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THE WETUMPKA HERALD Elmore County’s Oldest Newspaper - Established 1898

Wetumpka, AL 36092

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WEDNESDAY • NOVEMBER 30, 2016

THEWETUMPKAHERALD.COM

VOL. 118, NO.45

Wetumpka gets more than an inch of rain Monday night

By DAVID GRANGER Interim Managing Editor

Almost an inch and a half of rain fell in Wetumpka overnight Monday night and Tuesday morning. Normally, that amount

of rain wouldn’t be frontpage news, but considering the recent rain was the first of significance since September, these showers were greeted with greater than normal enthusiasm. “We had a volunteer observer that reported

Commission leaves open board appointment

1.47 inches of rain last night and this morning in Wetumpka,” said Gary Goggins, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service. “It looks like the last time you had rainfall of that amount in your area was overnight Sept.

17 and Sept. 18.” The really good news, Goggins said, is that there is the potential for more rain in coming days. “The potential for rain is continuing to increase

David Granger / The Herald

Almost an inch and a half of rain fell in Wetumpka overnight Monday See RAIN • Page 3 night and Tuesday morning after several weeks of no rain activity.

OH, CHRISTMAS TREE

By COREY ARWOOD Staff Writer

A new Elmore County Commission convened Monday to decide on multiple proposals from Probate Judge John Enslen and approve or deny county board authority appointments to Water and Sewer and Emergency Management Service boards. District 3 County Commissioner and Commission Chair Troy Stubbs led the commission, which is still awaiting the appointment of a fifth member in the absence of resigned District 4 Commissioner Joe Faulk. That appointment is expected to come from the governor’s office, and the absence of the District 4 commissioner and the area it represents in the county played a role in the commission’s decision of board appointees. Ultimately Stubbs proposed the seats remain open until the next commission meeting on Dec. 12. According to the agenda the appointments are due Jan. 9, a point the commissioners referenced in the deliberation of how to select the candidates. Candidates up for EMS board approval are Greg Jones, Lois Pribulick and Steve Dennis. Jones is the District 5

City will celebrate ‘Christmas around the World’ theme By DAVID GRANGER Interim Managing Editor

File / The Herald

Above, rows of trees line the span of Wadsworth’s Christmas tree farm. Below Frank Wadsworth measures one of the large trees offered at the farm.

Wadsworth produces centers of season By DAVID GRANGER Interim Managing Editor

One might think that this is Frank Wadsworth’s busy season. Wadsworth is a Christmas tree farmer and his operation off Wetumpka’s Dexter Road is a popular destination this time of year. Every day when his selling season begins, families, schoolchildren, businesses and others visit Wadsworth’s farm looking for that perfect tree. So, yes, he is busy from the last few days of November through Christmas. But he’s also busy at times he thought he might not be when he got into the Christmas tree business some 37 years ago. Wadsworth’s late father-in-law, Ollie Estes, who owned Wetumpka Wood Products at the time, got the young man

See COMMISSION • Page 3

Today’s

Weather

68 40 High

Low

Christmas on the Coosa around the corner One week from Saturday, Wetumpka will be jammin’. Well, make that jingling. Christmas on the Coosa is set to take place Dec. 3, beginning at 7:30 a.m. with the first of two character breakfasts and continuing through the Wakeboard Santa Show and fireworks, set to start at 6 p.m. But the Christmas on the Coosa events begin even sooner. On Tuesday, a panel of judges will choose the best of Wetumpka’s Christmas decorations among both businesses and residences. “The judges will start to drive around looking at the decorations at 6 p.m.,” said Tiffany Robinson, Wetumpka events and tourism manager. “You do have to register, but See COOSA • Page 2

File / The Herald

The kids in the WES Clown Troupe ride on the float in the parade during Christmas on the Coosa last year.

See TREES • Page 10

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Page 2 • NOVEMBER 30, 2016

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THE WETUMPKA HERALD

Obituaries Jimmy Lee Ballard

BALLARD, Mr. Jimmy Lee, age 80, a resident of Elmore, AL died on Thursday, November 24, 2016 at his residence. He was born on September 27, 1936 to the late James Robert Ballard and the late Bessie Hendricks Ballard. He deeply loved his family and served the Lord while serving others. He was an avid fisherman and was dedicated to Alabama football (Roll Tide Roll). He is survived by his Wife, Pat Ross Ballard of Elmore; Daughter, Allyson (Sam) Gibbons of Deatsville; Grandsons, James and Joshua Gibbons of Deatsville; Daughter, Carroll Parrish of Wetumpka; Daughter, Donna (Reginald) Gabel of Alexander City; Granddaughters, Angie (J.T.) Walker of Prattville, Melissa (CAPT. Jarret) Goddard of Union, KY, and Rachel Miller of Alexander City and 10 Great-Grandchildren; Son, Daniel Parrish of Orlando, FL; granddaughter, Peyton Parrish of Prattville and Grandson, David Parrish of Montgomery; Son, Marty (Tracy) Edge and a Grandson of Millbrook; Son, Keith (Kylee) Edge and 3 Grandsons of Oklahoma; Son, Caleb (Amy) Ross and 1 Granddaughter of Baldwin County; Sister, Juanita Bowman (Seymour) Childress of Jemison and Sister, Alice (George) Desmond of Massachusetts. A graveside service will be on Sunday, November 27, 2016 at 3:00 pm from the Chilton

Memorial Gardens with Dr. Reginald C. Gabel and Rev. Glenn Goggans officiating. Visitation will be at Martin Funeral Home on Sunday from 2:00 pm until 2:45 pm. Active Pallbearers will be James Gibbons, Joshua Gibbons, David Parrish, Sam Gibbons, J.T. Walker, and CAPT. Jarret Goddard. Honorary Pallbearers will be his Sunday School class at Mitts Chapel Baptist Church. In Lieu of Flowers make donations to Mitts Chapel Baptist Church or the American Cancer Society. Martin Funeral Home directing www.martinfuneralhomeinc.com

Jean Lumpkin TUSCALOOSA – Jean Lumpkin, a loving wife, mother and grandmother, died Sunday, Nov. 27, 2016 at her home. She was 83. Jean was the youngest of four daughters born to Mary Lyman Perry and Frederick Eugene Perry, in Birmingham. She grew up in the Norwood community, attended Norwood Grammar School and Phillips High School. Jean earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Education from the University of Alabama, where she served as president of the Pi Beta Phi social sorority. While attending the university she met

and fell in love with her future husband of 58 years, Dr. Thomas Riley Lumpkin. The couple lived in Birmingham, Mobile, Tuskegee and Enterprise before moving to Tuscaloosa in 1974, where Dr. Lumpkin served as a professor and interim dean of the College of Community Health Sciences at the University of Alabama. Jean lived a life of service, celebration and prayer. She loved life and loved her family, her friends and her church. Jean was very involved with her reunion group and Sunday school class and was a choir member at Forest Lake United Methodist Church. She also volunteered for Hospice of West Alabama and the Good Samaritan Clinic, which was founded by her husband. Jean is survived by her four children, Leah Lumpkin Hobart (Chip) of Birmingham, Thomas Riley Lumpkin Jr. (Janna) of Vance, Mary Lyman Boone (Kenneth) of Alexander City, and Cliff Lumpkin (Angela) of Birmingham; eight grandchildren, Lauren Wise, Brittany Hobart, Thomas Riley Lumpkin III, Reagan Lumpkin, Christopher Boone, Riley Frances Boone, James Boone and Olivia Lumpkin; and a great-grandchild, Kayne Wise. She is also survived by a sister, Polly Perry Marsh Brabham, of Texarkana, Texas. Jean was preceded in death by her husband Riley and two sisters, Mary Alice Perry Brown of Wilmington, Del., and

Coosa

Nancy Perry Abernathy of Columbia, S.C. Visitation will be held Thursday, December 1 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Forest Lake United Methodist Church followed immediately by the funeral with Tuscaloosa Memorial Chapel directing. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests memorials be made to Hospice of West Alabama or Forest Lake United Methodist Church.

Kendral Lamar “Kenny” Deason Deason, Kendral Lamar “Kenny”; age 64, a resident of Jacksons Gap, Alabama died Thursday, November 24, 2016. Funeral services were held Sunday November 27, 2016 at 2:00 p.m. from the Chapel of Gassett Funeral Home. Pastor Shawn Meeks officiated. Interment was in Pine View Memorial Gardens. Mr. Deason was preceded in death by his wife, Gloria Deason; father, Julius Deason; and sister, Ann Shaner. Survivors include his Mother, Vordell Deason; son, Jamie (Missy) Deason; daughter, Kimberly (Jereme) Watson; sister Sandra Lee; and four Grandchildren. Pallbearers were Johnny Bass, Norman McDonald, Robert Bass, Blake Bass, Casey McDonald, and Kevin Edgeworth. Visitation was Sunday, November 27, 2016 from 1:00 until 2:00 p.m. at Gassett Funeral Home.

continued from page 1

we have forms on the website. There may be a deadline on them, but we’ll let people in. You can nominate your neighbors or you can nominate yourself.” On Thursday, the lighting of Wetumpka’s Christmas tree will take place in Gold Star Park. There will be an opportunity for children to have their photograph taken with Santa Claus beginning at 5 p.m. and the Wetumpka Elementary School clown troupe will perform immediately prior to the tree lighting. “They dress up like clowns and do little dances,” said Robinson of the students, who range from kindergarten through fourth grade. “They’re really cute.” Nativity night and an open house will be Friday beginning at 6 p.m. That night usually also includes luminaries, but the recent dry weather has that in doubt. “I’m told no on the luminaries right now,” Robinson said. “I hate it, because it really does add to the atmosphere, but we’ll still have the nativity night with the downtown open house. “We have 10 churches that actually have nativity scenes that play out the Christmas story. We have other churches that come and provide refreshments. It’s just a great community-wide event where everyone comes together. The atmosphere is just magical. It’s my favorite event for Christmas on the Coosa because of what it means and what it means for this community.” Nativity night takes place throughout the downtown square (South Main, Company, the Alleyway and Hill Street), Robinson said. Each church re-enacts a different scene from the Christmas story, from the angel appearing to Joseph through the birth of Christ. Saturday gets started with one of the annual fes-

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tival’s newest events, according to Robinson, the Character Breakfast. There are actually two breakfasts, one at 7:30 a.m. and another at 9 a.m. “It’s one of our newer events, but it’s very popular,” Robinson said. “It actually got so large that we had to break it down to two different breakfasts. We generally serve pancakes and the characters will make their rounds. We have all kinds of characters. I don’t have a list because they change from year to year, but I tell parents, ‘If your child is into any kind of superhero or princess, there’ll be something there for you.’” The arts & crafts and car shows both begin at 10 a.m., the arts & crafts in Gold Star Park and the car show at the Wetumpka Depot Theatre parking lot. Robinson said space is still available for arts & crafts vendors by calling Valencia Smith at 567-5147. The annual street parade, open to all who register, begins at 2 p.m. and Robinson urges everyone to get their entry forms into her as soon as possible. She said there will be no boat parade this year, but there will be a new feature. “What we’re doing this year that we’ve never done before is a Wakeboard Santa Show,” said Robinson. “We’ve had the skiing and the wakeboarding during the fireworks, but we’ve never actually had a daytime show. I got the script earlier and we’re going to have elves involved, possibly reindeer, the Grinch, Santa and Buddy the Elf. I’m real excited about seeing it.” And, even though, for now, Friday night’s luminaries are out due to the dry weather, Robinson said the fire marshal has given an okay for the Saturday night fireworks show. “The fireworks are still a go, the fire marshal’s saying if we have enough water – of course we’ll be shooting them over water – but if we have enough water and a brush truck available, we should be good to go,” Robinson said.


THE WETUMPKA HERALD

TheWetumpkaHerald.com

NOVEMBER 30, 2016 • PAGE 3

Commission

continued from page 1

Council member for the City of Wetumpka. Central Elmore Water & Sewer Authority Board candidates were listed as James B. Harris, David F. Law, Thomas L. Macon III and Richard M. Roberts. District 2 Commissioner Mack Daugherty said he agreed on leaving the process open for those that were not aware and Reeves said there was a procedure rule of a 30-day grace period. Stubbs said by the Dec. 12 meeting the commission would have a better idea of the timeframe for the appointment of the new District 4 commissioner. He said he wanted all five commissioners in place and all Elmore County residents represented before appointing the board members “My thought would be just due to the fact that we have a completely new commission and giving the public the opportunity to learn of these opportunities and express interest that we accept letters of interest and/or resumes until our next meeting Dec. 12,” said Stubbs. “At which time we’ll take the necessary action as a commission between the Dec. 12 commission meeting and Jan. 9 to consider the names that have been submitted and make a decision.” Probate Judge John Enslen brought up three topics regarding his office. One item would place a new set of qualifications on who could serve as probate judge. In a lengthy appeal, Enslen proposed that the office only be held by a licensed, practicing attorney. “The reason I’m coming to you now, is that if you don’t get local legislation pre-filed before the legislature starts in early January you really limit your chances of it ever getting passed through that particular legislative session,” said Enslen. He talked about the various county positions, which required college degrees, and the complexity of his office’s dealing in numerous legal issues and the money he said he had saved the county on litigation issues being an attorney himself. The proposal would later be tabled until a later date by the commission. However there were two other items pertaining to the probate office Enslen proposed. One was in regard to a three-year contract renewal for office equipment such as printers and copiers and was later approved by the commission. But the commission also approved a $49,000 digital archiving project Enslen said he wanted to undertake

to make a portion of the records his office keeps more readily available to his staff and the public online. He said the money would come from the office’s discretionary funds, which are raised from a $3 record fee and also pay an employee’s salary. Enslen said they would a full year’s salary out of the $90,000 that had been amassed in the fund, just to be safe. But out of the $49,000 he said $8,500 would be used to convert 58 county commission minute books covering 1895-2014 and 22 county commission books with attachments from paper to digital. The rest he said he wanted to use to digitize 48 volumes of bound newspapers covering the years 1943 through 1967. The commission approved the request. The commission also approved a list of county depositories, which County Administrator Grace McDuffie said encompassed all banks in the county. The discussion on the vacation of Bellingrath Road was held over until Jan. 23 at 5 p.m. for a public hearing. After the work session and the commissioners had voted on the agenda items, reports to the commission were made. Highway Department County Engineer Richie Beyer talked about an equipment finance program employed by his department. He said the commissioners had a packet of information on items approved in the fiscal year 2017 budget, which had been ordered as part of their equipment rotation program. Beyer said the package would be going out to financial institutions – some local or some in Alabama – who have requested financing proposals from the department. Beyer said every three years they rotate large construction equipment to try to keep ownership costs as low as possible and cut down on maintenance costs. He asked commissioners with financial background for their input as well, and said he would have proposals in place by the Jan. 23 meeting. Emergency Management Agency Director Eric Jones said they were updating the emergency operation plan for the county, per FEMA regulations and State EMA. Jones said the EMA was working on updating an interoperable communication plan with a number of

Rain

continued from page 1

over the next couple of days,” he said. “There’s a system coming through that might actually bring the potential for some severe weather to your area between 8 a.m. and 2 p.m. on Wednesday. It’s a limited threat and the threat is greater to your north and west, but there is the potential for strong storms, a tornado or small hail. “Most importantly, you could get a half-inch to an inch more rain.” Goggins said it would likely take some months before the area can rebound from drought conditions and that he expects that the no-burn order in the state will

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remain in place until additional rains are received. The no-burn order, he said, should be lifted well before the drought ends if rains continue. As for the extended forecast for the area, there is a chance for still more

of that recently rare wet stuff. “There could be another round of rainfall this coming weekend,” Goggins said. “So it looks like we’re getting into a more active pattern. That is very good news for the

entire state.” The official NWS forecast as of 4 p.m. Tuesday was predicting a 100 percent rain chance today with the next rain chance coming on Sunday, when there is a 60 percent chance.

agencies. He said multiagency coordination group meetings would begin around the beginning of December for fire and volunteer fire departments. Jones also said he had been working with municipalities on how board appointments need to be made or handled. A commissioner asked Jones if the EMA had the capacity to operate its radios across all frequencies and any agency like volunteer fire departments and the sheriff’s department as well. Jones said they had the capability but did not operate on the sheriff’s unless absolutely necessary. District 1 Commissioner Kenny Holt asked Jones about the Elmore County Forestry Commission and talks of it leaving the county. Jones said the ECFC had moved from the fire training facility on Red Eagle Drive about 2 or 3 weeks ago. He said it is now operating out of its Montgomery and Coosa County offices. Holt asked if he thought that was sufficient for the area. “I don’t know that it’s the most efficient way for them to work for us, but they still work very hard to cover the needs that we have,” Jones said. “Certainly I would love to see them right here in the county, as well as I’m sure a lot of other people would, … they needed to make the best decisions that would suit them.”

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Steve Baker, Publisher David Granger, Managing Editor Opinions expressed in guest columns and letters to the editor do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the management of Tallapoosa Publishers, Inc.

OPINION

Page 4 • NOVEMBER 30, 2016

“Our liberty cannot be guarded but by the freedom of the press, nor that be limited without danger of losing it.” --Thomas Jefferson

TheWetumpkaHerald.com

THE WETUMPKA HERALD

The Herald strives to report the news honestly, fairly and with integrity, to take a leadership role and act as a positive influence in our community, to promote business, to provide for the welfare of our employees, to strive for excellence in everything we do and, above all, to treat others as we would want to be treated ourselves.

Your

Opinion

Reader hopes to see unbiased reporting stick around Dear Editor, Two articles in this past Saturday’s edition of the Herald have caused me some alarm. The first article, “Granger Name Interim Managing Editor…” touted David Granger’s experience in and knowledge of Elmore County as pivotal in his selection to this position. The staff writer goes on to say that “we are confident that he will be responsive to the community and be someone who can respond quickly to ensure the best possible coverage of news in the area.” Missing from the article (and I’m sure this was by design) was any information as to what happened to David Granger’s predecessor, William Carroll. For the time that Mr. Carroll served as Managing Editor, I can honestly say the news in Elmore County was reported with great integrity and, perhaps more importantly, in an unbiased manner. That is the kind of news reporting that is so desperately needed in this area. One quickly calls to mind the clandestine removal by the Montgomery Advertiser of columnist Josh Moon. Seems that whenever this area gets someone who has the grit to stand up and report the news as it is and not as some of those in power want it to be reported, they tend to be put on a short leash. Candidly

speaking, if those in power want the reporting of news slanted in their favor all they need to do is start doing things that cast them in a favorable light and the rest will take care of itself. Unfettered journalism and the candid reporting of the news is vital to the ability of citizens to hold their elected officials accountable. When this is not done, anarchy rules. The second article was David Granger’s own “Different Week Brings Renewed Optimism.” Here Granger talks about the Herald’s plan to “make the newspaper reflect more the people it serves.” I will certainly be watching and observing and, when necessary, commenting on how you’re doing in this regard. Lastly, Mr. Granger talks about coming “…changes in the content of the newspaper, new features that will add to the paper’s appeal as well as the Herald’s mission to inform and reflect the county.” This is all good news indeed. I will not pronounce a verdict without first hearing (in this case, reading) all available evidence. I just pray that Mr. Granger doesn’t get an undue portion of what community emphasis ought to be while visiting the local barber shop to ‘get a trim.’ Sincerely, Bobby L. Mays Wetumpka

Rain is post-Thanksgiving reason to be thankful

I

stayed up longer than I should have on Monday night waiting for it. I had missed it. I wanted to see it, hear it, smell it. I went to sleep before it arrived, but awoke to its familiar, though long-absent, sound. The rain was here! I walked outside and stood in it – not for long, but long enough to prove to myself that it was real. Long enough to prove to myself I wasn’t still asleep and dreaming. It was real, I was awake and I was not dreaming. Even after I stepped back inside, I stood and watched it fall through the screen door. The leaves on the ground seemed to leap impatiently upward at the falling drops. Even though their lives had ended, they sought to embrace their old friend, to recall his soothing touch. The wind that accompanied the rain made the trees dance a dance of pure wet, windwhipped joy. My lawn, though largely beyond hope, seemed a wee bit perkier. I thought about my grandfather who, for all of his life, farmed a patch of ground in Coffee County, Alabama, near Elba and how he loved to sit out front of Buren Bowers’ store and discuss the weather with his fellow farmers, especially when there was the

DAVID GRANGER Managing Editor

promise of a good rain shower. For him, those raindrops might as well have been coins. Then I thought about those men and women who still depend on the land for their living. I could only imagine their joy on this late November morning. Yes, it would have been better for the rain to have arrived weeks sooner, but, as they say, better late than never. At least there’s now moisture in the air, which bodes well for the water cycle and for future rain chances. The dryness that we’ve experienced of late was pervasive. It robbed the air and the land of the moisture it needs to whip up a cloud and a resulting rain. Now, we pray the moisture is back. We hope it sticks around for a while. Winter in Alabama is usually relatively dry. We hope we can maintain enough moisture so that we don’t go through a near threemonth period like we’ve just been through any time soon. Yes, the drought that we have endured these past few months has been memorable,

though many would like to forget it. The relief that we’ve felt with this current period of rainfall has been just as much so. For once, those who must get out in it don’t seem to mind the rain. It’s as if an old friend has returned for a much-overdue visit. But all is not right yet. The rain we’ve received already and that we have been promised over the next few days likely won’t be enough to end the fire danger in the state or restore sufficient moisture to the soil. For the sake of the well-being of the many farmers in this area and in this state, we need more. We’ve just celebrated Thanksgiving. We’re now in the Christmas season. People will be out shopping and, if the weather’s rainy, perhaps they’ll be upset about it. They shouldn’t be. They should remember the long, dry spell we’ve just gone through and know that, while Thanksgiving’s past and our thanks for the rain may be a few days late, we should still be thankful for it. There are many among us who depend upon it. Granger is the interim managing editor for the Elmore County newspapers of Tallapoosa Publishers, Inc.

334-567-7811 • Fax 334-567-3284 email: news@thewetumpkaherald.com THE WETUMPKA HERALD (681-260) is published twice weekly on Wednesday and Saturday by Tallapoosa Publishers, Inc., 548 Cherokee Road, Alexander City, AL 35010. Periodical postage paid at Wetumpka, Alabama. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Wetumpka Herald, P.O. Box 99, Wetumpka, AL 36092-0099. ISSN # 1536-688X.

We reserve the right to refuse to print any advertisement, news story, photograph or any other material submitted to us for any reason or no reason at all. •Obituaries - $.25 per word per paper. Additional $15 charge for a photo per paper. (Herald, Weekend, Observer, Tribune). •Weddings/Engagements - $.25 per word per paper. $15 charge for a 2-column photo. •Birth Announcements - $.25 per word per paper. $15 charge for a photo. SUBSCRIPTION RATES (includes Wednesday & Saturday) One Year in Elmore, Tallapoosa or Coosa County: $50 One Year Elsewhere: $75 The publisher reserves the right to change subscription rates during the term of subscription at any time. To subscribe or if you miss your paper, call 256-234-4281. © 2016 Tallapoosa Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved and any reproduction of this issue is prohibited without the consent of the editor or publisher. ADMINISTRATION Steve Baker publisher@thewetumpkaherald.com David Granger, managing editor david.granger@thewetumpkaherald.com NEWS Corey Arwood, staff writer corey.arwood@thewetumpkaherald.com Carmen Rodgers, staff writer carmen.rodgers@thewetumpkaherald.com Cory Diaz, sports editor Cory.Diaz@TheWetumpkaHerald.com. . . . . . . . . . . Ext. 306 SALES Molly Brethauer, marketing consultant molly.brethaur@TheWetumpkaHerald.com. . . . . . . . Ext. 313 Stacy Adams, marketing consultant stacy.adams@TheWetumpkaHerald.com . . . . . . . . . . Ext. 305

'In everything give thanks' 1 Thessalonians 5:18 In everything give thanks; for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus for you.

W

hile we should give thanks every minute of every day, this is the time of year where we really put an emphasis on giving thanks for all that we have. It should also be the time of year when we give thanks for what we don’t have. For example, on Thanksgiving I went to my best friend’s house to have lunch with him and his family. That evening I went to my mama’s house in Tallapoosa County for another festive feast. Both meals were absolutely to die for but something was missing: deviled eggs. I love deviled eggs, but none were to be found but what was found was thankfulness, because I’m the one who usually brings them, which means I didn’t have to go to the grocery store this past hectic holiday week. I’ve been there and done that and want none of it. I worked at a grocery store for over eight years, and during the holidays, it was reminiscent of a Hank Williams Jr. song: You could send me hell or New York City, it’d be about the same to me. I actually have a couple of fancy deviled egg holder plate thingies,

JODY FULLER Guest Columnist

which is absolute proof that I rock the deviled eggs. Back to my mama for a minute. Last week, I was the master of ceremonies for an event recognizing young students for outstanding leadership and other positive attributes. Each child received a Thanksgiving feast from a local charitable foundation with a turkey and all the trimmings that fed 10 to 12 people or four or five of me. There were over 300 kids in attendance. I’m not accustomed to speaking to or trying to entertain kids still in the single digits, but I know how the special little girl in my life thinks, so I looked up some dumb jokes online that I thought they would appreciate. They probably could not have related to my original humor, so I adapted and overcame. “What do you call a pig who knows karate?” I asked. “Yo mama!” one of the kids on the front row shouted out. His answer was, of course, incorrect. The correct answer was a pork chop. Get it? When you act it out like I did, it’s

funnier. It’s good to know that some things never change, because when I was that age “Yo mama” was the king of the comebacks. Speaking of ham, I sure do love it. Mama always received one from work during the holidays when we were kids, so ham holds a special place in my heart, as well as in my stomach. Turkey has to be cooked just right for me to really enjoy it. Mama doesn’t care much for it, but she cooked it for us anyway, because that’s what mamas do. The turkey I had on Thanksgiving at both locations was delicious, but the ham at lunch was just that much better. I mean, really though as long as I’m surrounded by family and friends, I’d be fine with a pork chop. It’s really the simple things that make this time of year so special: family, friends, ham and cranberry sauce that comes in the shape of a can. I’m a simple man, and for that, I am very thankful. Jody Fuller is a comic, speaker, writer and soldier with three tours of duty in Iraq. He is also a lifetime stutterer. He can be reached at jody@jodyfuller.com. For more information, please visit www.jodyfuller.com.


THE WETUMPKA HERALD

TheWetumpkaHerald.com

NOVEMBER 30, 2016 • Page 5

Tallassee begins search for next police chief By CARMEN RODGERS Staff Writer

Since the departure of police chief, Jimmy Rodgers, the City of Tallassee has officially initiated a national pursuit of the city’s next chief. By posting the position nationally, the scope of potential candidates is broadened. There is a list of qualifications for potential candidates, which include a background in criminal justice and/or at least five years of experience in highly responsible police management, policy development, budget administration, personnel administration and public relations. According to Mayor Johnny Hammock, there are a few more characteristics needed to fill this position.

R

“I am looking for someone who has strong leadership skills, has extensive experience with budgets, and understands data-driven enforcement,” he said. Although the position is open to a national search, that does not mean the perfect match for this position does not reside locally. “I think that we have several great police officers who live right here in our area that could do a fine job for us, if selected,” Hammock said. “We will go through all applications and will select the best person for the job no matter where they come from.” There has been some interest in the position; however, Hammock says the position will remain open until the appropriate match is found. “I have about 10 people that have applied so far,” he said. “I expect the talent pool to reach about 30

applicants and then we will start the resume review process. After that we will interview the top candidates.” Whoever is chosen to fill this position has a big task ahead of them. In recent years, the department has been rocked by scandal. In 2013, former Tallassee Assistant Chief Amy Davis was found guilty of 10 counts of using her position for personal gain, as well as 19 counts of unlawfully obtaining the criminal offender record information of multiple individuals. More recently, another former Tallassee assistant police chief, Chris Miles, was convicted for violating the civil rights of a prisoner and for stealing evidence from the department’s evidence locker. Miles is serving a concurrent

sentence for theft. In that case, Miles took a gun from the department’s evidence locker. Hammock says he would like to see the new chief have a more active role in the community to help mend the damage caused by these two rogue officers. “I would like to see the new police chief be very involved with the community,” Hammock said. “The police chief needs to be accessible to the public and have a clear vision on how to develop community policing.” While change is coming to the department and the community, the process could be a lengthy one. “I do not want to rush the selection process,” Hammock said. “I want to make sure we hire the right candidate for the position. It might be the first of the year before the position is filled.”

America must keep the upper hand with Iran

ecently the U.S. House of Representatives took up and overwhelmingly passed the Iran Sanctions Extension Act, which reauthorizes for another ten years the economic penalties the United States has used to deter the Islamic Republic of Iran from further developing its unconventional weapons program, including ballistic missiles and supporting terrorism. Originally enacted in 1996, these sanctions have been some of the most meaningful tools in bringing Iran and its ambitious weapons program to heel. Extending them for another ten years is the right decision, and I was proud to vote in favor of the bill’s passage.

Also last week, House Speaker Paul Ryan sent a letter to President Obama urging him to abandon any plans for new concessions to Iran during his final days in office. The letter asked that President Obama “take no further actions designed to bolster international investment in Iran, or otherwise change or alter the existing sanctions regime within international organizations through the use of waivers or through administrative actions…” The House vote and Speaker Ryan’s letter comes amid reports that the Obama Administration plans to take additional steps to aide Iran’s economy in attempt to save the president’s legacy nuclear agreement. You may remember that last year, despite

MARTHA ROBY U.S. Rep.

significant opposition from Republicans and Democrats alike in Congress, President Obama negotiated an executive nuclear agreement with Iran. I said at the time that the executive agreement was a bad deal because negotiators failed to achieve their very own stated objectives on inspections, verifications, and sanctions. Then in January, the Administration released a $1.7 billion payment to Iran coinciding with the release of five Americans

held prisoner by Iran, in violation of longstanding U.S. policy meant to protect our national security interests. I’m afraid the Obama Administration’s baffling behavior toward Iran is weakening what was once a very strong hand in dealing with this rouge nation. However, since President Obama’s Iran nuclear deal is an executive agreement and not a treaty, it is subject for review in the next presidential administration. Presidentelect Donald Trump said repeatedly throughout his campaign that he believes the Obama Administration negotiated badly, and he strongly suggested that he will pull the U.S. out of the nuclear agreement. Like everyone else who has been

engaged in this issue, I am eager to see how Presidentelect Trump deals with the situation. My colleagues and I in Congress certainly stand willing to support policies that strengthen our hand towards Iran, as evidenced by the overwhelming bi-partisan vote in favor of the Iran Sanctions Extension Act (ISA). Of course, this is just one of many decisions facing President-elect Trump and his incoming administration as the transition of executive power moves forward. I hope you’ll join me in praying for wisdom and guidance for the president-elect and all those who advise him at this time of great consequence for our country.


PAGE 6 • NOVEMBER 30, 2016

TheWetumpkaHerald.com

THE WETUMPKA HERALD

Who Was Nikola Tesla?

Everyday in the United States electricity is used in homes and businesses to turn on the lights. If you think about this process, you may recall the inventor of the light bulb, Thomas Edison, but what about the inventor who made it possible to have the AC power running in our homes? His name is Nikola Tesla. Tesla was born on July 10, 1856, in Smiljan, Croatia. Tesla was known for being a very intelligent student with a photographic memory. +HDWWHQGHGWKH8QLYHUVLW\RI3UDJXHLQWKHHDUO\œVIRFXVLQJRQWKH¿HOGRIHOHFWULFDOHQJLQHHULQJ+LVPRVW widely known invention, the alternating-current (or AC power), was created in 1882 after he left the University. +HFDPHWRWKH8QLWHG6WDWHVLQDQGZRUNHGEULHÀ\IRU7KRPDV(GLVRQ%\7HVODKDGSDWHQWHGKLV invention and sold those rights to a man named George Westinghouse. Westinghouse implemented the AC power system into all American homes and is still a major electric corporation today. This implementation was made possible by another invention of Tesla’s, the Tesla coil. This coil made the transmission of the AC power possible on a large scale. Without these inventions, society as we know it would run on a much-different type of power. In 1956, a new unit of measurement was named after the famous inventor in honor of all of his achievements. Nikola Tesla passed away on January 7, 1943, in New York City.

Tesla Word Find

You Be The Inventor All of the common household items we use everyday were once a brand new invention. For example, before ball-point pens were the standard, the quill and ink were used. Think of something that you think could be improved and create an invention to make it better.

A Across Clues: Cl 2. A unit of ________ was named after Nikola Tesla. 5. Tesla was said to have what type of memory? 7. Tesla attended which University in Europe? 8. Which Country was Tesla originally from? 10. Where in the U.S. was Tesla when he died? Down Clues: 1. Who bought the rights to Tesla’s AC patent? :KLFKIDPRXVLQYHQWRUGLG7HVODZRUNZLWKEULHÀ\" Gear 8 rotates counterclockwise. 4. Tesla created AC power to use instead of what? Which direction will gears 1, 2, 12, 6. AC stands for the term alternating ________. and 13 rotate? Put on your think9. This invention of Tesla’s made AC power practical. ing caps and solve the puzzle below!

Think It Through

AC Power, Coil, Croatia, Edison, Electricity, Engineer, Inventions, New York, Patent, Prague, Tesla, United States, Westinghouse

Ans: 1, 12 Counterclockwise and 2, 13 clockwise.

Crossword Ans: Across-2)measurement 5)photographic 7)Prague 8)Croatia 10)New York Down-1)Westinghouse 3)Edison 4)DC Power 6)current 9)coil

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TheWetumpkaHerald.com

NOVEMBER 30, 2016 • Page 7

What are we waiting for?

G

reetings from the corner of Bridge and Bridge! I do hope the blessings of Thanksgiving linger for all reading this column. Regardless of circumstance, there is always something to be thankful for. Another Thanksgiving has come and gone, and another Advent has begun. The season for giving thanks has given way to the season for preparing for the coming of Christ into the world. So goes the calendar of the Christian church in North America. Thinking about what the word of God made flesh actually means for the earthly kingdom is always an enlightening experience. While it begins with the limits of personal understanding and experience, it moves on to something much larger than personal experience

can capture. A look at the bigger picture seems in order. First, the word of God speaks of the coming Christ in great detail. God’s Messiah will come into the earthly kingdom and will reign as God’s king. The one who comes will be a unique and perfect mixture of humanity and divinity. There will only be one Jesus. Second, Christ coming in the flesh is not something new. The person of Jesus has been with God since the beginning of all things. Jesus has been around since the world was formed. Third, Jesus did not come into the world to serve those claiming relationship with God. On the contrary, scripture reminds us at every turn that Jesus came into the world for the whole of humanity. The redemption Jesus makes available is offered to all of God’s

REV. JONATHON YARBORO First Presbyterian

children. In this sense, the birth of Christ is not a Christian holiday. Obviously, I am not speaking of the observance and custom of it. These are Christian practices. I am speaking of the universal gift the birth of Christ represents. Christian scripture explains that God sent Christ into the world in the flesh to redeem the world. The message comes from Christian scripture, but the recipient of God’s gift is neither reserved for nor limited to Christians. Think about that

for a minute. When Jesus encountered people, did he tell them to “Go to church so the devil can’t get them”? Did Jesus make moral demands of people in order for them to regain their lives? Did Jesus require a pledge of allegiance before sharing the living water of life? The answer to these questions is no, but there is more to it than that. Every child of God in every time and place should take a look at the way Jesus did what God sent him to do in the earthly kingdom. The character of God is demonstrated powerfully in and through Jesus Christ. First and foremost, Jesus taught by example. He lived his faith in humble obedience. He did not require anyone to go to church. He regularly attended temple because that

was his tradition and custom, and it empowered him to be faithful. Jesus shared incredible wisdom through parables. Rather than answer the questions put before him directly, Jesus personified a thinking faith. Jesus emphasized and embodied the positive potential of God’s gift of free will. Finally, Jesus met people where they were and encouraged them to be the person God made them to be. His example was intended for all of God’s children in every time and place. What are we waiting for? Welcome God’s gift wherever you are in your life and allow God to help you be the person you were made to be. Rev. Yarboro is the Pastor of First Presbyterian Church, Wetumpka

Religion Briefs Episcopal Church of the Epiphany

On Dec. 4 at 9:30 a.m. the “Confirmation and Coffee” Sunday School series continues, running through all the Sundays of Advent. At 10:30 a.m. Father Wells Warren will celebrate the Holy Eucharist marking the second Sunday in Advent, with coffee hour to follow. At 2 p.m. Epiphany will host a performance of Handel’s Messiah, directed by Jerry Cunningham. Information about the event is on the church website: http://epiphanytallassee.org/messiah

East Tallassee United Methodist Church

On Dec. 11, at our service we will present our Cantata “Behold Emmanuel Love is With Us.” The program will include our church choir, a trio of Chris Sergent, Lee Gauntt and Linda Patrick, also a solo by Melanie Baker. We will have a manger scene including our children, Autumn, Steve, Jackson, Haley, A.J. and Matthew. We will also have a dance featuring Courtney Baker. On Dec. 18 at our 11 a.m. service, we will present singing “O’Holy Night.” During our night service, East Tallassee United Methodist Church and Bradford Chapel will

present a singing program. The program will start at 6 p.m. We will feature several bands, our church choir and various other talents. All are welcome to attend and help us celebrate the wonderful birth of our Lord and Savior.

Elam Baptist Church

Happy Thanksgiving to everyone! Elam Baptist Church, Hwy 14, Notasulga Road, Tallassee, invites everyone to worship each Sunday at 11 a.m. and 5:15 p.m. Each Wednesday mid-week renewal begins at 7 p.m. following the sanctuary choir practice ministry at 6 p.m. Dec. 4 will be Poinsettia Sunday. Poinsettias are sponsored and presented in honor or in memory of loved ones, family or friends and in honor of Christ’s birth as they adorn the sanctuary during the Christmas season. Visitors are always welcome at Elam. Make your contacts, calls, cards and visits this week. The Sunny Seniors are on winter break and will meet again in April. We are grateful during this season of thanks for many blessings. May God bless each of you. Pastor, Gene Bridgman Minister of Music, Kevin Lanier.

Tallassee Church of Christ

Announces our new minister, Charlie

Wetumpka Church of Christ 408 West Bridge Street

Jason Chesser Minister

Central Baptist Church 3545 W Central Rd Wetumpka, AL 36092 Hwy 9 & W. Central Sun: 10 Bible Studies 11 Worship 6 Worship www.CBCWetumpka.com 239.233.0341 Pastor “g”

Sunday Prayer and Fellowship.......8:30 a.m. Bible Study.............9 a.m. Worship service...10 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study........7 p.m.

Visitors Welcome At All Services

Boddy. Sunday School begins at 10 a.m. Worship Service begins at 11 a.m. Sunday evening service begins at 5 p.m. Wednesday night services begin at 6 p.m. Visitor’s welcome at all services 334-283-5437 209 Gilmer Ave.

St. Vincent de Paul Catholic Church

OUR LIFE’S JOURNEY is an outreach of St. Vincent de Paul Catholic Church in Tallassee, Fr. Mateusz Rudzik, Pastor; and Knights of Columbus Council 15093, Andy Lacey, Grand Knight. It airs on WACQ-AM 580 and FM 101.1 each Sunday from 8-8:30 a.m. Listen online at www.wacqradio.com OR on your smart phone using the TuneIn app. Dec. 4 - Love and Marriage Dec. 11 - Christianity vs. Islam Part 1 Dec. 18 - Christianity vs. Islam Part 2 Dec. 25 - Christ Mass Jan. 1 - Once Saved, Always Saved?

Salem Macon Baptist

Nancy Stephens by Dec. 4. They are $12 each and will be used to decorate the church for Christmas. We do not have our Forever Young meeting in November or December; our next meeting will be January 24. Salem Macon is located at 4647 Tallapoosa St, Notasulga, on Hwy 14 five miles west of Notasulga and 9 miles east of Tallassee. We would be happy to have you join us for Sunday School at 9:30 and 10:30 worship service. Mike Stephens is our pastor.

Lake Pointe Baptist

We reached our goal of Samaritan’s Purse shoeboxes for children of the world. We made 137 boxes! Thanks to all who fixed a box. If you would like to give a poinsettia in memory or in honor of a loved one, see

Super Sunday Evenings, Revival-themed services at Lake Pointe Baptist Church, 8352 Highway 50, Dadeville, are the last two Sunday evenings of August and the first two Sunday evenings of September. That’s Aug. 21, Aug. 28, Sept. 4 and Sept. 11 beginning at 6:30 pm each evening. Special guest speaker is Dr. Ray Cummings, pastor of Golden Acres Baptist Church in Phenix City. Everyone is invited and encouraged to come hear the exciting challenge from God’s Word. For answers to your questions, call the church at 256.373.3293 and leave your message or email pastor@lakepointebaptist. com

First

“And we know that Presbyterian allChurch things work 100 W. Bridge St. together for good to thoseJonathan who loveYarboro God, Rev. to those who are the Sunday School..9:45 am Morning called Worship..11 according toam His567-8135 purpose.”

Harmony United Methodist Church 8000 Titus Road Titus, Ala.

Sunday Services at 11 a.m. Minister Dr. John Brannon There is Harmony at Harmony United Methodist Church!

– Romans 8:28

“In the name of the Lord Jesus – Welcome.”

Please join us.

Wallsboro United Wallsboro United Methodist Church Methodist Church

Mountain View Baptist Baptist Church Church

11066 U.S. 231, Wallsbooro 11066 U.S. 231, Wallsboro

Rev. Ryan Rev. Ryan Johnson Johnson Pastor

Pastor Rickey Luster,

Rickey Luster, MusicDirector Director Music

SundaySchool..........10:45 School....10:45 a.m. Sunday a.m. Morning Worship....9:30 a.m. Morning Worship........9:30 a.m. Children’s Church.... 9:30 a.m. Children’s Church.......9:30 a.m. Thur. Night Service....6:00 p.m. Wed. Night Service.....6:30 p.m. You will receive a warm You will receive a warm Welcome at this friendly, welcome at this friendly, Christ-centered Church. Christ-centered Church.

NURSERY PROVIDED PROVIDED FOR NURSERY FOR ALL SERVICES SERVICES ALL

504 Osceola Street 504West West Osceola St. 334-567-4729 334-567-4729 •••• Anthony Rhodes Rev.Rev. Anthony Rhodes, Senior Pastor Senior Pastor Sarah Swedenburg, Worship Ministries

Need your business to

STAND OUT

Derek Blankenship, Tammy Student Driver:Ministries

from the crowd?

Children's Director

SUNDAY SERVICES SUNDAY SERVICES Sunday School...........9:30 a.m. Sunday Worship.....10:30 School........9:30 a.m. a.m. Morning MorningWorship.......6:00 Worship... 10:30p.m. a.m. Evening Evening Worship..... 6:00 p.m. WEDNESDAY SERVICES WEDNESDAY SERVICES Prayer Meeting...........6:00 p.m. Supper.....................5:30 p.m. Choir PrayerRehearsal.........6:45 Meeting........6:15 p.m. p.m. Student Worship........6:00 p.m. Choir Practice..........7:00 p.m. Calvary Kids...............6:00 p.m.

CEDARWOOD COMMUNITY CHURCH 10286 U.S. Hwy. 231 Wallsboro 567-0476 www.worshipcedarwood.org

Roger Olsen, Pastor Sunday Bible Study..........9:00 AM Sunday Worship.............10:00 AM We are a Congregational Christian Church which, in the name of Jesus, invites all to worship with us. Nursery Check out our Facebook page

Call us, we can help!

334-567-7811

• • • • •

Santuck Baptist Church

7250 Central Plank Road

“A Family of Families”

B.R. Johnson, Senior Pastor Larry Gore, Adm. & Counseling Randy Godfrey, Education Amy Pugh, Director of Children & Preschool Chad Middlebrooks, Students SUNDAY Sunday School............9 & 10:30 a.m. Worship........................9 & 10:30 a.m. Evening Celebration.................6 p.m. WEDNESDAY/FAMILY NIGHT Programs for every age 6:15 - 7:30 p.m.

Wetumpka Herald Eclectic Observer Tallassee Tribune Alexander City Outlook Dadeville Record

567-4458 1025 Rifle Range Rd. 567-4458 1025 RiÀe Range Rd.

Anthony B. Counts, Pastor InterimWorship Pastor Leader Angie Gallups, Billy of Students AngieReinhardt, Gallups, Min. Worship Leader

Billy Reinhardt, Min. of Students SUNDAY Morning Worship... ....10:30 SUNDAY School.............9:15 Sunday Morning Worship............10:30 Youth Choir .............. ....5:00 Evening Worship..........6:00 Sunday School.................9:15 WEDNESDAY Evening Worship..............6:00 Fellowship Meal............5:45 WEDNESDAY Preschool/Children’s Choirs.........................6:00 House of Prayer................6:00 House of Prayer............6:30 Preschool/Children’s Preschool/Children’s Missions............................6:00 Missions........................6:30 Youth Bible Youth BibleStudy.............6:00 Study.........6:30

Send your church news and happenings to: news@The Wetumpka Herald.com _________ Call or Molly Call Jayne Shannon at 567-7811 to advertise your church’s services in this space


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Lake & River Phone (256) 277-4219 Fax (205) 669-4217 The Alexander City Outlook

Reaching more than 22,000 households in Tallapoosa and Elmore counties The Dadeville Record

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THE WETUMPKA HERALD

TheWetumpkaHerald.com

NOVEMBER 30, 2016 • PAGE 9

Humane Society Volunteer Appreciation set for Friday organizations in need, thank you. Our annual Volunteer e hope everyAppreciation event is this one was able to Friday, Dec. 2, at 6 pm, relax a bit over Trinity Episcopal Church the Thanksgiving holiday (across from McDonalds and reconnect with fami- on Highway 231) in ly and friends. Wetumpka. This is our We are very lucky to chance to recognize our have such a huge extend- active volunteers and ed family of supporters their hard work on behalf who help our shelter in of our shelter and the aniso many ways – direct mals we all want to help. financial donations, food For planning we do need and supplies for our pets an RSVP so if you are an and shelter, items for us active volunteer with our to resell in our Thrift shelter and can attend, Store, as adopters, as pro- please RSVP no later moters of spay and neuter than noon, Wednesday, and responsible pet own- Nov. 30, to our Volunteer ership and so much more. Coordinator, Charline For all who support us Pope at 334-202-1381 or and so many non-profit email her at popecharBy REA CORD HSEC Executive Director

W

HUMANE SOCIETY OF ELMORE COUNTY NEWS lie58@yahoo.com. As you are doing your Christmas shopping don’t forget to check out our Tails End Thrift Store (co-located at the shelter) for gifts for yourself and your friends. Our Thrift Store has clothes, linens, Christmas decorations, books, collectibles, small appliances, toys and so much more! The store is open Thursday, Friday and Saturday from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. and can also

receive donations during those hours. While at our Thrift Store please thank our volunteers who work so hard receiving, sorting and selling all of the donated items on behalf of all the animals we all work so hard to help. Want a personalized gift for a fellow pet lover? We are also able to make custom engraved pet ID tags in our shelter office and what better gift for any pet lover than a way to help protect their special pet. Easiest way is to simply engrave the owner’s last name and phone number as nothing will get a pet back to a frantic owner faster than an ID tag

with the owner’s contact information. It only takes us a few minutes to make a tag and we have a wide variety of tag sizes, colors and shapes to choose from, including Alabama and Auburn tags. Prices range from $7 - $12 depending on the tag. And – hint, hint – tags can be used for lots of things, such as luggage, pet crate IDs, school book bags, even cool jewelry. Stop by the shelter during our normal adoption hours of 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday and we will be thrilled to make tags for many uses.


Page 10 • NOVEMBER 30, 2016

Trees

TheWetumpkaHerald.com

THE WETUMPKA HERALD

continued from page 1

started with his own Christmas gift of sorts. “Somebody gave him 2,000 Virginia pines,” Wadsworth said. “He’d heard that they were Christmas trees, that you could plant ‘em and grow Christmas trees. Well, he had a little area and he said, ‘You can plant two acres of them.’ So we planted those 2,000 Virginia pines and then I went back about three years later – I thought you’d just go back and there you’d have a Christmas tree. Well, that’s not quite the way it works.” Seeing that there must be more to the Christmas tree business than just planting the trees and walking away, Wadsworth sought a little professional help. “A lot of people were getting into the tree-planting at that time and the only tree we were planting then was the Virginia pine,” said Wadsworth, who currently grows eastern red cedars, Murray cypress and Arizona cypress trees at his farm in addition to Virginia pines. “People were planting acres and acres and acres of them. We may have had 15 growers in Elmore County that were planting trees. Lee County probably had close to 30. “Anyway, I was told about this meeting at Auburn. Since everybody was getting into it they had some specialists that were telling everybody what to do. They talked about pruning, mowing the grass between the rows and spraying herbicide and the different types of insects you need to control. I didn’t realize, you gotta do all this? Well the fourth year (1979), I think I sold 40-50 trees after I went in and worked real hard that late summer after I realized you gotta prune ‘em. They’d never been pruned. I was working on ‘em real hard and heavy and they turned out okay.” From those humble, hard-working beginnings Wadsworth learned that the Christmas tree business involved more than just the planting and the selling. He learned well, too. Today, he’s grown from those meager 40-50 trees in that initial year to 1,000-1,500 per year. Of course, he needs help with the pruning, spraying and manning the sales operation during the season, so the operation has turned into a family business with his wife Lucie and daughter Carrie, son Jacob and his fiancée Hannah and his son Josh and his wife, Lauren.. “It’s become a family business,” Wadsworth said. “Everybody does a little part.” Wadsworth’s most popular tree is the Murray cypress, one of which will adorn the Alabama Governor’s Mansion this year. “For at least the last 10 years we’ve provided a 12-foot tree for the Governor’s Mansion,” Wadsworth said. “Some years they get an eastern cedar. This year they got a Murray cypress. About a 13-footer. Big tree.” He has other commercial clients that prefer large trees, too – Tuskegee University and Hampstead in Montgomery to name a couple. “We’ve got some trees that are 19 feet,” Wadsworth said. “We had one 20. Some of those we deliver to Montgomery, one to a subdivision in Montgomery, Hampstead. We furnish what I guess you would call a community tree for them that we take down and set up for them. We’ve been doing that for three years, probably. They always want the biggest tree we’ve got which is usually in the 19-20-foot range.” This year’s tree for Tuskegee is a 19-footer, too, still awaiting pick-up. But most of Wadsworth’s sales are five- to 10-foot trees sold to families. “Generally, most of our trees are between five and 9 1/2, maybe 10 feet,” Wadsworth said. “We sell to people here in the area, mostly. We have people come out of Auburn, Birmingham, Selma, Prattville, Tallassee. Most of our customers are from fairly nearby. “I’ve had families that have been coming, young families with young kids, and they tell me they started coming with their parents when they were in the first or second grade. That means I’m getting old.” In addition to the family tree-hunters, Wadsworth makes his farm available to schoolchildren who come on field trips. “I think last year we probably had well over 1,500 kids from nine or 10 different schools,” Wadsworth said. “One school may have three classes. What we do is they come up and we give them a hayride, take them around the fields and then come back and they go out and select a tree for their classroom. And then we bring it back to our tree shaker and we shake all the loose needles out and make sure there are not any squirrels in the tree. We always play with that. Then, of course, we take the tree over here to the baler and bale it. They can sit around the bonfire, which we haven’t had yet because of the dry weather. Maybe this weekend if we get some more rain, the ban will be lifted where we can burn and enjoy one.” Wadsworth is a member of the Southern Christmas Tree Growers Association, one of about 15 member growers in the state. He is the only member grower in the area. “We work together,” Wadsworth says of his fellow members. “One of us runs out of trees, we call up another member and see if they can help a customer out. It’s a good relationship.” And all in the spirit of Christmas.

I

File / The Herald

The farm is sprinkled with little pieces of Christmas inspiration like this sign pointing visitors to the North Pole. Left, Frank Wadsworth poses with one of the trees as he goes about maintaining the farm.

Appointment to replace Sessions is ‘Kiss of Death’

t is definite. Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions is going to be President Donald Trump’s Attorney General, as well as his closest advisor. Sessions will be confirmed by the Senate. He has been a respected member of the Senate for 20 years. He has an impeccably clean history of integrity. Even though he is and has been one of the Senate’s most ardent right-wing conservatives, the Democratic senators on the left respect him. He has served on the Senate Judiciary Committee his entire tenure in the Senate and he has voted to confirm liberals to the high court even though he disagreed with them philosophically. All 52 Senate Republicans will vote for confirmation and probably most Democrats. Instead, the Democrats will pick on other conservative Trump appointees, if only out of respect for Sessions and Senate deference and courtesy. The liberal eastern media has scrutinized all of Trump’s appointments. Statements supposedly made by Sessions 30 years ago will not stand in the

way of his confirmation. Sessions is uniquely qualified for attorney general having been Alabama’s chief law officer along with his twenty years on the Senate Judiciary Committee. He was considered for Secretary of Defense and also would have been qualified for that post given that he has served on the Armed Services Committee for two decades. Defense would have been better for Alabama. The impact that the Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Maxwell/ Gunter in Montgomery and Ft. Rucker in the Wiregrass have on the economy of Alabama is immense. Speaking of Alabama’s influence in Washington, we do lose a senator with 20 years of seniority. Therefore, we will have an open Senate seat in the Heart of Dixie for the first time in two decades. The Sessions vacancy will be coveted by every viable political figure in the state, as well as everybody who ever won a 4-H speaking contest. The Governor gets to nominate a senator for the vacancy, although the label will be interim Senator.

STEVE FLOWERS Guest Columnist

Sessions’ current term in the Senate goes through 2020. However, the primary and general election will probably be in 2018. To call a special election prior to that would cost $4 million and get only a 15-20 percent turnout. Besides, the 2018 election is practically already here. The Republican primary is tantamount to election in Alabama. It will be held in June of 2018. Fundraising for state offices will begin this June – one year prior to the primary election. However, federal fundraising can begin immediately. Therefore, the bell has already rung for election to Sessions’ seat. The smart candidates would be best served to ignore and avoid the interim appointment by Gov. Robert Bentley. The appointment is a kiss of death. First of all, Bentley is extremely unpopular and

most people think he is totally irrelevant, irrational and distracted by his personal advisor. Whoever is appointed by Bentley may be associated with him. Secondly, history reveals that people in Alabama resent someone getting an appointment. They like electing their politicians. The last time there was an open Senate seat was a couple of decades ago. We actually had two open at one time. George Wallace had two appointments. Both appointees lost in the next election, and believe me, Wallace was more popular then than Bentley is now. This has happened over and over again in Alabama politics for high-profile posts. Alabama voters resent an appointment, especially if the appointee seeks election to that office. Therefore, my advice to anyone who wants to be a U.S. Senator is start running for it right now. Declare and start shaking hands from Gulf Shores to Huntsville and do not detour by the governor’s office in Montgomery. The appointment will be tainted even if by chance you are the best qualified and Bentley makes a rational

appointment, which would be unusual and unlikely. The list of names that have surfaced as potential candidates to run for the seat are 20-year veteran Congressman Robert Aderholt, Attorney General Luther Strange, State Treasurer Young Boozer, Secretary of State John Merrill, Congressman Mike Rogers, Congressman Mo Brooks, Supreme Court Justice Jim Main, State Senators Del Marsh, Trip Pittman, Cam Ward, Greg Reed, Dick Brewbaker, and former State Representative Perry Hooper, Jr., and, finally, Congresswoman Martha Roby may figure if you are going to lose reelection to your current seat in 2018 anyway, you may as well go out running for the Senate. We will keep you posted. Steve Flowers is Alabama’s leading political columnist. His weekly column appears in over 60 Alabama newspapers. He served 16 years in the state legislature. Steve may be reached at www.steveflowers.us.


SPORTS

THE WETUMPKA HERALD

Visit our sister website: TallasseeTribune.com

TheWetumpkaHerald.com

NOVEMBER 30, 2016 • PAGE 11

Tribe, Mustangs renew rivalry in non-area showdown By CORY DIAZ Sports Editor

Regardless of the players, coaches or the extenuating circumstances, Wetumpka and Stanhope Elmore comes down to one thing: rivalry. This Friday, the Mustangs and Indians renew their rivalry at Wetumpka, and for the first time in nine seasons, the game won’t be an area matchup. But the game doesn’t lose an ounce of importance. “We’re still going to play it as an area game, we’re still going to play it as a rivalry game, we’re still going to play Stanhope as Stanhope,” WHS boys basketball coach Ed Rogers said. “I think that’s what the fans want to see. We want to make sure we give the fans what they want to see. We realize it’s not an area game, but you always want to beat your rivals. We’re going to try to make a statement early. It’s a rivalry, I don’t how you look at it, how you put it, it’s a rivalry game.” First-year SEHS boys coach Kelvin Stokes, who’s coached the Lady Mustangs in the rivalry the last three seasons, knows postseason implications haven’t carried the intensity of the rivalry. “We’re separated by 10, 15 miles. We don’t need it to be an area game to solidify if we’ll be up for this game,” Stokes said. “Throw records out of the door, this is two old-fashioned rivals going at each other, and the excitement will be there regardless.” Stanhope (3-1) won the Eclectic Holiday Hoop Fest Tournament with senior forward Zech Byrd earning

MVP honors, scoring 25 points in two games. “It’s always big coming off a tournament win, knowing we can play back-to-back not at home. It helps a little bit, we see things we can improve on,” Stokes said. “We just take it one game at a time.” The Tribe needs to slow down Byrd (6-foot-7) in order to keep the upper hand in the rivalry, but Rogers knows the Mustangs can beat you on the perimeter with guards Alex McNeil and Jamal Williams. “Last year, I put too much emphasis on Zech, and the guy from the outside burned me. We’re going to try to put pressure on the ball, make it hard for them to throw it to Zech,” Rogers said. “We just have to match the intensity.” In it’s first five games, Wetumpka’s been getting 12 points per contest each from trio Keedrick Adams, E.J. Rogers and Nick Turner, but free-throw struggles have caused the Indians to start 2-3. “At this point, we have not been playing well. We’ve been missing a lot of free throws. If we would have made our free throws, we would be undefeated right now,” Rogers said. “That fourth person, it could be Cody Jones, Alex Turnell, those two guys can bring a spark. We know the other guys are going to bring what they bring, but we’re still looking for that fourth man. In case one of the three is not scoring, we’re going to need a spark.” Wetumpka and Stanhope meet Friday at WHS with tipoff at 7:30 p.m.

Cory Diaz / The Herald

Above, Wetumpka senior point guard Keedrick Adams, center, dribbles the ball during preseason practice. Left, Stanhope Elmore senior forward Zech Byrd (4) slams the ball during a game earlier this season.

Wetumpka dominates Poets, Trojans in tri-match By CORY DIAZ Sports Editor

Wetumpka dominated its second tri-match in as many weeks, defeating Sidney Lanier, 57-24, and St. James, 65-18, Monday at Wetumpka High School. The Indians collected 10 match victories and dropped five bouts in both duals, as the team improved to 4-0 on the early season. For the second straight competition, state qualifiers Cole Blackwell (126) and Trent Holley

(heavyweight) continued their hot start to the year, both earning two first-period pins each. Eighth-grader Mason Blackwell shined for the Tribe, winning both of his matches by pin. At 145, the eighth-grader beat junior Xavier Jarrett of Lanier and sophomore Leland Talbert of St. James. In their lone matches of the tri-match, senior John Ellis Rawls (195) and sophomore Kaleb Jones (138) both picked up pins. Tribe eighth-grader Avery Pyles secured a 19-4 technical fall over St. James’ Will Lee in his only match. Freshman T.J. Anthony opened his night on a See WRESTLING • Page 12

Cory Diaz / The Herald

Wetumpka sophomore Cullen Powers applies a crossface to a Sidney Lanier foe during Monday night’s tri-match at WHS.

Walters named to AISA All-Star football game By CORY DIAZ Sports Editor

Submitted / The Herald

Edgewood Academy seniors Blake Walters (65) and cheerleader pair Avery Johnston, left, and Caity Jo Lee were selected to the 2016 AISA All-Star Football Game, slated for a 7 p.m. kickoff at Cramton Bowl.

If Edgewood Academy was going to be represented at the AISA All-Star football game Friday, there was only one option. Blake Walters, the team’s lone senior player, kept the Wildcat program streak of making the All-Star squad going, with his selection to the East 44-player roster by the AISA coaches. The 6-foot-1, 240-pound offensive and defensive lineman will join Edgewood cheerleading pair Avery Johnston and Caity Jo Lee at the annual showcase Friday at Cramton Bowl. Kickoff is set for 7 p.m. After a tumultuous offseason that saw former head football coach Bobby Carr resign and more than 30 football players withdraw from the school, Walters stuck it out to keep some continuity for new head football coach Eric Folmar.

The Wildcats finished the season 0-10. On a youthful offensive line, Walters graded out the highest for his final prep campaign and collected 23 pancake blocks. Defensively, he recorded 30 tackles, including five for loss, and had one forced fumble and a recovery. “For Blake to still be here through all of this, as the only senior to stick it out, he could’ve easily left and gone anywhere in the world like other guys and won every game on his schedule,” Folmar said of Walters after the team’s final game on Oct. 28. “But that young man has a lot of character and a lot of pride and that’s the foundation that we’ll build this thing back on.” Johnston and Lee tried out for the East All-Star squad at the AISA Cheer Camp at Huntingdon College in July. Out of 63 girls, the senior pair made the cut of 24 cheerleaders for the team.

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THE WETUMPKA HERALD

Cory Diaz / The Herald

Edgewood Academy sophomore center Byron Simmons (50) gets swarmed by three Hooper Academy defenders during Monday’s game at EA.

Colts corral ‘Cats in non-region clash By CORY DIAZ Sports Editor

Hooper Academy’s defense doused Edgewood Academy’s hot start as the Colts pulled away, 61-48, Monday at EA. Led by junior Reece George, the Wildcats jumped out to a 15-7 first-quarter advantage. Hooper erased the deficit, cranking up the pressure on George and Edgewood’s young guards, freshman Austin Patrick and sophomore Brady Davidson, leading to miscues. Grabbing the lead, 16-15 at the 5:40 second period mark, the Colts forced 31 turnovers and

Edgewood offense lights up Hooper for first win By CORY DIAZ Sports Editor

Watching her first shot, a three-pointer, go in, the switch flipped for C.J. Weldon. The sophomore shooting guard shined for a season-high 22 points as Edgewood Academy lit up Hooper Academy, 60-36, Monday for its first win on the season at EA. “In the first two games, we hadn’t got much out of C.J. – much of our guards except Kaitlyn (Sampson),” Lady Wildcats coach Chris George said. “Maybe this is a springboard for her to understand what we need of her, what’s expected. I think once she saw the ball go in the basket, it kind of gave her a little confidence. We’re hoping it’ll build off of that. “When she sees the ball go in the basket, it raises her whole game, offensively and defensively. She’s more strong with the ball, reading the passing lane better, she just gets more active when the ball goes in.” Weldon fueled the ‘Cats best offensive output so far this season, as they piled up 53 points through three quarters of play. Senior forward Kevi Hansen put up another double-double, 14 points and 17 rebounds. Sampson and Kaylee Glenn each added 9. While EA shot the lights out on the offensive end, it arguably shined brightest on the defensive side, holding Hooper to 36 points, including just three made field goals in the first half. “That’s kind of our barometer is that we try to give up less than 40. First half, we kind of struggled,” George said. “Their No. 2 is really good. She’s a driver and she got to the foul line. They were 14-of18 on free throws in the first half. “We just made an adjustment where we softened the ball pressure on her instead of running at her. We just kind of contained her, forced her to make a decision quicker and earlier. We made her be an outside jumpshot, that really helped us with our pressure. We turned her over a little bit. She didn’t get near as many fouls because we were soft on her. We made other people beat us instead of her.” The Lady Wildcats (1-2) hosted East Memorial Tuesday and travels to Evangel Christian Thursday.

maintained the lead the rest of the way. “If we don’t take care of the basketball, we don’t have a chance to win,” Edgewood boys basketball coach Chris George said. “Having 30 turnovers really hurt us. “They outscored us in the second quarter, 20-7, and that really changed the momentum of the game and we were playing from behind the rest of the night. We couldn’t ever get even.” Guards Lance Moore and Wyatt Barnett picked pockets for most of the contest and combined for 20 points to pace Hooper. “They were quicker than we were, they were more athletic than we were. They went like a three- or

four-minute stretch where they didn’t miss,” George said. “Then the ball pressure they put on us really affected us. That’s the first challenge that we’ve had. “This is something we have to grow from. I think in the future we’ll handle it better. But when you start a ninth-grader and two 10th-graders, a junior and a senior, you’re going to have days where shots don’t fall.” Reece George scored a game-high 24 points, while Patrick and Davidson each had 9 points. The Wildcats hosted East Memorial Tuesday and travel to Evangel Christian Thursday, with tipoff at 7 p.m.

Wrestling

continued from page 1

high note, taking a 10-5 decision against Lanier’s Deandre Jarrett, but was the first Wetumpka wrestler to lose during the dual with the Trojans, falling to Travis Hamilton by pin. Tracey Brooks (152) lost to Jake Rice in six seconds. Reuben Garrison and Ladontay Garrison (170) grabbed victories for the Poets, pinning Tracey Brooks

and Logan Townson, respectively. Trailing 10-4 to Wetumpka’s Cullen Powers in the 182-pound bout, Damontez Franklin battled back to win by fall and collect six points for Lanier. The Indians will look to stay hot Friday, hitting the road to Smiths Station for a tri-match.

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Who Was Nikola Tesla?

Everyday in the United States electricity is used in homes and businesses to turn on the lights. If you think about this process, you may recall the inventor of the light bulb, Thomas Edison, but what about the inventor who made it possible to have the AC power running in our homes? His name is Nikola Tesla. Tesla was born on July 10, 1856, in Smiljan, Croatia. Tesla was known for being a very intelligent student with a photographic memory. +HDWWHQGHGWKH8QLYHUVLW\RI3UDJXHLQWKHHDUO\œVIRFXVLQJRQWKH¿HOGRIHOHFWULFDOHQJLQHHULQJ+LVPRVW widely known invention, the alternating-current (or AC power), was created in 1882 after he left the University. +HFDPHWRWKH8QLWHG6WDWHVLQDQGZRUNHGEULHÀ\IRU7KRPDV(GLVRQ%\7HVODKDGSDWHQWHGKLV invention and sold those rights to a man named George Westinghouse. Westinghouse implemented the AC power system into all American homes and is still a major electric corporation today. This implementation was made possible by another invention of Tesla’s, the Tesla coil. This coil made the transmission of the AC power possible on a large scale. Without these inventions, society as we know it would run on a much-different type of power. In 1956, a new unit of measurement was named after the famous inventor in honor of all of his achievements. Nikola Tesla passed away on January 7, 1943, in New York City.

Tesla Word Find

Let your kids enjoy the news too!

Eclectic Observer Page 4

You Be The Inventor

The

Across Clues: A Cl 2. A unit of ________ was named after Nikola Tesla.

All of the common household items we use everyday were once a brand new invention. For example, before ball-point pens were the standard,

AC P

C il C

ti

Edi

INSIDE PAGE 2

THURSDAY • NOVEMBER 30, 2016

TheWetumpkaHerald.com

Vol. 27, No. 48

Police dispatch moved to Elmore County By COREY ARWOOD Staff Writer

The Eclectic Police Department relocated its dispatch to the Elmore County E911 Center out of Wetumpka and both town and police officials said it was a smooth transition to meet state requirements and avoid costly upgrades. EPD Chief Robert Head said he had noticed little difference over the roughly

10 days since the after-hours calls have been directed to the Elmore County E-911 Administration Building off Highway 231 about 20 minutes away. He said the only thing to get used to so far was the empty front desk after 4 p.m. “It was something we were going to have to do in the long run regardless as far as what the state was mandating,� said Head, who has been chief of EPD

for four years. And despite the reshuffling of duties around the office, Head said the Elmore County dispatch had the capacity to take more calls and had all of the upgrades the town was going to have to invest in if they did not make the switch. Eclectic Mayor Gary Davenport said those upgrades would have come at a roughly $30,000 to $40,000 price tag. Davenport said now, with no dispatch

By COREY ARWOOD Staff Writer

See TRAFFIC • Page 3

By COREY ARWOOD Staff Writer

File / The Observer

An Eclectic Christmas again features presentations through a walking tour dramatization of the Christmas story and featured numerous structures, actors and live animals. Below, among the cast members of last year’s “An Eclectic Christmas� were Jeanne Osborn, left, and Norma Billings, right.

‘TIS THE SEASON Eclectic Christmas Festival planned for Saturday By COREY ARWOOD Staff Writer

Today’s

Weather

68 41 High

Low

THURS: HIGH 60 LOW 37

See DISPATCH • Page 4

Eclectic Christmas production set to begin Thursday

Business brings traffic changes into Eclectic A new business will bring changes in the rules of the road to Eclectic and Mayor Gary Davenport said he wants residents to be on the lookout for some of those that might affect travel more than others. On that list are a few changes that might already be known by those who live in or around the area. The new Dollar General store sits off of Highway 63 traveling north out of Eclectic, and Davenport said it is set to open around the middle of December. He said the traffic pattern changed as a result of

in Eclectic, someone would need to dial 911 instead of calling the non-emergency number to the EPD. From there he said a county dispatcher would determine how to address the call, whether it was an emergency, or a non-emergency like an animal-related issue. Head said the EPD would still operate as normal and he had not noticed any

Thanksgiving just ended but Santa’s making his rounds early in Eclectic and has plans to drop into town next weekend at the annual Eclectic Christmas Parade. And this year, the town’s tradition has been renewed into a full blown festival. “This year we have brought back our Eclectic Christmas Festival,� said Eclectic Mayor Gary Davenport He said this year’s Christmas celebration would be the first time since roughly 2009 the town has held a full-fledged festival. The parade is scheduled for Saturday at 4 p.m., but Davenport said this year there would be a day’s worth of activity beginning around 11 a.m. He said local merchants had entered the program and would hold an open house from 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. with drawings for giveaways and prizes. Davenport said businesses outside of the downtown area would participate as well. “We have merchants on the outskirts that will be setting up vendors along the parade route,� said Davenport. He said the parade route will come down West College by the senior center in front of the high school and would turn on U.S.

‘An Eclectic Christmas’ is set to begin Thursday marking another year and nearly a decade of bringing hundreds of volunteers from many churches to transport those in search of a much more traditional holiday experience through a production of biblical proportions. Starting Dec. 1, the event will run through Dec. 10. That’s an additional two days this year. It is one of what Jonalan Wright said is many changes to the program for 2016. Wright sits on the Eclectic See PRODUCTION • Page 3

Father, son duo down big bucks

Submitted / The Observer

Highway 63 north to Main Street, past town hall and will turn to go back to the high school and wind up at Panther Palace children’s park. See FESTIVAL • Page 3

Eclectic resident John A. Andrews kills the deer of a lifetime on Sunday, Nov. 20. Andrews downed a 220-pound 17-point buck scoring 176 on the Boone & Crockett scale in Matthews at the Ponderosa Hunting Club. To top off Andrews’ amazing day, his son, Joseph-Lee Andrews, also from Eclectic killed an eight-point with a 20-inch spread that scored a 112. Wayne Bozeman Jr. Taxidermy will be preparing Andrews’ trophy. See page 4 inside.

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NOVEMBER 30, 2016 • PAGE 2

TheWetumpkaHerald.com

THE ECLECTIC OBSERVER

Who Was Nikola Tesla?

Everyday in the United States electricity is used in homes and businesses to turn on the lights. If you think about this process, you may recall the inventor of the light bulb, Thomas Edison, but what about the inventor who made it possible to have the AC power running in our homes? His name is Nikola Tesla. Tesla was born on July 10, 1856, in Smiljan, Croatia. Tesla was known for being a very intelligent student with a photographic memory. +HDWWHQGHGWKH8QLYHUVLW\RI3UDJXHLQWKHHDUO\œVIRFXVLQJRQWKH¿HOGRIHOHFWULFDOHQJLQHHULQJ+LVPRVW widely known invention, the alternating-current (or AC power), was created in 1882 after he left the University. +HFDPHWRWKH8QLWHG6WDWHVLQDQGZRUNHGEULHÀ\IRU7KRPDV(GLVRQ%\7HVODKDGSDWHQWHGKLV invention and sold those rights to a man named George Westinghouse. Westinghouse implemented the AC power system into all American homes and is still a major electric corporation today. This implementation was made possible by another invention of Tesla’s, the Tesla coil. This coil made the transmission of the AC power possible on a large scale. Without these inventions, society as we know it would run on a much-different type of power. In 1956, a new unit of measurement was named after the famous inventor in honor of all of his achievements. Nikola Tesla passed away on January 7, 1943, in New York City.

Tesla Word Find

You Be The Inventor All of the common household items we use everyday were once a brand new invention. For example, before ball-point pens were the standard, the quill and ink were used. Think of something that you think could be improved and create an invention to make it better.

A Across Clues: Cl 2. A unit of ________ was named after Nikola Tesla. 5. Tesla was said to have what type of memory? 7. Tesla attended which University in Europe? 8. Which Country was Tesla originally from? 10. Where in the U.S. was Tesla when he died? Down Clues: 1. Who bought the rights to Tesla’s AC patent? :KLFKIDPRXVLQYHQWRUGLG7HVODZRUNZLWKEULHÀ\" Gear 8 rotates counterclockwise. 4. Tesla created AC power to use instead of what? Which direction will gears 1, 2, 12, 6. AC stands for the term alternating ________. and 13 rotate? Put on your think9. This invention of Tesla’s made AC power practical. ing caps and solve the puzzle below!

Think It Through

AC Power, Coil, Croatia, Edison, Electricity, Engineer, Inventions, New York, Patent, Prague, Tesla, United States, Westinghouse

Ans: 1, 12 Counterclockwise and 2, 13 clockwise.

Crossword Ans: Across-2)measurement 5)photographic 7)Prague 8)Croatia 10)New York Down-1)Westinghouse 3)Edison 4)DC Power 6)current 9)coil

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(334) 365-5085 740 Memorial Drive • Prattville, AL

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AUTOMOTIVE (334) 262-2544

1618 Gilmer Avenue • Tallassee, AL www.tallasseeautomotive.com

Beach Vacational Rentals Fort Morgan/Gulf Shores, AL • Three (3) four bedroom/three bath homes

ANGIE CARTER

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256-820-8000

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Body Shop L.L.C.

1533 GEORGIA ROAD, WETUMPKA, AL

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SCREENPRINTING EMBROIDERY • SIGNS

We accept all deer claims & all insurance claims. Call us for great customer service & a quick turnaround.

334-283-3463 • 334-283-8024 fax 101-B Caldwell Street, Tallassee, AL 36078 bhornsbyandson@elmore.rr.com

TIRES/BRAKES

Singleton’s Alignment and Muffler Service, LLC

AUTO & RV REPAIR CENTER, LLC

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ALIGNMENTS

PR ATTVILLE

Hornsby & Son

Eclectic Family Dental Care, PC

Faulkner.edu In Cooperation with Central Alabama Community College Call Carol Tarpley at (256) 215-4308 Or email ctarpley@faulkner.edu

Eclectic Family Pharmacy Serving you since 1998 Friendly Staff... “We go the Extra Mile�

Pharmacist/Owner, Teresa Lett 575 Claud Road, Suite 2000 • Eclectic, AL 334-541-2522 FOR ALL YOUR PHARMACY NEEDS

Epic National Caliber Outdoor Track Vintage/GP Turn Track 1/4 Mile Dirt Track • Seven Miles of Trails 30-Amp RV Hook-Ups Clean Restrooms & Showers

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WWW.MONSTERMX.COM

(334) 318-8475

JACKSON THORNTON CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS | CONSULTANTS

194 Fort Toulouse • Wetumpka, AL (334) 567- 3400 www.jacksonthornton.com

Central Baptist Church 3545 W. Central Road • Wetumpka, AL Hwy. 9 & W. Central www.CBCWetumpka.com 239-233-0341

WORLD-CLASS MOTOCROSS

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DRIVERS NEEDED $2,000 Sign-On Bonus

J&M TANK LINES, INC. 12 Gilmer Avenue • Tallassee, AL

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Class-A CDL Local GREAT BENEFITS! OTR Drivers Home And OTR Drivers Health Insurance $9 Weekly 2 or More Times Weekly

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Locally Owned & Operated by Jeff Martin and Tim Martin 1280 Holtville Road • Wetumpka, AL

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504 West Osceola Street 334.567.4729

Rev. Anthony Rhodes • Senior Pastor Sarah Swedenburg • Worship Ministries Derek Blankenship • Student Ministries

Pace SEW UNIQUE Body Shop, LLC

ALTERATIONS

77605 Tallassee Highway Wetumpka, AL

334-567- 4992

(334) 567-9900

7326 Hwy. 231 • Wetumpka, AL


THE ECLECTIC OBSERVER

TheWetumpkaHerald.com

NOVEMBER 30, 2016 • PAGE 3

Festival A tree-lighting ceremony is planned at the end of the parade, which Davenport said would be around 5:30 p.m, and a Santa Claus will be posted up across the street at the senior center. He said after the tree lighting the winners of the day’s prizes and giveaways would be announced. Davenport said the parade grand marshal planned for this year is Elmore County District Two

Traffic the new business. What was a four lane section of US Highway 63 heading south, Davenport said had been changed to a two-lane roadway with a multipurpose center lane beginning near Fred’s, and he said it continued on past Russell Do-It Center to Johnson’s Furniture. “Basically what’s happening is because of the Dollar General coming in there and because of the amount of traffic we’re now getting in that area, we are now going from a four lane to a two lane with a multipurpose,” said Davenport. However that change was only the first in a series Davenport said the section of the highway would see

Production Ministry board that has overseen ‘An Eclectic Christmas’ since it began roughly nine years ago out of First Baptist Church in Eclectic. Now Wright said it is the result of numerous churches and even more volunteers. He said on any one of the production nights there are about 200 people, representing upwards of 40 to 60 churches, who contribute to the multi-scene walkthrough of the traditional biblical holiday story, held at the Falk Farm, located at 1733 Claude Road, just south of Eclectic on Alabama Highway 63. Verdie Nummie, who also serves as assistant magistrate of Eclectic Municipal Court, is the secretary to the board of directors of Eclectic Ministry. Nummie said so far this year there were 6,014 persons registered to participate. “We’re at the point now what we did in total last year on confirmed reservations, we’ve already surpassed that and we haven’t even started yet,” said Wright. Wright said people from surrounding states come to Eclectic to walk through the three-quarter mile, 45-minute dramatization, which takes visitors down an outdoor walking trail through the live drama set during the Roman Empire, from Augustus Caesar’s decree that everyone must be counted in the census through the birth of Jesus.

continued from page 1

Commissioner Mack Daugherty. He said businesses from outside of Eclectic had planned to participate as well from areas like neighboring Kent and Wetumpka. Others from Eclectic who he said had not normally been able to participate but would this year are Russell Do-It Center, Johnson’s Furniture, First Community Bank, D&R Convenience Store and Kickin’ Chicken.

Davenport said the idea for bringing the festival back had been in the works for a few months after the local business leaders had expressed interest in giving the event another try this year.

continued from page 1

over the next few years. He said the town had already been in contact with the Alabama Department of Transportation on some of the changes. One change will be a speed limit reduction on the highway, which Davenport said will soon take effect. “So the speed limit will be changing as you come into the town limits from 55 to 45 until you get all the way down into town,” Davenport said. He said he wanted drivers to keep their eyes open for the new speed limit signs reflecting the change that would be appearing along the roadsides soon.

continued from page 1

He said he knew of some from Tennessee, Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina who had attended. Wright thanked the volunteers to the program, whether they were individuals or businesses that contributed to the performance. “I need the volunteers to know how much they’re appreciated. If it was not for them, this program could not happen,” Wright said. Nummie said she works on ‘An Eclectic Christmas’ year-round. She said the program would run from 6-9 p.m. on weekdays and on the weekend from 5:15-9 p.m. with walk-ins from 7:30-8:30 p.m. However she recommended making a reservation, due to the crowding that has occurred in the past during those times. Nummie said the tours begin every 15 minutes. Tours for handicapped individuals start at 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. She said the tour is free, but donations are welcome. Both Nummie and Wright concurred on the reason behind ‘An Eclectic Christmas.’ “People will come there that will not go to the church,” said Nummie. Wright said a pastor awaits those who finish the program and have questions.

“YOUR LOCAL GAS GO.” Items Vary Per Locations

CLOSEOUTS & DISCONTINUED ITEMS CALL OR COME BY ANY OF OUR LOCATIONS! NS! CLANTON OFFICE 1050 Woodfin Lane • Clanton, AL 35045 205-755-2739 • next to Walmart

SLAPOUT OFFICE 9945 Holtville Road • Wetumpka, AL 36092 334-569-3325

WETUMPKA OFFICE 7616 US Hwy 231 • Wetumpka, AL 36092 334-567-8833

TALLASSEE OFFICE 1603 Gilmer Avenue • Tallassee, AL 36078 334-283-2795

RODNEY GRIFFITH Lake Martin Properties

Serving Lake Martin, Tallassee and the Surrounding Area

RODNEY GRIFFITH BROKER

CELL: 334-207-0666 WEB: www.rodneygrif¿th.com EMAIL: rodneygrif¿th@windstream.net BRICK HOME ON EAST PATTON – 3 bd/2 baths, nice home on 16.6 acres that’s NOT in the city limits, $185,000. 2 NEW HOUSES – Tallassee River Hills Subdivision, 1500 sq. ft., 3 bd/2 baths, large open den & kitchen, fireplace, tile floors, granite counters, great location, $149,900. HOUSE IN RED HILL ON 229, 2 large bd/1 LDbath, nice den and kitchen, 32x20 shop, SO 2.6 acres, $115,000. BEAUTIFUL WILLIAMSBURG HOME in Tallassee on Indian Trails on very private 10 acres. 7000 sq. ft., 4 bedrooms, 5 baths, great kitchen and den, super nice home, $575,000. LAKE TALLASSEE – 650-ft. waterfront, 3 lots, 3± acres, super panoramic view, good building site, $225,000. COMMERCIAL PROPERTY, RED HILL – Formerly The Country Mile convenience store, gas station and restaurant. Will sell only gas station and convenience store or all. Call for details, $245,000. BEAUTIFUL HISTORIC HOME on Little Rd., Tallassee – 1.5 acres, completely remodeled. Very nice, 5 bd/5.5 baths, REDUCED TO $229,000. 78 ACRES off Lower Tuskegee Hwy., on Cleghorn Road, great hunting only, $135,000. RIVER HILLS SUBDIVISION – 23 lots, great views of Lake Tallassee, underground utilities, sewage. Prices start at only $20,000. 13 SOLD – NOW 10 REMAINING. BEAUTIFUL BRICK HOUSE in Plantation Pines, 4 bd/3.5 baths, 1.6 acre lot very modern and pretty, REDUCED TO $299,000. 3189 LITTLE ROAD – 4 bd/2ba., large lot, very modern, & pretty, only $215,000. RIVERHILLS SUBDIVISION – Water front lot 181 feet W/F 1.3 acres, Flat great views, $115,000. TALLASSEE GILMER AVE. – 3bd/2 ba next to DQ, zoned commercial, REDUCED TO $89,900. 548 PROSPECT ROAD, ECLECTIC – Beautiful home on 4 ACRES, 3 bd/ 2.5 baths, very modern and private, very close to Lake Martin. Reduced to $239,000.


PAGE 4 • NOVEMBER 30, 2016

TheWetumpkaHerald.com

THE ECLECTIC OBSERVER

CommunityCalendar Thursday, Dec. 1Saturday, Dec. 10

An Eclectic Christmas, The Falk Farm, 1733 Claud Road, Eclectic. Experience the true story of the first Christmas in the atmosphere of an outdoor walking trail. Be part of the live drama that is set during the Roman Empire. As decreed by Augustus Caesar, everyone must be counted in the census. As you make your way to Bethlehem, you will visit the field where shepherds received the angel’s message and news of the Messiah. Then visit the wise men as they journey in search of the New Born King. Reservations are now open! Shows are reserved in 15-minute increments. When registering, please have a primary and secondary choice for date and time. We remind you that this is an outdoor night-time walking tour. Admission is free, and donations are accepted and appreciated to help with expenses. If you make a reservation and are unable to make it, please contact An Eclectic Ministry and let us know to cancel your registration. Register online at http://www.aneclecticministry.org/an-eclectic-christmas

Today is

Submit calendar items:

Participate in your Herald and Observer by calling 256-234-4281, faxing them to 256-234-6550, sending your event to the.editor@thewetumpkaherald.com or logging on to http://www.thewetumpkaherald.com/.

Today’s Events

November 30, 2016

LifeSouth will be holding blood drives from 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Elmore Community Hospital, 500 Hospital Drive, and from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Christ Life Church, 2601 Holtville Road, both in Wetumpka. Everyone who qualifies is urged to donate blood.

January 10, February 4 and March 14

The Wetumpka Public Library, along with the Elmore County Museum, invites veterans and family members to sign up and participate in a free monthly reading discussion program on the experience of war, beginning September and ending in March. Discussions will be held in the Elmore County Museum from 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. on the following Tuesdays: January 10th, February 14th, and March 14th. All books and films will be provided for each participant in advance of each discussion. Recent veterans of the global war on terror are particularly encouraged to participate.

ONGOING EVENTS

December 1

The City of Millbrook’s “Spirit of Christmas” Annual Tree Lighting Ceremony will take place from 6 p.m. until 7 p.m. on the Village Green. There will also be a live Nativity, choral entertainment and refreshments for sale.

December 1

LifeSouth will be holding a blood drive from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. at Elmore County Health Department, 6501 U.S. Highway 231, in Wetumpka. Everyone who qualifies is urged to donate blood

December 1-3

Millbrook’s Spirit of Christmas 2016 begins on Thursday Dec. 1 with the annual tree lighting ceremony from 6 to 7 p.m. on the Village Green. There will be a live Nativity, choral entertainment and refreshments for sale. On Dec. 3 the Spirit of Christmas Parade begins at 2 p.m. Arts and crafts, food vendors and entertainment will also be present from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Santa and Mrs. Claus will be in the gazebo and available for pictures from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

December 1-4, 8-11, and 15-31

The Montgomery Zoo, the City of Montgomery, and the Montgomery Area Zoological Society invite you to the 25th Annual Christmas Lights Festival. The festival runs nightly from 5:30 p.m. until 9:30 p.m. Regular festival admission is $15 for ages 3 and older. Admission fee includes entry and one Christmas Lights Festival train ride. Group Rates are available for purchase. For more information call (334) 240-4900

December 2

Prattville’s Christmas Parade will roll through Downtown Prattville starting at 7:00 p.m. For more information call (334) 5950854 or visit www.prattvilleal.gov

December 2

The Montgomery Chorale will be hosting its annual Christmas Concert at FUMC Montgomery at 7 p.m. There will be an additional performance December 4 at 2:30 p.m. Tickets can be purchased online at www.montgomerychorale.org

December 2-4

The Montgomery Gem and Mineral Society will host the 46th annual Montgomery Gem, Mineral, and Jewelry Show at the Garrett Coliseum. Visit www. montgomerygemanmineralsociety.com for more information.

December 2

The Capitol Christmas Tree lighting ceremony will take place at 5:30 p.m. It will be decorated with more than 40,000 lights and 67 stars, each one representing an Alabama county. The tree lighting ceremony will be followed by a Capitol Open House from 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. There will be refreshments, photos with Santa, and a canned goods collection.

December 3

Camp Stew and Indoor Yard Sale at Cedarwood Community Church, Hwy. 231 N Wallsboro, Wetumpka. Saturday Dec. 3 from 7 a.m. until noon. Stew is $8.00 for large microwaveable container. All proceeds from stew and yard sale go to the building fund to help complete the church building and upkeep. For more information, call Laura Knight at 567-2457 or Jo Parker at 514-0242.

December 3

“A Fairy Tale Christmas,” Eclectic Christmas Parade and merchants’ open house. The merchant’s open house begins at 11 a.m. Visit Eclectic merchants for

Eve Street Celebration! The festivities will take place in the Commerce Street Entertainment District from 9 p.m. – 1 a.m., featuring live entertainment plus fireworks and confetti once the clock strikes twelve. Don’t miss this exciting downtown celebration in Montgomery! For more information, call 334-625-2100.

Submitted / The Herald

Joseph-Lee Andrews from Eclectic killed an eight-point with a 20-inch spread that scored a 112 on the Boone & Crockett scale in Matthews at the Ponderosa Hunting Club. Pictured up front, his father John Andrews, downed a 17 point buck. your Christmas shopping enjoyment and register to win prize drawings. The open house will continue until 4 p.m., when the Christmas parade begins. After the parade, the Christmas tree-lighting will take place at Panther Palace. At the tree-lighting, there will be holiday music and the announcement of parade and prize-drawing winners. You do not have to be present to win.

December 3-4

The Wetumpka Depot Players present “Jingle ARRGH the Way! A Christmas Pirate Adventure.” Call (334) 868-1440 or visit www.the wetumpkadepot.com for ticket information.

December 4

LifeSouth will be holding a blood drive from 1 p.m to 4 p.m. at Walmart, 4538 U.S. Highway 231, in Wetumpka. Everyone who qualifies is urged to donate blood.

December 4

Holiday Shoppe Open House to be held at The Graphics Factory located at 1990-C Downing Street in Millbrook from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. There will be many local business and crafters participating in this inaugural event. They will be accepting non-expired canned food and other non-perishable food items to be given to W.E.L.C.O.M.E., Inc., Millbrook’s Food Pantry. For each item donated, the participant will receive a ticket that enters them a drawing for door prizes that will be awarded every half hour.

December 4, 11, 12

Prattville’s Way Off Broadway Theater to Present “To Kill a Mockingbird.” Auditions will be held Sunday, December 4 from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., Sunday, December 11 from 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. and Monday, December 12 from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Cultural Arts Center located at 203 West 4th Street in Prattville. The play will open Thursday, February 9, 2017 at 7:30 p.m. and will run Saturdays and Sundays from February 10-26, 2017, with a special performance on Valentine’s Day. For further information call (334) 595-0854 or visit wobt.prattvilleal.gov

December 5, 12 and 19

The Governor’s Mansion will be open for Christmas Candlelight Tours from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. The historic 1907 Governor’s Mansion will be aglow with holiday lights and decorations. Admission is free.

December 6-15

Christmas on the Coosa returns to Wetumpka with events throughout the month of December. On Dec. 6 there will be a decorations contest. Entries for the contest must be received by Dec. 2 and decorations must be on or working on Dec. 6 at 6 p.m. The annual tree lighting ceremony will be held at Gold Star Park on Dec. 8 at 6 p.m. Prior to the ceremony kids will have an opportunity to get their picture made with Santa. On Dec. 9 at 6 p.m. will be Nativity/Luminary Night and the Downtown Open House. Christmas on the Coosa will be held Dec. 10 starting at 7:30 and 9 a.m. with the character breakfast followed by the car show running from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and arts and crafts vendors

from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. The street parade will begin at 2 p.m. and the Wakeboarding Santa Show will start at 6 p.m. Fireworks will follow at 6 p.m. On Dec. 15 at 7 p.m. The LeFevre Quartet and Wilburn & Wilburn will participate in a Christmas Concert at the Wetumpka Civic Center.

December 8

Wetumpka Christmas Tree Lighting, Gold Star Park. Santa Claus will be on hand to take photos with children beginning at 5 p.m. The Christmas tree-lighting begins at 6 p.m.

December 8-18

Prattville’s Way Off Broadway Theatre will be presenting two plays, “A Laura Ingalls Wilder Christmas” and “The Mice and the Manger.” They will be performed back to back and for the ticket price of just one play! They will be performed Thursdays through Sundays beginning December 8 and ending December 18. For more information call (334) 595-0854 or visit wobt@prattvilleal.gov

December 9

Christmas on the Coosa nativity/luminary night and downtown merchants’ open house, 6 p.m.

December 9

December 9 from 10:00 a.m. -8:00 p.m. and December 10 from 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.: The Elmore County Museum will be exhibiting Nativity’s from around the world. Admission is free. For more information call (334) 567-5097. The Museum is located at 112 South Main Street, Wetumpka, AL.

December 9

Free Holiday Concert presented by the Prattville Community Chorus and the Prattville Pops. It will be held at the Doster Center in Prattville at 7:00 p.m. Although the concert is free, guests are asked to bring a non-perishable food item to be donated to the Autauga Interfaith Care Center Food Bank. For more information call (334) 595-0854 or visit www.prattvilleal. gov.

Christmas carols! For more information please contact the church at 567-9695.

December 11

MILLBROOK PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH (PCA) – The community is invited to a Christmas Cantata (“And On Earth Peace”) in the church sanctuary on Sunday, December 11, at 5:30 p.m.; refreshments to follow in the church’s Trinity Chapel. Nursery is provided. The church is located at 3480 Main St. Contact the church office (285-4031) for more information and/or directions.

December 12-18

The Wetumpka Depot Players will present “Cinnamon Grits.” Call (334) 868-1440 or visit www.wetumpkadepot.com for ticket information

December 13

Calvary Baptist Church Wetumpka will be offering Grief Share “Surviving the Holidays” from 6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. They will be meeting in the fellowship hall. Please contact the church office at 567-4729 or visit our website at www.calvarybaptistwetumpka.org for any questions concerning this matter.

December 15:

The Wetumpka Chamber of Commerce and their new partner, River Region Women In Business will host a Meet and Greet at a Free Women’s Networking Event at 6 p.m. at the Chamber Office. Refreshments will be offered. Please RSVP to (334) 567-4811 or jyoung@wetumpkachamber.org

December 17

The Ninth Annual Christmas at the Alabama Nature Center from 9:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. There will be activities such as hayrides, Christmas crafts, decorating cookies, a movie special and much more offered from 9:30 a.m. until 3:00 p.m. Jolly Ol’ Saint Nick will be available for pictures as well. There is a $5 admission fee per person, $20 maximum per family. The Upper Pond will be open for catch and release. Please see the Alabama Wildlife Federation’s website for rules.

December 10

Christmas on the Coosa, featuring events all day. This year’s theme is “Christmas Around the World.” Activities include arts & crafts booths, a car show, street parade, skiing Santa and a fireworks display. Day begins with arts& crafts at 10 a.m. and ends with Santa and fireworks at 6 p.m.

December 10

Free Countywide Clean-Up Day from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. or until the truck is loaded (whichever occurs first.) Drop off locations for this event will be the Old Highway Department Shop in Holtville and the CEW&SA facility on Redland Road.

December 11

Hillside Baptist Church (405 Old Montgomery Highway, Wetumpka, AL) invites you to enjoy a traditional “home” celebration of Christmas at 11 a.m. The program will explain the Christmas Story through both dialogue and your favorite

December 24

MILLBROOK PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH (PCA) – The community is invited to a Christmas Eve Communion and Candlelight Service in the church sanctuary on Saturday, December 24, at 5:30pm. Nursery is provided. The church is located at 3480 Main St. Contact the church office (285-4031) for more information and/or directions.

December 31

The City of Wetumpka will hold New Year’s Eve Celebration behind the Wetumpka Civic Center. There will be a POW/MIA Recognition at 9:00 p.m. at the Old Elmore County Courthouse. Then at 9:30 p.m. Shawn Singleton will perform. The New Year’s countdown will begin at 11:59 p.m. followed by the Meteor Strike and Fireworks.

Dispatch problems with incoming calls for services. Davenport said one pro of the switch is a faster response time. He said another was that “the officers and the fire department will now have the capability of communicating with their sister departments.” There was a shift to a countywide system underway that Davenport said would connect most first responders in a few years. And by next year he said all first responders would be able to communicate with one another. Davenport said as of now there would be an operator at the EPD Monday through Friday 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. who

December 31

Ring in the New Year with the Downtown Countdown New Year’s

CHILD FIND: The Tallassee City School System is launching its annual campaign to assist children—birth to age 21—who have disabilities and may need special services. The campaign urges parents, service providers, and concerned citizens to contact Child Find, a program to locate, identify and evaluate children with disabilities or children who are believed to have disabilities. The Tallassee City School System wishes to notify you of the availability of special education services in our public schools. If you have questions regarding our programs, or if you wish to refer a student, please contact Lynell Carr at (334) 2835675 or Child Find (Alabama Department of Education) at 1-800-548-2547.” AMERICA THE BEAUTIFUL: A Photographic Celebration of Places, Faces and Activities is the new exhibit featuring Libby Christensen, John Jacobs, Wayne Atchison, Mit Fontaine, Kay Brummal, Sue Mehearg and Barbara Bryan. The gallery is opened from 8:00 am to 4:30 pm Monday through Friday at the Kelly Fitzpatrick Memorial Gallery 408 South Main Street in Wetumpka. The exhibit will close on January 20, 2017. SATURDAY NIGHT JAMBOREE: Every second and fourth Saturday of the month is the Highway 231 Saturday Night Jamboree at the Alabama League of the South Cultural Center Building at 12814 Highway 231 North in Wetumpka. There will be country, gospel, and rock and roll music in a good atmosphere. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. with music from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. There will be line dancing, no alcohol, no smoking and no charge. Donations accepted for upkeep of the building. Contact Ray Funderburk at R&R Music and things at 334-991-4682 or 224-8509804 with questions. SANTUCK FLEA MARKET: First Saturday, March-December, dawn to 2 p.m. in the area surrounding Santuck Baptist Church. An outdoor flea market with booths featuring arts, crafts, antiques, novelties, imports, food and more. Free admission to the public with free parking available. For info, call 334-567-7400. BLUEGRASS JAM: First Saturday, 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Alabama River Region Arts Center, Wetumpka. All acoustic instruments welcome - guitar, banjo, mandolin, fiddle, bass, singers. Beginner, intermediate, advanced and listeners. For info, call 334-578-9485. SIT AND SEW: First Saturday of each month, 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Alabama River Region Arts Center, Wetumpka. All sewers and knitters welcome. Bring your own sewing machine or hand-sewing project. Assistance and encouragement to help you through your project. Ironing board and iron provided. Free. For info, call 334-578-9485 or visit www.arrac.org. ART CLASS/ DRAWING AND PAINTING WORKSHOP: Saturdays, 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. at Alabama River Region Arts Center, Wetumpka For age 11 and older. $32 for four classes or $10 per week. Taught every Saturday by Theresa Wayne. Bring your own tools or use art center tools. Center provides other supplies. For info, call 334-300-9394. MASTER GARDENERS LUNCH AND LEARN: Second Tuesday of each month, 12 to 1 p.m. at the Elmore County Extension Office, Wetumpka. Hosted by the Central Alabama Master Gardeners Association. Free and open to the public. Bring a sack lunch, drinks provided. For info, call 334-567-6301 or visit www.aces. edu/counties/Elmore/. NAACP MEETINGS: Elmore County Branch NAACP Executive Committee meeting every 3rd Tuesday 6:30pm at MLK Center 200 Lancaster St, Wetumpka Elmore County Branch NAACP regular monthly meeting every 4th Tuesday 6:30pm at MLK Center 200 Lancaster St, Wetumpka.

continued from page 1

will answer calls. However, he said if the number is called after that time it would be forwarded to the county dispatch, where it would be determined to be either an emergency or an administrative call. Davenport said several meetings had been held over the last year to discuss the switch, and nationally they were aware there would be an overall shift to digital dispatch and radio systems. Another plus of the move Davenport mentioned was the ability to isolate the location of the caller with much greater accuracy through GPS technology at the county dispatch, who could then more efficiently assign an

officer from a local police department or a sheriff’s deputy. He said the biggest downside would be the number of administrative calls handled through the local dispatch, which would now have to be sorted by the county dispatcher. And Davenport said EPD officers would still have their personal radio system and cell phones and the county would be given a directory of officers on duty to coordinate in the instance of an emergency call. “Over the last couple of months we’ve been trying to fill in the loophole so we can move smoothly,” said Davenport.


Nov 30, 2016 Wetumpka Herald