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life/arts

sports

New coach breathes new life into volleyball team

Just a day in the life of rock 'n roll

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GROUPS & DEPARTMENTS

Health Center offers free HIV testing The UH Health Center encourages students to take advantage of its free HIV testing day from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. today at the UH Student Health Center. The testing is anonymous and confidential, and it is open to all UH students, faculty and staff. For more information, contact the Health Center at 713-743-5151. — Sara Nichols/The Daily Cougar

ARTS

UH Christmas program discounted for food donation

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December 1, 2010

Group targets smokers Health students join campaign to ban smoking on campus Sarah Raslan

THE DAILY COUGAR In a creative effort to curb smoking, UH student health organizations traded students a plate of barbeque, chips and a drink for their cigarettes. This annual national campaign, The Great American Smokeout, aims to encourage smokers to quit. The group intends to have a smokefree campus. “Instead of the University just banning smoking, we want it to be a student-led initiative,” said Thomas Frank, UH community and environmental health committee chairman. The organizations were stationed at three

locations between the M.D. Anderson Memorial Library and Philip Guthrie Hoffman Hall, at the University Center and at the UC-Satellite on Nov. 11. On display as part of the campaign were two pig lungs. One lung represented a healthy smoke-free lung while the other represented the lung of someone who had been smoking for 20 years. The smoker’s lung was injected with carbon, one of the main components of cigarettes, and connected to an air pump to show how each lung breathes. The carbon-injected lung doesn’t breathe so well, said health science junior Nina Imo. Another display item used to encourage SMOKING continues on page 8

The UC-Satellite C3-Store has sold packs of cigarettes to students 18 or above since its opening. | Brianna Leigh Morrison/ The Daily Cougar

Frontier Fiesta team plan to meet early

The comedic play is part of the Theatre for Young Audiences series and features six children who attend church for the first time and take command of the holiday pageant. Tickets are $5 for children and $10 for adults, but people can receive a $5 discount for bringing one nonperishable food item to donate.

Group is discussing new changes to increase participation at annual event

For more information, visit www.theatredance. uh.edu.

Joshua Siegel

— Sara Nichols/The Daily Cougar

THE DAILY COUGAR Frontier Fiesta is getting an early start in organizing this year’s event by holding its first Connection Meeting in an effort to increase participation and get more student organizations involved. We’re trying to break away from the stereotype that it’s just for Greeks,” co-director of marketing for Frontier Fiesta Cameron Bailey said. “We want to start our communication early, because we want there to be no reason that you’re not participating in Frontier Fiesta.” Bailey said that if a group needs financial assistance, they will be having fundraising events to help pay for entries and variety shows. The meeting, taking place at 7 p.m. today in the

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64 LO 43 HI

ON CAMPUS Frontier Fiesta Connections Meeting Frontier Fiesta Association will host a meeting that intends to inform student organizations about ways to participate in next year’s Frontier Fiesta. The meeting will be held in the UC Bluebonnet Room from 7 to 8:30 p.m.

AROUND TOWN Belanova Latin Grammy-award winning pop band Belanova will be in town tonight and performing at the House of Blues at 7 p.m. Belanova is one of Mexico’s greatest up and coming pop bands, so be sure to not miss this one! Find more campus and local events or add your own at thedailycougar.com/calendar

CORRECTIONS J

Wednesday

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Students and their families have one last chance to experience the UH School of Theatre & Dance’s holiday production of “The Best Christmas Pageant Ever” at 2 p.m. Saturday at the UH Wortham Theatre.

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FRONTIER continues on page 8

Protesters form a rally on campus

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group of individuals, all of whom were not students or UH staff, protested Tuesday morning in front of the UC-Satellite opposing President Barack Obama’s economic policies. The group dressed in costume, held signs and chanted out loud to grab students’ attention for more than two hours. | Andrew Taylor/The Daily Cougar

UH continues to lead in energy research Katie Rowald

THE DAILY COUGAR The Energy Research Complex, a facility just off of the Gulf Freeway and formerly known as University Business Park, has maintained its effort in leading energy research to help UH towards flagship status. Built in 1953 and comprising 580,552 sq. feet of warehouse and office space on 68 acres of land, the complex was once home to Schlumberger, an oilfield service provider that recently opened its first multinational research and geo-engineering center in Rio de ENERGY continues on page 8


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NEWS 101

Wednesday, December 1, 2010

The Daily Cougar

news 101

Headlines from around the world, so you can sound like an informed person.

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

HOUSTON

Texas A&M to compete in Cotton Bowl

Rare sentencing gives fatal DWI driver hope

After finishing the season with a 9-3 record, Texas A&M was awarded a trip to the Cotton Bowl. The bowl committee announced Tuesday that the Aggies will play an undisclosed member of the SEC Jan. 7 in the new Cowboy Stadium in Arlington.

A Houston judge gave his first “shock probation� ruling in over 2000 cases Monday. The probation, which is an alternative to straight jail time, is intended to reform good candidates for rehabilitation by shocking them with the reality of hard time.

While the official opponent hasn’t been announced, it is most likely going to be LSU. The game will mark the first time the Aggies have been to the Cotton Bowl since the 2004 season.

Leslie Parrish, 41, was convicted of killing 28-year-old Jason Schober during the morning of May 13, 2007. Prosecutors at the trial said that Parrish had a blood alcohol level of .24, which is three times the legal limit of .08.

ARKANSAS

Instead of serving six years in prison, Parrish will be placed on a 10-year probation. She has already spent six months incarcerated, which is the shock part of the treatment.

Education in motion for small rural district Students in the secluded Hector School District will now spend the two hours a day learning while riding the bus. The district, which is located in Pope County, is located mainly in the Ozark National Forest, and only holds 600 students total. The program, which is being coordinated with the help of Vanderbilt University’s Aspirnaut Program, will put ceiling-mounted projectors in school buses that will broadcast math and science material during the student transit period. The program, which was founded by Arkansas native Billy Hudson, works with rural schools in both Arkansas and Maine. The school district’s superintendent Karen Cushman said that the project’s goal is to enhance and engage students while they are a captive audience free from most distractions.

Schober’s family and friends don’t agree with the verdict. “I’m disappointed that she’s not going to spend her time just sitting in jail,� her mother, Patricia Schober said in the Houston Chronicle. “I know that putting her in jail won’t bring Jason back, but it will be a lesson to my children that the justice system does work.� Schober was engaged and had two sons when he was killed in the accident. Parrish asked Schober’s family for forgiveness after the judge handed down the verdict. Her mother, Carol Parrish, testified on the stand that her 11-year-old granddaughter currently needs counseling due to the pain of losing her mother. Parrish will not be immediately released. She will be placed in treatment for the next six months. Compiled by Jack Wehman

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ABOUT THE COUGAR The Daily Cougar is published Monday through Friday during the fall and spring semesters, and Tuesday and Thursday during the summer, at the University of Houston Printing Plant and online at http://www. thedailycougar.com. The University seeks to provide equal educational opportunities without regard to race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, disability or veteran status, or sexual orientation. The Daily Cougar is supported in part by Student Service Fees. The first copy of the Cougar is free; each additional copy is 25 cents. SUBSCRIPTIONS Rates are $70 per year or $40 per semester. Mail subscription requests to: Mail Subscriptions, The Daily Cougar, University of Houston, Houston, TX, 77204-4015. NEWS TIPS Direct news tips and story ideas to the News Desk. Call (713) 743-5314, e-mail news@thedailycougar. com or fax (713) 743-5384. A “Submit news item� form is also available online at thedailycougar.com.

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Wednesday, December 1, 2010

The Daily Cougar

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EDITORS Travis Hensley E-MAIL arts@thedailycougar.com ONLINE www.thedailycougar.com/arts

showtime

JILLIAN CONRAD

BOX OFFICE

“It’s better to regret something you have done ...” 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. Through March 6. 3913 Main. Art Place. For information, call 281-501-2964 or visit www.artpalacegallery. com. Free.

“Form Follows Function: Celebrating 10 Years of the American Institute of Architects, Houston Design Collection at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston” 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Thursdays, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, and 12:15p.m. to 7 p.m. Sundays. Through January 30. 1001 Bissonnet. For information, call 713-639-7300 or visit www.mfah.org. Free to $7.

Imagine all The Beatles walking down this road, it’s easy if you try. No Mini in front of us, only an empty road. Imagine all The Beatles on iTunes today. | Wikimedia Commons

MUSIC

“Perspectives 172: Kirsten Pieroth” Regular viewing hours are 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Thursdays, and 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. Through January 2. 5216 Montrose, Contemporary Arts Museum Houston. For information, call 713284-8250 or visit www.camh.org. Free.

The Beatles more than a band This legendary band is now available for download and is a focal point for arguments Travis Hensley

THE DAILY COUGAR

“Real Pirates: The Untold Story of the Whydah from Slave Ship to Pirate Ship” Wednesdays through Mondays, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesdays. Through February 6. Houston Museum of Natural Science, 5555 Hermann Park Drive, Houston Museum of Natural Science. For information, call 713-639-4629 or visit www.hmns.org. $35.

“B-Sides: A Dialogue with Contemporary U.S. Photography” 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Thursdays, and noon to 5 p.m. Saturdays. Vine Street Studios, 1113 Vine Street. For information, call 713-223-5522 or visit www.fotofest.org. Free.

“Cosmopolitan Routes: Houston Collects Latin American Art” 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Thursdays, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, 12:15 p.m. to 7 p.m. Sundays. Through February 6. 1001 Bissonnet, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. For information, call 713-6397300 or visit www.mfah.org. Free to $7.

The world is conspiring to get us to think more about The Beatles. The band’s music is now being made available on iTunes. Television seems to be flooded with four-minute commercial breaks to their tunes while we wait for our programs to come back. Before that, there was last year’s release of “The Beatles: Rock Band.” All this is really just adding insult to injury because anyone who has wanted to play the guitar in the last 40 years has had to learn at least one of the group’s songs, and now people don’t have to stare at the tabs for “Yesterday” to feel like they accomplished something. As bands go, they will always be in the canons as one of the greatest, if not the greatest, of all time. There is nothing that can be done about that simple fact; no new band can take that away from them. Everyone -- no matter what age -- will hold the lasting image of them frozen in 1964 playing “I Want to Hold Your Hand” on the “Ed Sullivan Show.” Even as the Beatles’ Billboard records get broken, they will always have a nostalgic factor to them for all of us. The band is so popular that I don’t have to look up how to spell Lennon’s girlfriend’s name, Yoko Ono. And that’s not your usual all-American name. Another great thing about that is that I

can put her name into a paragraph by itself. Yoko Ono. And it can be synonymous with irritating girlfriends who destroy friendships. You see, besides being known for groundbreaking music, there is also the arguing factor that they bring to culture. Maybe it started with the break up between John Lennon and Paul McCartney. At the end of their friendship, they even fought over how their names would be written: Lennon/McCartney or Paul McCartney and John Lennon. But the founding members are not the only ones who get to join in on the fun of quarrelling over the foursome. Some people really hate the Beatles; with events like bass player Glen Matlock getting kicked out of the Sex Pistols for going on too much about McCartney and the Beatles. Sid Vicious would later replace Matlock. Now Vicious offers his own arguments: Did he kill his girlfriend? Could he even play the bass? But people obviously care more about the Beatles than the Sex Pistols. If money translates to likeability and putting records sales aside, you can look to the number of movies made with the band as the next selling point to expand this argument. “Across the Universe” made more money during its opening week ($3,824,988) than “Sid and Nancy” has made since 1986 ($2,826,523). Even with Gary Oldman (The Dark Knight, Harry Potter) giving a breath-taking performance, the Pistols just don’t stand up. Of course, you’re not supposed to

make such comparisons of money with matters of art. If you like a band, it is supposed to have this indefinable reason that just grabs you. I get this when I hear some of the Beatles’ songs. But others like “Octopus’s Garden” make me want to eat calamari with the hope that the sea creature that inspired this song has been deep-fried so it can never do that again. You see, as arguments go, the band is more in the arena of major social issues than musical taste. I’ve seen people argue that “ A Day in the Life” is better than “Come Together” with a tenacity that would scare Navy Seals. It no longer has to do anything with music; it has to do with something that’s way too confusing. I wish I could find an explanation, but when the ads for iTunes started playing, it didn’t make me want to hear their music. It made me want to do the opposite. That was until I realized one thing. I like the “White Album.” I was in a really bad car accident with that album playing. While it’s not my favorite album, to be honest, I can’t think of one I would rather be listening to — even during a big wreck during rush hour traffic in the middle of one of the most traffic jammed cities in the world. And that is what’s missing from these arguments over taste. Who cares. If you like the music, then it’s good. Take this aspect to other areas in your life, don’t let anyone’s opinion overrun yours and don’t try to beat down your friend’s opinions. It is what makes us individuals. arts@thedailycougar.com


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Wednesday, December 1, 2010

The Daily Cougar

opinion THE DAILY COUGAR

EDITOR Andrew Taylor E-MAIL opinion@thedailycougar.com ONLINE www.thedailycougar.com/opinion

THE HOMELESS MAJORITY Courtesy USBICEF Stranahan Program

EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR IN CHIEF MANAGING EDITOR NEWS EDITORS SPORTS EDITORS LIFE

& ARTS EDITOR

OPINION EDITOR

Matthew Keever Newton Liu Hiba Adi, Jose Aguilar John Brannen, Christopher Losee Travis Hensley Andrew Taylor

STAFF EDITORIAL

WikiLeaks: Friend or foe to public knowledge?

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s many are aware, whistle-blowing website Wikileaks has been on a roll releasing confidential information regarding a number of matters around the world. And according to its founder, Julian Assange, there are no plans to slow or halt its streak of disseminating safeguarded documents.

Wikileaks sent the media into a frenzy recently by releasing classified material regarding international and foreign relations between various nations. Of course, the controversial website is no stranger to the press. Wikileaks slapped hundreds of thousands war logs onto its servers in October detailing operations in the Iraq War. A look at its history of leaks reveals much more information which has been radiated in the past. Enough with the background lesson though. More concerning is how Wikileaks is affecting the public. Critics of Wikileaks have been outraged at its actions. Adversaries of President Barack Obama’s administration have even started to criticize Obama for not intervening or fighting Assange’s machine. While this controversy is generating plenty of headlines for news publications, is it benefitting Americans? The method to which Wikileaks obtains all its information is a mystery at times and a subject worthy of leaking by itself. But whether the website has acquired these documents legally or not, it’s generally agreed on that the material is informational and sheds considerable light on political and government matters previously completely withheld to the public. With documents that could potentially put national security at risk aside, Wikileaks is not doing the American public a disfavor. Sure, it’s not pleasing governments and officials in office, but what is important is that the information is truthful and involves public concern. People have a right to know what’s going on behind closed doors, and despite that these leaks are probably only a glimpse of it, we think Wikileaks is acting in the right direction.

E D I TO R I A L P O L I C I E S STAFF EDITORIAL The Staff Editorial reflects the opinions of The Daily Cougar Editorial Board (the members of which are listed above the editorial). All other opinions, commentaries and cartoons reflect only the opinion of the author. Opinions expressed in The Daily Cougar do not necessarily reflect those of the University of Houston or the students as a whole. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR The Daily Cougar welcomes letters to the editor from any member of the UH community. Letters should be no more than 250 words and signed, including the author’s full name, phone number or e-mail address and affiliation with the University, including classification and major. Anonymous letters will not be published. Deliver letters to Room 7, University Center Satellite; e-mail them to letters@thedailycougar.com; send them via campus mail to STP 4015; or fax them to (713) 743-5384. Letters are subject to editing. ADVERTISEMENTS Advertisements published in The Daily Cougar do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of the University or the students as a whole. GUEST COMMENTARY Submissions are accepted from any member of the UH community and must be signed with the author’s name, phone number or e-mail address and affiliation with the University, including classification and major. Commentary should be kept to less than 500 words. Guest commentaries should not be written as replies to material already printed in the Cougar, but rather should present independent points of view. Rebuttals should be sent as letters. Deliver submissions to Room 7, University Center Satellite; e-mail them to letters@thedailycougar.com; or fax them to (713) 743-5384. All submissions are subject to editing.

Healthcare plan to have its day in court Despite the Obama administration’s plans to move forward with the health care law, a bit of controversy is on the horizon. Officials are preparing themselves for the possibility that a Virginian federal judge will soon rule the central provision of the health care law as unconstitutional. The law’s requirement that most Americans obtain Travis insurance is the issue Gumphrey judge Henry E. Hudson will decide the constitutionality of. The question before the courts is whether the government can require citizens to buy a commercial product, like health insurance. Kevin Sack and Robert Pear noted in a New York Times Article published

last Friday that “because the Supreme Court has said the commerce clause allows Congress to regulate activities that substantially affect interstate commerce, judges must decide if the failure to obtain insurance can be defined as an activity.” Earlier this year, attorney generals from 13 states sued the federal government claiming the bill was unconstitutional only minutes after Obama signed it into law. The lawsuit says, “the Constitution nowhere authorizes the United States to mandate, either directly or under threat of penalty, that all citizens and legal residents have qualifying health care coverage,” according to an article published in USA Today. The lead attorney for the case, Florida Attorney General Bill McCollum, said in the USA Today that the healthcare law

will cause “substantial harm and financial burden to states” and that this legal action is to “protect the American people from this unprecedented attack on our system of government.” How is it a plan to protect the American people when the law is made to help them? Under the law, health insurance would be available to 32 million Americans who are currently uninsured. The uninsured and self-employed would be able to purchase insurance through state-based exchanges, and funding is available to states to establish the exchanges. Opposition to reform the most non-functioning and broken part of our nation is incomprehensible. Travis Gumphrey is a communications sophomore and may be reached at opinion@ thedailycougar.com.

COMMENTS FROM THE WEBSITE Leave your own@thedailycougar.com In response to the Staff Editorial: Student-run organizations should remain student-run This isn’t the first time this has happened. A few years ago, the SGA was talking about distributing a national newspaper on campus and said students would prefer national news to what was in the Cougar. The Cougar made an effort to carry some national news, which prompted the SGA to slam the paper for not focusing enough on campus issues. No matter how much some student leaders might hate hearing it, a free student press is an essential part of any flagship institution. Trying to change the way Student Publications is run to suit someone’s personal agenda is a disservice to the entire campus. You’ve said so publicly before, Dr. Lee — are you listening now? -Red

This is a clear attempt to remove student involvement and input from campus

issues. They don’t want us to have a voice. So much for campus pride, Tier One B.S. -Hunter Mr. Lee has hated the Cougar for many years, especially when it highlighted some of the questionable activies associated with his office and others in the upper UH administration when I was the Editor-in-Chief of the paper. Lee isn’t the first and probably won’t be the last UH administrator who tries to strangle the Cougar, which certainly is the voice of the student body. The SGA rarely knows what really goes on with the Daily Cougar. It certainly would be a travesty to see the newspaper brought under the control of the administration. Many bad things that would have been covered up were, instead, brought to public scrutiny by the Cougar. All of the UH community, both current and alumni, should rally to defend its independence.

-Bobby Summers The SGA may want to consider what they are saying because for one thing I never picked up a USA Today on my own. That cost money and I don’t want to pay for a print paper when I could get it for free by walking on campus or going to the USA Today website. I been reading the Cougar since I came to UH back in Fall 06 and I have noticed changes, both good and bad, but I have always been a loyal reader. Two summers ago I was interning and wasn’t able to pick up the Cougar during the summer but I made sure to visit the website in order to hear about the latest news at UH and read the comics. The hard work that is put into each edition can be seen. I hope that the SGA rethinks whatever they are planning to do and at least communicate what they are planning. Also I hope that you guys can give out more information about what is going on with this topic. -Micheal


SPORTS

The Daily Cougar

Wednesday, December 1, 2010

5

VOLLEYBALL

Cougars see great improvement despite unhappy ending Keith Cordero Jr.

THE DAILY COUGAR The Cougars wrapped up their first season under head coach Molly Alvey this week improving on a nine-win season in 2009 to a 19-win season this year. UH (19-13, 13-7 C-USA) finished third in Conference USA and had big wins against SMU, BYU, Loyola Marymount and McNeese State for Alvey’s first win of the season. “I think it was an incredible season for us,” Alvey said. “On the outside looking in — from the beginning, if you would have told me we would be sitting in third place at the end of the season, I probably would not have believed that.” The Cougars put themselves in a challenging situation after a 1-6 start, but three of those losses came from the likes of Top 25 teams Florida State, Tennessee and Oklahoma. Losing to high-caliber programs did not make Alvey hit the panic button. “I think you only get better when you play better programs,” Alvey

said. “It gives you a visual of what it looks like to be a Top 25 program.” Following a loss against Wichita State, the Cougars reeled off five straight wins, including a 3-0 record and win at the Nicholls State Tournament, which improved them to 6-6 on the season. The conference season began with back-to-back losses against rival Rice and Tulane, putting the Cougars in a tough spot at 0-2 in C-USA. “It didn’t make me nervous at all,” Alvey said. “I think Tulane was probably the turning point in the chemistry of the team, the camaraderie and the emergence of a somewhat consistent starting lineup.” The second five-game winning streak of the season followed as the Cougars beat Tulane, UCF, UTEP and Southern Miss twice before losing a heartbreaker at Memphis 3-2 on Oct. 15. “I think we were really sharp,” Alvey said. “Our ball control got consistent, and that’s what changed the whole look to the team for us.”

The Cougars beat UAB in their next game, but like everyone in C-USA play this season, lost against Tulsa 3-1 on Oct.22. The No. 22 Golden Hurricanes finished the regular season with a 30-2 record, 20-0 in C-USA and are currently on a 28-game winning streak. The Tulsa loss was a jumpstart to another Cougar’s winning streak that reached seven games spanning from Oct. 23 – Nov.14, which included wins against SMU, Marshall (twice), East Carolina (twice), UAB and Memphis. The season ended with a rough patch as the Cougars dropped road games at Tulsa, SMU and Rice to end the season failing to get that 20th win. “It was really tough,” Alvey said. “Especially for a team that grew in confidence and believed in itself. Everyone was extremely upset, and probably felt like they could have done something differently to go out on a better note.” The Cougars say goodbye to two senior starters — Marluci Toazzi and

After the season, UH has something to build on as head coach Molly Alvey will try to elevate UH to Top 25 status in 2011. | Brianna Leigh Morrison/The Daily Cougar four-year player Amanda Carson. UH heads into the 2011 season with great expectations following a resurgence and exciting bounce-back season under Alvey. “I think more than anything now we don’t have to go into unfamiliar

territory,” Alvey said. “Coming up in February, it will be a year that we’ve all been together and expectations are a little bit more understood.” sports@thedailycougar.com

PLAYER PROFILE

Brooks sets tempo for next season Bethel Glumac

THE DAILY COUGAR Amber Brooks is to UH volleyball what Case Keenum is to UH football — minus all the recognition. Like a quarterback, her position as setter handles 90 percent of balls played on the court. Because she is the player in between the passer and hitter, every decision she makes has to be consistent. Some athletes, like Brooks, are made for the job. “It’s definitely mental — thinking about so many things at once. At the same time, I love the pressure. I love the situation and being the one that my team relies on to get the job done,” Brooks said. This season, Brooks tallied 1,258 assists. Her style is most noticeable on the court with unstoppable service aces and constant motion on the front line. Brooks also brought prestige to the Cougars when she was named C-USA Setter and Co-Setter of the Week, an honor she credits to the whole team. “It’s definitely a team thing and they definitely make me look good no matter what I do,” she said. Brooks fits well into the Cougar family. Junior middle blocker and team captain Lucy Charuk agrees that she is a plus for the team. “I think she’s done really well coming in as a transfer to a new team and probably a different system than what she is used to,” Charuk said. “She’s adapted well and taken to our new system and criticisms.” Born in Alvin, this season is actually Brook’s first at UH. For the past two years, she played as setter for the University of Texas at San Antonio. With the arrival of head coach Molly Alvey, Brooks decided to try UH. Brooks has known Alvey, the Cougar’s first-year head coach, since high school. Like Brooks, Alvey specializes in the setter position, so Brooks was able to receive the correct setter training she needed. Alvey believes in Brook’s ability to grow as a setter. “Amber has improved tremendously,” Alvey said. “I’ve put a lot of demands on her and have probably changed her perspective of the game

and how court management goes.” Brooks has been up to the challenge since middle school. She started playing club volleyball in fifth grade. Coming from a sports family, she already played softball and soccer. Visiting the UH gym at age twelve and playing there now inspires Brooks to encourage younger girls to pursue the game. Volleyball became a passion for Brooks then and has now solidified her future career path. “I would say there are certain things I will do 110 percent with my whole heart and soul — volleyball is one of those things,” Brooks said. “I knew when I was 11 that I was going to college for volleyball. I said, ‘This is what I want to do for the rest of my life.’”

After graduating with a degree in kinesiology, Brooks’ goal is to become a Division I volleyball coach in the fashion of many setters before her. “I think it’s easier for them (setters) to translate into coaching,” Brooks said. “I have to know where everyone is at all times. You have to know and make sure your team is all organized.” Until then, Brooks has her final year as setter to look forward to. “I think my senior year is going to be even better than what we are doing now. It’s going to be a really good season and something that the future girls can build from.”

Coupons and specials every Tuesday in The Daily Cougar!

FREE BONELESS WINGS

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with any Wing purchase on op your next visit to this Wingstop 8326 Broadway St., Broadway Belfort Center, Houston, TX 77061 (713) 847-9464

with purchase of any Family Pack on your next visit to this Wingstop 712 Gulfgate Center, Gulfgate Shopping Center, Houston, TX 77087 (713) 643-9464

One coupon per guest, per visit. Valid only on future visit. Coupons may not be combined. Valid at participating Wingstop Restaurants thru 12/31/10.

sports@thedailycougar.com

Thinking about law school? The UH Law Center is one of the best schools in the country, and its leading curriculum includes national “Top 10” specialties in intellectual property and health law. You are invited to learn more about the UH Law Center, the application process, and how UH can prepare you for a rewarding career in law. Plan to attend one of our upcoming information sessions which include a tour of the UH Law Center and a presentation by the Assistant Dean for Admissions.

• Saturday, December 4th, 9:00 AM- 12:00PM To RSVP or for more information, please contact us at 713-743-2280 or lawadmissions@uh.edu.

www.law.uh.edu/admissions


6

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FIND A

PLACE

Wheeler Avenue Baptist Church 3826 Wheeler Avenue Houston, Texas 77004-2604 713.748.5240 Worship Services 7:15a.m., 9:00a.m., 11:00a.m. & 1:00p.m. Wednesday, Bible Study: 12 noon & 7:00p.m. Rev. Dr. Marcus D. Cosby, Pastor Rev. William A. Lawson, Pastor Emeritus Sunday Services via webcast: www.wheeleravebc.org

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IN THE DAILY COUGAR

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Promote your church or temple’s services in our weekly Worship Directory.

Call 713.743.5356 E-mail dcclass@thedailycougar.com


The Daily Cougar

COMICS & MORE

Wednesday, December 1, 2010

comics

crossword

Rapscallions by Pablo Relampagos

ACROSS 1 Wine-press residue 5 Skywalker, e.g. 9 Pitcher in a basin 13 Far East nanny 14 Shaman’s findings 16 Green gem 17 Morrison or Braxton 18 Reeves of “The Matrix” 19 Lamb’s alias 20 Get real! (2 wds.) 21 Blow it 22 Bargain 24 Wrath 26 Attention getter 27 Chefs’ wear 30 Impassioned (hyph.) 34 What’s in 35 Sturdy lock 36 Flashy dresser 37 Typewriter key 38 Harshness 39 A Stooge 40 Project starter 42 Highest point 43 Mass-produce, slangily 45 Is in cahoots 47 Shamelessly bold 48 Not that 49 Fuddy-duddy 50 Flowering tree 53 Mark of Zorro 54 Workout locales 58 Xena’s dog 59 Bete — 61 Slow time 62 Sketch 63 Lugged 64 Raines of 1940s films 65 Thin Man’s terrier 66 Cat’s warning 67 View as

F.M.L. by Hoa-My Pham

sudoku How to play

Each row must contain the numbers 1 to 9; each column must contain the numbers 1 to 9; and each set of 3-by-3 boxes must also contain the numbers 1 to 9.

Previous puzzle solved

DOWN 1 — Hari 2 Cookie VIP 3 Sari wearer 4 Airy pie 5 Pranksters 6 File abrasive

*2009 stats

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Diary opener Motel of old Bailed out Saunter Stein bestseller Bring up More foamy Devotee And, for Hans Fragrant perennial Garret Madrid art gallery Rise up Engages in war Forest floor, in part Hound’s clues Bopper lead-in Holy cow! Aglow Pennsylvania town Dernier —

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44 Argued over price 46 Cousins of “um” 47 Reproduces 49 Dijon dads 50 Actress Powers 51 Late spring flower 52 Execs 53 Ristorante order 55 Festive log 56 Mme.’s daughter 57 Close violently 60 — and aah

2010 UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE INC.

Previous puzzle solved Y U K S

U S N A

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T AWA S H R NO B L Y E TWE E D A R I S WR S OW A O T T OMA N I N WO R N R E P O T L OU V ON E T C H T E P I D T H E A T E R C R L E X U C A N T A T A SM O B O E U N J AM S L U R ROU S E T E N S E N T E R

C O N A C L E F A L

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8

NEWS

Wednesday, December 1, 2010

ENERGY continued from page 1

Janeiro, Brazil. “(The acquisition of the property) represents one of the most important physical expansions in UH history and is an integral part of our goal to become the world’s foremost energy university, and a nationally competitive flagship research university,” UH President Renu Khator said in a fall 2009 news release. Three buildings in the ERP complex now house research facilities with programs ranging from the exploration of alternative fuel sources to the efficient storage, transportation and delivery of wind-generated electricity.

The campus is home to thirdparty research groups, including the Wind Alliance and the Power Technology Institute, that have partnered with UH to further technological development. ERP is also home to a new undergraduate program in petroleum engineering. “(It) combines the fundamentals of petroleum engineering and geosciences with economics, energy law and business,” said Carl Carlucci, executive vice chancellor and vice president of administration and finances, in a June 2010 presentation on the facility’s development. The new petroleum-engineering program was the first to be given space in ERP, with more than 20,000 square feet of laboratory, classroom

The Daily Cougar

The Energy Research Complex has housed multiple facilities for wind, electricity and fuel energy research since 1953. | Katie Rowald/The Daily Cougar and office space on two floors in building 9A. The building is to be

completed and fully functional by Fall 2011.

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Additionally, ERP offers space in buildings 5A and 14 that may be used for light manufacturing or assembly. UH is planning to rent the space out to small and start-up businesses that would otherwise lack the room to grow, allowing it to serve as incubator space. Most of the ERP is currently undergoing renovations to modernize and improve the properties to accommodate new tenants, including the installation of a fiber optic backbone by Contra Electric Link, which began over the summer to support communication needs. This is part of a $2 million refurbishment effort that also includes improvements to roads and aesthetic upgrades to buildings. news@thedailycougar.com

FRONTIER continued from page 1

University Center Bluebonnet Room, will mainly deal with registration deadlines and other schedule dates, though the group wants organizations to come with new ideas that they want to implement as part of the event. “Everybody knows the usual ways like variety shows, carnival booths and cook-offs,” Bailey said. “But if we touch base with organizations and see what they want to do, we can try to see if we can work with them and get that started.” The group plans to have new activities, but its production team is still working on details. “We’re going to have stuff like a dodge ball tournament and a skate ramp and stuff like that,” Bailey said. “We’re really open (to ideas).” Frontier Fiesta also aims to bring a fresh experience to students by creating a website that should launch in December and a Twitter account to help students keep up with the latest information. For more specifics visit www. uh.edu/fiesta. news@thedailycougar.com

SMOKING continued from page 1

INVENT YOURSELF. With over 140 degrees and certificates, there’s really no limit to who you can become. Not only are our classes more affordable than most four-year universities, we also offer financial aid and scholarships to help you pay for college. For information or to enroll, visit sanjac.edu or call 281.998.6150. EOI

students to give up their cigarettes was a half-full jar of tar. “It represents the amount of tar in the lungs of someone who has been smoking a pack-a-day for a year,” Imo said. Upon giving up their cigarette packs, students were encouraged to sign up for a quitter buddy, through the buddy system, designed to provide support from other students who chose to quit through the program and former smokers. Frank said he hopes the buddy system will encourage students to attend cessation classes to prevent them from lighting up again. UH rules prohibit smoking within 200 feet of a building, yet students can be found smoking outside building entrances and the M.D. Anderson Memorial Library. “The goal of our campaign is to educate our fellow Coogs on how to quit smoking and start a support system,” Frank said. He hopes this will encourage the University lawmakers to change the smoking rules. news@thedailycougar.com

76.069-120110  

Health students join campaign to ban smoking on campus AROUND TOWN ON CAMPUS HI 64 LO 43 CORRECTIONS GROUPS & DEPARTMENTS ARTS The UH He...

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