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#  I m p r i n t SUPERIOR MAGAZINE Lychener Strasse 76, 10437 Berlin www.superior-magazine.com FOUNDERS Tom Felber & Marc Huth EDITORIAL TEAM editors@superior-magazine.com Jana Wilms | jana@superior-magazine.com Nerys d'Esclercs | nerys@superior-magazine.com Sarah Weyers | sarah@superior-magazine.com Tom Felber (Chief Editor V.i.S.d.P.) | tom@superior-magazine.com CREATIVE TEAM creatives@superior-magazine.com Anthony Falconer | creatives@superior-magazine.com Arnaud Meneroud | creatives@superior-mag.com Itamar Inbar | creatives@superior-magazine.com Jana Sachse | creatives@superior-magazine.com MAGAZINE Advertising | advertising@superior-magazine.com General Inquiries | connection@superior-magazine.com Press | press@superior-magazine.com

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SUPERIOR Publishing UG (haftungsbeschränkt) Lychener Strasse 76, 10437 Berlin

Superior Magazine accepts no liability for any unsolicited material whatsoever. Opinions contained in the editorial content are those of the contributors and not necessarily those of the publisher of Superior Magazine. Despite careful control Superior Magazine accepts no liability for the content of external links. Any reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is strictly prohibited

COVER: Photo by Lynn Theisen


SUBMIT

Y O U R EDITORIAL


Fashion magazines? We’ve got a million free ones. Issuu.com

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MAY 2016

Dear readers,

#  Editorial

Spring is always the time of transition – between winter and summer. For us these months are also a period like that, with all its ups and downs. But it’s exciting to look forward, either to a new development or the summer … This month in our column LET’S TALK ABOUT GREEN Sarah presents the second hand charity project “PACKME”. She met the founder Marco Sola at the last GREENSHOWROOM in Berlin and talked with him about his unique idea of re-using clothes. Our May SELECTION comes from Australia. JDRT is a new accessory brand focussing on watches for a busy and moving lifestyle. Their concept: one face and several bands. Customizable for a timeless result, their customer should never get bored of what is on their wrist. Nerys talked to the four founders from Australia, USA and Germany about their vision. In March Nerys visited PORTUGAL FASHION and reported from that event. In our May issue we show you some more Show & Backstage Impressions. Our FASHION EDITORIALS come this time from Christine Lipski & Tina Gauff, Kai Dunkel, Kim Lang, Lynn Theisen (Cover) and Voir. Additionally of course we show you the winner of our EDITORIAL VOTING who is this time Kam Wong. Enjoy our SUPERIOR MAGAZINE May 2016 issue … best Tom & Marc and the whole SUPERIOR MAGAZINE team.

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FASHION & STYLE

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Voir

» MOTEL VICE« 

52 COLUMN: LET'S TALK ABOUT GREEN

Lynn Theisen

» HEADING SOUTH EAST« 

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Tina Gauff, Christine Lipski

» TWENTY FIVE HOURS« 

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» PORTUGAL FASHION A/W 2016/17« 

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Kim Lang

» TRIBAL WITCH« 


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Andreas Waldschütz

» EXITUS« 

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EDITORIALS MAY  

Kam Wong

» TO YOU, TO ME« 

#

SELECTION  

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Marc

MOTEL VICE photography & art direction by VOIR hair & make up by MELODY KONSTANTI styling & designer by MARINA ZOJ model KEIRA SMITH @ ONLY MODEL MANAGEMENT, ARMANDO GUEVARA assistant LEOBARDO TREVIZO

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OVERALL WARDROBE CREDITS: WHITE HAT & BLACK COAT PROVIDED BY PATTYE'S CLOSET VINTAGE SHOPPE BLACK HEELS BY LOUBOUTIN JEWELRY & WOMANS CLOTHING HAND MADE BY MARINA ZOJ MENS CLOTHING BY H&M LINGERIE BY VICTORIA‘S SECRET


Sebastian St端rzl, Rhys Thomas, Joel Davis, Rebecca Davis

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May 2016

SELECTION JDRT interview & text | NERYS D’ESCLERCS photos | JDRT

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JDRT Back in Sydney, Australia, two best friends Rhys Thomas and Joel Davis decided to found JDRT, an accessory brand focussing on watches. With the help of Joel’s sister, Rebecca, and Sebastian Stürzl, they developed signature watches for a busy and moving lifestyle. Their concept: one face – the first one being the Sterling – and several bands. Customizable for a timeless result, their customer should never get bored of what is on their wrist. In an exclusive interview with SUPERIOR MAGAZINE, they explained JDRT’s idea more in depth. # You are four founders of JDRT. What is your background? And what made you decide to start your brand?

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Joel: JDRT was founded by Rhys and I. Rhys was an account executive for Google at the time, and I was a corporate lawyer in an international law firm. Neither of us had much of a creative outlet, and our days were almost never our own. We would often meet after work and bemoan the fact that we wish we could pour the same energy we had to give to our day jobs into something together, like a project. It was from this that the idea for JDRT was born - like most small companies start. We discussed mutual interests, which saw us land on accessories - specifically timepieces. Things developed from there quite quickly actually - because we did a trip after that to Hong Kong to source factories and suppliers in Southern China. We visited Hong Kong in August 2013 and we incorporated


MAY 2016

JDRT as a company in October 2013. Somewhere in the middle there we named it JDRT, and we decided that watches was what we would do, and we just sort of got on with it! Rebecca: I am Joel’s sister and a designer (at least primarily!). I studied design in Sydney, and worked for a men’s athletic and swimwear company before moving to New York in 2012. I now design for a luxury womenswear label here. Joel and I have always been close, and when he told me he was thinking about launching an accessory company I was excited to be involved. Sebastian: I met Joel in summer 2015 in a bar in Germany. At the time I was finishing my master

studies in business management. During our conversation Joel told me about his plans with JDRT and we noticed very fast that we were on the same wavelength. We swapped email addresses and a few days later Joel contacted me and asked if I would like to be part of the company. I didn’t have to think twice. Now I’m responsible for sales and marketing activities in Europe. # Does any of you have experience in watchmaking? Rhys: No - our focus has always been on the use of the watch and the look, the touch and the feel of the accessory. JDRT is not about the watch as its own art form - some companies do that but they are more traditional watchmakers. For us, the watch is a timepiece accessory that looks good and can be worn with literally anything in any environment, whether you're surfing, running, going on a date or having a business meeting. # Who actually makes the watches then? Rebecca: The design of the Sterling came together collaboratively. Rhys and Joel developed the idea of JDRT - where they wanted to go with it, the look and feel, what they wanted to say and how to go about it. Joel came to visit me over Christmas in 2013, and we spent an intense week bouncing ideas and concepts around and discussing aesthetics and design. I began sketching to try to visualise our thoughts, and we came up with the first watch prototype that week. It was a pretty concentrated creative process.

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Joel: Our watches are made from Japanese Miyota movement with scratch resistant, sapphire crystal housed in a stainless steel case. A wellknown factory in southern China manufactures the watches; we’ve been over a number of times to work with the factory hands on, and sit beside the folks who actually assemble our watches, which is always a really great experience. # How would you characterize the brand's philosophy in a few words? Rhys: I think this is a very hard question because it’s evolving. A small company’s brand is never static. We keep changing the goal posts, because as people we change - and so do our customers in the market place. Our drivers and the things that motivate us change - the fashion industry itself is about the least static industry besides tech. I think overall we focus on the fact that we make a product that we would wear ourselves. I wear my JDRT every single day - shower, gym, running, at my desk, traveling, you name it. A JDRT product is something we have to want to wear ourselves, before we ask our customers to wear it. I think we also are guided by our core values: versatility, individuality and durability. So when we think about a colour or an idea or a strategy - we consider how this might fit against the backdrop of these values. Our other core driver is the customer; how can we always be providing a customer service experience that is relaxed but consistently excellent. If we have a fault with a product - which happens to every company whether they admit it or not - you take responsibility and you deal with it immediately and resolve it. I don’t know of any customer who wouldn’t speak highly of a company, in spite of everything else good and bad, if they have experienced absolutely exceptional customer service at every step of the way. At JDRT that is exactly what we are striving to achieve with every sale.

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# Why is your main watch called Sterling? Rebecca: The word ‘Sterling’ literally means exceptional, first-rate. We wanted to name our first product to reflect the quality of the watch build, and the values behind our brand. # What are your other watches going to be like? Will they also be timeless and individual? Rebecca: We are currently in the development stage for a second watch. It’s going to be a slimmer, more streamlined addition to the collection, still focusing on a clean aesthetic with an element of athleticism. Timeless design is always going to be important to us - we want to make products that remain stylish and transcend trend. # Why did you decide to have your watches unisex? Rebecca: Everything in life now is so much more fluid than ever before, we are experiencing the breakdown of barriers and changes everywhere. Designers have really begun to rethink how they approach design, and who they are designing for. People are no longer easily separated into neat little categories, they can’t be defined - this is true especially of age and of gender. I think good design now and in the future will transcend gender, instead addressing the needs of the consumer irrelevant to their sex or age or shape. That’s one of the key reasons why we focus on a classic design that can be built to fit the consumer. # You say that your pieces praise individuality. Would you do custom made bands?


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Rhys: Yes this is something we’ve been talking about quite a lot lately. Were it not for how expensive that process currently is for us - we would already have started. We are in the process of currently exploring how we could do custom screen printing and so on - so if you have a particular print or style you want - let us know because we need your feedback! # You call your watches timeless. Does that mean you don’t follow colour trends? Rhys: Yes and no. Colour is one trend, but actually the look and feel of watches is another. Earlier this decade larger, chunkier watches where the rage. More recently the slim line, preppy look took hold. But lately the watch market has expanded so much, which is really exciting to see, that there is no particular trend that is bigger than another. Which means yes, colour becomes important, but actually is the watch itself going to look good in another 6 months or 6 years? You can replace a -50-

JDRT band easily, but we don’t want you to feel the need to change the actual watch itself. We designed it so that it is highly durable to last quite some time - and we designed it so that it is minimalist, and very classic. It doesn’t look like it’s riding a particular trend - because it’s not supposed to. It needs to look smart when you wear it on a date or to work with an understated band, or more adventurous and spirited when you wear a bright band to the beach, for example. Rebecca: Colour trends are important for us in order to establish cohesive collections, and supply customers with something they can work into seasonal fashion trends. However, the unique slip through design of our bands allows us to present a more classic watch face and yet create different colours and looks with different bands that can be switched around. # What kind of customers are you hoping to sell your watches to?


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Rebecca: The Sterling appeals to customers who value not only style, but exceptional quality. This watch is understated, minimal but solid, and has the most value for consumers who have an eye for design and appreciate craftsmanship and detail. The functionality of the bands give the watch an athletic twist, it’s built for the versatile demands of modern life. We believe the JDRT customer is an individual, an explorer, an adventurer; be it traveling across the world or in a more mundane setting. Someone who appreciates considered design and quality. # What do you think you could bring to the European market? Sebastian: We think that a JDRT taps the pulse of the ages. Fortunately all of us are spread all over the world and because of this we can combine all of our impressions in one watch. Rebecca is living in New York and it isn’t a secret that a lot of all upcoming fashion trends gain serious moment also in Europe. We noticed an upcoming trend -51-

called “athleisure” and saw the chance to be one of the first watch brands to integrate this trend in Europe - and so we did. Our watches are classic and sportive at the same time. This is one of the key points that differentiate us from the rest of the European market. You can wear a JDRT in the office as well as in the gym. But it’s not tech - it’s still a quality, simple timepiece. The interchangeability of the bands and the watch faces allows the customer to be entirely flexible. Furthermore we are already planning to increase the range of our band materials (leather and metal) and the range of colours in order to offer the customer further customization. # Thank you very much!


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HEADING SOUTH-EAST photography by LYNN THEISEN hair & make up by NAPACHPORN BUTHDONG, WOW LEESAVAN styling by CHARIKA SARISUT model OPAL PHILAIWAN, JAN BAIBOON photo-assistant KANTAPICH BUTHDONG

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dress MANGO trousers STYLIST'S OWN jumpsuit BLACKHEART shoes MODELS' OWN jewelry STYLIST'S OWN


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top SODA trousers VINTAGE


dress MANGO trousers STYLIST'S OWN jewelry STYLIST'S OWN shoes MODEL'S OWN


blouse VINTAGE trousers VINTAGE lingerie BOUDOIR BY DISAYA dress VICK'S


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top VINTAGE kimono ZARA jewelry STYLIST'S OWN shoes MODEL'S OWN


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jumpsuit BLACKHEART shoes MODELS' OWN jewelry STYLIST'S OWN


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blouse VINTAGE skirt STYLE NANDA


PackMee Second hand, second chance How one company tries to lessen pollution and unnecessary use of resources.

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MAY 2016

COLUMN: LET'S TALK ABOUT GREEN by Sarah Weyers

For this month’s issue we spoke to the founder of the second hand charity project PackMee, Marco Sola. Taking a look at the second hand market and the advantages but also disadvan-tages, Sola and his team came up with a unique idea. You buy a new blouse, wear it a couple of months, then it sits in your closet. Every time you clean out your clothes and decide to give some pieces away, you still leave that blouse on it’s hanger, thinking that some day you’ll wear it again – you have only worn it so many times and can’t just throw it away! We all have been in a similar situation, when thinking that the bargain piece would bring more happiness than it eventually did and that we would combine it with oh-so- many pieces, creating many different top-notch outfits – and then we end up not even close to what we were aiming for. While many think that giving away to a recycling bank will bring the clothes that are still in good shape to people in need, the charity thought is really what counts: most of the items in those banks go straight into recycling, not being used again in its actual form. Yet, that is not ultimately a bad thing: Recycling is still a better choice than collecting and then throwing away. Still, using the clothes again and giving them to people in need is more efficient, causing less pollution and enabling the poor to own pieces of clothing. Another advantage is the decreasing need to producing new items when old ones are used for a longer period of time. -67-

Having this issue in mind – the contrariety of wanting to do good and ending up not knowing where the clothes end up and what happens to them, Marco Sola started PackMe. PackMee is a start-up company that has made this issue their mission: old clothes that are sent to them go through a control, are then repacked and shipped to countries that need support in their charity system. By creating a new segment in the market of recycling clothes, PackMee set new standards to second hand items and charity work. Taking the treatment of resources into consideration is one of the most important aspects factoring into the development of the concept. Sola explains that reusing items as long as possible because then no new clothes have to be produced. The actual location of the production does not play as big of a role in this question, because whether it is made in Germany or India or anywhere else does not by any means euphemize the fact that resources are needed. So the thought of giving away to charity by taking old clothes to a recycling bank is by far the best option, yet, the items that are thrown into the containers are rarely ever in a useable and especially wearable condition. The damp and moist and oftentimes rotting containers only provide shelter for products that are going to be recycled eventually and rarely ever leave the products in a good shape. And even though the process of recycling is a much better option than throwing fabrics away, downsizing a product is still worse than reusing it.


PackMee now offers the dry, clean, fast and secure version of reusing clothing. The process looks something like this: After sorting out old items from the private clothes, a package is put together with the items and then brought to any post office. From there, the package is shipped to the head office of the company where the items are sorted, the quality is ensured and they are sometimes washed and ironed. The percentage of clothes that can actually worn again is very high due to the circumstances of which the clothes are brought to PackMe e, the way they have been treated before and will be from here on. As a conclusion, the fash-ion items are automatically to be placed in a very different segment than when coming from a recy-cling bin, since they have been treated as wear-able garments and not as pieces of “recyclable trash”. Hence, the “value that we can give to charity after re-selling the pieces is much higher” too, Sola explains. Almost none of the products go into the burning factory, only a small percentage goes into recycling from which cleaning supplies are made and the most part is re-sold. The best pieces that are given to PackMee are sent to Eastern Europe, those in a very good shape are sent to Africa from where they are sold in shops and on markets. The revenue made by those deals is sent to charity straight away. The idea to be active in multiple segments of charity work was developed when Sola wanted to use E-Commerce for a social entrepreneur – and PackMe e re-launched in April. Hopes and plans for 2016 include acceptance in the fashion and

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lifestyle industry and the re-thinking of people to give away products to be re-used and especially re-worn. Since the company is re-launching in spring, the profits are not the number one goal. “We want to establish new beginnings on the market and also get in the first quantities of clothes. At the moment we get around 250 packages a day.” When asked if Sola also practices a sustainable lifestyle personally, he explained that he started sorting his trash early on, using eco-friendly methods of transportation and tries to integrate an eco-friendly and sustainable lifestyle into every part of his day. Speaking about integrating the thought into the every day life, the niche market in the food segment has grown immensely over the last couple of months. Even discount super markets now offer their own lines of eco-friendly and vegan food, Tofu is available in every price segment and the range of fruit and vegetable kinds that are sold has grown immensely. That shows that even a minority of people living a vegan lifestyle can have an influence on the majority of consumerism: Offering to cater those target groups has led to more people demanding fresh food and more transparency in the food segment. The topic of sustainability is definitely a topic of growth for many, even if only around 20-25% of all consumers give thought to changing their habits. Still, the market is worth working on because it has great potential and not lastly because the planet needs us to make some changes. If the re-using segment, including PackMe e, could make up around 2-3% of the market, Sola and his team could celebrate great success. Still, the matter of living consciously is very personal and not only depending on the surroundings in which a person lives, but also their experience, education, attitude and


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maybe even family status. “I think people with kids might live a little more conscious, simply because they are trying to leave a better world behind for their children.” Speaking of the fact that many consumers have not heard of the topic (or, more likely, not put their mind to the it yet), Sola adds that vertical chains like “green clothes” can be very good for the green market. Even though they have been accused of using green washing methods to sell their collections, (which is always counterproductive to the cause), bringing the topic of sustainability to all consumers can only be in favor of the niche. Cooperating with big retail chains is definitely in favor of PackMe e too, because they can inform

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their customers about what to do with the pieces they purchased, or rather with old pieces after they don’t wear them anymore, which is when PackMee comes in the picture. So far, consumers and retailers have been very open minded towards the concept and PackMe e has been able to celebrate successes as well. Still, since the concept is based on giving away 50% of all revenue to charity, the budget for marketing initiatives is small. Therefore, cooperating with chains is a major opportunity for the company. We are very much looking forward to the official re-launch of the company and definitely expecting to hear from Sola and his team again soon!


twentyfivehours

photography & concept by TINA GAUFF, CHRISTINE LIPSKI

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karla wears dress ANNA KANIA COUTURE bra CALVIN KLEIN paulina wears dress TWO KEYS julia wears dress STYLIST OWN leather jacket JN BY JNLLOVET

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laura wears dress ANNA KANIA COUTURE leather jacket JN BY JNLLOVET


gabriel wears eyewear ANDERNE mima wears dress ANNA KANIA COUTURE bra CALVIN KLEIN

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luise wears dress ANNA KANIA COUTURE mima wears dress ANNA KANIA COUTURE frederik wears eyewear WOLFGANG PROKSCH julia wears dress STYLIST OWN -80-


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berit wears dress ANNA KANIA COUTURE ola wears dress ANNA KANIA COUTURE paulina wears dress TWO KEYS eyewear ANDERNE EYEWEAR karla wears dress ANNA KANIA COUTURE bra CALVIN KLEIN -81-

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photography & concept by TINA GAUFF, CHRISTINE LIPSKI production teamleader FLORIAN SOMMER production agency HEYBLEND designer ANNA KANIA COUTURE styling woman by IANI ISKOWIK assistant styling woman by KIMBERLY REICHSTEIN styling man & set design by LEO LODESERTO, SUSANNE KIRCHER hair & make-up by MICHAEL GRÜSS, JENNY MAGDALENA HORDAN, CHRISTINA CRAMER assistant hair & make-up by ANJA JÜPTNER making-of film LAURA MÜLLER light assistant FELIX NÜRMBERGER, PHILIPP STENGELIN, RADOSLAW POLGESEK setrunnner CHRISTINA RUOFF, ANNE SCHWEIGHOFER postproduction by MAXI DE WITT location 25HOURS HOTEL HAFENCITY STARRING LUISE BEFORT, LAURA BERLIN, KARLA KENYA BERIT LASK @ TODAYS MODELS PAULINA K. @ CORE ARTIST MANAGEMENT OLA ZIEMINSKA @ ICONIC MANAGEMENT MIMA TIKVA JULIA KLÖPPER @ LOUISA MODELS GABRIEL HENDRIXX @ PMA ALPHA DIA @ MODELWERK TOM FARRELLY @ KULT MODEL AGENCY MIKE PISHEK @ KULT MODEL AGENCY FREDERIK WILKE @KULT MODEL AGENCY STAN GRIMMER -88-


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SHOW IMPRESSIONS BACKSTAGE IMPRESSIONS

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SHOW IMPRESSIONS View the shows at SUPERIOR MAGAZINE.

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Photos © VIEW FASHION BOOK


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BACKSTAGE IMPRESSIONS Photos by Mariana Valdoleiros

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More fashion on D'OLIVEIRA FASHION BLOG.

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WITCH photography by KIM LANG

styling by DIMITRIS KARAGIANNAKIS makr-up by KATI MERTSCH hair by ANNA BOKRANZ

model LUCY NELSON LEE @ VIVA MODELS LEONIE @ M4 MODELS ANH @ M4 MODELS assistant NICO ERNST styling-assistant GIULIA RICCIOTTI -103-


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vest VINTAGE jewelry VIBE HARSLØF

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vest VINTAGE jewelry VIBE HARSLØF

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cape STYLIST’S OWN

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collar MELAMPO earrings JANE KØNIG

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EXITUS photography by ANDREAS WALDSCHÜTZ hair & make up by STEVEN CAI all outfits by KAI DUNKEL models JASIN CHANG, TIANYI WEN, NICK SUN assistant FARUK PINJO

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March 2014DIGITAL

SUBMIT

Y O U R EDITORIAL -140-73-


MAY 2015 DIGITAL

ONLINE

DIGITAL

PRINT

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EDITORIALS FROM MARCH @ SUPERIOR ONLINE

Florian Grill

»CAPPUCCINO« 

Martin Kretzschmann

»CELESTIAL BODY«  Christina Hasenauer

»CHRONICLE OF A WRITER« 

Trevor Brady

»VULPES RED« 

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MAY 2016

Inken Rauch

»FOREST DAYDREAM«  Tony Ottosson

»HORIZON IN THE MIDDLE OF NOWHERE«  Runxi Wang

»OPTIMIST« 

Kam Wong

»TO YOU, TO ME« 

Cesar Love Alexandre

»THE TOURISTS« 

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MAY 2016

To you, To Me photography by KAM WONG styling by RUBY HUI make-up by LAI WAN hair by WWW models BARBORA V. & BRUNA J. @ QUEST ARTIST AND MODEL first assistant THOMSON YUNG assistant SUN SUN -139-


jacket SUN SUN skirt H&M -140-


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dress ZARA

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total outfit ZARA -147-


total outfit ZARA -148-


MAY 2016

-149-


top H&M -150-


MAY 2016

jacket SUN SUN -151-


top H&M -152-


-153-

top H&M skirt H&M shoes LANECRAWFORD


Magazine for fashion, design, music, art & culture • www.superior-magazine.com

coming out on JUNE 3rd 2016

# JUNE 2016


SUPERIOR MAGAZINE May 2016