuel Ligon and Jess Walter and thought we were supposed to be here.” “Maybe it is,” Tammy said. “It’s music by BaLonely. The free event “Maybe we’re done here,” Miller hard to know what’s best for the girls.” will be held at the Big Dipper, at 171 said. A giant wall clock ticked above S. Washington, with doors at 7, con“Or maybe Mom could come when Miller’s head, surrounded by a wooden versation at 8 and music at 9. More she gets out. She could help too.” rooster and three wooden chickens. details at Inlander.com/wrapparty. “Sure,” Miller said. Everything in Tammy’s kitchen might He parked the car and they walked have come from the same catalog. onto the square. No sign of Connor. “Carleen said you’ve done this before,” she said. “Where are we going,” Carleen said, and Miller said, “Shootings, I mean.” “To the fountain.” “Yes,” Miller said. “My nephew — ” Taking her to Lizzie felt like losing her, but maybe it The girls burst into the kitchen. didn’t have to be that way. “Try this,” Carleen said, opening the jar of butter and “I could go back to school,” she said, and Miller said, handing it to Miller. “Exactly.” “Fantastic,” he said. A woman on the bench beside them scattered crumbs “The bread’s too hot to cut,” Tammy said, but she cut for the pigeons, the birds lifting and resettling as people it anyway and they smeared it with butter and jam, then walked by. The fountain burbled behind them. Miller put Carleen gathered her things from Fiona’s room, everyone his arm around Carleen and she leaned into him. The hugging at the door. When they finally got outside it massacre was everywhere here, but would soon begin to seemed likely they’d never see Tammy and Fiona again. fade, even though so many had died close by. Marquette Miller told Carleen about her mom as they drove, would never recover. It would be best if the town were not knowing how to prepare her or if he should prepare bulldozed and buried. her. What if Connor was lurking and they had to bolt before seeing Lizzie? It didn’t seem possible that Carleen ...continued on next page

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AUGUST 8, 2019 INLANDER 31


MILLER CANE: A TRUE AND EXACT HISTORY  Chapter 8, Part 6 continued...

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32 INLANDER AUGUST 8, 2019

“Are we still looking at houses Friday?” Carleen asked. “If you want to.” “I do want to,” Carleen said. “But that’s in Columbia,” Miller said, “a few hours away.” Carleen loosened her bonnet and let it fall down her back. Miller kept his eyes open for Connor, but wanted to be fully aware of Carleen, fully here with her, because any second — And then Carleen gasped. “Mom!” she cried. She looked at Miller, her face radiant. “It’s Mom!” Across the square, Lizzie was approaching a table in front of the coffee shop. She put her hand to her forehead to block the sun, looking for the sound of Carleen’s voice, her other hand holding a cup and saucer. “Mom!” Carleen cried. She jumped from the bench. “Wait,” Miller said. “Carleen!” Lizzie said. She put her cup on the table and opened a gate in the wrought iron fence, moving toward Carleen. “Watch the street,” Miller said, taking Carleen by the hand. “Mom,” Carleen cried, dragging Miller. Up on the curb, he let her go and she ran to her mother, Lizzie opening her arms to take her in. Miller stayed back, checked the square. Still no Connor. Carleen said something into Lizzie’s neck. “I know,” Lizzie said, holding her. “I missed you so much.” “Miller,” Lizzie said, rising from her crouch with Carleen. He approached and they embraced, Carleen still attached to Lizzie, Miller putting his hand on her head, Lizzie pulling him in hard, the three of them together right there on the sidewalk. “I have to tell you about the butter,” Carleen said. “Yes,” Lizzie said, leading Carleen through the gate toward her table. “Tell me everything.” Lizzie sat and Carleen crawled into her lap. Miller had texted her last night and this morning, had talked to her on the phone before picking up Carleen, and she assured him that Connor would not be here, that he had no idea where they were meeting. Miller believed her. She ran her hands over Carleen’s back. “I love your bonnet,” she said, and Carleen said, “Miller got it for me. A cowgirl hat and a Barbie Clinic too.” “Wow,” Lizzie said. “Mom,” Carleen said, pushing herself closer to her mother. “Carleen,” Lizzie said. “Mom!” Carleen said. “Yes,” Lizzie said. It seemed wrong to be so close to them when they only needed each other. “I’ll get us a treat,” Miller said. He kissed Carleen’s head, Lizzie’s too. “Be right back,” he said. As he turned to walk away, he saw Connor across the square, leaning against a wall by the fountain. Miller’s heart kicked, but it wasn’t fear this time. It would be good to start whatever was going to happen between them. He looked at Carleen and Lizzie holding each

other, then walked through the tables, onto the sidewalk, across the street, Connor slouched by the fountain, his pure idiot self, skinny, scraggly, lighting a cigarette on a summer day in October. He needed to understand that Miller would be watching from now on, that Connor wasn’t going to bully anyone ever again. The pigeons fluttered from in front of the pigeon lady as Miller walked by. Connor did not seem to be looking at anyone. Maybe he was a junkie, blank, pathetic, oblivious. Miller was no more than ten feet away when Connor looked up and saw him, jerking upright. “You,” he said. The last time they’d seen each other Miller had brained him with a Madonna and was driving away, Connor running onto Lizzie’s lawn screaming, “I see you!” Now, he flicked his cigarette and planted himself. “Stay out of my business,” he said. “We’re here for her own good.” Sure you are, Miller thought, the smell of rotten meat and ammonia rising around him. “You don’t scare me,” Connor said. Miller had nothing to hit him with but his hands. But he wasn’t going to hit him. Unless he had to. He was going to tell him how it was going to be from now on. The smell came on stronger. Connor’s face changed, shifting from sneer to surprise to fear, as if Miller had frightened him just by looking at him. As if he finally understood. “No,” he said, holding his hands up and starting to turn. Miller should have done this months ago. Then Connor crumbled — it didn’t make sense exactly, Miller’s mind behind what he saw and heard — Connor crumbling at the same moment the gunshot cracked, Connor reaching for his leg as he fell, blood soaking the fabric of his jeans, as if Miller was seeing the shot Lizzie had taken him down with in her front yard all those months ago. “Why’d you shoot me?” Connor said, smoke and gunpowder mixing with rotten meat and ammonia. Miller turned and Heffner was there with a long revolver, the smell rising, pigeons flapping and people screaming. They looked at each other, the moment more intimate than any that had passed between them, as if they were agreeing to something, coming to terms. Someone shouted, maybe Connor. Then Heffner discharged a bullet into Miller’s brain, blowing off a piece of his skull like a Kennedy Doll’s — the warmth of it and the cold, the speed, a sky so blue it was purple, clouds swimming around Rainier, and down below the rolling green of the Palouse. It’s like an ocean of wheat, Carleen said. Relief ran through him. She was out there somewhere with Lizzie, across the square. They were all going to be okay. But he was falling, everything bright and crackling. It wouldn’t be so hard to raise her, to give her the chances she deserved. They both loved her. And she had Waffles and her dolls and her own big heart. She’d probably save the whole goddamned world. There were more shots as the cops took Heffner down, Miller certain, as he died, that Carleen was right there with him. n

MILLER CANE CONCLUDES IN NEXT WEEK’S INLANDER


NIGHTLIFE

Birds

and the

B-e-e-s Monthly Mootsy’s Spelling Bee offers a raunchy good time for the late night crowd BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

I

Danny Anderson aims to combine comedy with a childhood school game.

n the dim back corner of Mootsy’s, a man in a tacky tan suit with a mop of fake black hair sits under a spotlight, welcoming competitors to the bar’s monthly adult spelling bee. “Welcome to the Mootsy’s Spelling Bee, S-P-E-LI-N-G,” Richard O’Seanary says leaning into the mic, most of the crowd missing his intentional misspelling as they chatter away. You might call him Dick O’Seanary — get it, like “dictionary?” — but chances are you know him better as downtown bartender and actor Danny Anderson. This year, he’s been helping Mootsy’s bartender Will Brasch breathe new life into the bar’s spelling bee, which used to attract massive late night crowds before a previous host moved away. For the revitalized spelling bee, the duo concoct a new theme every month. For July, it was “Summer Lovin’: Spell me more, spell me more,” with each of the four rounds themed on warm-weather topics like barbecues, summer camp and more. It’s free to participate, and happy hour goes on all day, offering $1 off everything. Signups start at 9 pm the one Sunday a month the bee is held (usually the second Sunday, but check the Mootsy’s Spelling Bee Instagram and Facebook for future dates) and by about 10 pm the 10 contestants should be ready to tackle their stage fright and do some

DEREK HARRISON PHOTO

good ol’ fashioned spelling. Brasch’s personal lighting setup provides a colorful stage for the show, and Anderson has sound effects and music at his fingertips, making the bee feel like the lovechild of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? and a ’70s trivia game show. Those things in particular make the show fun and accessible, which is one of the main goals the two had in revamping the bee, Anderson says. “People are afraid of public speaking in general, let alone getting up and shaming them on their knowledge of vocabulary,” he says. “We’re just trying to make it more of a comedy show, make it fun again.” So the words are often super easy, offering more of a chance to make a quick joke than anything. Take the first round, “Grills gone wild,” when one woman is asked to spell “buns.” “Buns?” she asks, making sure she heard that right. “Buns! It’s a bread roll. Or a big ol’ fat ass,” O’Seanary quips. She spells it right and the round moves on as others are asked to spell “melons,” “sauce,” “condiment” and more. But even if a speller missed one of the fairly easy words, they aren’t eliminated right away. “I learned pretty early that it’s not fun to shut everyone down,” Anderson says. ...continued on next page

AUGUST 8, 2019 INLANDER 33


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JUDGING SESSION Pre-opening

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DOORS OPEN • Enjoy live music from THE POWERS BAND & drink beer from WALLACE BREWING

HOSTED BY TOM SHERRY

VOTING ENDS • RAFFLE SALES END

CULTURE | NIGHTLIFE “BIRDS AND THE B-E-E-S,” CONTINUED... Instead, words in the first round are worth one point, in the second are worth two, etc., with words typically getting harder by the third and fourth rounds. It’s worth emphasizing that the event is aimed at the late night crowd, and the list of words often reflects that, with body humor and sex making for easy punchlines. The July bee’s second round, “Camp: Pitch your tent,” features summer camp words moving from “counselor” and “s’mores” to the more risky “virginity,” “necking” and “fingering.” Round three, “Summer Lovin’: Messed up my ass,” is primarily a list of sexually transmitted infections and sex acts. It’s at this point that spellers start missing words. Someone misses one of the “I”s in syphilis, while others misspell chlamydia and gonorrhea. For the fourth and final round, “Hot Bods: Is your globe warming or are you just happy to see me?” the spellers take on heat-related terms like Fahrenheit, carcinoma and dermatologist.

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34 INLANDER AUGUST 8, 2019

DEREK HARRISON PHOTO

By the end, only the top three point-getters get to wager their points Final Jeopardy-style for the last word. It’s the only time spellers are allowed to write their answers down, and whoever spells it right and gets the most points, wins. “I always thought that was a problem with other bees, is the final spelling is just a back and forth, so it’s kind of fun to do that,” Anderson says. The final word for the three guys at the top of the point count tonight is “kumbaya.” All three spell it right, but in the end, Paul Conley wins by a single point. Afterward, he waits around to get a photo with Anderson in his O’Seanary getup. “I’ve done [the bee] the last four times and tonight felt great, it was awesome,” Conley says. “The fact they do this and it’s so engaging is awesome.” The key for Anderson is trying to get people to enjoy participating, but also in making a show that’s fun enough that people just want to come watch. “We can usually scrape up the 10 people max to play, but we want an audience, and we’ve found friends, like, avoiding it because they’re scared they’ll be forced to play,” he says. “We’re trying to get the word out it’s more of a comedy show and you don’t have to play!” It’s all about having fun, Anderson says. “It’s not always ‘syphilis’ and ‘fellatio,’ but it also is,” he says. “It’s fast and loose and not to be taken too seriously. So study your dictionaries and come on down.” n Mootsy’s Spelling Bee • Sun, Aug. 11, signups at 9 pm, show at 10 pm • Free • Mootsy’s • 406 W. Sprague • facebook.com/ mootsysspellingbee • 838-1570


CULTURE | DIGEST

Get Riffed

T FIXING PEE PROBLEMS The first big problem I faced in Oxygen Not Included, a charmingly rendered, impossibly hard spacebasebuilding game, was pee on the floor. (That’s what happens when you wait too long to unclog the outhouse.) So I had my little space-faring adventurers mop up the urine. But that left Culligan bottles of urine sitting around. How to get rid of a dozen bottles of pee? That took setting my dudes to research technology to build a supercomputer advanced enough to research the design to create a water filtration system, and then wiring it up to my coal-powered generator. But you couldn’t just dump the water into the filter — you needed to pipe it in. So that meant building an ad-hoc swimming pool to collect urine, sticking a water pump in the mess, piping up the pee to the filtration system. And that’s all! (DANIEL WALTERS)

BY QUINN WELSCH

he original crew of the Satellite of Love is still kickin’, and with age they’ve only gotten better. Don’t get me wrong. I’m happy Mystery Science Theater 3,000 got a reboot. But no one beats legendary movie riffers Mike Nelson, Kevin Murphy and Bill Corbett. As you may know, after MST3K ended, the original crew continued movie riffing with RiffTrax, and this summer they’ve come up with some real winners. Their next live show is The Giant Spider Invasion on Aug. 15, broadcast around the country. Below are a few of my favorites from the OG riffers: DEADLY PREY (1987) A suburban dude is kidnapped by a mercenary company in the dense jungles of the Los Angeles metro area (I know) so he can be used as bait for training. Unbeknownst to them, he’s a deadly former mercenary himself. Spokane fans will be pleased to know that the Lilac City gets a shoutout in this riff. What gets riffed: Oily pecs, inept villains, ’80s misogyny, “DANTON!!?!!” NORMAN GIVES A SPEECH (1989) The producers of this short film want you to know that life… well… life is just goddamn miserable for one man in particular. His name is Norman Krasner. Nothing goes

THE BUZZ BIN his way and everyone hates him, and rightly so. At least that’s the main point I took from this film. What gets riffed: The utter futility of mankind.

BACK TO BUNDYVILLE I’ll admit, I was surprised that Bundyville was getting a second season. But I was hooked after the first episode, and you’ll see why once you give it a listen. Former Inlander staffer Leah Sottile is back on the militia/anti-government/ patriot beat, this time following a bombing in a small Nevada town in 2016 that is seemingly connected to the Malheur standoff. At one point, Sottile questions a conspiratorial former militia leader in Utah about racial bias and the exchange is *Italian chef kiss* bellissimo! (QUINN WELSCH)

12 Yup, 2019 marks Terrain’s last year as a pre-teen, and the call for artists working in all genres for the juried annual Spokane art extravaganza is now live. Creative types, head on over to terrainspokane.com/terrain for the lowdown on getting your work in the Oct. 3-4 showcase. (DAN NAILEN)

REPLICA (2005) I almost feel bad laughing at this movie. This movie looks like it’s comprised entirely of cutscenes from a PlayStation game. There’s a lot of bad things about Replica, but the stiff, clumsy dialogue is the worst. What gets riffed: Valley girls, endless driving, obvious green screens.

THIS WEEK’S PLAYLIST Some noteworthy new music arrives online and in stores Aug. 9. To wit: SLIPKNOT, We Are Not Your Kind. Thanks, guys, I kind of knew that when I saw the scary masks. RA RA RIOT, Superbloom. New record label, same tasty indie-rock from these upstate New Yorkers. THE REGRETTES, How Do You Love? If their “I Dare You” single is any indication, this power-pop crew deserves your attention for their new one. (DAN NAILEN)

RETRO PUPPET MASTER (1999) Greg Sestero of The Room fame “stars” in this Puppet Master origin story. A sorcerer bequeaths his powers to a young puppeteer. Mummies try to kill him. He must rescue a damsel in distress. What gets riffed: Greg, “mummy magic.” FRANKENSTEIN ISLAND (1981) If you enjoy movies with multiple unrelated threads, nameless protagonists and zero plot, this is a movie for you. Hot-air balloonists crash land on an island populated by beautiful women. Also, Frankenstein is somehow involved? What gets riffed: Apparitions of John Carradine, brain jars, leopard bikinis. n RiffTrax: The Giant Spider Invasion • Thu, Aug. 15 and Tue, Aug. 20 at 8 pm • $12.50 • NorthTown Mall, Spokane, and Regal Riverstone, Coeur d’Alene •  fathomevents.com

STRANGE BUT TRUE Bizarre and grippingly true historical stories about the spies and scientists who sabotaged the Nazi atomic bomb make up Sam Kean’s The Bastard Brigade. The book’s principle actors include a Major League Baseball player-turned-American spy in Nazi-occupied Europe, scientists who published sensitive research leading to atomic weapons out of a commitment to free research, an American government without a civilian spy service because “gentlemen don’t read each other’s mail,” and a Kennedy dedicated to military glory at any cost, among others. Kean interweaves these stories into an exciting and complex narrative that combines the dread of the atomic bomb with the thrill of espionage. (JACKSON ELLIOTT)

AUGUST 8, 2019 INLANDER 35


CULTURE | PERFORMANCE ART

Laugh, Cry, Scream in Horror Everything is Terrible! brings its bizarre collection of nostalgia, psychedelia and comedy to Spokane BY QUINN WELSCH

A

lex McNeely is Coeur d’Alene’s most avid consumer of Jerry Maguire, the 1996 Tom Cruise film about a sports agent trying to make it big. In the last 10 years, McNeely’s collected more than 1,400 copies of the film and is the largest known Maguire collector in the country, and probably the world. But he has never actually seen Jerry Maguire. And at this point, he readily admits that it might be better if he doesn’t. Even if he wanted to watch this classic ’90s rom-com, McNeely would have to find a VCR. After all, every single copy he’s owned has been on VHS. And ultimately, McNeely doesn’t keep them. He donates them. All of the copies McNeely has acquired have gone toward a massive collection of more than 26,000 “Jerrys,” as they’re known. The goal: Build a giant pyramid of Jerry Maguire in the middle of the desert between Los Angeles and Las Vegas. I’m not making this up. This is the stated goal of Everything Is Terrible!, a media and performance group

36 INLANDER AUGUST 8, 2019

Guerilla video artists Everything Is Terrible! would love to take that VHS copy of Jerry Maguire off your hands. making its way to Spokane on Friday for a show at the Bartlett. You might wonder: What happens in 5,000 years, after humans have died off from the climate crisis, when an alien race lands on Earth and discovers this monument to excess? What anthropological questions will they ask themselves? What will they think of our civilization? Will they laugh? Cry? Eviscerate our remains and try to forget? I pose this conundrum to Dimitri Simakis, one of the evil geniuses behind the Jerry pyramid and a founder of Everything is Terrible! In essence, he says yes. That is the point of the pyramid. This sort of exhibition art might be the guiding philosophy/principle behind Everything is Terrible! (or EIT). For 10 years, they have been scouring the dustbins of American society, collecting forgotten or dead media from bargain bins and thrift stores — mostly VHS tapes from the ’80s and ’90s, such as So Your Cat Wants a Massage and My Yiddish Workout — and repurposing them into something… different. It’s easiest to describe EIT as “a media and performance group,” but that only skims the surface. They’re more similar to a modernist art experience, combining the spirit of dadaism with the insanity of 21st century internet culture. Simakis says the live show in Spokane will be “all new” material. Expect weird film clips, puppeteering, “beautiful costumes” and “literal song and dance,” culminating into a comedic and psychedelic experience.

S

imakis doesn’t like the term “so bad it’s good” when discussing the films EIT repurposes. You know, the type of music, film or art of such poor quality that its flaws make it entertaining. That’s kind of a shitty way to view other people’s work, he says. Instead, he offers a different take. “It’s not bad to begin with. It’s different,” he says. “It’s a certain type of folk art. It’s not professional, for sure. It doesn’t look legitimate, but that doesn’t mean it’s any less good, necessarily.” So while EIT’s edit of Ten Little Indians might fill you with a sense of angst and existential dread, it’s important

JIM NEWBERRY PHOTO

to remember that somebody, somewhere made this, and now you’re watching it. So enjoy. But Simakis says there’s another side to their films. Some are straight up dark. Enter The Great Satan (2018), one of EIT’s featurelength films, composed of news clips and Christian instructional films produced during the “Satanic panic.” It’s 75 minutes of incoherent religious zealotry, with occasional spikes of terror to keep things interesting. There’s no plot to speak of, but there are varying degrees of intensity. Some clips verge on borderline fascism, and those are the types of things Simakis says they want to expose. “We want you to laugh, but we want you to know that there’s a monster behind you at all times,” he says. For instance, “Do It Cuz Daddy Says So” is a children’s instructional singalong that quite literally instructs its audience to implicitly “trust” and “obey” authority figures for no other reason than “cuz Daddy says so.” “All of this media is propaganda in some way,” Simakis says. “‘Daddy will explain it if he has time. Respect authority. Do not question authority. Go to school. Go to work. Don’t talk.’ It’s amazing to see it that obvious.” The latest advancements in artificial intelligence and digital video editing have only expanded the potential for the nightmare realm of bizarre films. “It’s mind-blowing how endless this is. We don’t think there is an ending,” he says. The weird films keep pouring in. And so do the Jerrys. Jerry Maguire is beyond EIT, Simakis says. It’s not about being “anti-capitalist” or poking fun at consumerism. Now, it’s more about preserving the Jerrys for future generations and pushing the boundaries of art. “We couldn’t dream of something so unfunny at this point, but that’s precisely why it must continue,” Simakis says. “It comes back to experience and exhibition. Obviously, theres a level of stupidity. But it’s our lives and that’s what we want to do with it.” n Everything is Terrible! Live • Fri, Aug. 9 at 8 pm • $15 • All ages • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • thebartlettspokane.com • 747-2174


WE RAISED OVER $4 MILLION! (AND WEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE STILL COUNTING!)

Thanks to the generous support of our partners and the community, we raised over $4 million this past weekend to fight cancer in our region; bringing the total monies raised to $17 million since 2014.

Together, we are Community Cancer Fund. PR ES ENTING PAR T NER

ELIT E PAR T NERS

PLATINU M PAR T NERS

GOLD PAR T NER S

M A R KETING PAR T NERS

An E-Mail For Food Lovers

Subscribe at Inlander.com/newsletter AUGUST 8, 2019 INLANDER 37


FOOD TRUCKS

ON THE MOVE

Mad Moose Concession owner Nichole DeFrehn. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

The North Idaho mobile food scene continues to evolve, with plenty of new trucks, locations and ways of reaching customers BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

J

ust as food trucks have given Inland Northwest diners an even broader range of options, food truck owners, too, have many options to reach them as the industry continues to evolve. Some food trucks, like the 10-year-old, bright yellow Best Sandwich Shack in Coeur d’Alene, install themselves so as to appear permanent. The restaurant on wheels can always be found parked next to Best Avenue Food Court (510 E. Best Ave.). Some trucks have a symbiotic relationship with their mothership, like Meltz Extreme Grilled Cheese, which has both a brick-and-mortar in Coeur d’Alene (1735 W. Kathleen Ave.) and mobile operation that can reach diners outside that footprint. Others, like Meyer’s Gourmet Sandwiches, spend summers at numerous locations, many of which don’t serve food, like Up North Distillery and Slate Creek Brewing. Come this fall, however, both roving and semi-stationary North Idaho food trucks will have a new place to go. Prairie Pavilion is an efficiently designed food truck court on Coeur d’Alene’s north end that just might prompt other vendors to ask, “Should I stay or should I go?”

38 INLANDER AUGUST 8, 2019

Prairie Pavilion (7777 Heartland Dr.) features 39 parking spots, room for 13 food trucks and a covered, semi-enclosed eating area with rollup doors for warmer weather and a heater for winter. The park also offers necessary water, sewer and grease hookups, along with garbage and recycling, as well as a highly valued feature: a restroom. The restroom is one of the few features still underway before a soft opening later this month, co-owner Kym Nagel says. She and husband Nate teamed up with Jason and Laura Quast, who own the local Jitterz Espresso franchise (also getting a new drive-through at Prairie Pavilion), to open the new location. It will feature new and existing food trucks, some of which the Nagels became familiar with through their other business, Premier Auction House in Post Falls. “There are literally 10 housing developments around [here],” says Nagel, who hopes Prairie Pavilion can capitalize on increased traffic from housing and commercial businesses along Coeur d’Alene’s northwestern border with Hayden and Post Falls. Vendors scheduled to semi-permanently set up at the

pavilion include a mixture of veterans like Taco Works — Nagel notes that people refer to its longtime owner Omar Magdalena as “the godfather” — and newbies like Eat Fit, which offers vegan, vegetarian, keto and paleo meals. Also new: Big Daddy’s Treats’ Louisiana-style bread pudding and other sweets; Curry Shack’s Japanese curry and Casey’s Smoke Shack, which specializes in ribs, smoked tri-tip Philly cheesesteaks and the like. Rustic (309 E. Sherman Ave., Coeur d’Alene) and Messy’s Burgers (6285 Maine St., Spirit Lake), both of which have permanent locations, also plan to be represented at Prairie Pavilion with mobile units. Mad Moose Concession, meanwhile, is leaving the Best Avenue food court for the new site. At Best Avenue, Mad Moose Concession worked alongside fellow mobile kitchens Left Coast Fusion, Taco Works, RawDeadFish and Judi’s Joint, the latter of which is new-ish to Coeur d’Alene, relocating from Silver Valley. Mad Moose polled its customers, chef/owner Nicole DeFrehn says, and discovered that most hail from north of Coeur d’Alene’s city center, prompting her to relocate


FOOD | TO GO BOX the truck to better connect with its regulars. So why, in the first place, would a business owner pick a food truck over brick-and-mortar? “Initial investment, overall cost and keeping overhead down, and the ability to be mobile,” says DeFrehn, who’s been cooking since 2001. That means keeping the menu small and focused — try the truck’s eggs benedict with homemade buttermilk biscuits ($9.50) or the Mad Bundle ($5.75) of egg, sausage and cheese wrapped in fry bread and fried — which means a small inventory, too. While some trucks like the security of a dedicated spot, others tend to move around more, going where the people are, and especially to drinking establishments. Post Falls Brewing, for example, hosts several regular trucks, including D.A.T. Bella Moon’s BBQ, which serves up half-pound pulled pork sliders ($3), brisket, ribs and more every Monday. Junior’s BBQ sets up shop there on Tuesday, while Pi-Daho Artisan Pizza covers Wednesday through Sunday, serving its 10 to 14-inch pizzas ($9-$15) like the Moscow, with prosciutto, pineapple and fresh basil.

M

eanwhile, down south in Moscow, Grub Wandering Kitchen, aka “the Grub Truck,” is typically parked outside the Garden Lounge (313 S. Main St.), even though summer means around a 50 percent dropoff in foot traffic, owner John Fletcher says. Its macaroni and cheese ($6-$9), with options like truffles, habanero and fresh garlic, is the truck’s most popular dish, says Fletcher, who’s run the truck since 2013. Farther north in Sandpoint, food trucks are concentrated in several areas. Ohn’s Thai Plate is a longtime anchor at the small Oak Street Court (317 Oak St.), recently joined by La Catrina Cocina and newbie Green Go’s Fusion Food serving burritos and tacos with grass-fed beef and organic produce. Soul Picnic, which is near Evans Brothers Coffee (524 Church St.), has been serving up veggie-forward items like their southwest rice bowl ($9) since 2016. Sandpoint Curry, which used to be an order-andpickup place initially marketed as Curry in a Hurry, now splits time between a fledgling food truck court called 7Bistro (870B Kootenai Cutoff Rd.), which also houses Taco Tacos, and serving at area businesses, such as MickDuff’s Brewing. Newcomers to Sandpoint’s food truck scene include Heart Bowls, offering smoothies ($5-$9) and rice milk and banana “mylkshakes” ($5.50). Heart Bowls is currently parked outside of what’s expected to be an all-day café called the Longshot on South Boyer. Also new, Shilla - Korean BBQ with Seoul has taken the favored approach of going where the people are, teaming up with the uber-popular 219 Lounge (219 N. First Ave.) to offer things like potstickers ($7/five) and skewers of chicken, ribs or pork belly ($6/two). “Shilla provides our customers and others with a unique dining experience for lunch and late night dining,” 219 owner Melvin Dick says. “It is a win-win for both parties. We have a great location with a lot of events and music going on, which attract crowds.” Finally, for those wondering why we’re just now mentioning food trucks that have been around for a few years, the biggest reason is their inherent mobile nature. Sometimes we have them on our radar only to discover they’ve moved to focus on serving a new area, like Sandpoint’s Twisted Kilt Black Iron Grill, which posts its location on social media and serves sweet and savory cornbread waffles. Or we just haven’t heard about them yet, like I Don’t Care Asian Food Truck (7352 N. Government Way, Coeur d’Alene), as well as a potential handful of others we’ll have to catch up on in the next food truck roundup. n food@inlander.com

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VEGAN FRIENDLY LUNCH DINNER & LATE NIGHT FOOD DAILY

Plus, Stella’s Cafe plans to reopen this week

I

n the latest issue of Wine Spectator magazine, which includes its annual Restaurant Awards, a handful of restaurants in the Inland Northwest were named some of the best in the world for their extensive and high-quality wine selections. The five Spokane-area restaurants honored are Churchill’s Steakhouse, Masselow’s Steakhouse, Max at Mirabeau, Palm Court Grill and Table 13. The 2019 awards mark the first inclusion on the prestigious list both for Max at Mirabeau in Spokane Valley and Palm Court Grill inside the Historic Davenport Hotel in downtown Spokane. Max at Mirabeau received the Best of Award of Excellence, a tier above the Award of Excellence, which was presented to Churchill’s, Masselow’s, Palm Court Grill and Table 13. All five local restaurants join 3,800 other locations across the U.S. and the globe being recognized for having worldclass wine lists. Find all the winners at restaurants.winespectator.com/search. (CHEY SCOTT)

Stella’s tofu banh mi.

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THE RETURN OF STELLA’S

Beloved local sandwich shop Stella’s Cafe is slated to reopen at its new downtown home inside the Saranac Commons by the end of this week, says chef-owner Tony Brown. He tells the Inlander that the targeted reopening is Thursday, Aug. 8, while also cautioning on a Facebook post that lingering permit and equipment details could push it to Friday. Stella’s, which merged its lunchtime sandwich lineup with sister restaurant Ruins in early 2017 after its West Broadway home’s lease ended, is moving into the large counter space previously occupied by Biscuit Wizard, which closed in late June. Until its reopening, Stella’s sandwich offerings remain available at Ruins during lunchtime. (CHEY SCOTT) n

AUGUST 8, 2019 INLANDER 39


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Breaking New Trails Whiskey Barrel Cider Co. relocates from Pullman into a new Liberty Lake facility and rebrands under Trailbreaker Cider name BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

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hen life gives you the proverbial lemons, make cider. That’s what Whiskey Barrel Cider Co. owners Trent Maier and Brian Augdahl did three years ago when they discovered they’d have to vacate their production facility in the Pullman-Moscow Regional Airport due to a planned expansion. In 2016, they closed the tasting room, revamped their business plan, and shopped for a new location. Last month, they relaunched as Trailbreaker Cider in Liberty Lake. The former Whiskey Barrel name, explains Maier, didn’t apply to all the cidery’s products, only one of which is currently barrel-aged. The relocation became an opportunity to rebrand and to re-emphasize the fresh-pressed juices that distinguish their ciders. At its simplest, cider is juice resulting from mashed, strained apples, which becomes hard cider through fermentation. Everything else is extra: sugar or juice to increase alcohol content, additional flavors, carbonation and preservatives to increase shelf life. Trailbreaker sources apples directly from regional growers, giving it a more consistent product and more control in creating flavors and styles, thus requiring less post-fermentation additives. “The juice is what it’s all about,” says Maier, who started the company with brother-in-law Augdahl in 2012. The duo work directly with growers throughout Washington, including a Washington State University-run orchard that was also impacted by the airport expansion, Maier says. “We’re one of the few facilities that goes from apple to juice,” he says. First, they make the hard cider — Maier has

Trailbreaker Cider is now open and pouring in Liberty Lake. several basic cider recipes — then blend it with fresh-pressed juices and other ingredients to create ciders varying in alcohol percentage and taste. Trailbreaker’s aptly named Dry and Crisp, for example, is 5.8 percent alcohol-by-volume , while the signature Whiskey Barrel is tawnier, with a weighty 7 percent ABV. The Cucumber Mint, meanwhile is surprisingly refreshing. If Maier’s approach sounds like a winemaker’s, it’s on purpose. Intrigued by cider making, the Michigan native attended culinary school in Seattle, learning about cooking, running a kitchen and winemaking. Unlike winemaking, however, which often involves sulphites as a preservative, Trailbreaker doesn’t add preservatives. Instead, a sterile fermentation process stabilizes the product, allowing it to last one to two weeks in a growler until opened, Maier explains. In addition to the 14 ciders on tap ($4-$6/ pint), Trailbreaker serves two juices, one called “Sappy Fresh,” and a blend. Tasting flights served on live-edge wooden trays to match the space’s focal bar accommodate five 4-ounce samples. A standard flight is one juice and four ciders ($8); for $2 more, swap the nonalcoholic juice for a fifth cider. Trailbreaker’s food menu is modest: assorted dogs and sausages from bratwurst to linguica ($6-$11), a soft pretzel with cheese ($4), a grilled peanut butter and jelly and grilled cheese ($4 each). On Thursdays, try the rib special ($13). Seating is abundant in the newly built, 10,000-square-foot facility, both on a patio and indoors in diner-like booths or high-tops on the main floor, where roll-up garage doors bring the outside in. The second floor affords views of the production facility, including an array of crated apples, from bright green to pinkish-red. “If you see it in the grocery store in the Northwest, chances are we use it,” says Maier, who’s already working on plans to expand the cidery’s barrel-aged offering under the Whiskey Barrel brand. With an increased capacity over their old facility — about 80 barrels or 2,500 gallons every two weeks — Maier figures the cidery can produce enough to distribute throughout the Northwest and fulfill orders in-house. And they’re doing all of this, he adds, with regionally sourced apples that otherwise would be rejected by supermarkets. “We make ugly apples taste good.” n Trailbreaker Cider • 2204 N. Madison St., Liberty Lake • Open Sun-Thu 11 am-9 pm, Fri-Sat 11 am-10 pm • trailbreakercider.com • 279-2159

AUGUST 8, 2019 INLANDER 41


To Live and Lie A bittersweet portrait of death and cultural divide, The Farewell is one of the best films of the year BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

T

he Farewell is, according to an opening title card, “based on an actual lie,” and yet it is a film that contains so much truth. Writer-director Lulu Wang has taken real experiences and spun them into a movie that celebrates the breadth of life through the inevitability of death. That might sound corny, but this film most certainly isn’t. Wang’s likeness in the film is a young, unmoored woman named Billi (Awkwafina), a Chinese-born American just barely scraping by in New York City. While she’s doing laundry at her parents’ house — one of those well-observed, lived-in touches about regular life that the movie gets right — she discovers that her beloved grandmother, who she calls Nai Nai, has been diagnosed with terminal lung cancer. She likely won’t be around in three months.

THE FAREWELL

Rated PG Directed by Lulu Wang Starring Awkwafina, Zhao Shuzhen, Tzi Ma, Diana Lin

42 INLANDER AUGUST 8, 2019

But Nai Nai (Zhao Shuzhen) doesn’t know she’s dying. The family has decided to keep her prognosis a secret from her, telling her those dark spots on the X-rays are merely “benign shadows.” In order to gather her relatives in the city of Changchun to furtively say their goodbyes, they stage a fake, elaborate wedding banquet for one of the family’s cousins, whose Japanese girlfriend is now implicated in the scheme. Billi is horrified by the whole thing. It’s well-meaning deception, but it’s deception nonetheless. And what if Nai Nai has matters she wants settled before she dies? Nothing to fret about, she’s told: Nai Nai doesn’t have anything like that. Billi’s parents (Tzi Ma and Diana Lin) don’t want her to come to China, afraid she’ll be unable to hide her true emotions, but Billi puts a plane ticket on her credit card and flies to Changchun without any

advance notice. I suppose this set-up could have easily inspired some kind of wacky farce, or a somber meditation on the performative nature of preparing for death. The Farewell is neither of those things. This very real story, which Wang previously recounted in a 2016 segment on This American Life, contains scenes of tenderness and of bitterness, and as many moments of broad comedy as quiet wit. This tone is best exemplified in the climactic faux-wedding banquet, when all that repressed emotion finally bursts under pressure, as the evening swings from celebration to eulogy and back again. Wang is a fine observer of the small details of these peoples’ lives, like Nai Nai’s companion, who can barely hear and shuffles through their tiny apartment with his head down. Or the uncle who swears by the sketchy experimental medication he bought online, and the hotel concierge who gleefully interrogates Billi about all the customs of the United States. And Nai Nai’s fretting about the menu for the party, and the tense discussion between the family’s American expats and the Chinese nationalists. The script explores those cultural differences in deft, canny ways, particularly in its treatment of the grand display that is death in Chinese culture. In one of the film’s best, funniest and most poignant scenes, Nai Nai leads her family to the grave of her husband, where they leave offerings of food, flowers and trinkets. As Billi’s father lights a cigarette and leaves it for the dead man, Nai Nai protests: “He quit smoking!” she exclaims. These moments all feel like they were pulled straight from Wang’s experience; she even has some members of her own family playing fictionalized versions of themselves. The standout performance here is Zhao Shuzhen, who has appeared in Chinese TV series throughout her career but is making her film debut here. It’s a remarkable performance, the key to the whole film, a matriarch who is blunt and no-nonsense and yet capable of tremendous warmth. And Awkwafina, who broke out last year as comic relief sidekicks in Ocean’s 8 and Crazy Rich Asians, is finally put front and center in a film, and she announces herself as a magnetic and subtle dramatic actor. The Farewell walks such a delicate balance between humor and melancholy, and in that sense it is much like its characters, trying so hard to appear cheerful in the face of impending death. This is a sad movie and a charming movie. It’s life-affirming and reflective. It doesn’t take cheap emotional shots, or wallow in exploitative manipulation, and you will leave the theater with just a little more faith in humanity. n


FILM | SHORTS

The Kitchen

OPENING FILMS THE ART OF RACING IN THE RAIN

Based on Garth Stein’s bestseller, a fable about the loves and losses of a Formula 1 driver told from the POV of his faithful golden retriever. (NW) Rated PG

THE BRAVEST

In this harrowing Chinese drama, a group of firefighters tries to extinguish an inferno caused by an oil pipeline explosion. (NW) Rated PG-13

BRIAN BANKS

The true story of a rising college football star falsely accused of rape, and the attorney who aimed to clear his name. (NW) Rated PG-13

DORA AND THE LOST CITY OF GOLD

Dora the Explorer finally gets her own live-action movie, a youngster-friendly Indiana Jones swashbuckler that’s unfortunately undone by clunky writing and juvenile humor. (MJ) Rated PG

ECCO

A trained assassin who long ago ran

away from the profession returns to the fray when his former employers threaten his estranged family. (NW) Rated R

THE KITCHEN

In 1970s New York, three women (Melissa McCarthy, Tiffany Haddish, Elisabeth Moss) band together to finish the business left behind when their mobster husbands went to jail. (NW) Rated R

SCARY STORIES TO TELL IN THE DARK

Alvin Schwartz’s childhood-scarring horror anthologies are adapted for the big screen, with a new generation of teens discovering a cursed book that unleashes all kinds of terrors. (NW) Rated PG-13

THEM THAT FOLLOW

The daughter of a dangerously strict Pentacostal pastor looks to escape her isolated Appalachian church, which specializes in snake handling. Walton Goggins, Olivia Colman and Kaitlyn Dever star. (NW) Rated R

AUGUST 8, 2019 INLANDER 43


MOVIE TIMES

TER GIC LAN N THEATER MA FRI, AUG 9TH – THU, AUG 15TH TICKETS: $9 THE FAREWELL (98 MIN)

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FRI/SAT: 8:30 SUN-THU: 6:35

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WILD ROSE (101 MIN)

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ECHO IN THE CANYON (82 MIN) FRI-THU: 3:10

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FILM | SHORTS

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NEW YORK TIMES

VARIETY

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(LOS ANGELES)

(OUT OF 100)

THE FAREWELL

90

HOBBS & SHAW

60

THE LION KING

57

MARIANNE & LEONARD

69

ONCE UPON A TIME… IN HOLLYWOOD

85

SPIDER-MAN: FAR FROM HOME

69

WILD ROSE

80

DON’T MISS IT

WORTH $10

WATCH IT AT HOME

SKIP IT

NOW PLAYING ALADDIN

A bland, stiffly staged live-action retelling of the animated Disney classic about a petty thief who woos a princess with the help of a wisecracking genie. A whole new world this is not. (MJ) Rated PG

THE BIGGEST LITTLE FARM

Documentarian John Chester films himself and his wife Molly as they trade in their urban L.A. life for a full-service, 200-acre farm. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated PG

ECHO IN THE CANYON

Part documentary and part concert film, this is an entertaining tribute to the innovations and continuing influence of the L.A. rock scene of the mid’60s. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated PG-13

THE FAREWELL

A Chinese family follows tradition and hides their matriarch’s terminal cancer diagnosis from her, arranging a fake wedding banquet to say their goodbyes. Lulu Wang’s autobiographical film beautifully walks the line between humor and melancholy. (NW) Rated PG

Morihiko Nakahara, Conductor

FAST & FURIOUS PRESENTS: HOBBS & SHAW

Former foes Jason Statham and Dwayne Johnson go the mismatched buddy-comedy route, begrudgingly teaming up to fight super-soldier Idris Elba. A mostly forgettable Fast & Furious franchise spinoff. (NW) Rated PG-13

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JOHN WICK: CHAPTER 3 — PARABELLUM

Keanu Reeves’ stoic assassin is back for more ultraviolence, and this time he has a bounty on his head. Frustratingly frontloaded and too long, but it works as a showcase for lithe action choreography. (NW) Rated R

THE LION KING

Sure, it’s nowhere near as good as the original, but this CGI remake of Disney’s 1994 classic is nonetheless an entertaining, visually sumptuous jungle adventure. The stories and songs remain foolproof — hakuna matata, indeed. (SS) Rated PG

MARIANNE & LEONARD: WORDS OF LOVE

A documentary chronicle of the complicated romance between Leonard Cohen and Marianne Ihlen, which inspired some of the musician’s most famous songs. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated R

ONCE UPON A TIME… IN HOLLYWOOD

Quentin Tarantino’s ode to 1969 L.A. finds a washed-up TV star, his longtime stunt double and Sharon Tate crossing paths in unexpected ways. Rambling, elegiac, uneven and occasionally brilliant. (NW) Rated R

PAVAROTTI

Director Ron Howard’s latest music documentary focuses on legendary tenor Luciano Pavarotti, who helped bring opera to the mainstream. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated PG-13

SPIDER-MAN: FAR FROM HOME

Even on a trip to Europe, Peter Parker can’t dodge his superhero duties, donning his Spidey suit to fight off evil humanoids known as Elementals. A sharp and funny continuation of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. (SS) Rated PG-13

TOY STORY 4

Pixar’s most beloved franchise returns to assault your tear ducts. Having been given to a new owner, Woody and Buzz Lightyear have some familiar fun-filled adventures while also ruminating about the existential angst of being a toy. (MJ) Rated G

WILD ROSE

A charming ode to country music, with a breakthrough performance by Jessie Buckley as a Glasgow woman trying to piece her life together and become a honky-tonk star. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated R

YESTERDAY

A promising concept — a struggling musician discovers he’s the only person on Earth who remembers the Beatles, and cashes in — can’t overcome sluggish execution. Don’t overthink this one. (MJ) Rated PG-13 n


FILM | REVIEW

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Shouting at the screen won’t enliven the well-meaning but dull Dora and the Lost City of Gold.

Lost City of Zzzz

The Dora the Explorer movie is a potentially fun kid’s adventure pitched to the lowest common denominator BY MARYANN JOHANSON

I

knew nothing about Dora and the Lost City of being herself. Gold before I went into it except that it’s a There would seem to be almost no reason live-action adaptation of a kiddie cartoon I’d at all for this detour, except for Dora to collect a never seen — because it wasn’t created until I was coterie of city-kid hangers-on, whom neither she already long into adulthood, because I have no nor the story needs. The overly convoluted plot children of my own, and because it was never takes her back to the jungle to rescue her explorone of those grownup-skewing toons that might er parents (the splendid pair of Michael Peña and have exerted some pull on me anyway. I loved Eva Longoria) from treasure-hunter kidnappers that it was an educational show centering on a also bent on finding the fabled lost Incan city her smart Latina girl, of course, and I loved that all parents are seeking. Dora — and the story — is kids seemed to love it, particularly when the b.s. weighted down by queen bee Sammy (Madeleine conventional wisdom is that boys are Madden) and doofus not interested in stories about girls. But loser Randy (Nicholas DORA AND I was never going to be in its perceived Coombe), inexplicably THE LOST CITY OF GOLD audience. along for the ride. As a foil Rated PG But I would have been enormously for spunky Dora, her cousDirected by James Bobin more disappointed if I’d had more inforStarring Isabela Moner, Eva Longoria, in Diego (Jeff Wahlberg) mation in advance. Lost City is directed by Michael Peña, Eugenia Derbez would have sufficed. Why James Bobin, who directed the marvelnot just have him come for ous retro kiddie reboots The Muppets and Muppets a jungle visit before he and Dora get swept up Most Wanted. It’s co-written by Muppets rebooter in intrigue and adventure? I fear the presence of Nicholas Stoller. If I’d known that this Dora was Sammy and Randy is merely to offer some chaste from these guys, my hopes would have been very adolescent romantic potential for Dora and high, indeed. And consequently, I’d have been Diego, as if that’s essential in such a tale. much more disappointed than I ended up being, But once Lost City settles into itself, it has because my expectations would have been a lot little interest in appealing to anyone beyond its higher. grade-school audience. Fart jokes and kiddie-style Raiders of the Lost Ark lite for kids? That’s slapstick are the “highlights” of the “humor,” what Lost City is, mostly, and there’s nothing and weird editing and lazy continuity abound, wrong with that. What’s wrong is that it takes a the sort of stuff that drives a grownup viewer to solid 35 minutes to figure out what kind of movie distraction, though kids may not notice, or care. it is going to be. Before it settles on Indiana Jones The Indiana Jones stuff ends up feeling actively action drama, the movie indulges a long, pointderivative; I think one vital music cue is actually less detour with the now teenaged Dora (Isabela lifted intact from Raiders of the Lost Ark. Moner) as she is exiled from her South American I was 11 years old — pretty much smack jungle home — and her homeschooled lifestyle in the range of Dora’s target audience — when — and forced to attend public high school in Los Raiders was first released, and it captured my Angeles, where she does not fit in, what with her imagination just fine. Lost City could have been buoyant enthusiasm for the natural world, her a lot sharper and a lot smarter and still captured irrepressible cheeriness and her dedication to kiddie imaginations perfectly well. n

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AUGUST 8, 2019 INLANDER 45


46 INLANDER AUGUST 8, 2019


Q&A

Rock for a Cause Steve Gleason reflects on the history of Gleason Fest, recent advancements in ALS research, and the bands he’d most love to book BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

S

teve Gleason doesn’t need much of an introduction these days. The Spokane native and former NFL star was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, in 2011, and has since become a tireless advocate for those living with the disease. Amongst the charities that Gleason has founded is his very own music festival/fundraiser, appropriately called Gleason Fest, which brings a lineup of well-known regional bands — including Portland’s the Dandy Warhols and Seattle’s the Grizzled Mighty — to Riverfront Park this weekend. Gleason spoke to the Inlander via email in the week leading up to his namesake festival, reflecting on the history of the event, some recent advancements in ALS research, and what this year’s music lineup

means to him. Responses have been edited for clarity. INLANDER: In what significant ways has Gleason Fest evolved since 2012, and what separates it from other music festivals? GLEASON: What started as a small grassroots event, thrown together eight years ago by my brother Kyle and some friends, has grown a lot. We have changed locations twice since the inception of Gleason Fest, as our growth has demanded a larger space. What I love about Gleason Fest is that the community support has been astonishing — not just in attendance, but from our local sponsors, as well. We couldn’t do any of this without their un...continued on next page

Steve Gleason at Gleason Fest in 2016. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

AUGUST 8, 2019 INLANDER 47


MUSIC | FESTIVAL

Health

“ROCK FOR A CAUSE,” CONTINUED... wavering support. I feel that what sets the festival apart is that we’re bringing this region together to have a great time, but we’re also really showcasing the fight that is central to Team Gleason’s mission. Gleason Fest has always been about community. I love that my family and I get to attend this event every year, coming back to the Pacific Northwest, catching up with old and new friends and enjoying some great music.

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August/September edition on Inlander stands now

Since the festival began, have there been any advancements in ALS research that mean the most to you? ALS research has begun to more rapidly advance. One of those advancements is an effort Team Gleason helped start: Answer ALS. It’s the single largest coordinated and collaborative ALS research project in history. The goal is to gather an enormous amount of samples and data from 1,000 people living with the disease to discern what specific type of ALS each has. In doing so, researchers can then better develop personalized treatments versus failed attempts to treat all ALS as one disease. Everything Team Gleason does focuses on helping and empowering people living with ALS to continue with their purpose. Our most recent accomplishment, Independence Drive, allows people to drive their power wheelchairs with their eyes. For me, this technology has been incredibly liberating. It’s almost ridiculous to think that there were simply zero options for people like me to drive wheelchairs, and starting this year, we will help deploy this

powerful program to anyone who needs it. What kind of personal connections do you have with the bands performing at Gleason Fest this year? I’ve always loved the Dandy Warhols, and I think they embody the indie-rock genre that seems to fit so nicely with the character of Gleason Fest. I’m stoked that they’re this year’s headliner. In terms of personal connection, I went to high school with the guys in Delbert. I was a few years younger, and they lived in my hood in North Spokane. So growing up, long before Delbert was a band, I looked up to those guys. Then in college, the golden years of Delbert, they would play at our fraternity. I really love those guys. They’re so happy and creative, and their music plasters the walls of my memories. Is there a particular artist that you’d most love to have play the festival? Do you mean besides Pearl Jam, Queen and Led Zeppelin?! I’m really, really into Manchester Orchestra right now, so I’d love to see them play. Either way, we intend to keep things fresh, meaningful and fun for years to come. See you Saturday, Spokane! n Gleason Fest with the Dandy Warhols, the Grizzled Mighty, Delbert and Left Hand Smoke • Sat, Aug. 10 at 3 pm • $30 • All ages • Lilac Bowl Amphitheatre in Riverfront Park • 507 N. Howard • gleasonfest.org

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ART

Join us in the magical land of Corn Pasta. Daughters to the slaughter: The Iron Maidens are one of the best all-female rock tribute acts out there.

Imitation as Flat-her-y The upcoming visit from the Iron Maidens got us pondering gender-swapped cover bands BY SETH SOMMERFELD

T

here’s simply no denying that rock music has been a primarily male-dominated endeavor. While most of the best rock music these days comes from women, for most of the genre’s history they’ve been scoffed at, pushed aside and ignored by the dudes with power. This being the case, one longtime outlet for women who want to rock has been genderswapped cover bands. If the guys aren’t going to take you seriously as musicians with your own music, they’ll have a much tougher time dismissing you while you’re acing the tunes from one of their favorite male-fronted bands. And among all-female tribute bands, the Iron Maidens stand out as one of the undisputed top acts. Sure, there are other all-femme outfits that have tackled the English heavy metal of Iron Maiden (Iron Madame, Diamond Beast and Women in Iron Form, to be specific), but since 2001 the Los Angeles-based Maidens have stood out due to the quartet’s virtuosity and an army of fans (garnering over 1.2 million Facebook likes, which is insane). Heck, they’ve even opened for KISS. Not Priss or Black Diamond or another tribute act — actual KISS. A massive portion of the gender-swapped cover band movement roots itself in heavy metal, with classic rock tailing close behind. It shouldn’t come as a shock that the rock subsets most outwardly drunk on the testosterone-fueled machismo would be the most fun for the ladies to ape. The leader in the clubhouse when it comes to the most gender-swapped band? AC/DC. Holy hell, have there been a lot of all-female AC/ DC tribute acts: AC/DSHE, BACK:N:BLACK, Hell’s Belles, Hells Bells (not a typo, those are different bands), ThundHERstruck, Her Way to Hell. And there are many more. But there’s

plenty more metal women shredding where that came from. Just a cursory sample: Metallica (Misstallica), Black Sabbath (Mistress of Reality), Van Halen (She-Ruption), Alice Cooper (Malice Cooper), Judas Priest (Judith Priest) and even Spinal Tap (Tap This). There’s no shortage of women who have laid down classic rock licks, either. The list is long: Led Zeppelin (Hammer of the Broads), Queen (the Killer Queens), Cheap Trick (Cheap Chick), David Bowie (Ziggy Starlet and the Spiders from Venus), the Beatles (the She-tles), Jimi Hendrix (Foxy Lady). With all that said, there are so many genderswapped musical acts that don’t exist but should. For the sake of this article, we made a fantasy list of tribute bands that we wish were out there and rocking. Rancid — Ruby Soho. This is honestly my No. 1 draft pick of gender-swapped cover bands that need to exist. The thought of some badass women throat scratching their way through the punk band’s equally gritty and catchy anthems warms my heart. Jay-Z — Jay-She. First off, why aren’t there hip-hop tribute acts? Rock should not have a monopoly on this. Step it up, y’all. Secondly, I fully endorse Jay-She tweaking it to, “You got 99 problems, and this bitch is one.” Beyoncé — BeyoncThey. I’m just looking for an excuse to get the power of the Beyhive to support trans rights with the same passion they attack someone who says anything negative about Beyoncé online. Miley Cyrus — Guyly Cyrus. Anyone who’s seen me do “Wrecking Ball” at karaoke knows that I have dibs on this. Beastie Boys — Beastie Girls. As the opening line of “Intergalactic” fittingly states, “Well, now don’t you tell me to smile…” Japandroids — The Girls Are Leaving Town. Much like Ruby Soho, there’s no joke here. This band would just slay. Weezer — Sheezer. So it turns out this one already existed in Toronto circa 2011-15. But they broke up. SAY IT AIN’T SO-OO-OH-OO-OH! Saves the Day — Saves the They. Being emo is a choice; gender is a construct. Billie Eilish — Billy Eilish. More literally the bad guy. The Barenaked Ladies — The Barenaked Laddies. How long has it been since an awful pun? Well… hmmm. It’s been… n

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The Iron Maidens with Dogtown and Elephant Gun Riot • Fri, Aug. 9 at 8 pm • $15 • All ages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • sp.knittingfactory.com • 244-3279

AUGUST 8, 2019 INLANDER 49


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

SINGER-SONGWRITER SHAWN MULLINS

Y

ou’re probably most familiar with Shawn Mullins through his 1998 single “Lullaby,” the ballad of a faded Hollywood socialite that’s still playing on adult contemporary stations today. But Mullins is more than just his biggest hit. He was active before and has been since “Lullaby,” with socially conscious folk ruminations, bluesy jams and soulful country songs. If you see him live this weekend, you’ll hear his signature style — that gravelly, Tom Waits-esque speak-singing that soars into something more melodic — as well as that 20-year-old single that made him famous. — NATHAN WEINBENDER Shawn Mullins with Tonya Ballman • Sun, Aug. 11 at 8 pm • $28 advance, $30 day of • All ages • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • thebartlettspokane.com • 747-2174

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 08/8

219 LOUNGE, Szlachetka A&P’S BAR AND GRILL, Open Mic ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, One Street Over J J THE BARTLETT, Flynt Flossy and Turquoise Jeep BEEROCRACY, Herky Cutler BERSERK, Vinyl Meltdown BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn THE BIG DOG BAR & GRILL, DJ Dave BOLO’S, Inland Empire Blues Society Monthly Blues Boogie BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, Pamela Jean J BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE, The Song Project BRIDGE PRESS CELLARS, Open Mic J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Open Jazz Jam with Erik Bowen COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, John D. Hale J COEUR D’ALENE PARK, Sean Owsley and the Blue Mustangs CRUISERS, Open Jam Night THE CULINARY STONE, Wyatt Wood FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Country Dance THE GILDED UNICORN, Dylan Hathaway J HOUSE OF SOUL, Jazz Thursdays HUMBLE ABODE BREWING, Nick Grow JOHN’S ALLEY, El Dub J LAGUNA CAFÉ, Just Plain Darin LION’S LAIR, Karaoke with Donny Duck LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, Funk Soul and Hip Hop w/ DJ Exodus MOOSE LOUNGE, Last Chance Band NASHVILLE NORTH, Morgan Evans O’SHAYS, O’Pen Mic J PACIFIC PIZZA, Bad Motivator, Weep Wave, Skelf J THE PIN, Misfit Hour J RED DRAGON CHINESE, Tommy G RED ROOM LOUNGE, Coffin, SoSleepyy

50 INLANDER AUGUST 8, 2019

POP LAUREN DAIGLE

L

auren Daigle had the kind of 2018 that most Christian artists can only dream about. In addition to releasing her first album in three years, her single “You Say” set the record for a solo artist to reach No. 1 on the Christian Songs chart, sticking there for 35 weeks and taking the record from Carrie Underwood. Six months later, the song made its way to mainstream pop radio, where it enjoyed a second life, reaching the Top 40 of the Billboard Hot 100 pop charts and helping Daigle find a whole new, larger audience. — DAN NAILEN Lauren Daigle • Mon, Aug. 12 at 7:30 pm • $27.50-$77.50 • All ages • First Interstate Center for the Arts • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • inbpac.com • 279-7000 RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos RIVERSTONE PARK, Nu Jack City J STELLA’S ON THE HILL, Aaron Birdsall TAPP’D OFF, Karaoke on the Patio TRINITY AT CITY BEACH, Bright Moments Jazz J J WAR MEMORIAL FIELD, Lake Street Dive with Darlingside ZOLA, Blake Braley Band

Friday, 08/9

219 LOUNGE, Miah Kohal Band A&P’S BAR AND GRILL, DJ Skwish J AVISTA STADIUM, Into the Drift BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn THE BIG DOG BAR & GRILL, DJ Dave BIGFOOT PUB, Tracer BOLO’S, Chris Rieser and the Nerve BOOMBOX PIZZA, Karaoke BRIDGE PRESS CELLARS, Robin Barrett & Coyote Kings with Tiphony Dames J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, The Lack Family CHINOOK STEAK, PASTA AND SPIRITS (CDA CASINO), Wyatt Wood

COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Warrant & Firehouse; John D. Hale (Red Tail Bar & Grill) THE COEUR D’ALENE RESORT, Bands on Boats: Shane Clouse & Stompin’ Ground CORBY’S BAR, Karaoke CRUISERS, Karaoke with Gary CURLEY’S, The Happiness FORTY-ONE SOUTH, Truck Mills J J GORGE AMPHITHEATER, Mumford & Sons, Portugal. The Man THE HIVE, JoJo Herman IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY, Marty Perron and Doug Bond IRON GOAT BREWING, Meat Sweats IRON HORSE (CDA), Pastiche JOHN’S ALLEY, Szlachetka J J KNITTING FACTORY, The Iron Maidens (see page 49), Dogtown, Elephant Gun Riot J LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, James McMurtry MARYHILL WINERY, Nick Grow MAX AT MIRABEAU, Mojo Box (inside); Tuck Foster & The Tumbling Dice (outdoors)

MOOSE LOUNGE, Mad Love NASHVILLE NORTH, Ladies Night with Luke Jaxon and DJ Tom NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), Superchrome J PARK BENCH CAFE, Just Plain Darin PATIT CREEK CELLARS, Ken Davis J THE PIN, Sunny Sweeney RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos THE ROXIE, Karaoke with Tom STORMIN’ NORMAN’S, DJ Danger TERRAIN, Kelli Schaefer J J WAR MEMORIAL FIELD, The Avett Brothers with Che Apalche J J WATERFRONT PARK, Blue Waters Bluegrass Festival ZOLA, Night Shift

Saturday, 08/10

219 LOUNGE, BareGrass; Mudslide Charlie A&P’S BAR AND GRILL, DJ Exodus J J THE BARTLETT, Bad Motivator, BaLonely BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BIGFOOT PUB, Tracer

BOLO’S, Chris Rieser and the Nerve BROTHERS BAR, OverTime, The Blue Collar Soldiers J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Darrell Brann CHINOOK STEAK, PASTA AND SPIRITS (CDA CASINO), Wyatt Wood COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, John D. Hale CURLEY’S, The Happiness DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Pipers Rush: A Tribute to Rush DAVENPORT GRAND, Nick Grow EICHARDT’S, Mobius Riff FREDNECK’S, Just Plain Darin GARLAND PUB & GRILL, Into the Drift J J GORGE AMPHITHEATER, The Avett Brothers J HARVEST HOUSE, Just Plain Darin; Christy Lee & Luke Yates THE HIVE, Scott Pemberton Band J HUCKLEBERRY’S NATURAL MARKET, Aaron Birdsall HUMBLE BURGER, Kelli Schaefer, Willy Jay Tracy, okay okay IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY, John Firshi IRON HORSE (CDA), Pastiche


THE JACKSON ST., Karaoke LAUGHING DOG BREWING, Dave DeVeau J THE LOCAL DELI, Ally Burke LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, TAPESTRY: An Evening of Synthesis; Super Sparkle MARYHILL WINERY, Dylan Hathaway MAX AT MIRABEAU, Mojo Box MIX PARK, Stagecoach West MOOSE LOUNGE, Mad Love NASHVILLE NORTH, Ladies Night with Luke Jaxon and DJ Tom OFF REGAL LOUNGE, Tommy G RED ROOM LOUNGE, The Marshall Law Band REPUBLIC BREWING CO., The Pine Hearts RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos RIVER ROCK TAPHOUSE, Katie Fisher J J RIVERFRONT PARK, Gleason Fest feat. the Dandy Warhols, the Grizzled Mighty, Delbert and Left Hand Smoke (see page 47) THE ROXIE, Stevie Stone STORMIN’ NORMAN’S, Smash Hit Carnival J J WAR MEMORIAL FIELD, Kool and the Gang with Leroy Bell and His Only Friends

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J J WATERFRONT PARK, Blue Waters Bluegrass Festival ZOLA, Night Shift

Sunday, 08/11

219 LOUNGE, Bridges Home ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Rhythm Dawgs J J THE BARTLETT, Shawn Mullins (see facing page), Tonya Ballman J BIG BARN BREWING CO., Gil Rivas CRAFTED TAP HOUSE, Wyatt Wood CRUISERS, Bob Gallagher CURLEY’S, The Happiness DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Rev. Yo’s VooDoo Church of Blues Jam GARLAND PUB & GRILL, Karaoke HARVEST HOUSE, Nick Grow HOGFISH, Open Mic IRON HORSE (VALLEY), Chris Molitor LINGER LONGER LOUNGE, Open Jam MARYHILL WINERY, Dallas Kay O’DOHERTY’S, Traditional Irish Music PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Piano Sunday with Bob Beadling J THE PIN, Oh, Sleeper, Famous Last Words, Convictions, Empty, Traveler RED ROOM LOUNGE, Jason Perry Trio THE ROXIE, Hillyard Billys J SOUTH HILL GRILL, Just Plain Darin J J WATERFRONT PARK, Blue Waters Bluegrass Festival ZOLA, Lazy Love

Monday, 08/12

THE BULL HEAD, Songsmith Series J CALYPSOS COFFEE ROASTERS, Open Mic

CHECKERBOARD BAR, Jason Perry CRAVE, DJ Dave EICHARDT’S, Jam with Truck Mills J J FIRST INTERSTATE CENTER FOR THE ARTS, Lauren Daigle (see facing page) RED ROOM LOUNGE, Open Mic ZOLA, Perfect Mess

Tuesday, 08/13

219 LOUNGE, Karaoke with DJ Pat J THE BARTLETT, Zonky Night feat. Hot Club of Spokane BOOMBOX PIZZA, Karaoke CRAVE, DJ Dave GARLAND PUB & GRILL, Karaoke J KNITTING FACTORY, The Mighty O.A.R., American Authors LITZ’S BAR & GRILL, The ShuffleDawgs Blues Power Happy Hour J J NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO, Travis Tritt, The Charlie Daniels Band J THE PIN, The Convalescence, A Feasting Beast, Simpleminded, Phantom 309 POST FALLS BREWING, Devon Wade RAZZLE’S, Open Mic Jam RIDLER PIANO BAR, Country Swing Dancing RIVERBANK TAPHOUSE, Sammy Eubanks J RIVERFRONT PARK, Just Plain Darin J ROCKET MARKET, Ron Greene THE ROXIE, Open Mic/Jam TAPP’D OFF, Karaoke on the Patio THE VIKING, Songsmith Series ZOLA, Desperate 8s

Wednesday, 08/14

219 LOUNGE, Truck Mills Duo BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn J J BING CROSBY THEATER, Josh Ritter, Luca Fogale CRAVE, DJ Dave CRUISERS, Open Jam Night GENO’S, Open Mic IRON HORSE (CDA), Open Jam IRON HORSE (VALLEY), Echo Elysium THE JACKSON ST., Cowgirls from Hell, InComing Days & more THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE, Uh Oh and the Oh Wells J THE LOCAL DELI, Devon Wade LOST BOYS’ GARAGE, Kicho LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3 J MCEUEN PARK, JamShack J RED DRAGON CHINESE, Tommy G RED ROOM LOUNGE, Jam Session RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos J RIVERSIDE STATE PARK BOWL & PITCHER, Quarter Monkey SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS, Open Mic STORMIN’ NORMAN’S, Gil Rivas ZOLA, Donnie Emerson & Nancy Sophia

Coming Up ...

NASHVILLE NORTH, Reckless Kelly, Aug. 16 J NORTHERN QUEST, ZZ Top, Aug. 17 J NORTHERN QUEST, “Weird Al” Yankovic, Aug. 18 J THE BARTLETT, Giants in the Trees, Aug. 21 J FIRST INTERSTATE CENTER FOR THE ARTS, 3 Doors Down, Aug. 21

Medical Lake, WA August 9-11, 2019 “The Water is Blue. The Grass is too.”

Featuring:

• Wood & Wire • High Fidelity • Whiskey Deaf • True North • Greg & Caridwen Spatz

• Ashleigh Caudill • Masontown • The Eyer Family Band • High Valley Mountain Boys • Bitter Oak

bluewatersbluegrass.org

MUSIC | VENUES 219 LOUNGE • 219 N. First, Sandpoint • 208-2639934 A&P’S BAR & GRILL • 222 N. First, Sandpoint • 208-263-2313 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 BARLOWS • 1428 N. Liberty Lake Rd. • 924-1446 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 BEEROCRACY • 911 W. Garland Ave. BERSERK • 125 S. Stevens • 714-9512 THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 BOLO’S • 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BRIDGE PRESS CELLARS • 39 W. Pacific • 838-7815 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 THE BULL HEAD • 10211 S. Electric • 838-9717 CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY • 116 E. Lakeside Ave., CdA • 208-665-0591 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague Ave. • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley, Idaho • 800-523-2464 COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS • 3890 N. Schreiber Way, CdA • 208-664-2336 COSMIC COWBOY GRILL • 412 W. Haycraft, CdA • 208-277-0000 CRAFTED TAP HOUSE • 523 Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-292-4813 CRAVE• 401 W. Riverside • 321-7480 CRUISERS • 6105 W Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208773-4706 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S PUB • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-263-4005 FIRST INTERSTATE CENTER FOR THE ARTS • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • 279-7000 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings • 466-5354 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 THE HIVE • 207 N. First, Sandpoint • 208-457-2392 HOGFISH • 1920 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-667-1896 HONEY EATERY & SOCIAL CLUB • 317 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-930-1514 HOUSE OF SOUL • 25 E. Lincoln • 598-8783 IRON GOAT BREWING • 1302 W. 2nd • 474-0722 IRON HORSE BAR • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL • 11105 E. Sprague Ave., CdA • 509-926-8411 JACKSON ST. BAR & GRILL • 2436 N. Astor St. • 315-8497 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. Sixth St., Moscow • 208883-7662 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 2013 E. 29th Ave. • 448-0887 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE • 1004 S. Perry St. • 315-9531 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LION’S LAIR • 205 W. Riverside • 456-5678 LUCKY YOU LOUNGE • 1801 W. Sunset LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague • 747-2605 MARYHILL WINERY • 1303 W. Summit Pkwy, Ste. 100 • 443-3832 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan • 924-9000 MICKDUFF’S • 312 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208)255-4351 MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE • 208 N 4th Ave, Sandpoint • 208-265-9382 MOOSE LOUNGE • 401 E. Sherman • 208-664-7901 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MULLIGAN’S • 506 Appleway Ave., CdA • 208- 7653200 ext. 310 NASHVILLE NORTH • 6361 W. Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-457-9128 NORTHERN QUEST RESORT • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 PACIFIC PIZZA • 2001 W. Pacific • 443-5467 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PIN • 412 W. Sprague • 385-1449 POST FALLS BREWING CO. • 112 N. Spokane, Post Falls • 208-773-7301 RAZZLE’S BAR & GRILL • 10325 N. Government Way, Hayden • 208-635-5874 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 RIDLER PIANO BAR • 718 W. Riverside • 822-7938 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 STORMIN’ NORMAN’S SHIPFACED SALOON • 12303 E. Trent • 862-4852 THE THIRSTY DOG • 3027 E. Liberty Ave. • 487-3000 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

AUGUST 8, 2019 INLANDER 51


VISUAL ARTS ARTS ICONS

Harold Balazs (pictured) and Rudy Autio met in art school at Washington State University, and later in life the duo enjoyed laughing over a bottle of Bushmills. Balasz left behind a legacy of sculptures in the Pacific Northwest like his Lantern outside Spokane’s First Interstate Center for the Arts, and his famous message to “Transcend the Bullshit.” Autio left behind not only multimedia art in the Pacific Northwest and Finland, but a legacy as one of the most masterful artists working with clay in the United States. Both luminaries are showcased this month at Coeur d’Alene’s esteemed Art Spirit Gallery, with an opening reception to honor two friends’ legacies in art on Friday, Aug. 9, from 5-8 pm. The show runs through Sept. 7. — CARSON McGREGOR Monumentalists: A Tribute to Harold Balazs and Rudy Autio • Fri, Aug. 9 through Sat, Sept. 7; open daily from 10 am-6 pm • Free • The Art Spirit Gallery • 415 Sherman Ave., Coeur d’Alene • theartspiritgallery.com • 208-765-6006

THEATER HERE WE GO AGAIN

The “mother of jukebox musicals,” Mamma Mia! is making its way to Spokane Valley to dazzle audiences of all ages. This performance marks the end of Spokane Valley Summer Theatre’s 2019 season with eight shows. Get ready to jam with the fam to ABBA classics like “Dancing Queen,” “Gimmie! Gimmie! Gimmie!,” “Take a Chance On Me” and, of course, “Mamma Mia!” This musical turns the classic pop tunes into a cohesive plot that’s unlike any other. If you’ve never seen it, take a chance on Mamma Mia! because by the end you may find yourself saying “Thank You For the Music” and wanting to go again. — RILEY UTLEY Spokane Valley Summer Theatre: Mamma Mia! • Aug. 8-18: WedSat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm • $20-$39 • University High School • 12420 E. 32nd Ave., Spokane Valley • svsummertheatre.com • 368-7898

52 INLANDER AUGUST 8, 2019

COMMUNITY PIMP YOUR RIDE

Rev up those engines and speed on down to check out the 1,500 cars on display at Goodguys’ 18th annual car show next weekend. Featuring makes from 1987 and back to current muscle cars, hot rods, trucks of all kinds and custom cars, there’s no shortage of wheels to admire throughout the weekend. Those who own a car worth being appreciated can register their vehicle online, and enter to win some of the show’s many awards, presented on Sunday. In addition to acres of cool cars, there’s also live music, cars for sale, a swap meet, kids zone and lots of manufacturer and vendor exhibits and booths. Car lovers of all makes and models are in for a treat with this one. — MORGAN SCHEERER Goodguys 18th Great Northwest Nationals • Aug. 9-11: Fri-Sat from 8 am-5 pm, Sun from 8 am-3 pm • $17-$22/adults, $6-$10/ kids • Spokane County Fair & Expo Center • 404 N. Havana • good-guys.com/gnwn-2019


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COMEDY THE VOICE

Comedian Melissa Villaseñor has secured her place in comedy history simply by becoming the first Latina cast member in the history of Saturday Night Live. The Los Angeles (well, the suburbs, anyway) native landed the gig based on her strength at impressions that filled her comedy club act early in her career. Her array of famous characters is impressive, ranging from Hillary Clinton to Steve Buscemi to an array of pop music stars. She’s also adept at voice work for animated shows like the Cartoon Network’s Adventure Time and OK K.O.!, and she once finished third on America’s Got Talent. Expect to meet a slew of her famous “friends” when she takes the stage this weekend. — DAN NAILEN

〉〉 22 BREWERIES, 44 CRAFT BEERS, 2 BANDS SilverMT.com/Summer/Events/Brewsfest | 855-601-9759

Melissa Villaseñor • Fri-Sat, Aug. 9-10 at 7:30 pm and 10 pm • $15-$28 • 21+ • Spokane Comedy Club • 315 W. Sprague • spokanecomedyclub.com • 318-9998

BENEFIT POUR ONE FOR THE TRAIL

Tip back a cold one this weekend in support of local recreation, specifically the many activities and Northwest scenery that can be enjoyed along the North Idaho Centennial Trail. This annual summer event near the shores of Lake Coeur d’Alene brings together regional craft beer and cider makers, along with plenty of eats from Coeur d’Alene food trucks, all to support maintenance and other projects along the trail. Breweries pouring include local names and several from further afield, like Fremont and Elysian from Seattle, Bend’s 10 Barrel, plus Boise Brewing and others. Bike down to the event and store your ride in a monitored, free bike corral. Minors are welcome, too, as long as they’re accompanied by an adult age 21+. Tickets include six 5-ounce pours, with extra tokens offered at $2 each. — CHEY SCOTT Ales for the Trail • Sat, Aug. 10 from 2-8 pm • $30 • All ages • McEuen Park • 420 E. Front Ave., Coeur d’Alene • alesforthetrail.org

AUGUST 8, 2019 INLANDER 53


making the start of my weekend great. SWEET GUY AT SWEET PEAKS Sweet Peaks. Dusk. You were sitting by yourself. Hoodie on. I walked in while you were sitting and waiting. I enjoyed our conversation (hopefully you enjoyed your milkshake). Let’s be friends. DISTURBED CONCERT 7/31 - FRONT OF STAGE BARRIER You - long black hair, brown eyes, were lifted over the barrier when the crowd got too pushy. I’ve got your souvenir shirt if you’d like it back. cmoonl7@yahoo.com

I SAW YOU DEAR LIME SCOOTER CREW A couple of you dudes were zippin’ down Wellesley on your Lime Scooters, around 2:30, Sunday morning. You were clearly having a blast, and your cluster of bright LED lights were very visible from the front as you zoomed down the middle of the road. But guys... you were all but invisible from the back. I know it’s fun, and it’s summer, so ball out or whatever, but you gotta be more careful. The bikes and scooters aren’t supposed to be in the road anyway, and at 2 am on a relatively dark street, with drunks and people with crappy night vision, you’re rolling all kinds of dice. I damn near pulled over to tell you to get out of the road, but... you really shouldn’t have to be told. Please be more careful. It would legitimately suck to have as good a night as you appeared to be having, end in someone getting hit. HI THERE AT HILLYARD FEST I saw you at Hillyard Fest on Saturday. We both were enjoying the mister and commenting on the smells of teriyaki in the air. I hope your day was as productive and enjoyable as you had hoped it would be. Loved your shirt! BOY, THAT WAS A HOT ONE ;) I saw you while walking in the dreadful summer heat by the Centennial. You were so kind and a sight for sore eyes. Thank you for

WANDERING SOUL I saw you walking down Maple Street, with your life in your backpack. A dog beside you and the hardship of life showing on your face. Curious eyes turned uncomfortably towards you, glancing quickly. Many wonder why you stride down the street with such forceful steps yet they feel your emptiness. At night as you sleep you breath deeply, your arm around your faithful companion, I wonder if you think about your future, or are you struggling to live each day. Is your childhood a memory that feeds you or do you put up a wall and keep it behind? You may not show fear or emotion but I’m guessing when you are alone it barrels through you and hits the bottom of your soul. Can we as passersby lay judgment to your circumstances? We have no right to look upon you with sorrow or sadness. We have no idea what happened in your life that has made you walk alone. Stand tall young woman, stand proud. You may not feel this is where you want to be, but for now, this is who you are. Thank you for letting me into your life for just a few minutes. We all need to see how life can change so quickly, and we should live the lives we have right now, with a peace in our heart, every step we take. BN DANCING WITH A STRANGER At the Hillyard Festival you heard me wistfully say I hadn’t danced in years. When the music slowed, I felt a soft tug on my hand and looked over to see a kind face smiling at me quizzically as you gently pulled me up to dance. I was shy and awkward, but fit perfectly in your arms. You were a very good dancer and patiently showed

me some fun moves for four songs. Later when the tempo slowed again, I slipped my hand in yours. You smiled and lead me back for one last dance. You had to leave just before the fireworks, but we’re reluctant to do so. We hadn’t talked about ourselves, nor exchanged info — just danced. I’ll be at the music venue at

the Argonne Library, 8/13 at 6:30. Would you dance with me again? e_femail@ yahoo.com

CHEERS

refusing interviews. She’s a former media personality, why is she afraid of backing her own hardline agenda? Sunlight is always the best disinfectant.!

JEERS

CDA PROSECUTING ATTORNEY AND FIREMAN I had the pleasure of meeting you both and you said you were supporting the community, you so kindly offered to buy a stranger a burger, I must have offended you since I was your server and cook but you never left any gratuity. So please accept my apology. I look forward to your next visit. I TRUST YOU I have faith that one day you and I will be together again. Although it seems impossible right now I am not going to give up on us. Through this wild and crazy life I have lived I have met two kinds of people: those you can trust, and those you can never trust not even in a million years, and you are absolutely someone I would trust with my life. I don’t have any time to waste on untrustworthy people so I pray every day that we could make peace with one another and that this war between us would cease.

1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

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from your King Solomon that you so sanctimoniously quoted on my doorstep. JEERS TO STUCKART For both exploiting the “homeless” population and using it as a platform to bash his mayoral opponents. If Ben cared as much about the actual tax paying, hard working,

We hadn’t talked about ourselves, nor exchanged info — just danced. I’ll be at the music venue at the Argonne Library, 8/13 at 6:30. Would you dance with me again?

SOUND OFF

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ATTENTION REGISTERED VOTERS Cheers to you, the community of Spokane! I’ve noticed many of us opening our eyes to the misinformation and lies that fall from Cathy McMoscow Rodgers mouth. I encourage you all to check her voting record - as well as her “A” rating from the NRA. PS- Nadine Woodward is no better,

OOH THE IRONY OF A CHRISTIAN HYPOCRITE I’m a neighborly type, so I came out of my small house to talk to you about the little housing development where I live. You are thinking about buying a couple of the units as rentals. But you just couldn’t stop yourself from getting in a little preaching. Going into a three minute sermon about King Solomon and the “wisdom” of riches. While your fancy cream-colored SUV sat in the gravel parking lot of this modest development you had the gall to preach to me! I’m the one who made the choice to live in a 650 sq-ft house. Take a lesson from this atheist - don’t buy into this development. Take that money and invest it in people - like a wounded warrior, or a kid trying to go to college, or a working mom trying to feed her kids on a minimum wage job. Your fancy SUV and desire for rental income clearly demonstrate that you haven’t learn that lesson

contributing people of Spokane as much as he did as the “homeless” I might have voted for him. But, just like his initials his campaign and policies are B.S. DOG SHIT While I try to keep my corner of the universe clean and healthy, I do not appreciate someone putting an open bag of dog shit down the catch basin at the corner of our street. Storm water and run off from sprinklers is all that is supposed to go into those. How do you expect to have clean water for the Spokane River if you put that in it. Maybe you should have a glass of water to drink and appreciate the people who try to keep that clean for you. Only thinking of yourself again. n

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EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

A NEW BEGINNING A fundraiser for Morning Star Boys’ Ranch to support the children in its residential, foster care, case aide and other programs. The evening includes wine by El Corazon, dinner, live music, dessert and more. Aug. 9, 12:30-9:30 pm. $175. Davenport Grand, 333 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. morningstarboysranch.org AHCC 16TH ANNUAL GOLF TOURNAMENT A tournament hosted by Airway Heights Corrections Center to benefit Shriners Hospital for children. Aug. 10, 6:30 am. Hangman Valley Golf Course, 2210 E. Hangman Valley Rd. spokanecounty.org/1141/Hangman-Valley BARN BRUNCH This year’s auction includes front porch chairs created by local artisans and a brunch of quiche, fruit, scones and more. Aug. 10, 11 am-1 pm. $25. Dahmen Barn, 419 N. Park Way. artisanbarn.org PAW-ART For a donation, local artists with Avenue West Gallery help your pet make a paw print with non-toxic washable paint and then, with a few strokes, turn it into a flower. Saturdays from 12-2 pm through Aug. 24. SCRAPS Regional Animal Shelter, 6815 E. Trent. spokanecounty.org/scraps IDAHO CONSERVATION LEAGUE MEMBER & SUPPORTER GATHERING Join the ICL staff and meet new executive director, Justin Hayes. Also get updates on the big statewide conservation issues in Idaho and hear about ICL’s plans to tackle them. Aug. 14, 6-8 pm. Free. Evans Brothers Coffee, 524 Church St., Sandpoint. idahoconservation.org (208-265-9565) FAMILY SERVE & SCOOP Spend an evening with the family while supporting Second Harvest, with one part volunteering and one part ice cream. Aug. 15, 5:30-8 pm. $15. Second Harvest, 1234 E. Front. secondharvestkitchen.org IDAHO CONSERVATION LEAGUE MEMBER & SUPPORTER GATHERING Join the ICL staff and meet new executive director, Justin Hayes. Also get updates on the big statewide conservation issues in Idaho and hear about ICL’s plans to tackle them. Aug. 15, 6-8 pm. Free. Art Spirit Gallery, 415 Sherman Ave. idahoconservation.org

COMEDY

2.0PEN MIC Local comedy night hosted by Ken McComb. Thursdays, from 8-10 pm. Free. The District Bar, 916 W. First Ave. facebook.com/districtbarspokane/ GUFFAW YOURSELF! Open mic comedy night hosted by Casey Strain; Thursdays at 10 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First Ave. (509-847-1234) MELISSA VILLASENOR Melissa broke barriers by becoming the first-ever Latina cast member of Saturday Night Live. A comedic impressions expert, she got her start as a semifinalist on “America’s Got Talent.” Aug. 8-10 at 7:30 pm, Aug. 10 at 10 pm. $15$28. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. (318-9998) STAND-UP COMEDY Live comedy featuring established and up-and-coming local comedians. Fridays at 8 pm. No cover. Red Dragon Chinese, 1406 W. Third Ave. reddragondelivery.com THIS JUST IN... With audience suggestions, the BDT players build a one-

of-a-kind evening of all-improvised parody news. Rated for general audiences. Fridays at 7:30 pm, Aug. 2-Sept. 6. $8. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. (747-7045) SAFARI The BDT’s version of “Whose Line,” a fast-paced short-form improv show with a few twists added. Rated for mature audiences. Fridays at 7:30 pm. $8. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com SPOKANE VALLEY COMEDY COMPETITION A night of competitive standup; local comedians compete for a $500 cash prize. Aug. 10, 7 pm. $13.59. CenterPlace Event Regional Center, 2426 N. Discovery Place. (688-0300) THE SOCIAL HOUR COMEDY SHOWCASE Featuring comics from the Northwest and beyond, and hosted by Deece Casillas. Sundays, from 8-9:30 pm. Free. The Ridler Piano Bar, 718 W. Riverside Ave. socialhourpod.com IMPROV JAM SESSIONS Each session is led by a Blue Door Theatre Troupe member. This is an informal Improv meetup and is not considered a class. Ages 18+. Mondays from 7-9 pm through Aug. 26. Free. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) T.J. MILLER Miller has voiced numerous characters in animated films and series, including How to Train Your Dragon, Big Hero 6, Gravity Falls and more. Aug. 15-17 at 7:30 pm; Aug. 16-17 at 10:30 pm. $25-$60. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. (318-9998)

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AUGUST 16TH & 17TH

COMMUNITY

GIANTS, DRAGONS & UNICORNS: THE WORLD OF MYTHIC CREATURES This traveling exhibit from the American Museum of Natural History combines unique cultural objects, dramatic models, multimedia and interactive games to tell the origin stories behind the legends of mythical creatures from around the world. July 5-Sept. 2. TueSun 10 am-5 pm. $5-$10. The MAC, 2316 W. First. northwestmuseum.org HERITAGE GARDENS TOURS Step back in time and experience this unique garden as it looked in 1915. Learn about the discovery, the careful restoration and the two influential families of early Spokane who made this their backyard. Offered Aug. 8 and. 15 at 2 pm; Aug. 11 at 11 am. Free. Moore-Turner Heritage Gardens, 507 W. Seventh. heritagegardens.org NORTHWEST LEGENDS Visitors explore the world of Northwest Legends including the Sasquatch and Coyote to make their own decision. This engaging family-oriented MAC-curated exhibition provides interactive opportunities including designing mythical creatures, a fairy wing selfie, stepping into Sasquatch tracks and more. Through Sept. 2; Tue-Sun 10 am-5 pm. $5-$10. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org (456-3931) VOLUNTEER ORIENTATION Attend orientation to learn more about joining Spark’s team. Second Tuesdays, 5:30-7 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org MOBIUS PLANETARIUM See our solar system from another point of view. Shows run every 15 minutes; drop in anytime. Aug. 9, 10 am-noon. Free. West Central Community Center, 1603 N. Belt St. westcentralcc.org

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AUGUST 8, 2019 INLANDER 55


RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess THE FEUD PYRAMID

Two weeks ago, I finally dumped my totally abusive jerk of a boyfriend. I do miss him, but I know I made the right decision. I came to see that he was cruel, manipulative, sociopathic, and toxic. However, I stupidly went on Facebook and saw that he already has a new girlfriend! I’m so pissed that I was replaced so quickly. I do not want him back, but I do want to make him suffer, basically to get revenge for all he put me through. My friend keeps telling me revenge is AMY ALKON unhealthy and toxic and forgiveness is good for you and I need to forgive him. Is she right? ­—Burned Revenge looks so Clint Eastwood-cool in the movies ­— less so when you get arrested for keying “micropenis!!!” into your ex’s car, right under a street cam. The desire for revenge is basically the urge to punish people who’ve harmed us or those close to us. It’s widely believed to be a poisonous and maladaptive feeling that leads to poisonous and maladaptive behavior — ­ like forays into the dark web to seek out a highly recommended but affordably priced assassin. In fact, evolutionary psychologist Michael McCullough explains in “Beyond Revenge” that the revenge motive seems to be “a built-in feature of human nature,” a sort of psychological police force guarding our interests. It was likely vital to the evolution of human cooperation, which in turn led to essential human innovations such as flush toilets, open-heart surgery, and the Dorito. Research that McCullough cites suggests the revenge motive has three functions: Deterring aspiring aggressors, deterring repeat aggressors, and punishing (and reforming) freeloading moochbags. The thing is, revenge has a companion motivation, forgiveness, which McCullough describes as “an internal process of getting over your ill will for an offender.” Interestingly, whether we forgive appears to be context-sensitive, meaning it usually isn’t the particular crime so much as the particular criminal that matters. McCullough notes that the forgiveness motivation seems to switch on when there’s a valuable relationship at stake ­— a continuing relationship between the harmer and harm-ee. In your situation, however, there’s no ongoing relationship to motivate you to forgive the guy. And though forgiveness is correlated with mental health and even physical well-being, the assumption that forgiveness is always the best course of action is a little under-nuanced. For example, McCullough writes that people with strong social support networks that encourage hostile responses to offenders can end up feeling “justified, comforted, and satisfied (by) their unforgiving stance” and “may not experience any negative emotional or physical consequences.” On the other hand, he notes that “people who feel coerced to ‘forgive and forget’ may find their post-offense distress exacerbated.” To decide what’s best for you, consider the reason you give for wanting revenge: because your ex was on to the next woman pronto after you dumped him. Also consider that you now identify him as a pretty terrible person and partner. Of course, the reality is, we all want to be wanted, sometimes even by people we really don’t have any business wanting. But ask yourself something: In light of the sort of person you now see him to be, is it surprising in the least that he immediately latched onto his next victim? Next, look at your life and calculate how much time and energy you’re investing in thinking dark and nasty thoughts about him. Is keeping the hate fires burning for him benefiting you? Does it feel energizing (that is, rewarding), or does it feel a bit poisonous, psychologically and maybe even physically? Sure, it’s understandable that you’d long to do something ­— take some action, even the score — ­ in response to feeling angry. However, if the reason for your anger is ultimately that you didn’t look too closely at whom you were getting together with, maybe what’s most productive for you now is deciding to let go of the past and working on being better at boyfriend vetting in the future. This starts with reviewing your last relationship from start to finish. Be intensely honest with yourself about all you overlooked about the guy and how you got used to his escalating levels of abuse as your continual “new normal.” By focusing on your part in this and how selective you need to be, you can shift into a sense of satisfaction that things will be different for you in the future. You should find this a welcome replacement for the head versus heart loop you’ve probably been stuck in: Your head says, “Move on.” Your heart says, “Sure thing ­— behind the wheel of heavy machinery when he has nowhere to go but el squasho!” n ©2018, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

56 INLANDER AUGUST 8, 2019

EVENTS | CALENDAR NIGHT OUT AGAINST CRIME Activities include chemistry magic with Tom Flanagan, music by Musha Marimba, a raffle and opportunity to meet Safety Day representatives from the community. Aug. 9, 5:30-8:30 pm. Free. Hays Park, Crestline and Providence. facebook.com/bemissnc FRIENDS OF THE NORTH SPOKANE LIBRARY SIDEWALK BOOK SALE Proceeds from book sales support library programs, activities, and services. Aug. 10, 10 am-noon. Free. North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne. scldfriends.org HISTORIC WALKING TOURS Walk through the park and learn the history of the Spokane Falls, Expo ’74 Pavilion, Clocktower, Looff Carrousel, Centennial Trail and more. Saturday at 10 am and noon, through August 31. Free. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard. (625-6600) HOMEBUYER EDUCATION SEMINAR: Explore the major aspects of the homebuying process in an unbiased format with SNAP Spokane instructors certified by the Washington State Housing Finance Commission. Registration required. Aug. 10, 9 am-2 pm. Free. Moran Prairie Library, 6004 S. Regal St. snapwa.org/education-calendar (319-3040) INTRO TO LETTERPRESS Learn to letterpress print a broadside using the pressure printing technique, a userfriendly version of relief printing that doesn’t require a linoleum or wood block. Aug. 10, noon. $25-$35. Spokane Print & Publishing Center, 1925 N. Ash. facebook.com/spokaneprint/ NATIONAL NIGHT OUT AGAINST CRIME Activities include a free barbecue, concert by the Ken Davis trio (4-6 pm), demos from the Spokane Police, Spokane County Sheriffs Dept. K-9s, Spokane COPS and a free movie, Marley and Me. Aug. 10, 4-11 pm. Free. Shadle Park, 2005 W. Wellesley. (625-3300) SERA & ECNC COMMUNITY CELEBRATION This annual celebration marks the end of Spokane Eastside Reunion Association’s (SERA) basketball camp and celebrates the wonderful East Central Neighborhood. This year’s event offers free hot dogs and drinks, a raffle, games, and kids activities. Aug. 10, 12-4 pm. Free. Underhill Park, 2900 E. Hartson Ave. bit.ly/2M5mXCA UFO JOINT MEETING The Washington MUFON and NUFORC host a public meeting featuring representatives from the top UFO organizations in Washington presenting the latest news, sighting reports, pictures, and videos. Speakers include Maurene Morgan, Washington MUFON State Director, Daniel Nims, MUFON Chief Investigator, and Peter Davenport, Director of NUFORC. Light refreshments provided. Aug. 10, 1-3 pm. Free. Spokane Valley Library, 12004 E. Main. (360-344-2991) QUEST SUNDAY FEST A new outdoor street festival offering a weekly lineup of local and regional arts and crafts, gourmet food, free kids activities, performance art, music and more. Sundays from 11 am-5 pm through Aug. 11. Free. Northern Quest Resort & Casino, 100 N. Hayford Rd. northernquest.com NERD CRAFT NIGHT SCHOOL: RPG WORLD BUILDING This 3-week journey explores the many ways to bring your tabletop role playing world to life, including character creation, world building, improvisational narratives, map and monster creation and much more. Meets Tue/Thu 6:30-9:30 pm from Aug. 13-29. $80. Spark Central,

1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org SPACE SCIENCE WITH MOBIUS Educators present hands-on space-themed activities for two hours; drop in any time. Young children should be accompanied by a caregiver. Aug. 13, 2-4 pm. Free. Shadle Library, 2111 W. Wellesley Ave. spokanelibrary.org (444-5300)

FESTIVAL

GOODGUYS 18TH GREAT NORTHWEST NATIONALS The annual threeday event features more than 1,500 rods, customs, classics, muscle cars and trucks through 1987, along with vendor and manufacturer exhibits, a dragster exhibition, model and pedal car show, swap meet, kids events, live entertainment and more. Aug. 9-11. $10-$22. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana. good-guys.com KURONEKOCON A three-day anime convention celebrating Japanese culture and pop culture, including panels, cosplay, gaming, dances, artists, a vendor fair and more. Aug. 9-11. $30-$45. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. kuronekocon.com SPOCON A science-fiction and fantasy convention. This year’s theme is “All Hail the Goblin King,” a tribute to Labyrinth. SpoCon is a nonprofit, and proceeds from this event go to Freeman CVA School. Aug. 9-11; Fri noon-11 pm, Sat 10 am-11 pm, Sun 10 am-4 pm. $45. Historic Davenport Hotel, 10 S. Post St. spocon.org (800-899-1482)

FILM

HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON 3 Screening as part of the Garland’s annual Free Summer Movies series. Doors open at 9 am; movies at 9:30 am. Through Aug. 9. Free. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland. garlandtheater.com SCREEN ON THE GREEN: ALADDIN (2019) U of I’s Dept. of Student Involvement hosts free outdoor movies, starting at approx. 8:45 pm, on the Theophilus Tower Lawn. Aug. 8. Free. University of Idaho, 709 S Deakin St. uidaho.edu (208-885-6111) SUMMER MATINEE MOVIE SERIES The Kenworthy’s 18th annual series offers young fans and their families a summer filled with 10 of their favorite films (Rated G or PG). Wednesdays and Thursdays at 1 pm through Aug. 15. See schedule online. $3. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org/calendar MOVIES IN THE PARK: MARY POPPINS RETURNS A free outdoor screening with pre-movie kids activities an hour before showtime at dusk. Aug. 9. Free. Mirabeau Park Meadows, 13500 Mirabeau Parkway. spokanevalley.org SUMMER MOONLIGHT MOVIES: KUBO & THE TWO STRINGS Outdoor movies start at dusk. Aug. 9. Free. Sunset Park, 924 S. Lawson St. cahw.org (244-4845) CLASSIC CARTOONS Free classic cartoons return to the Kenworthy from June to September, every Saturday from 9 am-noon. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) THE INCREDIBLES 2 All movies start at dusk. Outside food and drink (no alcohol), blankets and low-backed chairs welcome. Snacks for sale from the Liberty Lake Kiwanis Snack Wagon. Aug. 10, 8:30 pm. Free. Pavillion Park, 727 N. Molter Rd. pavillionpark.org (755-6726) MEGAMIND Screening as part of the

Garland’s annual Free Summer Movies series. Doors at 9 am; movie at 9:30 am. Aug. 12-16. Free. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland. garlandtheater.com FRIDAY THE 13TH Screening as part of the Garland’s annual Summer Camp summer movie series. Aug. 13, 7:15 pm. $2.50. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. garlandtheater.com (327-1050) CHINESE MOVIE NIGHT The University of Idaho’s Confucius Institute’s monthly event, with a brief intro. Aug. 14, 7-10 pm. Free. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org WSECU OUTDOOR MOVIES: SPACE BALLS Moviegoers are invited to pack in their own snack/dinner or purchase from food vendors on site (no alcohol). Aug. 14, 8:30 pm. Free. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard. (625-6600) RIFFTRAX LIVE: GIANT SPIDER INVASION One of the most popular MST3K movies ever is coming back for a livestreamed event. Aug. 15 at 8 pm; Aug 20 at 7:30 pm. Regal Northtown and Riverstone. fathomevents.com TURNING POINT SCREENING & PANEL DISCUSSION Acclaimed filmmaker and director James Keach follows a team of researchers on the front lines of Alzheimer’s research and captures the raw disappointment and renewed hope of those working to find a cure for this fatal, incurable disease affecting nearly 5.7 million Americans. Aug. 15, 6:30 pm. Free. The MAC, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org

FOOD

BIRDS & BUBBLES DINNER A full fried chicken meal with all the fixings, plus bubbly. Aug. 8, 6 pm. $35; reservations required. The Yards Bruncheon, 1248 W. Summit Pkwy. theyardsbruncheon.com COEUR D’ALENE SUNSET DINNER CRUISE Dine at sunset on this 2-hour cruise featuring a full dinner buffet. Daily at 7:30 pm through Aug. 31; Sept. 1-9 at 6:30 pm. $33.25-$57. The Coeur d’Alene Resort, 115 S. Second. tickets. cdacruises.com (208-765-4000) PARTY ON THE PATIO A summer event series at the new Spokane Tribe Casino, with local beer, wine and spirits, food specials, live music, giveaways and more. Aug. 8 and Sept. 12 from 4-7 pm. Shuttles from area hotels available. Free. Three Peaks Kitchen + Bar, 14300 W. SR Highway 2. inlander.com/spokane/PartyonthePatio/Page PICKLING 101: MAKING YOUR OWN STAPLES Learn how to pickle and ferment fresh local produce in a hands-on session that also covers the probiotic and health benefits of pickled foods and more. Aug. 8, 5:30 pm. $40. Glorious Artisan Bakery, 1516 W. Riverside Ave. howglorious.com (720-7546) SCOTCH & CIGARS Select a flight of whiskey, scotch or bourbon paired with a recommended cigar during an event on the outdoor patio. Thursdays, from 6-10 pm. $15-$25. Prohibition Gastropub, 1914 N. Monroe. facebook.com/ Prohibition.Gastropub.Spokane1 TASTINGS ON THE TERRACE Enjoy an evening overlooking the Spokane River and Riverfront Park and meet GSI members while enjoying hors d’oeuvres and drinks from local breweries and wineries. Aug. 8, 5-7 pm. $30-$40. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. greaterspokane.org ALES FOR THE TRAIL The annual craft


beer, wine and cider celebration in Coeur d’Alene benefits the North Idaho Centennial Trail. Aug. 10, 2 pm. $30. McEuen Park, 420 E. Front Ave. cdaid.org (208-769-2252) PEACH PICKIN’ PARTY & VENDOR FAIR Come up to Green Bluff to pick fresh peaches and meander through the vendor craft fair. Aug. 10-11. High Country Orchard, 8518 E. Green Bluff Rd. bit.ly/2ZbYUnI (238-9545) SUNDAY BRUNCH CRUISE A 90-minute cruise featuring a full breakfast buffet. Prepaid reservations required. Sundays at 11 am through Sept. 1. $30.75-$50.75. The Coeur d’Alene Resort, 115 S. Second. cdaresort.com SECRET GARDEN CHEF SERIES River City Youth Ops has partnered with chef Tony Brown of Ruins and Stella’s to create a five-course rooftop dinner. The gourmet meal features produce grown by local youth participants in River City Youth Ops’ urban farm program. Aug. 12, 6 pm. $95-$175. Saranac Rooftop, 25 W. Main. bit.ly/2OGMUKz EAT MORE RAINBOWS: VEGAN COOKING SERIES Chef Charmaine walks participants through basic and intermediate vegan cooking techniques. Aug. 15, Aug. 29, Sept. 11 and Sept. 26 from 6-7:30 pm. $22/class. My Fresh Basket, 1030 W. Summit Pkwy. myfreshspokane.com LET’S MAKE BEER! Join Adam Boyd, a local professional and award-winning home brewer, as he demonstrates the process of making beer. Aug. 15 from 6-8 pm. $59. Spokane Community College, 1810 N. Greene. scc.spokane.edu

MUSIC

MUSIC BRIDGES BORDERS An evening of classical and chamber music presented by student musicians from Mexico. Aug. 8, 7-8 pm. Free. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William St. thejacklincenter.org BLUE WATERS BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL A three-day blues festival on the shores of Medical Lake. Aug. 9-11. $25-$45. Waterfront Park, 1386 S. Lefevre. bluewatersbluegrass.org JAZZ AT THE JACC Featuring Michael Jaramillo & Friends with special guest openers The Coeur d’Alene Charter Academy Jazz Band. Aug. 9, 6-9 pm. $10. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William St. thejacklincenter.org SUMMER CONCERT SERIES: THE CHERRY SISTERS REVIVAL A silly string band of ukuleles, a banjo, percussion and vocals playing an eclectic collection from old country to traditional, and everything in between. Aug. 9, 7 pm. $15. Dahmen Barn, 419 N. Park Way. artisanbarn.org WALLACE ACCORDION JUBILEE The iconic Red Light Garage and Fainting Goat Restaurant host accordion players from around the U.S., with concerts, parades and a Sunday Accordion Church Service. Aug. 9-11. Wallace, Idaho. wallaceidahochamber.com CHERYL HODGE JAZZ TRIO Awardwinning jazz/blues pianist-vocalist Cheryl Hodge is joined by her rhythm section: Brian Flick on bass and Rick Westrick on drums. Aug. 11, 2-4 pm. $15. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William St. thejacklincenter.org (208-457-8950)

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Now on Inlander.com: National and international stories from the New York Times to go with the fresh, local news we deliver every day AUGUST 8, 2019 INLANDER 57


Patagonia’s workwear collection made from hemp.

CLOTHING

Dress for Success Yes, with hemp! BY WILL MAUPIN

T

hinking of cannabis and fashion might not conjure up images of the haute couture, but the plant, along with the government and some big brands, are showing that stoner style is a lot more than just tie-dye T-shirts. A simple Google search of “hemp clothing” leads to some expected results. Small retailers and sellers on marketplaces like Etsy and Amazon tout the environmental benefits of hemp as a textile. But also near the top of the results is a brand that rakes in revenue in the hundreds of millions of dollars: Patagonia. Yes, Patagonia is an outspoken and politically active

58 INLANDER AUGUST 8, 2019

outdoor clothing brand. It’s not exactly a stretch for a company like that to embrace hemp. But it’s notable because no matter its views, the company is still a massive national brand. And even though Betsy Ross’ first version of the American flag was sewn with hemp, the plant is kind of like the new kid on the national block. It’s said that there are 50,000 uses for the hemp plant, and getting you high isn’t one of them. So, it’s somewhat surprising that getting the ball rolling on legalizing recreational marijuana was easier than legalizing its THCdevoid cousin. When Washington and Colorado voted to legalize

PATAGONIA PHOTO

recreational marijuana in the fall of 2012, they did so six full years before the federal government took substantive action on industrial hemp production. That didn’t happen until December of last year when Congress passed the Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018, which Republican Sen. Mitch McConnell enthusiastically referred to as the Hemp Farm Bill. Even here at home, where recreational marijuana has been legal for the better part of a decade, we’ve been lagging when it comes to hemp. In April, Gov. Jay Inslee signed a state-level hemp bill that has helped spur planting of the crop. The vast majority of hemp production in the United States at present — around 70 percent, according to research by New Frontier Data — is for CBD and related products. When it comes to fiber products, China is leading the way. But as regulations are loosened and investment in the crop grows, domestic hemp could become the cotton of the West. Yes, indeed, welcome to an environmentally friendly cash crop for clothing that is cool in both the counter-cultural sense and the light, breathable fabric sense of the word. n


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EVENTS | CALENDAR SPRING TONIC The Coeur d’Alene Public Library continues its summer outdoor music series. Aug. 12, 6 pm. Free. Coeur d’Alene Public Library, 702 E. Front Ave. cdalibrary.org

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

CONQUEST OF THE CAGE Meet former World Champion Cody Garbrandt and UFC star Michael Chiesa while witnessing new stars in the making. Aug. 9, 7 pm. $39-$69. Northern Quest Resort & Casino, 100 N. Hayford Rd. northernquest.com COEUR D’ALENE TRIATHLON The 35th annual race offers three options: an Olympic triathlon, scenic sprint triathlon or duathlon. Open to relay teams. Aug. 10, 7:40 am. $95-$210. Coeur d’Alene. cdatriathlon.com GN CORNHOLE TOURNAMENT DJ Moon Wild spins tunes, with No-Li beer and Ethiopian food for purchase, and prizes for winners. Proceeds support Global Neighborhood’s mission of providing pathways to employment for local refugees. Aug. 10, 1 pm. $21.99. Global Neighborhood Thrift, 919 E. Trent. global-neighborhood.org YOGA ON THE BRIDGE Local yoga teachers guide this all-levels series. Meet at the orange bridge near the carrousel. Aug. 10, 17 and 24 from 9-10 am. Free. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard. spokaneriverfrontpark.com BRITBULL BRITISH CAR SHOW The 23nd renewal of BritBull brings together the Northwest’s finest British motorcars. Aug. 11, 9 am-1:30 pm. $15/ car; Free/spectators. Grant Park, 1015 S. Arthur. northwestbritishclassics.com BACKPACKER GET OUT MORE TOUR The interactive seminar educates and inspires participants while covering topics including backpacking essentials, the latest in gear and apparel, living a van life, survival skills and more. Aug. 13, 6:30-8 pm. Free. REI, 1125 N. Monroe. rei.com/spokane (328-9900)

THEATER

ALICE IN WONDERLAND As the curtain rises, Alice slides into view at the end of her fall down the rabbit-hole. Through Aug. 11; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. Pullman Civic Theatre, 1220 NW Nye. pullmancivictheatre.org THE CARPET CAPER An original melodrama written and directed by Cyndi Bentley. Through Aug. 25; Wed-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10. Sixth Street Theater, 212 Sixth St. sixthstreetmelodrama.com (208-752-8871) COEUR D’ALENE SUMMER THEATRE: SMOKEY JOE’S CAFE This musical revue illuminates a golden age of American culture. Through Aug. 25; Wed-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $20-$49. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. cdasummertheatre.com LES MISERABLES A new production of the Tony Award-winning musical phenomenon. Aug. 6-11, times vary. $50$98. First Interstate Center for the Arts, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. inbpac.com SPOKANE VALLEY SUMMER THEATRE: MAMMA MIA! This exuberant and dazzling musical production completes the 2019 SVST Season. Aug. 9-18; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $20-$39. University High School,

60 INLANDER AUGUST 8, 2019

12320 E. 32nd. svsummertheatre.com

ARTS

MONUMENTALISTS: A TRIBUTE TO HAROLD BALAZS & RUDY AUTIO The Art Spirit celebrates the lasting work and legacies left by these masterful artists. Over sixty Balazs pieces are featured, and for the first time in years, Autio ceramic pots and drawings are available for purchase. Aug. 9-Sept. 7; open daily 11 am-6 pm. Reception Aug. 9 from 5-8 pm. Free. Art Spirit Gallery, 415 Sherman. theartspiritgallery.com NORTH IDAHO ARTISTS’ STUDIO TOUR Visit the working studios of painters, sculptors, photographers, jewelers, potters, glass artists and more. See website for map and list of participating artists; locations in and around Sandpoint. Aug. 9-11 and Aug. 16-18. Free. arttourdrive.org ART ON THE STREET: MEGAN PERKINS Perkins teaches the technique of blind contour to improve coordination between the hand and the brain. Aug. 10, 11 am-2:30 pm. Free. Spokane Art School, 811 W. Garland. spokaneartschool.net PEND OREILLE ARTS COUNCIL ARTS & CRAFTS FAIR This two-day event occurs during the Festival at Sandpoint and features artist booths, food vendors and a youth art area. Aug. 1011. Free. Downtown Sandpoint. artsinsandpoint.org DRAWING CLASS: PEOPLE & CHARACTERS A workshop covering the basics of what it takes to draw people and do character design. Ages 13+. Aug. 12, 7 pm. $20. Spokane Print & Publishing Center, 1925 N. Ash. facebook.com/spokaneprint/ MAKE A MURAL WITH DANIEL LOPEZ Join the local muralist and street artist for a four-part workshop covering every aspect of creating a mural. Aug. 14, 6:30 pm. $100. Spokane Print & Publishing Center, 1925 N. Ash. facebook. com/spokaneprint/ SKETCHING HISTORIC BROWNE’S ADDITION A class led by artist Megan Perkins offering adults and mature teens of all skill levels on how to capture the essence of sketching outdoors. Aug. 15, 6-8 pm. $18/$20. The MAC, 2316 W. First Ave. (456-3931)

WORDS

FAMILY SUMMER READ CELEBRATION A special appearance by author Grace Lin to celebrate a summer of reading with crafts, activities and a presentation from the author. Aug. 8, 6:30-8:30 pm. Free. CenterPlace Regional Event Center, 2426 N. Discovery Place Dr. scld.org LILAC CITY LIT CRAWL Join Spokane Poet Laureate Mark Anderson and a lively group of writers, readers, and food and drink appreciators for a pub crawl featuring poetry and prose readings at several stops along East Sprague. Aug. 11, 4-7 pm. Free, registration requested. Starts at the Checkerboard Bar, 1716 E. Sprague. bit. ly/2K4rhOV (509-568-9004) BROKEN MIC Spokane Poetry Slam’s longest-running, weekly open mic reading series. Wednesdays at 6:30 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First. spokanepoetryslam.org (847-1234) n


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Enhance your exploration of the Coeur d’Alene region with a guided tour tuned to your precise interests and level of adventure

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Geographic. Their sunset kayak tours through Sept. 1 are a family-friendly way to enjoy beautiful Fernan Lake just off Lake Coeur d’Alene and popular with anglers. Tickets include all necessary gear for a gentle two-hour paddle (adults, $54; ages 5-12, $47). Although they’re known for waterbased tours, ROW is a great resource for other adventures, too, including hiking and biking. Join them on a guided bicycle tour of the TRAIL OF THE COEUR D’ALENES. Learn about the region’s history — miners, missionaries, fur traders, the Coeur d’Alene Tribe — as you pedal parts of the magnificent 73mile trail. Tickets (adults, $89; ages 5-12, $79) include bicycle, helmet and transportation to and from your departure site. Learn more about the region’s rich mining history on an hour-and-a-half tour of Wallace via their vintage trolley, then descend into the Earth for the SILVER MINE TOUR (adults, $16; ages


60-and-up, $14; ages 4-16, $8.50; family rate, two adults, two children, $49). Less physically adventurous, but no less appealing to your curiosity are tours offered by the MUSEUM OF NORTH IDAHO. Tuesday through Saturday (by appointment), their local historian may arrive looking like any number of local figures — a fur trader, a riverboat captain — to walk you through Coeur d’Alene. Tickets are $15 and include admission to the museum, as well as parking nearby. Finally, don’t forget the tummy. Eat your way through Coeur d’Alene, including six to seven tastings and a bit of local lore with BLUE MOOSE FOOD TOURS. Adults, $59 ($79 with alcohol); children, $45.

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Set in the idealized ’50s, Smokey Joe’s Cafe, presented by Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre, is a compelling musical about love lost and won, brought to life with some of the greatest songs ever recorded. $49 adult, $42 senior, $27 child; Friday-Saturday at 7:30 pm, Sunday at 2 pm; Salvation Army Kroc Center.

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E VE RY SUNDAY THROU G H S E P TE MB E R 1

ArtWalk AUGUST 9

Enjoy the last ArtWalk of the summer, as dozens of art galleries, restaurants and businesses showcase the work of talented local, regional and national artists. Free; go to artsandculturecda.org/artwalk to download a map of locations.

Ales for the Trail AUGUST 10

Sample great local and regional craft beer and cider from almost two dozen producers while supporting the North Idaho Centennial Trail. Live music from Kelly Hughs, food trucks and a free bike corral round out the event. $30 for six 5-ounce pours; 2-8 pm; McEuen Park.

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8 5 5 . 20 8 . 4 3 8 5 AUGUST 8, 2019 INLANDER 63


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MMA Saturday, August 17th Purchase tickets at CDAcasino.com, the Casino Box Office, or any TicketsWest outlet.

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