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SPRING 2018 thegorgemagazine.com

LIVING AND EXPLORING IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER GORGE

After the Fire All About the Art

Looking back, and ahead Gorge artists welcome visitors during Open Studio Tour

Meadows turns 50 Five decades of Gorge area skiing

Off the Beaten Path Seeking the trails less traveled

Oneonta Gorge Views Gorge TheAward-winning beloved slot canyon images in winter of our beloved landscapes

Cover_SP18.indd 1

After the Fire Looking back, and ahead

Meadows turns 50 Five decades of Gorge area skiing

2/21/18 11:03 AM


Windemere_SP18.indd 2

2/21/18 11:07 AM


Visit Historic Downtown

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CONTENTS : FEATURES

p.40

It’s All About the Art — and the Artists Gorge artists welcome visitors during the annual Open Studio Tour By Janet Cook

p.56 AWARD-WINNING GORGE VIEWS A photo essay

Renata Kosina

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SPRING 2018 : THE GORGE MAGAZINE


Starlisa Black

Discover your adventure…experience ours! MARTIN’S GORGE TOURS Guided tours for individuals, groups, families, or couples. Including waterfalls, wildflowers, wineries, breweries, trail hikes, scenic drives and more. Sit back and relax as we explore the hidden treasures of the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area.

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EXPLORE KLICKITAT COUNTY, WASHINGTON AND THE NORTH SHORE OF THE COLUMBIA RIVER GORGE! VISITOR INFORMATION CENTER: 1 Heritage Plaza, White Salmon, WA 98672 • 509-493-3630 • mtadamschamber.com


CONTENTS : DEPARTMENTS

our gorge 12 PERSON OF INTEREST 16 VENTURES 18 BEST OF THE GORGE 22 HOME + GARDEN 24 LOCAVORE 26 STYLE + DESIGN 30 EXPLORE 32 WINE SPOTLIGHT 82 EPILOGUE

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Kelly Turso

76 PARTAKE

66

26

Michael Peterson

outside 62

SAFE HIKING FOR ZERO ACCIDENTS Going up the trail is optional, getting home safely is mandatory By Christopher Van Tilburg

arts + culture 66

16

wellness 70

Top and bottom, David Hanson

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SPRING 2018 : THE GORGE MAGAZINE

FOR ART’S SAKE Artists at The 506 Gallery explore their creative side By Janet Cook

NOTHING TO SNEEZE AT Cascade Acupuncture’s allergy elimination treatment aims to help people with allergies By Janet Cook


SINCE 1994

JEWELRY

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HOME

305 OAK STREET • HOOD RIVER 541-386-6188


EDITOR’S NOTE

I

find it difficult lately not to be deflated by the headlines of the day. With the polarization and politicization of so many things, it’s sometimes hard to sift through it all and feel cheery. As spring began to drop hints of its arrival, I wanted more of the optimism that the longer days, the emerging wildflowers, the ever-warming sun brought.

And here is where I found it: in the stories that make up this issue of the magazine. Stories about people like Rachel Harry, Artwork by Jenny Loughmiller Hood River’s very own Tony Award-winning high school theater teacher, whose passion for teaching kids is inspirational. And Shannon Red Cloud, who teaches yoga classes to inmates at NORCOR and just may be helping some of them learn how to better cope with the pressures of the world when they get out of jail. And Bob Dill, who crafts astoundingly beautiful guitars that are something to behold, and still more to hear played. And David Lamoreaux, dedicated to working with people with developmental disabilities, helping them express themselves through art. This being our annual Arts Issue, the stories of the professional artists we’re featuring lifted me up, as well. There’s James Diem, who makes beautiful ceramics and knows that simply holding, say, a handmade coffee cup offers the opportunity for contemplation. There’s Leah Hedberg, whose curiosity about the natural world inspires her photography, which is often stunning in its simplicity. And there’s Jenny Loughmiller, who hit a personal low point a couple of years ago and turned to her art to climb back up. The journey led her to create the Hundred Hearts Project, an ongoing endeavor in which she’s painting hearts for 100 women in her life for whom she’s grateful — and helping others find ways to express their own gratitude. “Art and gratitude completely changed my life,” she told me. “I don’t say that lightly. It changed everything. Every. Thing.”

SPRING 2018 thegorgemagazine.com

It’s powerful stuff, these stories about people in the Gorge doing what they do every day, and making the world better for it. It doesn’t change the headlines, but in their way, they’re making their own. Taking a page from Jenny Loughmiller’s book, I’d like to express my gratitude to all of you whose stories inform and inspire and help make the Gorge such a special place. And thank you to our writers and photographers for working hard to tell those stories. To our readers, thanks for being here. May you find inspiration and optimism in this issue, too. —Janet Cook, Editor

LIVING AND EXPLORING IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER GORGE

After the Fire All About the Art Looking back, and ahead Gorge artists welcome visitors during Open Studio Tour

Meadows turns 50 Five decades of Gorge area skiing

Off the Beaten Path Seeking the trails less traveled

Oneonta Gorge Views Gorge TheAward-winning beloved slot canyon images in winter of our beloved landscapes

Cover_SP18.indd 1

After the Fire

ABOUT THE COVER Creative director and photographer, Renata Kosina, was assigned to take photos of the artists for this issue’s Gorge Artists Open Studio Tour story, and ended up with this cover-worthy shot of metal artist Brad Lorang. “I was immediately drawn to the large open feel of Brad and Debora’s living room, which used to be a grocery store,” Kosina says. “The warm color of the walls provided a perfect backdrop to Brad’s portrait and his metal artwork.” renatakosina.com

Looking back, and ahead

Meadows turns 50 Five decades of Gorge area skiing

2/21/18 11:03 AM

When you have read this issue please pass it on to a friend or recycle it. Together we can make a difference in preserving and conserving our resources. 8

SPRING 2018 : THE GORGE MAGAZINE


SPRING 2018 JANET COOK Editor

where the Gorge gets

engaged

RENATA KOSINA Creative Director/Graphic Designer

JODY THOMPSON Advertising Director

JENNA HALLETT Account Executive

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Becky Brun, Don Campbell, Viki Eierdam, David Hanson, Peggy Dills Kelter, Kacie McMackin, Christopher Van Tilburg

COVER PHOTOGRAPHER Renata Kosina

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Paloma Ayala, David Hanson, Jen Jones, Renata Kosina, Kacie McMackin, Michael Peterson, Stephen Smith, Kelly Turso, Christopher Van Tilburg

ADVERTISING INQUIRIES jthompson@thegorgemagazine.com

SOCIAL MEDIA facebook.com/thegorgemagazine instagram/thegorgemagazine pinterest/thegorgemagazine twitter.com/TheGorgeMagazin

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THE GORGE MAGAZINE thegorgemagazine.com PO Box 390 • 419 State Street Hood River, Oregon 97031

We appreciate your feedback. Please email comments to: jcook@thegorgemagazine.com

The Gorge Magazine is published by Eagle Magazines, Inc., an affiliate of Eagle Newspapers, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronically or mechanically, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without the express written permission of Eagle Magazines, Inc. Articles and photographs appearing in The Gorge Magazine may not be reproduced in whole or in part without the express written consent of the publisher. The views and opinions expressed in these articles are not necessarily those of The Gorge Magazine, Eagle Magazines, Inc., Eagle Newspapers, Inc., or its employees, staff or management. All RIGHTS RESERVED. PRINTED IN THE U.S.A.

Please visit SOLRIDES.COM or call 503.939.4961 for reservations and tour calendar

THE GORGE MAGAZINE : SPRING 2018

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OUR GORGE person of interest p. 12 ventures p. 16 best of the gorge p. 18 home + garden p. 22 locavore p. 24 style + design p. 26 explore p. 30 wine spotlight p. 32

The bar at The Lyle Hotel welcomes guests with its old-world charm and regional libations menu. p. 24 Photo by Paloma Ayala

THE GORGE MAGAZINE : SPRING 2018

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OUR GORGE : PERSON OF INTEREST

Rachel Harry

Backstage with Hood River Valley High School’s Tony Award winner STORY AND PHOTOS BY DAVID HANSON

L

ast year Rachel Harry, Hood River Valley High School theater teacher, went to Nordstrom with her son and a $2,000 gift card. After nearly three decades running the HRVHS drama department, Harry had accumulated prop closets full of Victorian, Elizabethan, Middle Eastern, Cuban and modern American costumes, but she wanted a new dress and her son needed a tux. They were heading to New York. Rachel Harry had won a Tony. Many Gorge residents were shocked to hear Hood River mentioned in the 2017 Tony Awards, wondering how the world’s most prestigious drama committee discovered our local high school teacher for the Excellence in Theater Education Award. This winter I went to meet Harry and observe a class on Shakespearean movement and rehearsals for Steel Magnolias and Terra Nova. The first person I meet backstage is senior stage manager Zach Barbour. I ask how Harry won a Tony. “Hundreds of current and former students got together and we nominated Krum,” he says, using Harry’s nickname, a shortening of the surname from her previous marriage. “She’s

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SPRING 2018 : THE GORGE MAGAZINE

like a mom for the theater students. We look up to her and learn from her, but she listens to us, too.” When I meet Krum she’s sitting on the stage in her jeans, legs outstretched and punctuated in purplelaced Nikes. I can almost hear her brain whirling. She leans over a playbook to Steel Magnolias while four girls act out a beauty parlor scene. There’s no time for chit-chatty introductions. “You’ve got to pop up with a squeal — eehhh!” Harry says to the girls on stage. “Because she’s just butchered your hair and you can’t believe it. It’s a bit of shtick here.” When the girls retreat to the green room for a costume change, I ask Harry if winning the Tony has changed anything.


Rachel Harry searches through costumes backstage, and poses on the set of Terra Nova, opposite. She demonstrates a proper bow during a Shakespeare theater class, above. Below, student Aleeyah Enriquez prepares for a rehearsal of Terra Nova.

“Maybe a little,” she says. “We performed Fiddler on the Roof after the award and some people probably came because the director won the Tony, but then they came back. Two or three times. That tells me it was about the performers, cast, crew, and band all coming together for a great performance.” Krum grew up in Wisconsin, her mom an ex-dancer and her dad a university vice-chancellor. Being the youngest of four, she fought for attention, adapting acts gleaned from Red Skelton, Danny Kaye and vaudeville dancers and mimes she discovered on TV. She was a ballet dancer and studied classical mime at the University of Utah before becoming a teacher at HRVHS at age 30. She returned to school for her masters in theater a decade later. Harry built the HRVHS theater department from a single class into a four-year program where students progress from Umoura (awareness through movement) and mime to college-level skills such as scoring scripts, the Meisner and Stephen Book techniques for instinctiveness and improvisational acting, Hodges directing theory, and two forms of stage combat. The plays and musicals she directs act as real-world practice for the classroom lessons. After a year or two, students find their niche, either in acting, behind the scenes or in set design. Ash Vaday, a senior assistant stage manager,

310 Oak Street, Downtown Hood River 541.386.7069   chemistryjewelry.com

THE GORGE MAGAZINE : SPRING 2018

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Rachel Harry works with students at a rehearsal for Steel Magnolias, above, and during a Shakespeare theater class, below. Harry won the prestigious Tony Award for Excellence in Theater Education last year after hundreds of current and former students nominated her.

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Hood River · The Dalles 14

SPRING 2018 : THE GORGE MAGAZINE

for instance, grew up on a farm and was immediately attracted to the tools and “blue collar work” he saw backstage. He intends to continue studying theater in college. This spring, in a typically ambitious twist, Krum is directing two plays, Steel Magnolias for the girls and Terra Nova for the boys. Even in a thriving theater department like that of HRVHS, producing two plays means more responsibility for everyone. But that’s one of Krum’s specialties, knowing when to teach and when to let the students take charge. She entrusts them with complex sets that stretch their acting and stage management skills, but she also wants to challenge the teenagers’ perspectives. “Historically theater has been there to teach, advise, point out what’s not right in society,” she says. “It’s been like that for thousands of years. Every once in a while I do a show that’s just a lot of fun, but invariably I can find in every show that there’s a message. We’ve done some really controversial plays, like She Kills Monsters that deals with LGBTQ issues. I had girls kissing on stage. We did Does My Head Look Big In This about a woman wearing a hijab. “I’m not telling people what they should think, but I just want them to think,” Harry adds. “The kids relate to that. To putting something out there to talk about. I could go through my entire life without anyone knowing what I’m doing. Because I know I’m doing good work here. The kids know we’re doing good work here. They’re very proud of it.” I return to watch Krum’s Shakespeare class. Twelve couples, mostly sophomores, in full Elizabethan garb fill the stage. (The Tony came with a $10,000 prize, and Krum is using it to buy more costumes, which she can loan to other, less robust high school theaters.) Krum demonstrates how the women sit in a chair — “straight posture, one leg out, slowly lower, sit at the chair’s edge.” She tells the boys to straighten a leg and point one toe when standing on stage, better to exhibit the calf muscles. “The boys need to be sassy,” she says before correcting herself. “No, wait, rakish. That’s the word.” She walks them through a progressive human “tunnel,” with each dancing couples’ hands touching to create an arch as the long formation weaves across the stage. Dancer pairs hustle through the tunnel one by one. Leather shoes swoosh on the plywood beneath billowing dresses, chest ruffles, fake swords and feathered hats. There’s not a bored face on stage. Krum applauds and lines them up, girls facing boys. “Always move slowly and regally,” she reminds them. “Boys take a bow, girls take a curtsy. And you’re done.” David Hanson is a writer, photographer and video producer based in Hood River. Find his editorial and commercial work at ModocStories.com and weddings at CascadiaStudios.com.


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OUR GORGE : VENTURES

Yoga on the Inside A new program at NORCOR brings weekly yoga classes to inmates in The Dalles

STORY AND PHOTOS BY DAVID HANSON

B

e honest with yourself,” Shannon Red Cloud calmly implores her class of nine women in pink and orange outfits. “If you go into a position that is hurting you, don’t go so deep. Through that honesty is where change happens. As pretty or ugly as it is.” It’s surprisingly quiet in the recreation room of the adult complex at Northern Oregon Regional Correctional Facility in The Dalles. No distant cell doors clanking or orders being barked. There’s not even a guard in the room. Cinder block walls painted pale yellow rise more than 20 feet to the vaulted ceiling. The room’s back windows open onto a concrete courtyard with a basketball hoop and the same towering walls capped in chain-link fence. Other than the ceiling fence and the overly bright fluorescent lighting, this could be a yoga studio anywhere in America. Red Cloud’s calm, soft voice shares a message familiar to most of the 35 million Americans who practice yoga: be present, make adjustments, get a little better each time. But in here, behind these locked doors, her words take on a deeper significance with the women who have chosen to come to the Friday afternoon class.

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SPRING 2018 : THE GORGE MAGAZINE

As yoga’s mental and physical health benefits become increasingly mainstream, it’s no surprise that prison yoga programs have been on the rise, as well. Kay Alton began the NORCOR yoga program in 2016. Alton, a social worker and yoga instructor who pioneered inmate yoga programs for youth and adults in Minnesota, had moved to the Gorge that same year. She cold-called NORCOR’s new administrative lieutenant, Brian Brandenburg, who happened to be looking for new activities for inmates. Alton received grant funding and began a six-month program of bi-weekly classes for men, women and youth. She brought on Red Cloud, owner of Pure Yoga in The Dalles and Hood River, and Burt Wyatt, a former middle school principal and the only male yoga instructor in The Dalles. “There’s this assumption that teaching yoga at NORCOR or any prison setting is an opportunity for a beginner or volunteer,” Alton says. “I value really good teachers with backgrounds in mental health or trauma-informed yoga. There’s nothing easy about teaching in a prison. And I pay the instructors a fair amount because that’s the only way to make it sustainable.”


-----------“They just said ‘There’s yoga class, who wants to go?” Luke Chastain, 14, tells me in the rec room of NORCOR’s juvenile unit. “I didn’t want to sit in my room, so I went. But I didn’t think it’d be cool.” Chastain is a bright-eyed boy who looks me in the eyes from under his long brown bangs. He’s on his second stint in juvie. Things got bad for Chastain when his little brother was diagnosed with a rare disease, and his mom and brother had to move from Baker City to Portland for longterm treatment. Chastain remained in Baker City, staying with friends or grandparents, and he started hanging with the wrong people. “After that first yoga class I came out completely aware of what it was,” Chastain says. “I have ADHD and it’s hard to sit still, but when I’m doing yoga, I’ll just, like, fall into my mind. My mind just goes blank and that feels good. “I already told my mom that we’re joining a yoga class when I’m out. It keeps me out of trouble and I’m not coming back here. My brother was crying when he found out I got sent here again.” -----------“We’re somewhat limited on the activities we can offer,” says Jeff Justesen, juvenile manager. “We allow basketball but there’s a potential for physical contact there. Yoga involves a quieter mindset on focus and relaxation. It’s a different experience. We’ve even heard that some of the kids practice yoga in their rooms.” NORCOR’s juvenile detention unit was recently criticized in a Disability Rights Oregon report that claimed harmful conditions. While NORCOR disputes the accuracy of the report, it has instituted corrective changes and the yoga classes are uniformly revered for their positive impact. A Pew Charitable Trust study found that national youth incarceration rates dropped over 50 percent between 2001 and 2013, but Oregon’s rate only dropped 23 percent. There’s always room for more correcting in the correctional system. “We’re constantly working with Kay and with others to find funding,” Justesen says. “We’d certainly like to offer yoga at least twice a week if we can.” Back in Red Cloud’s class the women are in pigeon pose, chests lifting up, one leg bent beneath them, eyes closed. It’s been an emotional 45-minute class with a few women commenting on how much the Friday yoga means to them. At different times they thank Red Cloud in effusive bursts, some choked with tears. She thanks them back. Red Cloud had suggested I wait until the end of class for interviews, anticipating yoga’s relaxing after-effects. Now, as the session wraps up, some of the women quietly sing along to a pop-gospel song on Red Cloud’s small speaker.

Shannon Red Cloud, opposite top, teaches yoga classes to inmates at NORCOR, including Kayla Smith, opposite inset, and Baylee Christopher, above (both of whom have since been released). Grant funding has allowed the correctional facility to offer bi-weekly classes.

Afterward, I speak with Bayley Christopher, 21, who has been in and out of institutions since age 14. She’s athletically built and quick to smile. “I spent a lot of time in jail,” she says. “It didn’t bother me as much to come back before, but now I’m not content with it. I come to yoga to stop my mind from all the outside things. I want to be in control of myself when I get out this time. I’m going to go down to the free class in Hood River when I’m done.” David Hanson is a writer, photographer and video producer based in Hood River. Find his editorial and commercial work at ModocStories.com and weddings at CascadiaStudios.com.

THE GORGE MAGAZINE : SPRING 2018

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OUR GORGE : BEST OF THE GORGE

Dance Performances

1

Rene Westbrook

The Columbia Center for the Arts Theater hosts an impressive line-up of dance productions throughout the spring. On March 17, the theater hosts a multicultural evening of dance and music featuring belly dancing accompanied by traditional cello music by Third Seven, and flamenco dancing by Experience Flamenco. On April 14, the popular Art of Movement returns featuring several local dance troupes performing in myriad genres. On May 11, Oregon Ballet Theatre 2 performs a uniquely choreographed evening of ballet. columbiaarts.org

Art as Activism

Chris Leck

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SPRING 2018 : THE GORGE MAGAZINE

An exhibition called Raising our Voices: Art as Activism runs March 1 through April 1 at Columbia Center for the Arts in Hood River. The show examines how artists bring about social awareness, lead others to a broader understanding of issues and perspectives, and motivate people to act for change and move the dial of cultural transformation. Art installations by eight artists, as well as individual artwork by others, explore the impact of art on political, personal and environmental issues. columbiaarts.org


Maryhill Museum

3

Jen Jones

Maryhill Museum of Art opens for the season on March 15, with a special exhibition featuring 40 works by Richard F. Lack, one of the most significant and prolific American realists of the last half of the 20th century. American Classical Realism will also be featured in a concurrent exhibition that includes work by R.H. Ives Gammell, Robert Douglas Hunter and Samuel Rose. Historic and contemporary European and American landscape paintings, and an exhibition of smaller sculptures, all drawn from the museum’s collection, will also be on view. maryhillmuseum.org.

Hood River Music Month

4

The Second Annual Hood River Music Month takes place during March, with dozens of diverse musical events taking place at various Hood River venues — including wineries, cideries, breweries, pubs, theaters, hotels and restaurants. Events range from classical, jazz, acoustic, indie, rock and bluegrass performances to musicals, films and lectures. hoodriver.org

Courtesy of the Lack Estate

Columbia River Treaty Talk

5

Join Hood River photographer Peter Marbach for a presentation on March 14 entitled From Source to Sea — Salmon Dreams and the Columbia River. Marbach will share photos and stories from his ongoing project to document and photograph the riverscapes and people along the 1,200-mile river. A moderated discussion with a panel of experts about the re-negotiations underway between the U.S. and Canada of the Columbia River Treaty, which governs hydropower and flood control along the river, will conclude the evening. The event is part of Gorge Owned’s Sense of Place Lecture Series, and takes place at Columbia Center for the Arts. gorgeowned.org.

Peter Marbach THE GORGE MAGAZINE : SPRING 2018

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OUR GORGE : BEST OF THE GORGE

Austin Smith/Bear Boot Productions

Cider Fest

7

With nine cideries and counting, the Gorge is becoming the epicenter of Oregon cider making. The craft and local talent are showcased at the fourth annual Hood River Hard-Pressed Cider Fest on April 21. More than two-dozen local and regional Northwest cideries will be on hand, with more than 50 ciders on tap. The daylong, family-friendly event also features a lineup of local music and a kids’ activity area. hoodriver.org

Cherry Festival

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Celebrate springtime in the Hood River Valley during Blossom Time, which takes place throughout the month of April with art exhibits, craft shows, plant sales, culinary activities, wine and cider tastings and other events — all taking place alongside the beautiful blossoming fruit trees stretching from Hood River to Parkdale. Take a tour of the valley on the 35-mile Hood River County Fruit Loop, which passes more than two dozen farms, fruit stands, wineries, cideries and other venues, many of which offer special events during the month. hoodriverfruitloop.com

Bigstock.com

The 39th Annual Northwest Cherry Festival takes place April 27-29 in The Dalles. The festival showcases the deep agricultural heritage and Western roots of the area, and includes the Gorge’s largest parade, a classic car show, a 10K race and lots of live music featuring local bands. There’s also cherry sampling, craft vendors and kids’ activities. thedalleschamber.com

Blossom Time

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SPRING 2018 : THE GORGE MAGAZINE


Courtesy of Columbia Gorge Discovery Center

Discovery Center

9

The Columbia Gorge Discovery Center & Museum in The Dalles offers free admission for students accompanied by a paying adult during Oregon and Washington’s consecutive spring breaks (March 24 through April 8). In addition to the popular raptor programs held every Saturday and Sunday at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m., the center hosts a special program on meteorites, led by Dick Pugh of the Cascadia Meteorite Laboratory at Portland State University, on March 24 at 1 p.m. Bring rocks you think might be meteorites and Pugh will help identify them. gorgediscovery.org

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THE GORGE MAGAZINE : SPRING 2018

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OUR GORGE : HOME + GARDEN

Designs for the Time — and Place

Interior designer Ashley Hinkle adds her creative touch to Gorge living

STORY BY JANET COOK • PHOTOS BY JEN JONES PHOTOGRAPHY

A

shley Neff Hinkle has been practicing interior design since she was a kid growing up in White Salmon. She was constantly arranging and rearranging her closet-sized bedroom. Her parents let her experiment with color and design ideas in one of their home’s small bathrooms, which she repainted so many times she lost count. After her older brother left for college, Hinkle tried painting his walls with a zigzag design. “It was a complete fail,” she says, laughing. “It looked like an Easter egg.” But all that experimenting — along with a passion and talent for art — was part of her journey to becoming a professional interior designer. She went on to graduate from Central Washington University with an interior design degree and a minor in business. Coming out of college in 2010 during the heart of the recession, Hinkle felt lucky to get a job as a designer for a construction supply company in Yakama, Wash. There, she did exterior design work — helping clients pick out stone, roofing, siding and exterior colors. “It was a great job out of the gate,” she says. “But it wasn’t as much designing as I wanted to do.” After a year she returned to the Gorge, working as a kitchen and bathroom designer for a cabinetry company and as a color consultant for Morgan Paint in Hood River. On the side, she launched her interior design business, Ashley Neff Designs. As the economy recovered, Hinkle got busier. Last summer, she let go of her other jobs as her own business took off. “I’ve been the busiest I’ve ever been in my life,” she says. “I love it.” Hinkle offers a full range of interior design work, from single room color consultations to providing whole house design services for new construction and remodels. She also provides exterior design services, including paint and stain color selection, patio furniture selection and layout, and design and selection of pavers or patio stones. She also offers house-staging services. 22

SPRING 2018 : THE GORGE MAGAZINE


Ashley Hinkle, opposite inset, favors clean lines and organization when designing interior space. She also likes to tie spaces together with a unifying color scheme.

Hinkle is a big believer in matching a client’s interior design to their lifestyles as well as to the home’s environment — which, in the Gorge, can involve many factors including views, privacy and indoor-outdoor living. With the many stunning views so readily available in the Gorge, she likes to “bring the outside in.” “The Gorge is such an inspiring place to live,” she says. “It greatly affects how I design homes.” She also believes in timeless design. “I don’t want to be trendy,” Hinkle says. “I want it to last. The bulk of interior design — building a new house or remodeling — is all the permanent investment pieces in your home. I want them to look good in 20 years.” For more information, go to neff-designs.com.

INTERIOR DESIGN TIPS

By Ashley Hinkle of Ashley Neff Designs Start with a color scheme. Whether you buy or build, create a whole-house color scheme before you start shopping. Pick one or two colors that appear consistently throughout the house. It might be paint color in one room, throw pillows in another room, a rug somewhere else — all with the same color theme. It helps tie everything together. Put investment pieces front and center. This could be a piece of art, inherited furniture, or something brought home from travels. Make sure it’s out in your home, not hidden away. If it makes you happy, put it out. Invest in a sofa. Don’t put off buying a nice sofa, just because you have small kids, for example. I’m a firm believer in buying quality pieces that will last forever because that’s the best use of your money. Buy a nice leather sofa that you love and teach your kids to respect it. Don’t buy a placeholder that will later end up at the landfill.

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THE GORGE MAGAZINE : SPRING 2018

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Inset photo and portrait by Paloma Ayala

OUR GORGE : LOCAVORE

Gorge Getaway A cozy, old-world inn with a gourmet restaurant makes The Lyle Hotel an inviting destination STORY BY DON CAMPBELL • PHOTOS BY PALOMA AYALA AND COURTESY OF THE LYLE HOTEL

L

ife doesn’t get much better on a wet, late winter night than a warm roadhouse, a sumptuous meal, and a glass of hearty wine. Throw in a couple of hours of achingly funny comedy, and you’ve concocted what might be the perfect getaway. It’s a fact that everyone needs to get away — for a couple of hours, a day or even overnight. And the closer that opportunity exists, the better. Escaping the workaday world, your perpetually whirling kid-cyclones, or any brow-knotting issue is good for the soul. The Columbia Gorge affords a ridiculously plentiful array of singular getaways tucked away in its basaltic cliffs, riparian retreats and fruit-yielding fields and orchards. We found one in The Lyle Hotel, near the railway that spawned it, in downtown Lyle, Wash. It’s minutes from Hood River and The Dalles, an easy drive from Portland, and as vivacious and satisfying a night (or a weekend) out as imaginable. Richard Simpson and his wife, Trece, have infused the historic businessman’s hotel just off Highway 14 on Seventh Street with a kind of old-world charm that manages to capture the spirit of our West — as frontier gave way to industry, and as the railroad began to provide the connective tissue between ranching and agriculture with the needs of the burgeoning city. The Simpsons may well be the modern take on serving as that connective tissue. Before we get to know them, we are treated to a Saturday night of cozy dining, with what seems like 25 or so of our closest friends we’ve never met. Comedy Night has returned to the hotel, a regular occasion during the off-season. We are greeted with the likes of local beer, cider and wine, along with a menu of spicy jambalaya, rich pot roast and ravioli, and a host of other dishes. Richard, a classically trained chef, mans the kitchen, and Trece, with skills in both orthodonticspractice management and construction, handles the people — both do so with dexterity and aplomb. Richard, born in southern California, is a California Culinary Academy-trained chef who thrives on the steamy

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pressure of gourmet cooking for a room of ravenous people. While attending boarding school on the East Coast, he went to work in a Portuguese restaurant, fell in love with the art, science and alchemy that is food, and never looked back. “By the time I got to (the academy) I’d been cooking for 10 years,” he says. “But there I learned how to cook, how to be busy, and how to handle a knife.” An avid cyclist and fan of the Tour de France, he fell in with the 7-11 U.S. cycling team and found his way to France with them as their chef.


Celilo Restaurant and Bar

Pacific Northwest cuisine with an emphasis on locally grown products, extensive wine list, and full bar. Richard and Trece Simpson, opposite, replaced the entire kitchen of the Lyle Hotel when they bought it four years ago, along with other remodeling of the early 1900s-era inn. Richard, a classically trained chef, creates a changing, gourmet menu for the restaurant.

He was given a van as his traveling food-service vehicle, which quickly proved untenable. Its scullery capabilities — which he says translates to the ability to “wash everything!” — were lacking, and he figured out a way to use the bike team’s hotel kitchens to ready the breakfasts and dinners the team hired him to prepare. He spoke no French, but found that he and the kitchen crews all understood the same language that is restaurant. Trece, along with her wait staff, lights up the dining room like a sun. She and Richard met in 2011 and found their way eventually to Portland and Seattle before taking the bold leap to Lyle. It wasn’t an easy decision. “We were going to buy a B&B,” Richard says. After remodeling and selling a condo in Seattle, and while Trece was studying a website called LoopNet.com, they found the listing for The Lyle Hotel, which had lain empty since 2012. “I saw pictures of the dining room and said, ‘No!’” Richard recalls. But he relented and they took a tour. He knew the kitchen would need a full replacement, among other arduous remodeling and reopening tasks, like getting the electricity turned on and ridding the place of spiders. But he remembers looking up at the hill full of houses — many owned by part-time residents — and thinking, “Those people need someplace to go. But I was naïve.” Still, the pair, who opened the hotel on New Year’s Eve in 2015, has found a supportive clientele (including an increasingly international one), fueled by the Simpsons’ enthusiasm for what they do. They’ve filled the building — built in 1905 and reputed to be one of the largest single-pour concrete buildings back in its day — with an adventurous spirit and attention to sincere customer service. During the year’s slower months they feature things like the recurring comedy night (as festive, fun and raucous as anything in Portland), vintner and brewer dinners that pair local potables to scratch-cooked comestibles, and other theme nights. “It’s a beautiful thing,” says Richard. The stylish old-school bar features live music on Fridays, along with a generous selection of craft beers, ciders, and wines from the Columbia Gorge AVA. And the 10 hotel rooms, though small, are a time warp, back to Lyle’s rich heritage as a railway hub and a bustling center of regional commerce. Sitting up late one night, drinking wine with Portland guitar virtuoso Terry Robb, Richard again realized how much cooking is like music. Musicians have to bring it every night, he says. So does he. “When people come here to eat, drink and be merry, we feel like there’s magic. I love it when I can hear laughter or music from the kitchen. We wanted the experience of doing a place we would want to go.” And, as does often happen when the stars align, the wind blows true and you follow a dream, many, many others will follow. For more information, go to thelylehotel.com

Paloma Ayala

Don Campbell is a writer and musician. He lives in Mosier and Portland and is a frequent contributor to The Gorge Magazine.

Dinner (Daily) 5pm-close Lunch (Fri/Sat/Sun) 11:30-3pm Happy Hour (Daily) 5-6pm

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THE GORGE MAGAZINE : SPRING 2018

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OUR GORGE : STYLE + DESIGN

Crafting Resonance

Bob Dill, once known for his custom sailboards and cabinets, finds passion in building guitars STORY BY PEGGY DILLS KELTER • PHOTOS BY MICHAEL PETERSON

E

ver since Bob Dill was a curious young boy hanging out in his grandfather’s tool-filled garage, he has been fascinated by tools, and he’s spent a lifetime utilizing all kinds of them to make beautiful products — from surfboards to his current passion, acoustic guitars.

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His interest in tools and making things began when he was a Southern California kid learning to surf. He cut down and stripped the fiberglass off a heavy, balsa wood surfboard to make a board the right size for his second-grade body. His father hated surfing, but told Bob if he hit a home run in baseball, he’d help him buy a custom board. Bob hit the homer, and with additional earnings from a summer of caddying, ordered the board. He learned some good lessons about handling tools and materials when his custom board, almost completed, was thrown out the window of the board shop on fire — too much cobalt had been mixed with the fiberglass. His new board was “toast.” By age 10, he was adept at using fiberglass. He watched sailboats being made, and helped his dad repair a boat. He soon began working in the local board shops, where he was employed throughout high school, learning other board-making skills and how to use tools that would be useful in future creative endeavors. After high school, Bob spent one semester in college before moving to Vail, Colo., where he skied and also began working in construction. A stint in the army followed (new tools to learn about) and then a move to Steamboat Springs, Colo., where he and his wife, Alexa, remodeled local restaurants and bars. From Colorado, Alexa and Bob moved to Seattle looking for “real” jobs. There, Bob truly began refining his woodworking skills. They both worked for a company that specialized in custom high-end kitchens. “Skilled artisans and craftsmen took me in and I learned from them,” Bob says. “This brought my woodworking skills to a high level. The state-of-the-art workshop was jaw dropping.” While in Seattle, Bob also built kayaks and fine furniture. He learned to windsurf, and was soon designing and building windsurfing boards for friends and acquaintances. Fellow windsurfers encouraged Bob and Alexa to visit the Gorge. “I didn’t even know where the Columbia River was,” Bob recalls. “We got to Home Valley, and I said, ‘Oh man, there’s some wind out there.’ We got to Hood River and it was


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smoking. I realized we were over our heads. We were still using teak booms, and no one was making sails small enough.” In 1985, Bob and Alexa moved to the Gorge and started Dill Sailboards. He also set up a cabinet shop adjacent to their home, and had a successful furniture and cabinet business. Before long, local woodworkers, including luthiers, would stop by to share his tools. Bob retired from his cabinet business in 2007 and began to seriously study guitar design. What seemed like a huge departure from his previous work was a natural segue for Bob. “I’ve always been the kind that looks at things like kayaks and surfboards and I say, ‘I could build something like that,’” he says. He bought a book, and picked the brains of two local luthiers, Craig Wilson and Paul Lestock, both of whom he credits with helping him tremendously. After completing and selling his first guitar, he bought a kit, which helped him answer many of the questions he still had. And he drew on the wealth of his life experiences working with tools and construction methods. “Bob has always had a penchant for trying something a little bit new,” Alexa says. “He incorporated into his guitars from his windsurfing and building knowledge things like carbon fiber reinforcements within the guitar. It’s not at all an old-school way of traditionally doing it but he thought, ‘This carbon fiber had a certain function in our sailboards, I wonder what would happen if I used some of that material in a guitar?’” Bob knew, from many days shredding on the Columbia, that a day on a board built with carbon fiber made the rider’s whole body vibrate — a negative for the sailor’s body, but a positive for a guitar. And so, Bob began using carbon fiber in his guitars, and found the material not only made the guitar stronger, but also more resonant.

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Bob Dill and his wife, Alexa, below middle, often play music together with other friends including Diana Blackman, below right. On Sunday afternoons, they play at The Pines 1852 tasting room in Hood River.

Of course, the most essential material in a guitar is the wood it is made from. Bob gets a lot of his wood from local sources, including Fred Paxton, a local lumber mill operator and furniture maker known for his salvaged wood selection. Bob has made many guitars using Fred’s wood, including a piece of Red Cedar with a compelling history. Fred recounts, “This was an old salvaged piece of cedar that had probably been through a fire at one point and been in a bog.” Bob removed the charcoal and milled the wood. He’s made six guitars out of it. “It’s so resonant,” he says. “It’s so old growth you can barely see the grain.” Alexa adds, “Fred will find a piece of wood that has history behind it. He’ll tell Bob. (Bob and Fred) take a beautiful tree that’s been felled for whatever reason and give it another 100 years to live.” Kit Garoutte, a White Salmon musician and guitar teacher, owns a Dill guitar. “I am a native Oregonian and have lived in Oregon most of my life, so when Bob told me the top (of my guitar) is made with Port Orford Cedar and the back and sides with Oregon Myrtlewood, I was floored!” he says. “Bob has an amazingly inquisitive and creative mind, and this unique combination of woods, along with the carbon fiber to stabilize the neck and fingerboard and the bracing, is perfection.” Bob estimates he averages about 40 hours on every guitar. He’s made 120 of them so far; a large collection awaits guitarists’ visits to the Dill’s workshop and home. There, musicians can try out the instruments. “People come and we leave them alone — we lose people in here; they can’t make up their minds,” Alexa says. Of her husband, she adds, “He disappears into his shop first thing in the morning, and I have to drag him back in for dinner. The intensity of his drive to keep doing it — it’s not a job, it’s a passion.” On Sunday afternoons, Bob, Alexa and their musical friends play together at The Pines 1852 tasting room in Hood River. They all speak to the “aliveness” of the guitars. “The sound is ever changing,” Bob says. “The more the guitars are played, the more they open up.” As the musicians caress beautiful sounds out of the instruments, it’s easy to believe they live. For more information, go to bobdillguitars.com. Peggy Dills Kelter is an artist and writer who lives in Hood River. She’s a frequent contributor to The Gorge Magazine. 28

SPRING 2018 : THE GORGE MAGAZINE


Andrea Johnson/Maryhill Winery

Discover Klickitat County Washington the north side of the Columbia River Gorge

STAY PLAY ENJOY 4

4

KLICKITAT COUNTY WASHINGTON Finish a beautiful driving loop tour with a visit to our premium wineries, museums, colorful shops, farmers markets, and festive restaurants. Oh, and meet some of the friendliest folks around. Join us on the sunny side of the Columbia River Gorge! Enjoy a scenic whitewater rafting excursion, kiteboarding or windsurfing, world-class fishing, cycling trails, or star-gazing at the Goldendale Observatory…Klickitat County has it all! Whitewater Rafting

Farmer’s Markets

Maryhill Museum

Maryhill Winery

Dean Davis Photography

MAPS AND ACTIVITY BROCHURES AVAILABLE AT:

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Annie Kaplan

OUR GORGE : EXPLORE

Off the Beaten Path Discover the hidden gems of the northern and eastern Gorge

O

n Sept. 2, 2017, hundreds of people ventured out for a day hike on the popular Eagle Creek Trail. Many carried daypacks with water, sunscreen, snacks and other items they might need in the hot weather. They wore hiking boots, sunhats and quick-drying clothing. Others, wearing swimsuits and flip-flops, carried nothing more than a bottle of water. None of them expected to spend the night along the trail or hike 13 miles to Wahtum Lake to get out. But that’s exactly what happened to 150 people who became trapped when a wildfire ignited below. Making international news, this very public incident made people aware that hiking comes with risks. “Anything can happen, whether you’re out for a short hike or an overnight trip,” says Rachel Pawlitz, public affairs officer for the U.S. Forest Service. “So it’s important to take some very basic steps to be prepared.” To help improve the visitor experience in the Gorge, the U.S. Forest Service teamed up with Friends of the Columbia Gorge, Travel Oregon and Oregon Department of Transportation to launch Ready, Set, GOrge! “The tips you’ll find on ReadySetGorge.com will help you plan your hike (Ready), consider conditions and determine 30

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STORY BY BECKY BRUN

what to bring (Set), and find ways to help protect the Gorge so that future generations can enjoy it, too (Gorge),” Pawlitz says. Historically, the vast majority of hikers flocked to the popular trails on the Oregon side of the Columbia River between Troutdale and Wyeth — the same trails that have been closed due to damage from the Eagle Creek Fire. “Just 17 percent of the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area was impacted by the fire,” says Maegan Jossy, outreach manager for Friends of the Columbia Gorge. “There are plenty of places to explore — many of which have waterfalls, wildflowers, natural history and jaw-dropping views of the Columbia River. Plus, fewer crowds.” Following are some suggestions to get you started. Visit ReadySetGorge.com to find directions to these and other trailheads, a list of the 10 essentials, and other tips to help you have a safe and fun adventure.

Type: Out to a loop and back Distance: 2.75 miles round trip Difficulty: Easy Restrooms: Yes Trailhead Pass: No Public Transportation: Yes, accessible via the Gorge West End Transit (WET) bus

STEIGERWALD LAKE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE

Debbie Asakawa

If you’re looking for an easy, family-friendly trail with excellent wildlife viewing, few trails are as fitting as the 2.75-mile Gibbon Creek Art Trail within the Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge. Numerous sculptures and interactive displays along this flat, graveled path help visitors learn about wildlife, which includes almost 300 species of birds. After a stroll through Steigerwald, grab lunch in nearby


Trail Notes: The eastern segment of the trail is

closed from October 1 to May 1 to reduce disturbance to wintering waterfowl. Dogs are not allowed in the wildlife refuge any time of year. Access the WET Bus schedule at www.readysetgorge.com.

COLUMBIA HILLS HISTORICAL STATE PARK

Debbie Asakawa

Type: Numerous options, including loops Distance: Varies Difficulty: Easy and Moderate Restrooms: Yes Trailhead Pass: Discover Pass Public Transportation: No

Whether you’re seeking geologic features, history, natural beauty or all of the above, you’ll find it at Columbia Hills Historical State Park. Located 6 miles east of Dallesport, Wash., on SR 14, this 3,600-acre nature preserve features numerous hikes that unveil signs of its past — from the ice-age floods to Native American settlements to the construction of The Dalles Dam. Choose from more than 12 miles of well-maintained trails, including the Crawford Oaks Loop, a 9-mile, figure-eight loop that’s popular in April and May when the lupine and balsamroot are in full bloom. On a clear day, you’ll spot hundreds of wildflowers as well as the snow-capped peaks of Mount Hood, Mount Adams, Mount Rainier and Mount Jefferson. Columbia Hills is well known for its impressive collection of Native American rock art, including the famous pictograph, “She Who Watches.” Park rangers offer seasonal, guided tours of the petroglyphs and pictographs along the Temani Pesh-wa Trail (see Trail Notes below). After your hike, go wine tasting at the nearby Maryhill Winery, which hosts live music and food (for sale) on its outdoor terrace weekends from 1 to 5 p.m. throughout the summer.

Trail Notes: You will need a Discover Pass to park here; the day rate is $10 (bring the correct amount in cash) and you can find envelopes near the restrooms. Guided tours of the Temani Pesh-wa Trail are offered Fridays and Saturdays, April through October, at 10 a.m. Tour sizes are limited to 25 people. Call 509-439-9032 for reservations.

Type: Out and back Distance: 5 miles round trip Difficulty: Moderate Restrooms: Yes Trailhead Pass: No Public Transportation: No

WELDON WAGON TRAIL

This 2.5-mile historic wagon road-turned-trail was built in the early 1900s to help Micheal Drewry orchardists in Husum, Wash., transport their fruit to the Columbia River. Today, hikers and mountain bikers can enjoy this scenic trail featuring Oregon white oak woodlands, wildflowers, meadows, and views of Mount Hood and the White Salmon Valley. Along the way, you’ll see rusted farm equipment and other signs of a previous era. After your hike, take a detour to Everybody’s Brewing in White Salmon for lunch with a view on its outdoor deck. Trail Notes: This trail is open to both mountain bikers and hikers.

Becky Brun is writer and outdoor adventurer who lives in Hood River.

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OUR GORGE : WINE SPOTLIGHT

Hiyu Wine Farm

A Hood River couple delves deep into the farmto-table ethos of local food and wine STORY BY VIKI EIERDAM • PHOTOS BY STEPHEN SMITH PHOTOGRAPHY

W

e are all the sum of our parts — our past experiences linked with our present already shaping our future hopes and dreams. To know a bit about someone’s past is to better understand who they are in the present. Pieces of what Nate Ready is doing at Hiyu Wine Farm in the Hood River Valley develop richer layers when his time spent at Ronco del Gnemiz, a winery located in northeastern Italy, is taken into account.

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Ronco del Gnemiz is highly regarded in the Friuli-Venezia Giulia region and, although Ready also has a Napa harvest under his belt, his work in the winery and vineyards of Ronco clearly influenced his vigneron approach to wine today. “There’s a cultural matrix where wines and food taste like the place, the people who live there and how they adapt to the landscape,” Ready said. “The Columbia Gorge is so intense like that. We very much wanted it to feel like, if you’re coming to the Hood River Valley, we’d make a wine that tasted like the Hood River Valley.” On Ready’s long and winding road to the country, he met China Tresemer. Her own strong artistic interests, including gardening and culinary leanings, were in tandem with the vision Ready was hatching, and together they began actively exploring the concepts of true sustainability on a small and intentional scale. Now presiding over a 30-acre farm, with 14 acres planted to vine, Ready sees Hiyu — a Chinook Indian word meaning plenty or abundance — as


WA Tasting Room Magazine

Guests gather around the big farm table in the Hiyu Wine Farm kitchen during a winemaker dinner, one of the hallmarks of the Hood River Valley winery, opposite top. Hiyu co-owner China Tresemer and chef Jason Barwikowski plate a course, opposite bottom.

a collaborative space of gifted and passionate artisans coming together to witness, share and educate others on the caretaking of land, what it can bring forth, and the fair market value for that life’s work. It’s not a spoken agenda meant to shame anyone but an act of love and respect for a way of life that recent generations have distanced themselves from. “The European ethic is based around the host and their guest,” Ready said. “It’s reciprocal but weighted. There is a reverence on the side of the guest for the host where you wouldn’t go somewhere and not eat what was served to you.” He’s referring to the multitude of dietary restrictions in American culture and how that mentality is counter to the farm-to-fork movement. Ready maintains that a great food encounter must go from harvest to preparation to presentation in a matter of hours as opposed to the days or longer often required to accommodate all the different exceptions within a group of diners. This philosophy of genuine connection is best understood at Hiyu’s Saturday night winemaker dinners, where 12 to 18 people gather together for a dining experience that is part wine class and part “traditions around the table.” Each menu features ingredients of the moment, some of which have a unique responsibility in the vineyard.

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THE GORGE MAGAZINE : SPRING 2018

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OUR GORGE : WINE SPOTLIGHT

The winemaker dinners at Hiyu range from formal, multi-course affairs to casual, family style meals. Chef Jason Barwikowski, formerly of Portland’s Clyde Common and The Woodsman Tavern, is adept at the whole range. Below is his take on fish and chips, with Northwest halibut, kacap manis (Indonesian sweet soy sauce) and seaweed.

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SPRING 2018 : THE GORGE MAGAZINE

In addition to milking their own cows and goats, Ready and Tresemer raise Guinea hogs for the animal’s exquisite marbled meat as well as their gentle disposition. More grazers than diggers, this slow-growing black pig helps cultivate rows of cover crops between the vines. Free-roaming chickens and heritage cows also lend a foot or hoof to tilling. Back in the open kitchen, Chef Jason Barwikowski (formerly of Portland’s Clyde Common and The Woodsman Tavern) and Tresemer exhibit their culinary prowess while guests imbibe a welcome glass of white wine with the characteristic food-friendly acid of the Friuli-Venezia Giulia region and layered minerality that demonstrates Ready’s well-read and angled approach to winemaking. In addition to the aforementioned training, Ready brings a master sommelier background as well as time spent at Antica Terra winery to every barrel and bottle. The friendships Ready has made along the way are an important component of Hiyu and show up most heavily at winemaker dinners. Last November, Hiyu hosted guest winemaker Laura di Collobiano from Tenuta di Valgiano in Tuscany. The first collaborative dinner of 2018, held in March, features Gunnar Gíslason, owner/chef at Dill in Iceland and executive head chef at Agern in New York City. His farm and forage approach will be right at home in the bountiful Gorge.


“There’s a ton of energy around these spontaneous small events that aren’t commercially significant but are about sharing,” Ready said. “The food can be so wonderful but without stress. Chef is right there and they can sit down and hang out and not have to worry about the madness (of a large restaurant scene).” Along with the estate vineyard, Hiyu farms three other vineyards in the Gorge on long-term leases: the 10-acre Scorched Earth Vineyard near Lyle, Wash., planted to Grenache and Syrah; Atavus Vineyard which was last farmed by Analemma Wines and is a historic Washington vineyard sitting at the 1,700-foot elevation; and a three-acre site on the east side of the Hood River Valley. Hiyu wines have Old World stylings with racy acidity that complements the strong culinary focus of the wine farm. Visitors will still find fruit notes like citrus, blackberry and black cherry, but minerality with a hint of salinity or smoke also show up in their whites. Silky, elegant notes with a confident masculinity made to age with great refinement grace their reds. In the tasting room, guests can enjoy no-reservations-required small bite and wine pairings. The winery’s more accessible flight is comprised

from vine

d

to bottle Finely crafted wines,

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mountain & vineyard views, and spring blossoms. Wine tasting daily from 11am to 5pm

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DISCOVER THE AMAZING WINES

AND STUNNING BEAUTY OF

LYLE, WASHINGTON

THE NEXT GENERATION OF WASHINGTON WINE can be found in the heart of the incredible Columbia Gorge. Five amazing wineries only 75 breathtaking minutes east of Portland.

For individual winery info: WINERIES OF LYLE.COM

THE GORGE MAGAZINE : SPRING 2018

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OUR GORGE : WINE SPOTLIGHT

China Tresemer, above, prepares an herbal tisane and rhubarb trifle to finish a meal. Below, Hiyu Wine Farm co-owner Nate Ready presents wines to guests at a dinner highlighting the modern revolution in farm-to-table British cuisine.

of three Smockshop Band wines — a second label, whose name comes from a marking on a map of the Lewis and Clark Expedition at the location of Hiyu referencing the local Indians — and three from like-minded producers for $25. Tastings of the single vineyard Hiyu label and additional inspirational wines are poured for $65 and also are served with food pairings. These abbreviated adventures are an apt introduction to what the Hiyu team is trying to convey — an exploration into the food shed of the Columbia Gorge. For more information, go to hiyuwinefarm.com

Viki Eierdam is a freelance writer and frequent contributor to The Gorge Magazine.

IN THE GORGE OF THE GORGE

Tasting Room on the River Lyle, WA | Open Year Round Winery, Vineyards & Tasting Mosier, OR | Beginning April 2018 •

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IDIOTSGRACE.COM

SPRING 2018 : THE GORGE MAGAZINE


Visit our

TASTE SHOP ENJOY! OPEN DAILY 12 - 6 304 Oak St., Suite 3, Hood River, OR TastingRoomHRD@hrdspirits.com 541-716-5276 2018 Hood River Distillers, Inc. Hood River, Oregon USA, www.hrdspirits.com Stay in control.ÂŽ

Portland Grand Tasting

Bigstock.com

Tasting Room

Join award-winning Columbia Gorge wineries at the Portland Grand Tasting on April 12 at Leftbank Annex, 101 N. Weidler Street in Portland. More than 20 Gorge wineries will all be pouring under the same roof at this annual event, where you can socialize with vintners and learn about the Columbia Gorge wine region. General admission tickets include complimentary tastings from more than 20 Gorge wineries, light hors d’ouevres, and a commemorative wine glass. For those wanting a more intimate and elevated experience, get a VIP ticket to gain early admission and access to a private VIP balcony with special library tastings, small bites, wine education and more. For information and tickets, go to columbiagorgewine.com.

Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of marijuana. For use only by adults twenty-one years of age or older. Keep marijuana out of the reach of children.

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Bigstock.com

Wine Tasting Tips

CONFIRM HOURS

Gorge wineries and tasting rooms vary in their hours and days of operation. Call ahead if you’re planning to visit with a large group. DRESS FOR THE WEATHER

Dress appropriately, especially if you plan a vineyard picnic or tour. DON’T WEAR FRAGRANCES

Perfume and cologne can interfere with the subtle aromas in wine. ASK ABOUT FEES

Some wineries charge a fee for tastings. Some will waive fees with a purchase. TASTING TIPS

Generally, white wines are tasted first, followed by red wines and then dessert wines. It’s okay to skip any of the wines on a tasting list by politely declining. If you’re genuinely interested in purchasing a particular wine, it’s okay to ask for a second taste. WHAT TO DO

Swirling the wine in your glass helps aerate the wine’s many aromas. When tasting, hold the glass by the stem rather than the bowl as holding it by the bowl can disturb the temperature of the wine. Inhale before taking a sip to appreciate the wine’s aromas. Likewise, swirl the wine around in your mouth once you sip to coat all the surfaces. HIP TO SPIT

You don’t have to drink all the wine in your glass. Toss the unwanted wine into the dump bucket provided for this purpose.

Award winning wines, friendly staff, bocce courts, picnic and pet friendly. Come see us! Corporate Outings, Rehearsal Dinners, Retirement Parties, Weddings and Other Special Events

PACE YOURSELF

Don’t try to visit too many wineries in one day. Know your limit and stop when you reach it.

welcoming tasting room & patio 5.5 scenic miles south of hood river on hwy 35

HAVE A DESIGNATED DRIVER

This will ensure your wine tasting adventure is fun and safe for you and others.

Elements Studios

541.386.1277 / wyeastvineyards.com Open Daily 11-5 or so

THE GORGE MAGAZINE : SPRING 2018

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IT’S ALL ABOUT

THE ART

Ted Olson

James Diem

Jenny Loughmiller

Leah Hedberg

Brad Lorang

Christine Knowles

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AND

THE ARTISTS

GORGE ARTISTS WELCOME VISITORS during the annual Open Studio Tour Story by Janet Cook • Artists photos by Renata Kosina There are as many reasons to take part in the Gorge Artists Open Studio Tour as there are artists on the tour — which, this year, is 41. This is the 12th year of the annual tour, which has become a hallmark of spring in the Gorge. The three-day tour takes place April 20-22, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., when participating artists welcome visitors into their studios for an intimate look at what goes in to creating their work. A few of the artists on the tour gave us early access, answering some of our burning questions and letting us photograph them in their studios. We hope this preview helps inspire you to take part in the tour. This year’s artist roster features a variety of work including painting, drawing, jewelry, glass, sculpture, ceramics, photography, textiles, fiber, furniture and more. Artists’ studios are located throughout the Mid-Columbia, from Cascade Locks to The Dalles and from Parkdale to Trout Lake. The Gorge Artists Open Studio Tour is a juried event, with artists representing the highest quality work available from the region. It includes artists who have been on the tour since its inception, and others who have joined it more recently. The tour is free and self-guided. For more information, including a map, go to gorgeartists.org.

THE GORGE MAGAZINE : SPRING 2018

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TED OLSON

Top two photos courtesy of Ted Olson

Oil on wood

tedolsonpaintings.com TED OLSON HAS A DEGREE IN FINE ARTS FROM PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY AND AN MFA IN VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS. HE AND HIS WIFE HAVE BEEN SPENDING TIME IN THE GORGE FOR NEARLY 20 YEARS — MANY OF THEM ON PROPERTY THEY OWNED NEAR WILLARD, ON THE LITTLE WHITE SALMON RIVER. THEY MOVED TO WHITE SALMON IN 2015, WHERE TED PURSUES HIS PAINTING AND WORKS IN DIGITAL DESIGN. HOW DID BECOMING AN ARTIST HAPPEN OR EVOLVE FOR YOU?

Growing up, I was always the guy who could draw anything. I took art classes all through high school. In college, the decision to major in Fine Arts was easy. I was lucky at Portland State University to study painting with two very influential teachers: Craig Cheshire and Mel Katz. These two guys looked at the art world from opposite ends of the spectrum — Cheshire was very traditional, right down to sizing canvas with rabbit skin glue. Katz took the opposite tack. He was very modern and used us, his students in Advanced Painting, as explorers. He would send us off to try things he simply did not have time to do himself. I learned a lot through this guided experimentation. For years, I worked through a lot of paintings to discover what was true and valuable to me. I always loved the great artists from the ‘50s and ‘60s, from the Abstract Expressionists to the Minimalists. Those concerns were balanced by a deep appreciation of William Turner, the Impressionists, and so on. Couple all of that with trying to improve craft and technique. In very simple terms, that was the evolution. HOW DID YOU ARRIVE AT YOUR MEDIUM?

Through school and subsequent exploration, I played with a variety of media, from color pencil to pastel to acrylic, house paint — you name it. Oil really grabbed me — its workability, the texture, the ability to deliver color so close to nature. I’ve also experimented with surface. For years I went back and forth between stretched canvas and paper. These days, I’m working with birch panels that I put together myself. They are strong and stand up well to an aggressive approach to building up — and taking down — layers of paint. HOW DOES YOUR PROCESS WORK?

The paintings are done in oil paint on birch panels. I mix colors with a medium, then move the paint around on the panels with scrapers, sticks, rags and hands, laying down layers. Paint is applied and removed, applied again, and shaped. The strength and resistance of the birch panels allow an aggressive 42

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approach with the scrapers and sticks and even orbital sanders. Marks and textures from the application of these tools take on a life of their own and lead the development of the painting more than any focus on subject matter. Multiple panels allow smaller, more manageable pieces to scale up into interesting compositions. The resulting constructions are usually framed.

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WHAT IS MOST SATISFYING ABOUT YOUR WORK?

As I’ve gotten closer to landscape, I’ve found a logic for my work that was missing for a long time. You know there is strength in the horizon line. For many years, I could see that, and feel it, but I could not really see a way to incorporate it into what was, for me, a more non-objective pursuit. But now, given the newer work over the last two or three years, I have found ways to really bring landscape forward while still enjoying more of the aspects of non-objective painting — edge, surface, texture, color. It doesn’t always come together but, when it does, it is satisfying. WHAT IS LIKE TO BE AN ARTIST IN THE GORGE?

I’m pretty sure I’m not the first person to realize that the landscapes out here are spectacular and unique. From the fjords of the central Gorge out to the deserts past The Dalles, the views are absolutely inspiring. Long, wide lines and big skies. Living here, you see these views everywhere, even from the grocery store parking lot. It would be difficult to not be inspired by this amazing place. It is a great place to make paintings.

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WHAT DOES BEING PART OF THE GORGE ARTISTS OPEN STUDIO TOUR MEAN TO YOU?

First, I look forward to traffic in my own studio. I’ll be interested to see how visitors react to my work and my techniques. Then, as a first-timer, I’m amazed by the professionalism and dedication of the GAOS group. To be a part of it is an honor and I appreciate it. I look forward to continuing with the tour in the years ahead.

$1,250,000 Trout Lake: Giant Mt. Adams view and approx.. 2,400 ft of the White Salmon River frontage. Gorgeous home 3 beds, 3 baths, 4223 sqft on 21.31 acres. Features view from almost every room and attention to detail. RMLS 17380594

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THE GORGE MAGAZINE : SPRING 2018

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JAMES DIEM Ceramics

hawkeyedesign.com JAMES DIEM FELL IN LOVE WITH THE GORGE IN 2000 WHEN HE AND HIS WIFE, ANNA, A SPEECH THERAPIST, MOVED HERE WHILE SHE TOOK A TEMPORARY JOB. THEY RETURNED TO THE GORGE FULL TIME IN 2003, AND DIEM CAME ARMED WITH AN ART TEACHING DEGREE WITH AN EMPHASIS IN CERAMICS. HE NEVER GOT A TEACHING JOB, BUT INSTEAD BEGAN WORKING AS A FULL-TIME POTTER. HE CONTINUES TO BUILD ON HIS REPUTATION FOR FUN AND FUNCTIONAL POTTERY WITH UNIQUE FORMS AND GLAZE COMBINATIONS AT HIS HOOD RIVER VALLEY STUDIO, JAMES DIEM CERAMICS. HOW DID BECOMING AN ARTIST HAPPEN OR EVOLVE FOR YOU?

When we moved here, I had every intention of being a high school art teacher and a part time potter. Initially there weren’t any positions open so I got to work setting up my studio and learning the mechanics of being a full-time artist — balancing the production and the marketing, finding the right retail shows and developing gallery relationships, not to mention making work that people are interested in actually buying! There’s a lot more to it than a young potter realizes. It was quite an eye-opener realizing how much production is required to earn a living making pots. I was really fortunate to have a supportive spouse in the early years. In the beginning I was juggling arts education residencies, substitute teaching and learning to be a potter — which was contrary to my belief after college that I was a pretty good potter already. I applied several times when positions opened up at the high school over the years, each time ending up as the second place candidate. Eventually I progressed too far along with my pottery business to make an entry level teaching position be a good decision for my family. I would love to teach again someday, though. HOW DID YOU ARRIVE AT YOUR MEDIUM? 

Artwork photos courtesy of James Diem

My art-teaching program at Grand Valley State University in Michigan required you take several courses in every media: drawing, painting, sculpture, design and ceramics. Clay quickly became my passion and emphasis.

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DESCRIBE YOUR PROCESS.

Most of my work is wheel thrown and altered. After the initial forming (throwing) on the wheel, the work is set aside to partially dry — to what is known as the “leather hard state” — then it’s returned to the wheel to be refined to its final shape through trimming with specialized tools. Then after the work is fully dried, it’s fired first in the kiln to 1,945 degrees, and then cooled and glaze applied and finally re-fired at 2,200 degrees. Glaze (the colorful part) is essentially a thin layer of glass formulated to shrink at the same rate the clay shrinks in the kiln.


WHAT IS MOST SATISFYING ABOUT YOUR WORK?

I love how you can literally take a handful of earth and transform it into something beautiful and functional that, if cared for, will last forever. It feels good to be able to create affordable art for the middle class. Everyone deserves to have beautiful objects in their lives, and pottery, with its relatively lower price point, is readily accessible to most people. Also the functional aspect of the craft puts pots in your hands often — providing the everyday opportunity, for example, to notice a beautiful curve or glaze mark while enjoying a cup of tea or coffee. I don’t think it’s an overreach to believe that a good pot can assist and enhance a reflective state in the present moment. WHAT IS IT LIKE TO BE AN ARTIST IN THE GORGE? 

There’s a great artist community here. With fewer employment opportunities than a big city, lots of us have to hustle to make things work. Artists are a perfect fit for the Gorge in that regard. Plus when you’re self-employed you can never be fired! There’s actually a significant potter stronghold in the Gorge — probably 10 to 12 of us. Fortunately potters are gregarious and collaborative by nature. There are so many methods and techniques of working with clay, there’s room for everyone under the umbrella without feeling competitive. I feel it’s standard practice around here to help each other when needed. It’s a good tribe we have. We’re so lucky to be surrounded by such a beautiful environment. Whether our work is inspired directly or indirectly, we’re all influenced by this amazing place we call home. WHAT DOES BEING PART OF THE GORGE ARTISTS OPEN STUDIO TOUR MEAN TO YOU? 

The tour has really grown over the years I’ve participated. Last year I had folks from all over northwestern Oregon and southwestern Washington visit. It’s a great time of year for people to get out, see the valleys in blossom and see art studios first-hand.

101 Oak St, Hood River, OR THE GORGE MAGAZINE : SPRING 2018

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JENNY LOUGHMILLER

Acrylics • Collage

hundredheartsproject.org JENNY LOUGHMILLER LANDED IN THE GORGE IN 2006 WHEN SHE AND HER HUSBAND BOUGHT THE MUIRHEAD CANNING COMPANY IN THE DALLES. AN ARTIST SINCE CHILDHOOD, SHE TOOK A HIATUS WHEN SHE HAD HER CHILDREN — NOW FOUR IN ALL. SHE LONGED TO GET BACK TO IT, BUT WAS ALSO AFRAID. AS A WAY TO DIVE BACK IN, SHE BEGAN “PAINTING HER GRATITUDE” TO 100 WOMEN WHO HAVE IMPACTED HER LIFE. THE ENDEAVOR CONTINUES AND HAS EVOLVED INTO HER HUNDRED HEARTS PROJECT, WHICH HELPS INSPIRE OTHERS TO EXPRESS THEIR GRATITUDE. HOW DID BECOMING AN ARTIST HAPPEN OR EVOLVE FOR YOU?

I was artistic as a young child — not a prodigy by any stretch but art came naturally to me and I loved it completely. Insecurities set in during adolescence and I became embarrassed by my work, but I still enjoyed creating and took classes through high school and minored in fine art in college. I began creating art quilts in my early twenties to scratch the creative itch. I stopped quilting when I had my second child and then stagnated for several years while I focused on my children. By then I was so paralyzed by lack of practice and fear that the thought of anyone seeing my work brought on anxiety attacks. I finally decided to push past the fear and start painting as a way to express gratitude for beloved people in my life. HOW DID YOU ARRIVE AT YOUR MEDIUM?

I’ve always been drawn to work that is richly colored, patterned and textured. I tend toward minimalism in all areas of my life — except in my art! “More is more” is my motto when I’m in the studio. The flexibility of acrylics lends itself to lots of layering. I can use them as a gentle wash or with traffic-stopping intensity. I can go over the top with a variety of mark-making tools as well as layer in papers for collage/mixed media. I also appreciate how fast they dry. Being a mother to four means I only have short periods of time to create my art — I need to work fast. Acrylics are perfect for a quick layer before someone decides to bring the chicken inside to give it a snack.  DESCRIBE YOUR PROCESS. Artwork photos by Renata Kosina

Every “heart” I paint starts out as a 12-by-12 inch art panel, which I build myself. I paint a bright color for a base layer and then start adding pattern — stencils, freehand, collage. I just start building texture. Eventually I need to make some specific design decisions. I really start to think about who the painting is for. Once I know that, the rest just flows out as my expression of gratitude for her. Sometimes I have a specific idea for a specific person and then I work to get as close as I can to what’s in my mind’s eye. Either way, the process is pure magic and incredibly powerful to be a part of. 46

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WHAT IS MOST SATISFYING ABOUT YOUR WORK?

My original intention with my gratitude project was to keep it a secret until I’d finished all 100 hearts. I made the uncharacteristically bold decision to share the project on Facebook. I named it the Hundred Hearts Project and began posting photos of each painting as it was completed. The response was overwhelmingly positive — and people wanted to do their own project. I realized I had an incredible opportunity to make a positive change in the world though my project. I printed notecards — gratitude cards — featuring artwork from my Hundred Hearts Project. These cards gave people an easy way to express their gratitude. The most satisfying thing about my work is seeing how it impacts other people. The connections that have been made, the relationships that have been strengthened, the hearts that have been touched simply because I painted a few hearts and copied them onto some paper — it’s humbling and incredibly rewarding. WHAT IS IT LIKE TO BE AN ARTIST IN THE GORGE?

I love that inspiration is everywhere I look. From the intense colors of spring wildflowers to the (occasional) glassy Columbia River reflecting the Klickitats to alpenglow on Mount Hood to the way the sun kisses the hills at sunrise to the blooming cherry orchards. It all feeds my soul and ultimately ends up in my artwork.

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WHAT DOES BEING PART OF THE GORGE ARTISTS OPEN STUDIO TOUR MEAN TO YOU?

It’s an honor. To be in the company of such incredible talent is truly humbling. I am also both grateful for and mindful of the opportunity I have to share the story of gratitude and transformation that is behind my work. If I can inspire one person to make positive change in their life, it will be time well spent.

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THE GORGE MAGAZINE : SPRING 2018

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LEAH HEDBERG

Photography

theartofwelcome.com LEAH HEDBERG’S ROOTS IN THE GORGE GO BACK GENERATIONS, TO HER GREAT-GREAT-GRANDMOTHER, WHO EMIGRATED FROM NORWAY IN THE 1880S AND SETTLED IN CASCADE LOCKS. HER GREAT-GREAT-GRANDFATHER WORKED ON CONSTRUCTION OF THE LOCKS, AND THE COUPLE HOMESTEADED ON WIND MOUNTAIN IN HOME VALLEY. SUBSEQUENT GENERATIONS MOVED TO PORTLAND WHERE THERE WAS MORE WORK, BUT AS A CHILD, LEAH AND HER FAMILY LIVED FOR A TIME IN THE DALLES. LEAH REMEMBERS HER DAD, AN AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHER, TAKING PICTURES OF THE WHEAT FIELDS AND OLD BARNS IN THE AREA AND IT HELPED SPARK HER INTEREST IN PHOTOGRAPHY. LEAH AND HER HUSBAND, GUS, MOVED TO THE GORGE IN 2000. A SELF-DESCRIBED “NATURALIST AT HEART,” LEAH PURSUES HER WORK PHOTOGRAPHING THE NATURAL WORLD FROM HER STUDIO IN HOOD RIVER. HOW DID BECOMING AN ARTIST HAPPEN OR EVOLVE FOR YOU?

Photography was a natural progression from growing up in a musical family and being interested in poetry and literature. I found the language of light fascinating, and I liked the way a picture can speak through metaphor and be ethereal, with economy of expression, like a poem. HOW DID YOU ARRIVE AT YOUR MEDIUM?

When I was 16, my family moved to Flagstaff, Ariz. Everything about life was so fresh. I can remember the stands of quaking aspen and seeing the mountain light shimmer through yellow leaves. The beauty of Flagstaff reconnected me to some of my earliest memories, when I’d lived in Oregon, and had experienced a similar kind of beauty here. These encounters with light and movement led me to get my first camera at age 17. It was a joy coming of age with a camera in my hands, and the association of photography and sense of wonder has remained strong and full of possibility after many years.

Artistic photos courtesy of Leah Hedberg

DESCRIBE YOUR PROCESS.

The photographic process has two sides: exposing pictures and printmaking. Taking pictures starts by getting curious about something. This can be anything, but I’m strongly interested in things people didn’t make. The more everywhere a subject is — like moss or leaves — the more suspicious I become it has interesting things to say. Sometimes I photograph in a place; other times I bring things back to the studio. A shoot goes well when it feels conversational, as if there’s looking, asking questions, and responding to what I see. Digital processing and image selection follow the photography. Editing is modest, and honest. On the printmaking side, files are prepared according to print surface. I print most 48

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of my work in the studio using a large format pigment ink printer. I make traditional photographic prints on cotton paper, and also do pigment ink transfers on birch panels. These are fun because the wood grain interacts with the imagery. WHAT IS MOST SATISFYING ABOUT YOUR WORK?

It is rewarding to get lost in creating and to enjoy the work so much that I forget about time, as often happens through photography. I also love that it allows being playful and free. WHAT IS IT LIKE TO BE AN ARTIST IN THE GORGE?

It’s windy! In the past, as a portrait photographer, I used to ask clients to say “breeze!” But I think the wind and rain and contemplative winters are part of the mystery and beauty that captivates people here, including artists who value connection to the natural world. The beauty seems, like the wind here, a constant and powerful presence.

Making History Come Alive…

WHAT DOES BEING PART OF THE GORGE ARTISTS OPEN STUDIO TOUR MEAN TO YOU?

It’s a wave of freshness as spring and people and conversation come through the studio. I’m so grateful the people of the Gorge embrace the studio tour, and I always look forward to sharing the passion of photography with our community and visiting adventurers.

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THE GORGE MAGAZINE : SPRING 2018

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BRAD LORANG

Metal Art

bradlorang.com BRAD LORANG, WHO WAS BORN IN THE DALLES AND LIVED IN THE GORGE UNTIL AGE 14, HAS ALWAYS CONSIDERED HIMSELF AN ARTIST. HE WAS INITIALLY DRAWN TO GRAPHIC DESIGN, BUT FOUND HIS TRUE PASSION WHILE WORKING AT AN ART FOUNDRY AFTER HIGH SCHOOL AND HAS BEEN WORKING WITH METAL EVER SINCE. HE AND HIS WIFE DEBORA, ALSO AN ARTIST, MOVED TO CASCADE LOCKS IN 2004 WHERE THEY OWN LORANG STUDIOS. HOW DID BECOMING AN ARTIST HAPPEN OR EVOLVE FOR YOU?

There was never a time in my life where I doubted that I was going to be an artist. My parents were always supportive of my art and they encouraged me and let me take painting classes beginning when I was about 10. My thought was to be in advertising — my first job at age 15 was as a graphic artist at a local print shop. After graduating high school I got a job at a small art foundry. I really took to the process and loved the medium. That seemingly small — what I thought was temporary — change in direction put my entire life on a different trajectory. HOW DID YOU ARRIVE AT YOUR MEDIUM?

As an artist, I struggled to find something that really clicked for me and which I felt totally sincere about. The medium I am now working in is the perfect marriage of all of my skills and interests, my background as an illustrator, and my more than 25 years in sculpture, bronze casting, fabrication, metal finishing, and patina. As soon as I began to work in this medium, it felt right. My new obsession opened the door to endless opportunities to go in new directions, to push the boundaries, and do something that was uniquely and unmistakably mine. For me, that is what makes art exciting. DESCRIBE YOUR PROCESS. Artwork photos courtesy of Brad Lorang

I begin with a detailed sketch that is in scale proportionally to the larger finished piece. I then scale the drawing up to full size, which may be fairly large. This is my working pattern. I also determine how many separate pieces it will take — there are often more than 50 — and number them in order of assembly. Using my pattern I redraw and number each of the separate pieces with a marker on a sheet of metal. I then take a plasma torch and cut out all the pieces, then finish, grind and texture each one. I begin assembling the piece, tack welding the pieces together from the backside, bending tabs and using spacers to create dimension. Once the piece is assembled, I begin the coloring process with a torch and patina chemicals, as well as transparent metal stains, to achieve the desired effects. I finish the piece with an acrylic clear coat. 50

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WHAT DOES BEING PART OF THE GORGE ARTISTS OPEN STUDIO TOUR MEAN TO YOU?

As part of the Gorge Artists Open Studio Tour we have a chance to share what we do, our creative process and showcase the myriad things that we create. Our home and studio is an old grocery store built in the 1920s with a kind of rustic whimsy. For the last 13 years we have been doing a very custom renovation with a lot of handforged copper and steel. This is our opportunity for people to see the full range of the things we love to do.

WHAT IS MOST SATISFYING ABOUT YOUR WORK?

I love what I do! These days I do a lot of commission work. From day to day, the types of projects I do will run the gamut. Every one presents a new challenge. I may do a custom fine art wall sculpture to grace a specific place in someone’s home, or a custom gate or railing that becomes a focal point on someone’s property. I believe what we do has lasting value. A quote by Katherine Graham resonates strongly with my wife and me: “To love what you do and feel that it matters — how could anything else be more fun?” WHAT IS IT LIKE TO BE AN ARTIST IN THE GORGE?

I don’t think I understood when I was growing up here what an incredible place this was. I cannot imagine living anywhere else. As an artist there is an endless source of inspiration. All the trees, waterfalls, the verdant beauty of the Gorge — they’re both my inspiration and often my subject. My wife Debora as an artist works with found objects and natural materials, so for her every hike or walk at the river is also typically a supply run. There could not be a more perfect place on Earth to be artists.

THE ANDREW’S EXPERIENCE

pizzeria • drafthouse theater arcade • frozen yogurt

It’s the pizza...over 25 years of authentic East Coast thin-crust pizza

Skylight Drafthouse Theater “Outstanding Luxury Theater” First run films, great beer selection, create a gourmet pizza = perfect night out.

Andrew Mcelderry and his family have been making pizza since 1991. To survive and grow, you must have a great product, everything they do is fresh and from scratch. This pizzeria loves pizza and, therefore, their pizza has to be and is the best. Bring some friends, have a slice of real East Coast thin-crust pizza, combine with a fresh salad, wings or a calzone. 14 inch pies • 18 inch pies

107 Oak Street, Hood River | AndrewsPizza.Com | 541-386-1448 ON-LINE ORDERING | EAT IN | TAKE OUT | DELIVERY

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CHRISTINE KNOWLES Pastels

christineknowles.com CHRISTINE KNOWLES HAD A 30-YEAR CAREER IN LAND USE AND PUBLIC POLICY, BUT ALWAYS DID ART IN HER SPARE TIME. SHE AND HER HUSBAND BEGAN COMING TO THE GORGE IN THE 1980S FROM SEATTLE TO WINDSURF. THEY MOVED HERE PERMANENTLY IN 1997 AND CHRISTINE BEGAN TO PURSUE PAINTING MORE SERIOUSLY. SHE NOW WORKS PRIMARILY IN PASTEL. HOW DID BECOMING AN ARTIST HAPPEN OR EVOLVE FOR YOU?

I grew up in a family where art and creativity were considered part of living a full life. I painted as a child. My grandmother gave me a subscription to MOMA for all the years I was an undergraduate in New York City. During my career in public policy, I always did something — pottery, jewelry, calligraphy etc., and when I left the work world, I decided to go back and learn to paint seriously. I’m a workshop junkie. I’ve taken lots and lots of workshops with wonderful teachers and working artists. I try to leave town to attend one or two intensive workshops a year. It’s been incredible to move from a world focused on analysis and words to one focused on images. Perhaps this is where I always belonged. (I remember faces even though I’m challenged with remembering names.) I’ve morphed from land use economics to celebrating transcendence in the landscape. And windsurfing isn’t that important anymore. HOW DID YOU ARRIVE AT YOUR MEDIUM?

Artwork photos courtesy of Christine Knowles

My first medium was watercolor. It’s juicy and fluid and challenging. It requires skill and the willingness to let go and let things happen. I was juried into the watercolor society of Oregon and found a wonderful supportive organization, with workshops and regular critique groups to help me improve my skills. But when I joined Bonnie White (another Gorge artist) on her regular plein air sorties, I started looking for a medium that was more spontaneous and tried soft pastel. I love pastel and it has been my primary medium for more than 10 years. My work remains landscape-focused and I do love plein air painting. Increasingly I am also creating larger, more abstract studio work, relying on memory and feeling and color and texture to make more personal statements about my world. My new process includes meditation and music and mixed media. It’s more me and more fun and it’s so rewarding that some of my abstracts have been purchased and received awards in regional shows. 52

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Have

MORE THAN A MEETING.

Create A PRODUCTIVE RETREAT

DESCRIBE YOUR PROCESS.

My process begins with a general idea. I create an under-painting with watercolor or sumi ink and white gesso. It’s a meditation accompanied with music from my iPad. Next, I look inside the canvas and begin to respond to what’s there with color and shape and pattern. My goal is to respond to the under-painting and to let my piece evolve and change. Reality does creep in now and again but I try to stay focused on color, motion and design, and expressing myself.

The Westcliff Lodge now has meeting space available for up to 30 attendees and 57 guest rooms to choose from.

R

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4070 Westcliff Dr., Hood River, OR

WHAT IS MOST SATISFYING ABOUT YOUR WORK?

I get satisfaction from trying new things and growing with my work — when I am comfortable enough with techniques to simply cut loose and enjoy the process. This winter I did some work with oil painting. WHAT IS IT LIKE TO BE AN ARTIST IN THE GORGE?

The Columbia River Gorge is a stunning inspiration to Gorge artists. After living here for more than 20 years, the river, cliffs and weather patterns have become a part of me. And it’s still special to join other artists at a new plein air location, to see the Gorge from a new vantage point. Ours is a supportive art community. We help and encourage each other. I learned to paint here and I’ve recently taught my first art class here. We have community galleries and co-op galleries and wonderful collaborative events like GAOS. We paint together. WHAT DOES BEING PART OF THE GORGE ARTISTS OPEN STUDIO TOUR MEAN TO YOU?

I have shown my work in galleries in Seattle, Tacoma, Maui and the Gorge. Nevertheless, GAOS has been the most successful way for me to meet collectors and to sell my work. I love talking about art and about my work with the wonderful people who visit my studio.

Spectacular views

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Experience Skamania County, Washington! CASCADE LOCKS MARINE

PARK & HIST. THUNDER ISLAND Reserve our unique island for your wedding ceremony featuring private settings and stunning vistas. Stroll to our riverside pavilion (up to 200 guests) through our lush green park.

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MARTIN’S GORGE TOURS

A family owned portable restroom and septic service based in The Dalles, OR, we service the entire Columbia River Gorge and beyond. Available 24/7. We provide the best products and units the industry has to offer!

Guided tours for individuals, groups, families, or couples. Including waterfalls, wildflowers, wineries, breweries, trail hikes, scenic drives and more. Sit back and relax as we explore the hidden treasures of the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area.

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BED & BREAKFAST ASSOCIATION

COLUMBIA GORGE INTERPRETIVE CENTER

Let the charm and hospitality of our inns provide all your lodging needs. Our innkeepers are happy to share their local knowledge for the best places to visit, explore, wine, dine and more. Inns in both WA and OR.

The first human imprints in the Gorge were left by the Indian cultures that flourished here for thousands of years. Explore the natural and cultural history of this beautiful region. Open daily 9-5.

541-402-1422 • gorgelodging.com Roomfinders

800-991-2338 509-427-8211 990 SW Rock Creek Dr. • Stevenson

SKAMANIA COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE: 167 NW Second Avenue, Stevenson, WA 98648 • 800-989-9178 • skamania.org


WALKING MAN BREWING

BRIDGESIDE

Just minutes from the Bridge of the Gods, we have become a destination for beer enthusiasts and gorge travelers. Experience our small community craft brewery. Enjoy our dog-friendly beer garden or cozy up with a pint and a bite in the brewpub.

Fast, friendly family dining for breakfast, lunch and dinner, plus spectacular views of the Gorge and Bridge of the Gods.

509-427-5520 • walkingmanbeer.com 240 SW 1st Street • Stevenson

541-374-8477 • bridgesidedining.com 745 NW Wa Na Pa St. • Cascade Locks

GATOR CREEK GARDENS Wander along the pathways of our retail garden nursery and find majestic trees, unique shrubs, and an abundance of flowers. Our gift shop is filled with handmade treasures and a variety of pottery. We also carry barks, composts and rock. 509-427-0010 • gatorcreekgardens.com 51 Hot Springs Avenue • Carson

RIVER DRIFTERS Perfect for families, groups, and friends with trips for all ages and abilities. Guided rafting on the White Salmon, Deschutes, Clackamas Rivers, and more! Last minute reservations okay. For updates and specials follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

Burgers • Sandwiches • Salads • Soups Baskets • After 5 menu • Desserts Gift shop • Historic artifacts

BEST WESTERN PLUS COLUMBIA RIVER INN Stunning views, spacious guestrooms on the Columbia River at the Bridge of the Gods. Close to waterfalls and outdoor activities. Complimentary hot breakfast, pool, spa, fitness room. 541-374-8777 • 800-595-7108 bwcolumbiariverinn.com 735 WaNaPa St. • Cascade Locks

GORGE BLUES & BREWS FESTIVAL Celebrate 25 years with us! June 22-23, at the Skamania County Fairgrounds in Stevenson with an incredible blues line-up on two stages and craft brews that will blow your mind. All in a spectacular waterfront setting.

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800-989-9178 • gorgebluesandbrews.com 650 SW Rock Creek Dr. • Stevenson

WINDMILL PHYSIO

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SKAMANIA COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE: 167 NW Second Avenue, Stevenson, WA 98648 • 800-989-9178 • skamania.org


Award-winning Gorge Views

GRAND PRIZE:

Matt Meisenheimer

“Mirror,” Elowah Falls

GRAND PRIZE

FRIENDS OF THE COLUMBIA GORGE HELD ITS THIRD ANNUAL PHOTO CONTEST last year, with the requirement that photographers submit photos taken between May 29 and Sept. 10, 2017. The organization received a record number of entries: 533, from 125 photographers. Contest winners were announced in November. Matt Meisenheimer of Janesville, Wis., took the grand prize with his photo of Elowah Falls titled “Mirror.” “The Gorge has so much iconic beauty, and photography is a vital way of preserving and celebrating that beauty,” said Vince Ready, a contest judge and Friends board member who owns Lasting Light Photography in Hood River. “This year’s photo contest entries showcased an incredible amount of variety and originality, and it was fun to experience so many familiar places and unique scenes through the amazing collection of images that were submitted.” This year’s contest was lent poignancy by the outbreak of the Eagle Creek fire on Sept. 2. Virtually all of the contest photos had already been taken by the time the fire began, and many of the submissions — including the grand prize and waterfalls category winning photos — depict areas later burned in the fire and which, as of now, are closed to the public. To see all of the winning photos, as well as the honorable mentions, go to gorgefriends.org/photocontest.

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CATEGORY WINNERS

GRAND PRIZE

WILDFLOWERS: Margot

Kelley

“Balsamroot Rising,” Rowena Plateau

WATERFALLS:

Sean Estergaard

“Lush Wonderland,” Wahclella Falls

WILDLIFE: Linda

Steider

“Eagle Family Breakfast,” Columbia River near White Salmon, Wash.

CULTURAL: Bill

Partin

“Hikers’ Tunnel Under SR-14,” Cape Horn Trail

THE GORGE MAGAZINE : SPRING 2018

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CATEGORY WINNERS

SCENIC: Theresa

Peterson

“Golden Sunlight over Crown Point”

YOUTH: Katie

Colson

“Misty Morning,” Vista House

BABIES | MATERNITY | FAMILIES

ShellyPetersonPhotography.com 509-637-4989

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Annie Kaplan

“Horsethief Butte”

HONORABLE MENTIONS

Ann Hubard

“Wildflowers at Tom McCall Preserve”

Sean Estergaard

“Moonlit Vista House”

Scott Christianson

“Paintbrush on Dog Mountain”

Explore...

THE GORGE

CLARK AND LEWIE’S

TRAVELERS REST SALOON and GRILL

HAPPY HOUR | WINE SPECIALS CATERING | SPECIAL EVENTS BREAKFAST | WATERFRONT DINING

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130 SW Cascade Ave Stevenson, WA 98648

FOLLOW US

THE GORGE MAGAZINE : SPRING 2018 Untitled-2 1

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2/14/17 10:26 AM


THE GORGE GREEN CROSS The first licensed dispensary in the Gorge since 2014

HONORABLE MENTIONS

Recreational & Medical

Cannabis

Don Jacobson

“Sagebrush Mariposa Lily”

Sung Choi

“Aurora and Northern Light,” Vista House

Superior Quality • Fair Pricing Knowledgeable, Friendly Staff

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“Young American Kestrel at Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge”

Superior Quality • Fair Pricing Knowledgeable, Friendly Staff Open Everyday 11am to 7pm to AnyOnE 21 and Over

Linda Steider “EEP!” American Pika

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TheGorgeGreenCross@gmail.com N W

Mike’s Ice Cream

5th St.

Brian’s Pourhouse

6th St.

7th St.

E S

Oak St. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. For use only by adults 21 years of age or older. Keep out of reach of children.

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Linda Steider

“Smoky Sunset During Indian Creek Fire”


s p e c i a l

a d v e r t i s i n g

s e c t i o n

Discover Beautiful HOOD RIVER : OREGON

mark etpl ace ho od ri ver

HOOD RIVER COFFEE ROASTERS

APLAND JEWELERS

Hood River Coffee Roasters sells coffee to the public! Yes, the same flavorful and fresh coffees that we offer to fine restaurants, grocery stores, espresso bars and business offices is available to you, too. We are proud to be the Gorge’s premier roaster since 1990. Open MonThu, 9am-5pm and Fri, 9am-3pm.

Designers, goldsmiths, and craftsmen, we make and repair in our state-of-theart workshop. Ken Apland brings 38 years of experience as a goldsmith and gemologist, so whether you need to have old jewelry redesigned, an heirloom restored, or an entirely new design made we can create it using reclaimed metals and responsibly sourced gems.

1310 Tucker Rd • 541-386-3908 hoodrivercoffeeroasters.com

216 Oak Street • 541-386-3977 info@aplandjewelers.com

HOOD RIVER JEWELERS

BEND IN THE ROAD

We are artists and professional jewelers. If you are looking for something special, we can custom design it. We work with silver, gold, platinum and more. We can use your stone or work with you to find the perfect stone for your needs. Hood River Jewelers also carries beautiful timepieces, diamond jewelry and designer collections.

We are NOT your Grandma’s Antique Store! Located in the Hood River Heights, Bend in the Road is a new twist on the classic antique mall. Enjoy our newly remodeled storefront, offering vintage clothing, furniture, jewelry, home décor, antiques and collectibles. We carry Dixie Belle Chalk Paint & Howard Products! We offer DIY crafting & chalk painting classes.

415 Oak Street • 541-386-6440 hoodriverjewelers.com

1120 Tucker Road • 541-436-3101 bendintheroadhr.com THE GORGE MAGAZINE : SPRING 2018

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Renata Kosina

OUTSIDE

Safe Hiking for Zero Accidents Going up the trail is optional, getting home safely is mandatory STORY AND RESCUE PHOTOS BY CHRISTOPHER VAN TILBURG

O

Bigstock.com

ne spring many years ago, the Hood River Crag Rats mountain rescue team was called on to search for a family lost in the Mark O. Hatfield Wilderness. A couple with two kids had started out on a beautiful day, hiked to a vista, and then headed back down. As they walked downhill, the foursome unknowingly veered off the trail. After several hours, they found themselves stuck in a cold, dark, deep canyon that ended in tangled vine maple thickets and a sheer basalt cliff. Crag Rats found the family in the middle of the night via cell phones, an altimeter watch, whistles, and headlamps. They were cold, hungry, thirsty, and tired — but alive and uninjured. Most of the time, hiking in our beautiful Columbia River Gorge goes off without a hitch. But sometimes the situation metamorphoses into peril for unsuspecting hikers. Occasionally a short hike

can change instantly, which is what happened to nearly 150 hikers stranded when the Eagle Creek Fire erupted last September. To help minimize wilderness accidents, my colleagues at Teton County Search and Rescue started Backcountry Zero, an educational outreach campaign aimed to reduce injuries and fatalities among backcountry enthusiasts in Wyoming’s 62

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Teton Range. It was modeled after Sweden’s successful Vision Zero program designed to reduce motor vehicle accidents. As we are on the cusp of the Columbia Gorge hiking season, we too should aim to decrease hiking accidents by reviewing how to stay safe on the trails — some of which will be closed indefinitely due to the Eagle Creek Fire. Columbia Gorge Zero When planning a hike, first check with the U.S. Forest Service to determine which trails are open (www.fs.usda.gov/recmain/crgnsa/recreation). Respect all closures. Trails are closed because they are impassible and unsafe. Columbia Gorge National Scenic Area Public Affairs Officer Rachel Pawlitz said Eagle Creek and Tanner Creek trails were the most damaged by the fire — particularly the upper headwaters — and may not open this summer. Once you’ve picked out a trail, follow time-tested preparation guidelines: check the weather; get a map; tell someone where you are going; prepare for inclement weather year-round with foul-weather clothing (every

year Crag Rats rescue hikers stuck in mid-summer cold); on sunny days, wear sun-protective

A hiker ascends Dog Mountain, opposite top. Opposite bottom, members of the Hood River-based Crag Rats search and rescue team respond to an emergency several miles up Eagle Creek. Above left, Crag Rats do a technical extrication in steep terrain in the Mount Hood National Forest. Above right, Crag Rats evacuate an injured hiker on Eagle Creek.

clothing, use sunscreen, and drink plenty of fluids (every year Crag Rats rescue hikers with heat

exhaustion and dehydration); and fuel up with food and water before you leave your car. Always wear sturdy footwear, even if you’re on a short junket to a waterfall or a quick picnic at a nearby lake. Open-toed hiking sandals and flip-flops are not good for hiking. One year a hiker wearing sandals was bitten on the toe by a rattlesnake on the Dog Mountain Trail and required litter evacuation.

New Vegan Styles! 0% Leather, 100% Comfort. Stop by Footwise for a professional fitting Hood River • Portland • Corvallis • Eugene

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THE GORGE MAGAZINE : SPRING 2018

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OUTSIDE

What’s in your pack? 3 Puffy jacket, rain jacket , hiking pants, hat, gloves, spare socks 3 Sun hat, sunglasses, ban dana or buff 3 Food and water

3 Navigation: GPS, map,

compass 3 Cell phone with full batter y and a spare power pack 3 Critical medicines and spare glasses 3 Umbrella and/or rain pon cho 3 First aid kit, including allergic reaction medicines and tape to make spl ints or a bandage 3 Headlamp with spare bat teries 3 Whistle 3 Multitool

learn how to use your phone’s compass, map app, and latitude/longitude function. If you get into trouble and can tell the rescuers where you are and

what your problem is, it helps immensely. A personal locator beacon is an

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3 Small roll of duct tape

3 Firestarter and matches/

lighter 3 Water purification tablets

3 Sunscreen

3 Small tarp

3 Insect repellent

Bigstock.com

Good support and traction are important and best provided by trail shoes or boots. One year a hiker slipped on the trail to Tamanawas Falls and required rope extrication. Cell phones seem to be our lifelines nowadays — or at least they are omnipresent. Get a GPS app for your phone like Gaia (www.gaiagps.com) and


Fresh Spring GREENERY

Bigstock.com

ORGANICS PRODUCE DELI & BAKERY MEAT & SEAFOOD WINE & BEER FLORAL

HUCKLEBERRY’S NATURAL MARKET option, too. Keep your cell phone battery full and know you won’t get cell reception in many deep canyons. It’s a good idea to bring basic emergency gear — which means extra stuff you don’t expect to need. The type and quantity of emergency gear depends on a lot of factors: the current and predicted weather, the difficulty of the hike, your skill level, the distance from your car, and your ability to improvise. Some people head up the trail with nothing more than a cell phone, water bottle, and a jacket tied around their waist. But a better plan is to carry a small backpack with some extra gear. The best gauge for preparedness is to ask yourself: can I survive an unexpected night out? For a short summer hike, you might carry extra food and water, a puffy jacket, hiking pants, and a small survival kit (see sidebar). For longer hikes or those in less-than-pristine weather — which can be any day in any month in Oregon — you might add a rain jacket and pants, hat, gloves, and spare socks. An umbrella or rain poncho is effective at keeping you dry. A small tarp is useful for a bivouac. Tread Lightly Once you’re out on the trails, have fun, tread lightly, and pay attention. Leave No Trace is a good mantra to follow (www.lnt.org). Don’t enter any closed trails or areas. Stay on existing well-marked tracks to prevent erosion, getting lost, and falls on rough terrain. Watch for burned snags that could topple, as well as steep, muddy, slippery slopes. Camp in designated overnight spots and minimize campfires if allowed. Respect wildlife from a distance, especially if the animals are displaced from the Eagle Creek Fire. Be cautious of overlooks and vistas that are perched on cliffs, and slippery rocks in streams and waterfalls. Above all, pay attention, use good judgment, and don’t be afraid to turn back. If something doesn’t seem right, listen to intuition. Seattle-based mountaineer Ed Viesturs said it best in his book, No Shortcuts to the Top: Climbing the World’s 14 Highest Peaks: “Getting to the top is optional. Getting down is mandatory.”

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Paul Shapard

Christopher Van Tilburg is a 20-year rescue mountaineer with Crag Rats, and author of 11 books including Mountain Rescue Doctor (St. Martins, 2007) and Search and Rescue (Falcon, 2017). He lives in Hood River and is a frequent contributor to The Gorge Magazine.

Columbia River Realty

360-601-9759

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ARTS + CULTURE

For Art’s Sake

Artists at The 506 Gallery explore their creative side STORY BY JANET COOK • PHOTOS BY KELLY TURSO

N

early a dozen people sit around two long tables in a storefront gallery on 2nd Street in The Dalles on a recent Wednesday. In front of each of them is an art project. There’s Debi Jo Fish, wearing a Portland Trail Blazers jersey as she creates a design with Sharpie pens on a ceramic tile.

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There’s David Cox, in a wool stocking cap and rainbow suspenders, head down, painting vigorously. There’s Lisa Woodside with an infectious smile and twinkling eyes, as interested in a visitor as she is in her pastel drawing. And there’s Brad Divish, painting a series of circles with colorful acrylics, an abstract in the making. These four and several more are here at The 506 Gallery, where they come three days a week every week, to bring out their inner artist. Providing gentle guidance and unflagging support — along with matting and framing and other useful artistic services — is David Lamoreaux, an artist himself and curator of The 506 Gallery. “Remember, guys, you have different size brushes,” Lamoreaux tells the painters. “You don’t always have to use the big ones.” He walks around the tables, stopping to offer a compliment here, a helpful tip there. “Don’t blend the paints too much,” he advises one painter. “If you keep blending and blending, it eventually becomes a muddy mess.” The 506 Gallery grew out of a program called Art Connect, which in turn is part of Opportunity Connections, a nonprofit organization founded in Hood River in 1967 that helps people in the Gorge with developmental disabilities live as independently as possible, as well as work and take part in community activities. Lamoreaux started working for Opportunity Connections 12 years ago, initially in a position called a “one-on-one,” where a staff member is assigned to one client who has behavioral or other challenges that require close supervision. “The entire field was new to me and I was very nervous about how to interact with people with developmental disabilities,” he said. “Within two weeks, I realized that people are people. Our clients, though they may have additional hurdles to deal with in life, are just people like everyone else. They have hopes and dreams and triumphs and tragedies.” Lamoreaux eventually became a skills trainer, where he worked with a group of clients teaching social and life skills, as well as providing safety trainings and community outings. Then, about five years ago, Opportunity Connections started looking for ways to get its clients more integrated with the


March 1-April 1: Art as Activism Exhibition March 3-10: CCA Children’s Theatre The Little Prince March 13: Conversation Project Beyond Fake News March 18: National Theatre Live Cat on a Hot Tin Roof April 1 National Theatre Live Rosencrantz & Guildenstern are Dead April 4-29: Abstract Art Exhibition Artists Jodiane Ferguson, above, Brad Divish, below left, and Lisa Woodside, below right, get creative during the Art Connect program at The 506 Gallery in The Dalles.

community, giving them the means to explore different interests and opportunities. “We were looking for ways to expose them to other things that they might not have ever experienced,” Lamoreaux said. “There were these art programs sprouting up here and there around the country, working with people similar to the ones we work with. We thought, let’s give this a try.” Lamoreaux was the obvious person to implement the program. “I knew most of the people we worked with very well by then, and they knew me, and I had a background — though many years ago — in art and photography,” he said. He was hired as the art coordinator. At first, he developed a series of lessons similar to what students might learn in a college art class. “Trying to follow that didn’t last very long,” he said. “Not only was it boring or over-complicated for many of the artists, it also somewhat stifled creativity. So I went to a more free-form, ‘let’s get crazy’ sort of approach, offering suggestions and advice as needed.” The classes were initially offered two days a week at both The Dalles and at the Opportunity Connections Pine Grove location. When the Pine Grove facility began to be phased out in 2015, the Art Connect Program expanded to three days a week in The Dalles, where it’s been thriving ever since. “As we went along, we were piling up all this really great art, and we didn’t really have anything to do with it except hanging it on our office walls,” Lamoreaux said. He wanted to get it out there for the public to see, so he came up with the idea of turning the front of the Opportunity Connections office into a gallery and an artists’ studio. Thus was born The 506 Gallery, named after its address on 2nd Street.

April 22: National Theatre Live Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? May 2-27: Glass, Stone, Clay, & Wood Exhibition May 18-26: CCA Children’s Theatre & Plays for Non-Profits The Blind Princess 215 Cascade Ave., Hood River, OR 97031 (541) 387-8877 | columbiaarts.org

Don’t be Late for the Mad Hatter’s Tea Party Fall down the Rabbit Hole with friends of

Opportunity Connections

Support the oldest and largest non-profit organization in the Gorge committed to serving individuals with developmental and intellectual challenges. Proceeds go to many essential programs. Columbia Gorge Hotel & Spa

May 20, 2018 • 2 to 4 pm The Majestic Columbia Gorge Hotel & Spa Hood River, Oregon

O C

Limited Seating Tickets $40 - On Sale now 541-386-3520 oppconnect.org

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ARTS + CULTURE The Art Connect program has been going strong for five years, and the gallery has been open for two. “After five years, I haven’t seen any of them lose interest,” Lamoreaux said of the dozen core artists. The group meets for Art Connect every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday at noon at the gallery. Lamoreaux leads them through all manner of mediums, from painting and pastel to collages and clay sculpture. Sometimes they work on a group project, with everyone adding their own ideas to a large canvas painting, for example. They occasionally go out to the alley and splatter paint. Lamoreaux recently purchased some camera equipment and a tripod, and plans to take the group out on some photography expeditions during the spring. Lamoreaux has been intrigued to watch the artists come into their own over the past few years. “Each person really has their own style and you see it evolve over time,” he said. “It’s really neat to see. You won’t see it over a short period of time, but over several years, you really can.” Each artist has created a portfolio of unique work over the years. Lamoreaux works with each artist to decide which pieces will be framed and displayed on the gallery walls, with a price tag. “I give suggestions, but they have the final say in sales price,” he said.

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David Lamoreaux, left, curator of The 506 Gallery, shows off an artist’s work. James McDonald, right, works on a painting.

When a piece is sold, the artist gets most of the profit; the gallery takes a 20 percent commission. The gallery exhibits artwork from a few outside artists in the community alongside the Art Connect artists. “Sometimes a local artist is just starting out, so we’ll take a look and if it fits, we’ll add it in,” Lamoreaux said. But the Art Connect artists are so prolific, “we don’t have the space to get a lot of outside art in.” The gallery is open during the Art Connect sessions, and Lamoreaux and the artists invite visitors who stop in to browse to watch the artists at work. “It’s been really wonderful,” Lamoreaux said. “Most of the artists had never given art a second thought — especially them doing art. It’s been a great process. It’s rewarding and fun. You never know what we’re going to end up with.” The 506 Gallery is open Monday thru Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, go to the506gallery.com.


12th Annual

GORGE ARTISTS OPEN STUDIOS Year-round Guide to Art In the Gorge Visit the studios of local artists | April 20, 21 and 22 2018 10am-5pm gorgeartists.org

CHRISTINE KNOWLES Pastel christineknowles.com

SUZANNE KROL BOLLER Contemporary Realism suzannekb@me.com

BRAD LORANG Fabricated & Patinaed Metal Art bradlorang.com

ABIGAIL MERICKEL Printmaking abigailmerickel.com

TED OLSON Oil on Birch Panel tedolsonpaintings.com

​ROBIN PANZER ART STUDIO 33 Chigirie Torn Paper Fine Art robinpanzer.com

CHARLENE RIVERS Acrylic on Canvas charleneriversstudio@gmail.com

MARY ROLLINS Watercolor maryrollins.com

JO DEAN SARINS Jewelry arrayofelegance.com

​HEATHER SÖDERBERG-GREENE Bronze Sculpture heathersoderberg.com

VICKY L WILSON Metal Jewelry vickylwilsondesigns.com

DONNA WOODS Gouache and Acrylic Instagram Username: Offtharip

Visit gorgeartists.org or facebook.com/gaos.tour. Find tour books for this free event online and area Chambers of Commerce, Columbia Center for the Arts in Hood River and The Dalles Art Center.


WELLNESS

Nothing to Sneeze At Cascade Acupuncture’s allergy elimination treatment aims to help people with allergies STORY BY JANET COOK • PHOTOS BY PALOMA AYALA

N

ate Ohlson was diagnosed with Crohn’s disease, a chronic inflammatory bowel disease, more than a decade ago. He was rail thin and felt ill most of the time, with fever, headaches and cramping. “It was like having the flu times 10,” he says. In one month alone, he lost 25 pounds. His doctors tried him on multiple medications including prednisone, a powerful corticosteroid, which he took for nearly three years despite its unpleasant side effects. “They tried about a dozen different medications and none of them really worked,” he says. “I got to the point where I couldn’t really eat anything without feeling sick.”

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About three years ago, a friend of Ohlson’s who also suffered from Crohn’s mentioned that he’d had some success with acupuncture. For Ohlson, it seemed another in a long list of well-meaning but ultimately useless recommendations he’d gotten from others over the years. But he was desperate, and eventually found himself at Cascade Acupuncture Center in Hood River. There Carola Stepper, who owns the center and has been practicing Oriental medicine for 17 years, recommended Ohlson go through the center’s allergy elimination treatment. The treatment is a five-part protocol that involves muscle testing, “clearing” the allergen, percussive massage, and acupuncture, followed by a 24-hour avoidance of the allergen. Ohlson agreed to try it, and the results changed his life. Carola Stepper began her journey as a healer in the Western medicine tradition. Born in the U.S. but raised in Germany, she became a registered nurse in 1989, then immediately entered medical school in Germany. After two years, she


FAMILY MEDICINE WALK-INS WELCOME

Carola Stepper, LAc., opposite inset and above, does muscle testing — also known as applied kinesiology — on a client, opposite bottom, and arranges vials of allergens in a wrist band so they remain in skin contact during the allergy elimination treatment, above and below.

took a semester off to travel. She ended up taking a permanent hiatus from medical school and moved to Maui, where she worked as an RN. Stepper moved to Portland in 1995, still with a desire to further her medical education. She researched graduate programs in chiropractic, naturopathic medicine and acupuncture before deciding on the latter. “What intrigued me was that acupuncture is so ancient,” Stepper says. “It’s so simple and yet still so effective, even after 3,000 years.” She enrolled at the Oregon College of Oriental Medicine in Portland, graduating in 2001 with a Master’s in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine. She practiced in various settings in the Gorge for several years — including being the first Licensed Acupuncturist on staff at Celilo Cancer Center in The Dalles, treating patients suffering from the side effects of chemotherapy and radiation — before founding Cascade Acupuncture Center in Hood River in 2005. She opened a second clinic in The Dalles a year later. Around 2010, Stepper became interested in the work of Dr. Devi Nambudripad, an MD and Licensed Acupuncturist practicing in California, whose work treating her own food allergies led her to create Nambudripad’s Allergy Elimination Techniques, known as NAET. Stepper went on to study with a protégé of Nambudripad’s, who developed his own allergy elimination protocol using Nambudripad’s techniques. Stepper in turn has added her own tweaks and, based on client feedback, has found the resulting allergy elimination treatment offered at her clinic to be highly effective in clearing allergens.

Enjoy the

BEST HEALTH possible At Skyline Medical Clinic, our friendly, kind staff work diligently to deliver the very best service and highest quality of care to you and your family – at every stage of life! OUR CLINIC SERVICES INCLUDE: Family Medicine Ear, Nose & Throat General Surgery

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• Accepting new patients • Serving adults and children • Accepting private insurance, Medicaid and Medicare • Offering discounted pricing for uninsured patients • Conveniently located on Skyline’s campus • Same day & evening appointments To learn more or to schedule an appointment, call 509-637-2810.

MEDICAL CLINIC www.skylinehospital.com

THE GORGE MAGAZINE : SPRING 2018

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WELLNESS

Virginia Thomas Certified Power Pilates Methods ACE Certified Personal Trainer

Rehabilitative Exercises • Core Stability Strength • Stamina

During muscle testing, gentle pressure is applied to the client’s forearm as vials of potential allergens are held in the opposite hand. If there’s sensitivity, or an allergy, the client won’t be able to resist the pressure and the arm will drop. Cascade Acupuncture Center has 750 vials of potential environmental and food allergens available for testing.

2002 12th St. • Hood River • OR 97031

541-490-0660 hoodriverpilates.com

END HEEL PAIN SUFFERING FAST

NEW

Non Surgical Office-Based Treatment Does Your Heel Hurt When You: • First step out of bed? • The More you’re on your feet? • When you get up after sitting? • When you exercise, or run or walk fast? • When you are barefoot?

Call Today! 541-386-1006

KESSA MAURAS, DPM

Board Certified, American Board of Podiatric Medicine

MtHoodPodiatry.com 1100 E. Marina Way, Suite 223 • Hood River

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Stepper’s treatment begins with muscle testing, also known as “applied kinesiology.” She has 750 vials that each contain water, alcohol and the electromagnetic “signature” of a potential allergen — everything from environmental allergens like trees and plants to about 150 food allergens. A client will hold a vial in one hand and extend the other arm straight out to the side. Stepper applies brief, gentle pressure to the extended forearm. If there’s no sensitivity to the substance, the client will have no problem resisting the pressure. If there’s sensitivity, or a full-blown allergy, the client won’t be able to resist the light pressure and the arm will drop. The next step is to determine which allergen or group of related allergens to clear during the session. “We would clear all the different trees our client is allergic to in one session, or all the different sugars, but not sugars and trees in one session,” Stepper explains. The vials containing the allergens remain in skin contact with the client for the remainder of the session, which moves through percussive massage along the client’s spine combined with a breathing technique, and acupuncture (or acupressure if the treatment is being done on a child). Each session lasts from 60 to 75 minutes. The final step is for the client to avoid the allergen for 24 hours afterward. “With foods, it’s easy,” Stepper says. “With environmental allergens, it’s harder. I just tell them to do the best they can.” Depending on how severe an allergy to something is, it may take more than one session to clear it. Stepper usually recommends a series of five treatments initially, followed by an evaluation. Her team of practitioners at Cascade Acupuncture is also trained in the allergy elimination treatment, so clients can see any of the acupuncturists on staff when they come in. For Nate Ohlson, whose Crohn’s disease was essentially causing him to have an allergic reaction to most things he ate, treatment took longer. During his initial visit, he remembers being tested on 12 different vials. “I was allergic to 10 of them,” he says.


Ohlson’s initial skepticism remained even as he began the treatments. “The whole thing seemed kind of weird, kind of hokey,” he says. But as allergens were cleared, he began to feel better and his uncertainty diminished. “I would notice an instantaneous difference the next day. I could eat the food (containing the allergen that was cleared) and not feel sick.” The results kept bringing him back, and over the course of about six months, the treatments had cleared about 60 different allergens. Nearly three years later, Ohlson’s life looks very different than it once did. He takes no medication at all for his Crohn’s disease. “I still have to be fairly careful with what I eat and manage my stress well,” he says. “But I can have a normal job and be a normal person.” He now lives in California, but returns to the Gorge fairly frequently and always schedules a treatment when he’s here. His illness — and subsequent relative wellness — changed the course of his life in other ways, too. Along with dietary changes, he started exercising, saw how good it was for him and became a personal trainer so he could help others. Based on his experiences, he started looking at how mindset affects situations and became a life coach.

Sunshine coming soon!

Photo by Shelly Peterson

Remember to protect your eyes...Stop in and see our sunglass collection. Eco | Lily Pulitzer | Maui Jim | Modo | OGI | Prodesign | Spy | Salt Seraphin | Smith | WileyX | TOMS | Woow | Vera Wang | Zoobug

Rebecca Chown, OD FAAO • Julie Demaree, OD • Shauna Harbison, OD 541-386-1700 // icfec.com // find us on Facebook 1700 12th Street, Suite A // Hood River, Oregon

New Wellness and Therapy Center Expanded Surgical Services Pain Management Services Behavioral Health Services Same Day Appointments

Making A Healthy Change kvhealth.net/healthychanges

509.773.4017

THE GORGE MAGAZINE : SPRING 2018

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WELLNESS

Hood River • Portland • Oregon Coast NATUROPATHIC PRIMARY CARE• MASSAGE THERAPY CHIROPRACTIC CARE• LIFESTYLE AND HEALTH CO ACHING

HoodtoCoastHealthcare.com • 800·277·0117 Our Specialties are: Hormone Balancing, Women's and Men's Health, Thyroid and Metabolism Issues, Auto-Immune Disease Management, Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, Pediatrics, Fatigue, Chronic Pain and Fibromyalgia Supportive Treatments, Massage and Chiropractic Therapies, and many more ... Our doctors strive to optimize each patient's health and well-being utilizing years of first hand knowledge, extensive training, and the most effective treatments currently available.

An acupuncture treatment is part of the five-part allergy elimination protocol at Cascade Acupuncture, where clients can receive acupuncture on tables or in recliner chairs.

“It’s all been trying to help myself get better, and I realized, I need to share this,” he says. “This whole illness thing has taken me on a grand journey.” Stepper, of course, was pleased with Ohlson’s results — but not surprised. She’s been seeing her clinic’s allergy elimination treatment help clients for years, from firefighters with allergies to trees and plants — even poison oak — to people allergic to pet hair to seasonal allergy sufferers. The treatment is so noninvasive and unthreatening, she’s able to treat even very young children. Five years ago, Lisa Shirk of Stevenson, Wash., brought her then-5-yearold son, Payton, to Cascade Acupuncture for treatment of his pollen-related allergies. “We didn’t realize the extent of it until he joined Little League baseball,” Shirk says. Payton had trouble breathing, wheezed, was short of breath and constantly had to clear his throat. Over-the-counter allergy medication made him groggy. “We cleared trees, weeds, flowers and dairy, and he improved over the course of a few weeks to at least 80 percent better,” she says. Payton has held that level of improvement, according to his mom, and it’s helped him thrive not only in baseball but also in soccer, basketball and swimming. “It has been life-changing for him,” she says, adding that Payton tells her the trees are now his friends. “Even if he doesn’t know it, I do.” For more information, go to CascadeAcupuncture.org. The Hood River clinic, formerly located downtown, opens in its new location at 2690 May Street in March.

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Nichols Landing FULL page ad 8.75x11.25.qxp_Layout 1 2/12/18 10:44 AM Page 1

MCMC Specialty Clinics at Nichols Landing Now Available at Nichols Landing:

Outpatient Therapy Services MCMC OUTPATIENT THERAPY SERVICES AT NICHOLS LANDING, formerly Hood River Therapy, has relocated to Nichols Landing. This new facility overlooking the Columbia River is right off of I-84 next to the Hampton Inn. Their highly skilled therapists will be providing physical, occupational, and speech therapies, in a large open gym space with upgraded exercise equipment.

For quick and easy scheduling with the same professional therapists and staff call 541.386.2441.

Specialty Clinics Coming Spring 2018: GORGE UROLOGY is being relocated to Nichols Landing from their previous Hood River location, and look forward to continuing to provide the highest quality of urology care for the entire Hood River community.

PODIATRY for personalized treatment of foot and ankle injuries, plus helping patients manage diabetes. Kathryn Jenewein, DPM

MCMC CARDIOLOGY with

Dr. Robert Florek and Dr. Kathy Grewe, who have been providing cutting-edge diagnostics and treatment for heart patients in Hood River since 2011. Gary Gingrich, MD

Marc McAllister, MD

Robert Florek, MD

Kathy Grewe, MD

Nathan Ullrich, MD

MCMC DERMATOLOGY is

MCMC SPORTS MEDICINE & ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY, offering

comprehensive orthopaedic care, sports injury treatment and prevention.

relocating its existing Hood River clinic to Nichols Landing. The expanded office will mean more Hood River patients will have access to specialized expert care.

Macey Delcambre, MD Melinda Riter, MD

LABORATORY SERVICES with no appointments necessary. DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING, featuring state-of-the-art

Mark Cullen, MD

James Reardon, MD

Ashlyn Williams, PA-C

Michael Orlo, PA-C

imaging technology.

Nichols Landing | 33 Nichols Parkway, Hood River | mcmc.net


OUR GORGE : PARTAKE

OLIVE OIL FRIED EGGS & GARLIC GREENS RECIPE AND PHOTOS BY KACIE McMACKIN

This simple recipe is a go-to for us on weeknights, often served with a thick slice of buttered sourdough bread. My favorite versions are with roughly chopped kale or spinach, but so many greens would be great in this recipe. It’s easy, flavorful, healthy, and completely satisfying — while still leaving room for dessert. This recipe serves two adults but can easily be doubled.

Ingredients:

• about six large handfuls of fresh greens
 • 1 large garlic clove, very finely minced or grated with a micro plane 
 • 4 eggs
 • extra virgin olive oil
 • flake salt
 • red pepper flakes

In a large non-stick skillet heat about a tablespoon of olive oil over medium-high heat until it’s shimmering. Add in the greens and sauté. Season with a small pinch of salt. Once the greens have wilted (about 2-3 minutes), add the garlic and a pinch of red pepper flakes, tossing constantly, until the garlic is fragrant but not coloring (30-60 seconds). Transfer the lot to two bowls. Give the pan a quick rinse and wipe it out (carefully) with a paper towel before frying your eggs. Heat a couple of tablespoons of olive oil over medium-high heat until shimmering — may take a minute or so. Carefully crack your eggs into the oil, season them with a pinch of salt, and allow them to cook until the yolk is set the way you like and the edges are crispy and golden. Remove from the pan with a spatula and divide them into the dishes with the greens. If you prefer your eggs over-easy (as I do), carefully flip them about halfway through the cooking process. Season the greens and eggs with a bit more salt and red pepper flakes if desired. Serve immediately with your favorite hot sauce. 76

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okkijan /Bigstock.com

• your favorite hot sauce (optional)


Kacie McMackin is a food blogger, writer and photographer at gorgeinthegorge.com. She is a frequent contributor to The Gorge Magazine.

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EAT + DRINK

THE ANDREW’S EXPERIENCE

BACKWOODS BREWING COMPANY

BRIAN’S POURHOUSE

Pizzeria • drafthouse theater • arcade • frozen yogurt It’s the pizza -over 25 years of authentic East Coast thin-crust pizza

Backwoods Brewing is family owned and located in Carson, WA. Established in 2012, we offer delicious beers, hand-made pizzas, outdoor seating, and welcome all ages.

Located in the heart of historic downtown Hood River, we blend nature’s finest ingredients with impeccably friendly service to offer an unforgettable dining experience.

Open daily: 11:30am-9pm

Call us for catering at your location, too!

BRODER ØST

CASA EL MIRADOR FAMILY MEXICAN RESTAURANT

541-386-1448 • AndrewsPizza.com 107 Oak Street • Hood River

On-line ordering • Eat in • Take out • Delivery

BRIDGESIDE

541-374-8477 • bridgesidedining.com Exit 44 off I-84, Cascade Locks

541-436-3444 • brodereast.com 102 Oak St. Suite 100 • Hood River

Stunning views next to the Bridge of the Gods – Bridgeside (formerly Charburger) still serves tasty char-broiled burgers plus an extensive menu of breakfast items, chowders, fish & chips, fresh salad bar, sandwiches, and desserts. New name, new management, but historic charm and western artifacts remain. Serving breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

Offering Nordic inspired breakfast and lunch to the gorge. Something new and exciting for the whole family to enjoy. Come try traditional recipes such as aebleskiver (danish pancakes), swedish meatballs, norwegian lefse (potato crepes) and lots more!

Gift shop • Special event room & terrace

#broderost

CELILO RESTAURANT & BAR

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509-427-3412 • backwoodsbrewingcompany.com 1162 Wind River Hwy • Carson

We look forward to serving you!

CLOCK TOWER ALES

541-386-5710 • celilorestaurant.com 16 Oak Street • Downtown Hood River

541-705-3590 • clocktowerales.com 311 Union Street • Downtown The Dalles

Celilo began with a desire to honor the bounty of this region and a commitment to a healthy and sustainable future. Our ever-changing menu reflects the seasonal highlights of the region’s growers and foragers. We offer the most innovative in fresh, local cuisine as well as an award-winning wine list, full bar, small plate menu, and happy hour daily from 5-6pm.

Located in historic downtown The Dalles. Clock Tower Ales is the family friendly place to be! Extensive outdoor seating on our deck, live music on the weekends, upscale pub style lunches, chef inspired dinners, handcrafted cocktails, local wines, and over 30 craft beers on tap! Enjoy a bit of history, sit back and relax, it’s always a good time at the tower!

Dinner daily from 5pm • Lunch Fri-Sun 11:30-3pm

Open Daily: 11am-close

SPRING 2018 : THE GORGE MAGAZINE

541-387-4344 • brianspourhouse.com 606 Oak Street • Hood River

Reserve our outdoor patio for private parties, groups, and rehearsal dinners.

541-298-7388 • casaelmirador.com 1424 West 2nd Street • The Dalles

Quality Mexican food prepared with the freshest and finest ingredients. Warm, friendly service and a lively atmosphere. Indulge in generous portions of flavorful sizzling fajitas, fish tacos, savory enchilada dishes and daily specials. Drink specials & Happy Hour menu from 4-7pm, Mon-Fri. Full service bar, take-out menu, gift certificates and catering services. Open for lunch and dinner 7 days a week.

COLUMBIA GORGE BAKERY A GLUTEN FREE FACILITY 541-645-0570 • columbiagorgeglutenfree.com 740 East Steuben Street • Bingen

We use locally sourced, seasonal ingredients in all of our fresh baked breads, treats and savory hand pies. We are committed to bringing you the most delicious baked goods available, anywhere. Call ahead for catering, wedding cakes, events or just stop by the drive-thru for coffee and a gluten free, dairy free or paleo treat!


EAT + DRINK

CROOKED TREE TAVERN & GRILL

DOG RIVER COFFEE

DOPPIO COFFEE

541-352-6692 • cooperspur.com 10755 Cooper Spur Road • Mt Hood/Parkdale

541-386-4502 • dogrivercoffee.net 411 Oak Street • Downtown Hood River

541-386-3000 • doppiohoodriver.com 310 Oak Street • Downtown Hood River

A scratch-made Northwest kitchen hidden up in the woods at the historic Cooper Spur Mountain Resort. Sourcing local and bringing freshness to the table, from the handmade burgers with house baked buns to the hand-cut steaks. Open for lunch & dinner 7 days a week with daily specials. Happy Hour Monday thru Friday 3-6pm.

Named one of ‘America’s top 10 coffeehouses’ by USA Today

Relax on our patio, right in the heart of downtown…enjoy a hand-crafted espresso drink made with locally roasted, fair trade and organic coffee. Serving breakfast and lunch all day: panini, salads, smoothies, and fresh baked goods (vegetarian, vegan, gluten-free options). Local beers on tap, and local wines by the glass or bottle. Free Wi-fi and our patio is dog-friendly. Open daily at 7 am.

EL PUERTO DE ANGELES III

EVERYBODY’S BREWING 509-637-2774 • everybodysbrewing.com Downtown White Salmon

541-386-2247 • fullsailbrewing.com 506 Columbia Street • Downtown Hood River

Authentic Jalisco Cuisine. We provide a great dining experience and freshly prepared platters delivered to your table with Mexican hospitality by our friendly staff. Enjoy good food, good folks and good times. Offering daily lunch and dinner specials served all day. Happy Hour Mon-Fri 2-5pm. Enjoy our outdoor patio (open weather permitting).

See for yourself why Everybody’s Brewing is a local favorite! We brew 15 different styles of beer plus seasonal selections onsite. The menu is filled with affordable food choices made with high-quality local ingredients. The atmosphere is warm and family-friendly. Enjoy the stunning Mt. Hood view from the outdoor deck, listen to free live music on Friday nights. Open 11:30am to Close.

If there is one thing a brewer loves more than great beer– it’s great food and great beer! Our northwest-inspired menu complements our award-winning brews and features seasonal, local ingredients. Swing by for a pint, grab a bite, tour the brewery or just soak up the view. Open daily at 11am serving lunch and dinner. Guided brewery tours are offered daily at 1, 2, 3 and 4pm and are free of charge.

KICKSTAND COFFEE & KITCHEN

McMENAMINS EDGEFIELD

541-308-0005 1306 12th Street • Hood River, on the Heights

Sun-Thu 10am-9pm, Fri & Sat 10am-10pm

INDIAN CREEK GOLF COURSE & DIVOTS CLUBHOUSE RESTAURANT 541-308-0304 • indiancreekgolf.com 3605 Brookside Drive • Hood River

Located in the heart of the Hood River Valley just minutes from downtown. Breathtaking views of Mt. Hood and Mt. Adams from our covered patio. Full service bar and fabulous northwest cuisine at a reasonable price. Your everyday vacation spot! Open to the public. Open Daily for Lunch & Dinner. Happy Hour 3-6pm.

Full service espresso bar featuring Stumptown coffee Breakfast burritos, pastries and more Caffeinating your adventures since 2004 Open: Mon-Fri, 6am-6pm & Sat-Sun, 7am-6pm

FULL SAIL BREW PUB

541-436-0016 • kickstandcoffee.net 1235 State Street • Hood River

503-669-8610 • mcmenamins.com 2126 SW Halsey Street • Troutdale (off Exit 16)

Locally sourced ingredients. Unique world flavors. Full breakfast, lunch and dinner menus. Donuts made fresh daily. House-roasted coffee. Healthy salads, burgers and entrees. Beer, wine & house - infused cocktails at “The Handlebar”.

Scattered around our small bars, those tiny watering holes in which people meet and talk and share ideas and laughs and drinks and songs, we offer roaring fires to stave off the cool weather while allowing one to enjoy a handcrafted beverage outdoors.

Open daily 7am-9pm. Outdoor patio. Fire pit. SMORES. Kid-friendly.

Ales, wines and spirits are crafted onsite.

THE GORGE MAGAZINE : SPRING 2018

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EAT + DRINK

PFRIEM FAMILY BREWERS

PIETRO’S PIZZA

541-386-1606 • pietrosrestaurants.com 107 2nd Street • Hood River

541-716-4020 • remedyjuice-cafe.com 112 Third Street • Downtown Hood River

pFriem artisanal beers are symphonies of flavor and balance, influenced by the great brewers of Belgium, but unmistakably true to our homegrown roots in the Pacific Northwest. Although they are served humbly, each glass is overflowing with pride and a relentless aspiration to brew the best beer in the world. We’ll let you decide.

Pietro’s is proud to serve the same famous original thin pizza crust and pizza sauce that has made us a Northwest favorite over the years. We use only the freshest and finest cheese and toppings. Proud to be locally owned and operated with four locations: Hood River, Milwaukie, Beaverton and Salem. Dine in, take out, online or delivery.

Open Daily: 11:30am-9pm

Open Daily 11am-10pm

Recharge at Remedy Café with organic and satisfying breakfast or lunch bowls, burritos, curry, smoothies, juices, or hot drinks. Vegan and paleo options, created from scratch from the best quality organic and local ingredients. Kombucha on tap. Locally roasted, organic espresso. Free WiFi. Open Mon-Fri 7am-5pm Sat & Sun 8am-5pm. Dine-in or take out. Order ahead online or call us!

RIVERTAP PUB & RESTAURANT

RIVERSIDE & CEBU LOUNGE

SOLSTICE WOOD FIRE PIZZA

Happy Hour daily, 3-6pm

Diners seek out newly remodeled Riverside for some of the best food and views in the Gorge, and Cebu for great bar food and drinks. Fresh menus change seasonally—plus an award-winning wine list. Enjoy indoors, on the deck, or in our popular Cebu Lounge.

Inventive, thin-crust pizzas, seasonally inspired entrees, & sublime s’mores. Creative cocktails, craft beers, wine, & ciders on tap. Family dining & kids play area. Vegan & gluten-free options.

541-296-7870 • rivertappub.com 701 East 2nd Street • Downtown The Dalles (I-84, Exit 85) Late Night Happy Hour Friday & Saturday, 10-close Live Music every Friday, Saturday and Sunday We Cater

541-386-4410 • riversidehoodriver.com Exit 64 off I-84 • Waterfront Hood River

Cebu Lounge Happy Hours: Mon-Fri 4-6pm

gorge in the gorge

A local guide to the best food, drinks, farms, and markets! gorgeinthegorge.com

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REMEDY CAFÉ

541-321-0490 • pfriembeer.com 707 Portway Avenue, Suite 101 • Hood River Waterfront

SPRING 2018 : THE GORGE MAGAZINE

541-436-0800 • solsticewoodfirecafe.com 501 Portway Avenue • Hood River Waterfront

Heated patio & waterfront views across from the park Wood-fired & Gorge-inspired!


EAT + DRINK

541-386-3940 • stonehedgeweddings.com 3405 West Cascade Avenue • Hood River

STONEHEDGE GARDENS

541-386-7423 • sushiokalani@gorge.net 109 First Street • Downtown Hood River

SUSHI OKALANI

TAD’S CHICKEN ‘N DUMPLINS

“The best outdoor dining in the Gorge.” –NW Best Places We are a favorite among locals and visitors. Our cuisine is a classic, European blend that utilizes fresh, local ingredients and pairs well with our select wines. Our gardens are the perfect setting for weddings. Full-service catering available. “Romantic setting and the best meal I had in town.” –The Los Angeles Times

Come find us in the basement of the Yasui Building, the local’s favorite spot for fresh fish, Pan-Asian Cuisine, and a rockin’ atmosphere! Lots of rotating specials, creative rolls, and a large sake selection means you’re always trying something new! Private rooms are available for groups up to 20 people. Take-out menu available online. Open for dinner nightly at 5:00, closing hours change seasonally.

We are nestled on the banks of the Sandy River in Troutdale, OR–the gateway to the Columbia River Gorge. We are located halfway between Portland and Multnomah Falls. Serving exquisite American cuisine since the 1930s. The menu includes: Seafood specialties as well as traditional steak, chicken, and pasta dishes; a full bar, and our famous home-style chicken ‘n dumplins. Open every night for dinner.

WET PLANET CAFÉ & GRILL

WHITE SALMON BAKING CO.

YOUR PARTAKE LISTING HERE

Off the beaten track, outside and delicious. From a perfect espresso in the morning with a fresh pastry, to one of the best burgers in the Gorge! Farm-to-Table menu, including freshly caught Salmon. Enjoy great food paired with local brews, cider and wines on our outdoor patio, while watching the rafters and kayakers have fun on the White Salmon River.

Wood-fired artisan breads, pastries, espresso, with a café serving breakfast and lunch. Regional and Italian wines for sale. Stop by and check out Monday Pizza Night!

503-666-5337 • tadschicdump.com 1325 East Historic Columbia River Hwy • Troutdale

CAFÉ & GRILL 509-493-8989 • wetplanetwhitewater.com 860 Highway 141 • White Salmon (Husum)

509-281-3140 • whitesalmonbaking.com 80 Estes Avenue • White Salmon

Open daily 8-6.30 PM, Memorial weekend - End of Sept

Monday, Thursday and Friday 7-3:30 Saturday and Sunday 8-3 Closed Tuesday and Wednesday

Contact Jody Thompson for more information: 425-308-9582 • jthompson@thegorgemagazine.com 541-399-6333 • thegorgemagazine.com The Gorge is a mecca for great food and drink: restaurants, cafés, wineries, breweries, food carts & more. Help visitors and locals decide where to dine and drink. They’ll see your ad in print and in the online digital edition of the magazine…for one affordable price! RESERVE A PARTAKE LISTING SPACE TODAY

Reserve Ad Space Now

The area’s premier lifestyle publication

for SUMMER 2018! On Stands June 8th

For advertising, contact Jody Thompson:

jthompson@thegorgemagazine.com 425-308-9582 For more information, contact Janet Cook jcook@thegorgemagazine.com or 541-399-6333 never miss another issue

SUBSCRIBE

$19.99 FOR ONE YEAR $29.99 FOR TWO YEARS (4 issues per year mailed to your home)

Order online at thegorgemagazine.com or call 541-399-6333

thegorgemagazine.com THE GORGE MAGAZINE : SPRING 2018

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OUR GORGE : EPILOGUE

A circa 1920 postcard of Beacon Rock, also known in the late 1800s and early 1900s as Castle Rock. (Photo from the Collection of the History Museum of Hood River County.)

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SPRING 2018 : THE GORGE MAGAZINE


THINKING OF YOUR NEXT HOME IN THE GORGE?

THINK LOCAL!

JEFF SACRE

STEVE WOLF

NMLS - 140302, MLO - 140302

NMLS - 114305, MLO - 114305

Sr. Mortgage Specialist

Sr. Mortgage Specialist

102 3RD STREET | HOOD RIVER, OR 97031 Looking to Purchase or Refinance?

CALL US TODAY!

541.436.2662 directorsmortgage.net

This is not a commitment to lend. Information deemed reliable but subject to change without notice. Subject to credit approval. Restrictions may apply. Call for Details. Consumer Loan License NMLS-3240, CL-3240.

Directors_Mortgage_SP18.indd 83

2/21/18 10:55 AM


We’ve got BREAKFAST, LUNCH & DINNER covered!

Egg River Cafe “BREAKFAST of CHAMPIONS”

&

New York Times, 2014

Mesquitery Steakhouse The only steakhouse in the Gorge... a locals favorite since 1988

{ Open Daily 6am-2pm } Breakfast & Lunch

{ Open 4:30pm-9pm } RESTAURANT { Open 4:30pm-11pm } THE SHED BAR

Extensive Breakfast

We grill everything over

& Lunch Menus

100% Mesquite Wood

Organic Eggs • Omelets

Steaks, Ribeyes, Prime Rib

Pancakes • Waffles

Ribs, Poultry

Crepes • Skillets

Seafood, Pastas

Organic Coffee

Great Side Dishes

Espressos & Lattes

Homemade Desserts

Soups • Salads

Beer & Wine Selection

Sandwiches • Hamburgers

Cocktails

Family Friendly

Summer Patio

Easy Parking

Adjoining The Shed Bar

541-386-1127 1313 Oak Street, Hood River eggrivercafe.com

10% OFF

YOUR TOTAL BILL with this coupon

EggRvr_Mesquitery_SP18.indd 84

Not valid on holidays or with any other offer. Expires 6/7/18

541-386-1127

541-386-2002 • 541-387-4002 1219 12th St., Hood River thebestinhoodriver.com

10% OFF

YOUR TOTAL BILL with this coupon

Not valid Fridays, holidays or with any other offer. Expires 6/7/18

541-386-2002

2/21/18 11:00 AM

Profile for The Gorge Magazine

The Gorge Magazine - Spring 2018  

Enjoy our colorful spring issue full of captivating stories and beautiful photography. Happy reading!

The Gorge Magazine - Spring 2018  

Enjoy our colorful spring issue full of captivating stories and beautiful photography. Happy reading!

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