Issuu on Google+

ooch Sc Issue No. 20

May 2012

p

M O NTHLY

SPRINGWOOD DISTRICT DOG TRAINING CLUB INC.

Shane Grundy & Hachiko’s Story Our Hachikō, a beautiful German Shepherd, was born 9th March 2009 at Orange NSW to a breeder that was the sister of a family friend.

Dog Friendly places for a Holiday S

ituated in the leafy suburb of Shoal bay and only a 7 minute stroll to the village centre and five minutes drive to the very popular Nelsons Bay, Bali Hai is a very comfortable 3 bedroom house sleeping up to nine people. It’s the ideal place for exploring the Port Stephens Area. Take a Dolphin watch tour, a four wheel driving tour or a boat cruise. Stroll along the seafront or take the dogs to the many dog friendly beaches or one of the walks in the area. The Port Stephens area is famous for it’s attractions for families and couple alike. Shoal Bay Port Stephens. www.shoal-bay.com phone: 0421 510 955

Dog Of The Month? If this photo shows your dog and you claim it at the table by the end of the month from Ella, Leanne or Wally, you can then pick a small gift out of our raffle box.

Prior to the arrival of Chiko our house was filled with the pita patter of 12 paws, there was Bear, a Rottweiler X Shepherd, Bonnie a Rottweiler and Grace our Dalmatian. We lost Bonnie on Boxing Day 2007 and Bear a couple of months after that, a pretty horrible time as many of you would understand. This left Grace the lone dog and she fretted pretty badly, and I missed the companionship of the larger dogs in the yard and around the shed, as Grace was happy in bed or in the house with my wife Samantha. In June 2009 the surprise was unveiled when I was coaxed into a trip to Orange. This is where we first met all the pups. We had the pick of the boys and there were three to choose from. After some time watching them we chose a pup that was extremely calm, easy going and a gorgeous fluff ball. We had to leave him there as I was going overseas for a few weeks. Back home and the next day we were off first thing to get the boy. Prior to his arrival home we had to pick a name, the breeder informed us it had to start with a H so the

DISCLAIMER PLEASE NOTE: News, views and opinions in this newsletter are those of the correspondent’s and not necessarily those of the club, editor, committee and publicity officer. The Springwood District Dog Training club INC reserves the right of rejection of material.

search began. We settled on the name Hachikō. The name was chosen after reading the story of a remarkable dog. Here it is: In 1924, Hachikō was brought to Tokyo by his owner, Hidesaburo Ueno, a professor in the agriculture department at the University of Tokyo. During his owner’s life Hachikō saw him off from the front door and greeted him at the end of the day at the nearby Shibuya rail Station. The pair continued their daily routine until May 1925, when Professor Ueno did not return on the usual train one evening. The professor had suffered a stroke at the university that day. He died and never returned to the train station where his friend was waiting. Hachikō was given away after his master’s death, but he routinely escaped, showing up again and again at his old home. Eventually, Hachikō apparently realized that Professor Ueno no longer lived at the house. So he went to look for his master at the train station where he had accompanied him so many times before. Each day, Hachikō waited for Professor Ueno to return. And each day he did not see his friend among the commuters at the station. The permanent fixture at the train station that was Hachikō attracted the attention of other commuters. Many of the people Continued page 3

Sponsored by

Bill, Ella, Mary-Anne & Mick


Dog’s Delish

SPRINGWOOD DISTRICT DOG TRAINING CLUB INC

August 2011-2012 Annual General Meeting: The AGM for Springwood Dog Training Club was held on the 25th August 2011. We had several new members attend our meeting. It was great to see them and thank you for coming along. Committee for 2012 is: Lynn Olson Vicki Finn Leanne Brown Ella Sweeney Bill & Ella Sweeney Robyn Assar Trevor Mawer Paul Kelly Dorothy Luker Wally Campbell Sarah Visser Ella Sweeney & Lynn Forward Ella Sweeney Nicola Read Ron Amann David Brown Charnie Cameron, Vicki Cooper, John & Gail Cameron, Paul & Maryjka Kelly

Annual General Meeting held at the clubhouse on 23rd August 2012 at 7:30pm. There will be no dog training on that night. Web Site: Email:

SDDTC

Honary Members: Pam Waters, Lesley Piggott.

www.sddtc.org info@sddtc.org

Training Nights at Lomatia Park Agility: Monday 7:30pm Obedience: Thursday 7:30pm Wet weather call Bounce back on 19922767 text dogtraining and you will get a message back whether the oval is open or not.

2nd

Pooch Scoop Monthly

Proud to Sponsor

Dot Luker, Ann Moy, Ron Amann, Wally Campbell.

Sponsored by

500

1 packet of digestive Biscuits

• Mix together • Spead onto a biscuit tray • Cook at 180° for 20 minutes or until golden brown

ELLA’S VERSION mmm... I sent Bill to get me the ingredients for the above recipe he brought back 2 packets of arrowroot biscuits and the 2 sardines so knowing my big girls have a big appetite thought I would just double everything up so I did.

G

Ingredients:

Directions:

2 Packets arrowroot Biscuits

• Mixed it up on a tray and baked… just a wee bit too long?

2 tins of sardines 1 tin mussles

FULL COLOUR

BUSINESS CARDS

$125

Directions:

2 eggs

. PTY . LTD

Life Members:

O GW

OD PRINTIN

Ingredients:

2 tins of sadines

. CO

They will all be working hard for our club and representing you. Remember you are always welcome to attend our club’s General meetings at the Red Cross Hall Springwood on the 3rd Tuesday of the month at 7:30pm. Except December.

SPR IN

President: Vice President: Secretary: Treasurer: Obedience Trial Manager: Obedience Trial Secretary: Agility Trial Manager 2012: Agility Trial Secretary 2012: Trophy Officer: Table Manager Obedience: Table Manager Agility: Shop Manager: Website and Newsletter Co-Ordinator: Chief Instructor Agility Chief Instructor Obedience Sporting Representative General Committee:

THIS IS A TRUE AND TRIED ONE FROM LEANNE BROWN

INCL. GST

8 eggs

• Still when cool my dogs went bananas for them. • Some bits were soft and chewy others crispy and Bill put heaps in the freezer.

“Tip out the bikkies, add the sardines. Boy this is hard work. I could really do with a pair of thumbs right about now. That must be why that Gordon Ramsay guy is always so angry, he hasn’t got any thumbs either.”

• All in all dogs seem to love the fish flavour?

465 Great Western Highway Faulconbridge

4751 6119

Fax 4751 1745 spc@springwoodprinting.com.au

Shane Grundy

Pooch Scoop Monthly

15th


Azdam enterprises pty ltd — trading as

Q’s without A’s

Shane Grundy & Hachiko’s Story continued

• Why do Kamikaze Pilots wear helmets?

who frequented the Shibuya train station had seen Hachikō and Professor Ueno together each day. They brought Hachikō treats and food to nourish him during his wait.

Licensed Motor Repairer 032544

• Whose idea was it to put the letter S in the word Lisp?

Specialists in all Mechanical Repairs

• Why do people say they slept like a baby when babies wake up every few hours?

Les Cooper

Servicing New & Used Cars Rego checks, clutch & Brakes, Electronic Tune Ups Suspension repairs, Electronic Wheel Balancing Exhaust Systems

4732 1716

26 Preston St. Penrith We accept Mastercard Visa & Eftpos

Vehicle safety Checks

• Why do people pay to go up high buildings then use binoculars to look down at things on the ground?

Have you looked on the back page to see if a photo of your dog is on it?

This continued for 10 years, with Hachikō appearing only in the evening time, precisely when the train was due at the station. That same year, another of Ueno’s faithful students (who had become something of an expert on the Akita breed) saw the dog at the station and followed him to the Kobayashi home where he learned the history of Hachikō’s life.

Teachers and parents used Hachikō’s vigil as an example for children to follow. A well-known Japanese artist rendered a sculpture of the dog, and throughout the country a new awareness of the Akita breed grew. Eventually, Hachikō’s legendary faithfulness became a national symbol of loyalty. Chiko is now three and has just began to do obedience trials, his first trial was at Erskine Park in the CCD ring, he did well with a second place, I was extremely happy and proud of my little mate.

Shortly after this meeting, the former student published a documented census of Akitas in Japan. His research found only 30 purebred Akitas remaining, including Hachikō from Shibuya Station. Professor Ueno’s former student returned frequently to visit the dog and over the years published several articles about Hachikō’s remarkable loyalty. In 1932 one of these articles, published in Tokyo’s largest newspaper, threw the dog into the national spotlight. Hachikō became a national sensation. His faithfulness to his master’s memory impressed the people of Japan as a spirit of family loyalty all should strive to achieve.

Big Win BIG WIN AT THE ROYAL EASTER SHOW IN SYDNEY 2012 IN AGILITY Congratulations to Nicola Read and her dyamic duo her dogs Coogee & Puzzel they were both entered in the Masters Jumping and Puzzel came 1st and Coogee came 2nd wow great work from both the boy’s and Nicola what a great effort we are all proud of you. Ella Sweeney OAM

Nicola in action with one of the boys

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Schnauzer

Upcoming Events A

s I mentioned last month the next big event is our Obedience Trial held in July. We will be happy to get some names from members who would like to help out in some way, from Stewarding to just helping with morning tea etc.

Schnauzers are Friendly Yet loyal and True But we like to be spoiled

Anyone interested in helping please either send me your details at ella.sweeney@ bigpond.com or give Bill Sweeney your name and phone number at training, we appreciate it very much.

And doted on too! An ideal pet. Wherever you live…

If you have a dog you want to enter as well that’s fine too. Just bring or borrow a crate for your dog for when you are working.

We’re great little friends With so much love to give

If you need one we need to have names and numbers as we have lunch catered for all judges and helpers .

Greeting Cards,

Hand Made

Birthday, Wedding, Anniversary, Get Well, Sympathy, Births, Deaths, New Home, Bon Voyage, Christmas etc

Includes Verse and Envelope Enquiries: sofalegs@ozemail.com.au or see Lynn on Training nights.

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Sent in by Vicki Finn

Sponsored by

Greeting Cards G Hand Made 

Don Holland Automotive

Sponsored by

Kate and Tyson

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Obedience & Agility Results

Members Shop

• Dot Luker and Leah did very well with Leah coming 2nd in the novice ring. She was also the first dog in our club to get her first pass in Rally O… good on you both.

A

• A new kid off the block is Chiko a German Shepherd and Shane his master who went into their first Trial last weekend and came 2nd on 90 points. The dog who got 1st only beat him by 1 point, keep up the good work Shane… and Chiko too of course

To the new members my name is Ella Sweeney; both I and Lyn Forwood run the shop. If the table is not set up just ask your instructor or Wally at the sign in table. I might not be there very often for a wee while as I have had a shoulder replacement and tendon fixed and will have my left arm in a sling for a while but just ask if you want anything?

s many of you know, we have a small shop (table) and sell many items at low prices to our members. Things like leads, collars, halti’s and treats as well as pigs ears.

• At Mid Week Trial on 25/4/2012 Marla came 1st in Judith Walders UD Ring on 188 points

Leah

SOME CLUB SHOP TABLE ITEMS

• Royal Bathurst on 27/4/2012 Marla came 1st again in Charlie Giles UD Ring on 190 points • At Northern Suburbs Marla came 2nd in Vicki Etheringtons UDX Ring on 185 points On the same day Marla came 2nd in Vicki’s UD Ring on 185 points so happy with that.

Chicko

ch in

the

Po

Marla

Pa n t r y

May B’days V. Finn

Pepper

20th May

Bryce

Bundy

25th May

Have you tried our delicious meaty training treats & cookies?

Pooch in the Pantry Email: richard@poochinthepantry.com.au

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$10.00

Dumbell Holders

$6.00

Scent Discrimination Articles

$20.00 (plain)

Scent Discrimination Articles

$25.00 (merle)

Set White Leathers

$10.00 (set of 3)

Dogs NSW Agility Rule Book

$5.00 (set of 2)

Cold Drinks In Fridge

$1.00 each

Long 20 Metre Dog Leads

$20.00 each

“Can I get a cushion.”

Advertising Charges ¼ page is $10.00 per month ½ page is $15.00 per month

• They have a big meaty taste that dogs can’t resist. • Our locally produced treats contain 50% Australian meat and use human quality natural ingredients. • Provide nutritional balance suited for Dogs, including 25% protein

www.poochinthepantry.com.au

Dumbells Various Sizes

Closed at the t momen

Please contact Ella at ella.sweeney@bigpond.com

Wet Weather Exemptions W “All I’m saying is, if one of your balloons pop, I’ll make the mess but you’ll be cleaning it up.”

Sponsored by

Annette & Tully

e have been given an exemption to train during wet weather in certain circumstances? If it has been dry at Lomatia Park while raining further up the mountain or when the message on the council phone number is an old one we may send a text message to 19922767 with Dog Training in subject area and a company called Bounce Back will then tell you if we can use the oval that night the call will cost 55 cents.

Sponsored by

Mary, Harry & Chelsea

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The Australian Cattle Dog T

he Australian Cattle Dog is the outcome of a deliberate breeding programme. Various dogs with specific abilities were crossbred over a period of 60 years. During the 1830’s a collie type dog was crossed with the native wild Dingo. The result was a dog, called Timmon’s Biters, that barked less and was better at driving the herds. In the 1840’s 2 blue-merle smooth coated collies were crossed with the Dingo, the best of the resulting litter were kept. These dogs were known as Hall’s Heelers. Timmon’s Biters, Hall’s Heelers and Dingos were used in further breeding experiments. One experiment involved a male Dingo being bred with a blue merle collie. A Dalmatian was then introduced which made the breed good with horses but not as good at herding. The Bull Terrier was then added but made the dogs too rough so they were bred out. They can still be seen, ever so slightly, in the AuCaDo of today, in their head shape and temperament. Later on the black and tan was added, this reintroduced the original herding capabilities. This was the final dog to be used in the breeding programme and the AuCaDo has been bred true since 1893.

Dogs of great stamina and endurance, Australian Cattle Dogs are a picture of strength and agility, with intense watchful eyes. They are compact and symmetrical and should look wellmuscled, with a double coat. The undercoat is smooth, short and dense; the outer coat is hard, straight and weather resistant. They move freely and tirelessly with powerful drive from the hindquarters and are capable of quick and sudden actions. The only colours in this breed are blue and red-speckle with black, tan, red or blue markings on the head. Australian Cattle Dogs will live to 14 years of age. Australian Cattle Dogs are very intelligent and eager to work and learn, making them very easy to train. However, temperament changes through adolescence are common, especially a lack of selfconfidence, and so owners must be consistent and reassuring at these times. This breed needs copious amounts of exercise to keep it in good physical and mental condition. Competition work, as in agility trials, would be ideal. As puppies, the breed experience a rapid growth rate between the age of 9 to 12 months and during this period exercise may have to be adjusted.

The Mystery Mutt

by Lynn Olsen

MEMBERS’ GUESSING COMPETITION No. 20

Who am I

Using an amalgamation of different breeds, a German created the breed in the late 19th century. It is said that he used Rottweilers and Great Danes for their size and strength, Greyhounds for their speed and Manchester Terriers for the sleek coat and graceful outline, as well as the terrier tenacity. Other breeds, which may have contributed to the breed include Schnauzers, German Pinschers, German Shepherds, German Shorthaired Pointers and Weimaraners. The first dog was registered in the German studbook in 1893. Herr Louis died shortly thereafter and Otto Goeller and Philip Gruening took up the cultivation of the breed. During the first World War, the breed suffered along with the rest of the country. By the end of the war, the few dogs left were either going to be eaten or put down as no one could afford to keep them. However, American servicemen had grown fond of the breed and took several home.. The breed club in the U.S. was formed in 1921. The breed was first classified as a terrier and was seen as derivative of the Manchester Terrier (in that time, a much bigger dog than the Manchester Terrier we know today.) During World War II, the U.S. Marines used these dogs when they went ashore to flush out the enemy. This earned them the nickname, Devil Dog, and many people today are still intimidated by the breed. It was after WWII that the breed became known in England, with the breed club forming in 1948, primarily at the instigation of the Curnows, a couple dedicated to establishing the breed in England. The Curnows, using the kennel name of Tavey, started with European stock but later decided the American dogs were more elegant and larger and started their breeding programme again. This is a moderately large, powerful, yet still elegant animal. The coat is smooth and short and can come in various colours with tan markings. This dog appears to be square in the body, they are built for endurance and speed. Dogs measure between 68 to 72cms at the withers and bitches measure between 63 to 68cms.They should weigh between 32 to 45kgs. These dogs are very intelligent with a strong desire to please. They do need to know who is the boss and will bond very closely with the family. They can become a one-man-dog. They do have the fiery temper of the terrier and many can be quite excitable. Owners need to be firm and consistent with the training.These dogs should be given plenty of socialisation and training from a very early age. If you have had little experience of dog training then this breed is not the dog for you.

WHO AM I? Last months dog was a Miniature Schnauzer

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Sponsored by

Lynn Olson

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My Digger, Barker, Chewer & Escape Artist

New Members for April 2012

Do you own a DIGGER, a BARKER, a CHEWER or an ESCAPE ARTIST then we may have a solution to your problem.

Sean Lavlika

Rachel O’Loughlin

Jenny kennerson

Maricia Gold

Nathan Brown

Julie Vassallo

Paulette Edwards

Greg Parkes

Sarah Herbert

The KONG could be the answer for any of the above problems. Kongs come in a variety of shapes and sizes, but essentially they are a device or toy made from very durable, dishwasher and microwave safe rubber, and they normally have a hole through the centre. These features are what make the Kong a very valuable training tool. All you need is a dog who loves food and you can keep him amused for hours with a Kong. It is important to choose the correct sized Kong for your dog. Too large, and your dog will have trouble getting his teeth around it, too small and your dog may choke. Kongs come in small, medium, large, extra large and king sized. Small is designed for toy breeds (small terriers, chihuahua, toy poodle, etc) medium is for small breeds (jack Russell, pug, sheltie), large for medium sized, fine boned or short jawed breeds (collie, boxer, standard poodle). Extra large is for medium to large breeds (golden retriever, dalmation, samoyed) and King Kongs are designed for large dogs with strong jaws such as german shepherds, mastiffs and great dane, etc. As individuals within a breed can vary in size be sure to discuss what is the right size Kong at your place of purchase. Next thing to consider is the style of Kong you choose. There are a number of types including one with a rope attached which is great for playing fetch. The most popular style of Kong is shaped something like a snowman with a small hole at the top and a large hole at the bottom. This is the most versatile shape and the one I assume you are working with the recipes below. To make the Kong irresistible simply fill it with food and hand it to your dog as a challenge. The easiest method is to stuff the Kong when preparing the dogs nightly meal. Put something dry in the small end, such as liver treats, biscuit pieces or doggy chocolates for dessert, then stuff the rest of the Kong with your dogs normal meal e.g. meat and vegetables. The dog gets the remainder of the food for dinner and the Kong goes into the fridge or freezer for the night. In the morning when you leave for work, etc., doggy gets a Kong and your garden beds get a rest from your digger….HOPEFULLY

MORE SUGGESTIONS Vege Kong – Microwave mixed veges then mash, or use leftovers from dinner (no onion or potato). Put a layer of dry treats in the small end of the Kong, stuff the rest with mashed veges, sprinkle cheese over the end and

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Pooch Scoop Monthly

microwave for 20 seconds, give to your dog once the cheese is cold and has set to form a plug. If you don’t think your dog will go for this vegetarian version, you can mix in some meat such as sausage or steak chunks. Kibble Kong – If you feed your dog dry kibble then try this. First plug the small end with something like melted cheese, peanut butter or cream cheese. Fill the Kong with dry kibble then pour water, or better still, beef or chicken stock in the Kong until it is full. Keeping upright, place the Kong in the freezer overnight and in the morning – INSTANT KONGSICLE.

Things We Get Up Too

Tuti Frutti – If your dog has a sweet tooth – fill the Kong with small pieces of cut fruit then either plug the end with mashed banana or fill with water or juice and freeze. Remember to plug the small end if you are going to fill the Kong with liquid. Speedy Kong – No time in the morning – Fastest Kong in the West – Simply stuff a chicken wing into the Kong and give it to your dog. Be sure to place the wing in such a way that it’s going to be difficult for your dog to get it out. At first you will find it may take your dog many hours to empty the Kong, but over time he will become more efficient, so it is up to you to make the stuffing more difficult to remove. Packing the food tighter, using soft foods all the way through the Kong and freezing are all strategies that will make the Kong harder to empty. How often you give your dog a Kong depends on how many Kongs you have. But remember, if your dog is getting a Kong everyday, you will probably need to reduce his nightly meal. Better still feed your dog his nightly meal in the Kong. If your Kong is the right size for your dog, his nightly meal should fit into approximately two or three Kongs. By keeping all Kongs loaded and feeding one in the morning and one in the afternoon/evening, you will ensure hours of work and entertainment for your dog. It is easy to see now why the Kong is a valuable training tool. This device trains your dog while you are away by rewarding him with food for keeping himself occupied with an acceptable activity. A dog that spends three hours getting a treat has little time for digging, barking, chewing or escaping. Give it a try and your dog will thank you.

“Please let us out, we promise to be good.”

“They wont miss this. Yummy!”

Great Website for Dog Lovers T

he Pug photo is from the “Dog Articles” page as seen on the great “Dog Deals Direct” website at: www.dogdealsdirect. com.au a great website to find dog product with a free “Ask the Vet” service. You can ask a question of Dr Carl a Queensland Veterinarian who has a huge interest in dogs.

Dog Quote of the Month The dog was especially created for children he is the god of frolic

Information for this article was taken from Springwood District Dog Club Fact Sheets.

Sponsored by

Vicki Finn ,Misty & Pepper

Henry Ward Beecher

Pooch Scoop Monthly

7th


Springwood District Dog Training Club Inc

8 th

Pooch Scoop Monthly

Sponsored by

Hon David Brown (Patron)

Sponsored by

Hon David Brown (Patron)

Anzac Day 2012

Pooch Scoop Monthly

9th


Springwood District Dog Training Club Inc

8 th

Pooch Scoop Monthly

Sponsored by

Hon David Brown (Patron)

Sponsored by

Hon David Brown (Patron)

Anzac Day 2012

Pooch Scoop Monthly

9th


My Digger, Barker, Chewer & Escape Artist

New Members for April 2012

Do you own a DIGGER, a BARKER, a CHEWER or an ESCAPE ARTIST then we may have a solution to your problem.

Sean Lavlika

Rachel O’Loughlin

Jenny kennerson

Maricia Gold

Nathan Brown

Julie Vassallo

Paulette Edwards

Greg Parkes

Sarah Herbert

The KONG could be the answer for any of the above problems. Kongs come in a variety of shapes and sizes, but essentially they are a device or toy made from very durable, dishwasher and microwave safe rubber, and they normally have a hole through the centre. These features are what make the Kong a very valuable training tool. All you need is a dog who loves food and you can keep him amused for hours with a Kong. It is important to choose the correct sized Kong for your dog. Too large, and your dog will have trouble getting his teeth around it, too small and your dog may choke. Kongs come in small, medium, large, extra large and king sized. Small is designed for toy breeds (small terriers, chihuahua, toy poodle, etc) medium is for small breeds (jack Russell, pug, sheltie), large for medium sized, fine boned or short jawed breeds (collie, boxer, standard poodle). Extra large is for medium to large breeds (golden retriever, dalmation, samoyed) and King Kongs are designed for large dogs with strong jaws such as german shepherds, mastiffs and great dane, etc. As individuals within a breed can vary in size be sure to discuss what is the right size Kong at your place of purchase. Next thing to consider is the style of Kong you choose. There are a number of types including one with a rope attached which is great for playing fetch. The most popular style of Kong is shaped something like a snowman with a small hole at the top and a large hole at the bottom. This is the most versatile shape and the one I assume you are working with the recipes below. To make the Kong irresistible simply fill it with food and hand it to your dog as a challenge. The easiest method is to stuff the Kong when preparing the dogs nightly meal. Put something dry in the small end, such as liver treats, biscuit pieces or doggy chocolates for dessert, then stuff the rest of the Kong with your dogs normal meal e.g. meat and vegetables. The dog gets the remainder of the food for dinner and the Kong goes into the fridge or freezer for the night. In the morning when you leave for work, etc., doggy gets a Kong and your garden beds get a rest from your digger….HOPEFULLY

MORE SUGGESTIONS Vege Kong – Microwave mixed veges then mash, or use leftovers from dinner (no onion or potato). Put a layer of dry treats in the small end of the Kong, stuff the rest with mashed veges, sprinkle cheese over the end and

10th

Pooch Scoop Monthly

microwave for 20 seconds, give to your dog once the cheese is cold and has set to form a plug. If you don’t think your dog will go for this vegetarian version, you can mix in some meat such as sausage or steak chunks. Kibble Kong – If you feed your dog dry kibble then try this. First plug the small end with something like melted cheese, peanut butter or cream cheese. Fill the Kong with dry kibble then pour water, or better still, beef or chicken stock in the Kong until it is full. Keeping upright, place the Kong in the freezer overnight and in the morning – INSTANT KONGSICLE.

Things We Get Up Too

Tuti Frutti – If your dog has a sweet tooth – fill the Kong with small pieces of cut fruit then either plug the end with mashed banana or fill with water or juice and freeze. Remember to plug the small end if you are going to fill the Kong with liquid. Speedy Kong – No time in the morning – Fastest Kong in the West – Simply stuff a chicken wing into the Kong and give it to your dog. Be sure to place the wing in such a way that it’s going to be difficult for your dog to get it out. At first you will find it may take your dog many hours to empty the Kong, but over time he will become more efficient, so it is up to you to make the stuffing more difficult to remove. Packing the food tighter, using soft foods all the way through the Kong and freezing are all strategies that will make the Kong harder to empty. How often you give your dog a Kong depends on how many Kongs you have. But remember, if your dog is getting a Kong everyday, you will probably need to reduce his nightly meal. Better still feed your dog his nightly meal in the Kong. If your Kong is the right size for your dog, his nightly meal should fit into approximately two or three Kongs. By keeping all Kongs loaded and feeding one in the morning and one in the afternoon/evening, you will ensure hours of work and entertainment for your dog. It is easy to see now why the Kong is a valuable training tool. This device trains your dog while you are away by rewarding him with food for keeping himself occupied with an acceptable activity. A dog that spends three hours getting a treat has little time for digging, barking, chewing or escaping. Give it a try and your dog will thank you.

“Please let us out, we promise to be good.”

“They wont miss this. Yummy!”

Great Website for Dog Lovers T

he Pug photo is from the “Dog Articles” page as seen on the great “Dog Deals Direct” website at: www.dogdealsdirect. com.au a great website to find dog product with a free “Ask the Vet” service. You can ask a question of Dr Carl a Queensland Veterinarian who has a huge interest in dogs.

Dog Quote of the Month The dog was especially created for children he is the god of frolic

Information for this article was taken from Springwood District Dog Club Fact Sheets.

Sponsored by

Vicki Finn ,Misty & Pepper

Henry Ward Beecher

Pooch Scoop Monthly

7th


The Australian Cattle Dog T

he Australian Cattle Dog is the outcome of a deliberate breeding programme. Various dogs with specific abilities were crossbred over a period of 60 years. During the 1830’s a collie type dog was crossed with the native wild Dingo. The result was a dog, called Timmon’s Biters, that barked less and was better at driving the herds. In the 1840’s 2 blue-merle smooth coated collies were crossed with the Dingo, the best of the resulting litter were kept. These dogs were known as Hall’s Heelers. Timmon’s Biters, Hall’s Heelers and Dingos were used in further breeding experiments. One experiment involved a male Dingo being bred with a blue merle collie. A Dalmatian was then introduced which made the breed good with horses but not as good at herding. The Bull Terrier was then added but made the dogs too rough so they were bred out. They can still be seen, ever so slightly, in the AuCaDo of today, in their head shape and temperament. Later on the black and tan was added, this reintroduced the original herding capabilities. This was the final dog to be used in the breeding programme and the AuCaDo has been bred true since 1893.

Dogs of great stamina and endurance, Australian Cattle Dogs are a picture of strength and agility, with intense watchful eyes. They are compact and symmetrical and should look wellmuscled, with a double coat. The undercoat is smooth, short and dense; the outer coat is hard, straight and weather resistant. They move freely and tirelessly with powerful drive from the hindquarters and are capable of quick and sudden actions. The only colours in this breed are blue and red-speckle with black, tan, red or blue markings on the head. Australian Cattle Dogs will live to 14 years of age. Australian Cattle Dogs are very intelligent and eager to work and learn, making them very easy to train. However, temperament changes through adolescence are common, especially a lack of selfconfidence, and so owners must be consistent and reassuring at these times. This breed needs copious amounts of exercise to keep it in good physical and mental condition. Competition work, as in agility trials, would be ideal. As puppies, the breed experience a rapid growth rate between the age of 9 to 12 months and during this period exercise may have to be adjusted.

The Mystery Mutt

by Lynn Olsen

MEMBERS’ GUESSING COMPETITION No. 20

Who am I

Using an amalgamation of different breeds, a German created the breed in the late 19th century. It is said that he used Rottweilers and Great Danes for their size and strength, Greyhounds for their speed and Manchester Terriers for the sleek coat and graceful outline, as well as the terrier tenacity. Other breeds, which may have contributed to the breed include Schnauzers, German Pinschers, German Shepherds, German Shorthaired Pointers and Weimaraners. The first dog was registered in the German studbook in 1893. Herr Louis died shortly thereafter and Otto Goeller and Philip Gruening took up the cultivation of the breed. During the first World War, the breed suffered along with the rest of the country. By the end of the war, the few dogs left were either going to be eaten or put down as no one could afford to keep them. However, American servicemen had grown fond of the breed and took several home.. The breed club in the U.S. was formed in 1921. The breed was first classified as a terrier and was seen as derivative of the Manchester Terrier (in that time, a much bigger dog than the Manchester Terrier we know today.) During World War II, the U.S. Marines used these dogs when they went ashore to flush out the enemy. This earned them the nickname, Devil Dog, and many people today are still intimidated by the breed. It was after WWII that the breed became known in England, with the breed club forming in 1948, primarily at the instigation of the Curnows, a couple dedicated to establishing the breed in England. The Curnows, using the kennel name of Tavey, started with European stock but later decided the American dogs were more elegant and larger and started their breeding programme again. This is a moderately large, powerful, yet still elegant animal. The coat is smooth and short and can come in various colours with tan markings. This dog appears to be square in the body, they are built for endurance and speed. Dogs measure between 68 to 72cms at the withers and bitches measure between 63 to 68cms.They should weigh between 32 to 45kgs. These dogs are very intelligent with a strong desire to please. They do need to know who is the boss and will bond very closely with the family. They can become a one-man-dog. They do have the fiery temper of the terrier and many can be quite excitable. Owners need to be firm and consistent with the training.These dogs should be given plenty of socialisation and training from a very early age. If you have had little experience of dog training then this breed is not the dog for you.

WHO AM I? Last months dog was a Miniature Schnauzer

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Obedience & Agility Results

Members Shop

• Dot Luker and Leah did very well with Leah coming 2nd in the novice ring. She was also the first dog in our club to get her first pass in Rally O… good on you both.

A

• A new kid off the block is Chiko a German Shepherd and Shane his master who went into their first Trial last weekend and came 2nd on 90 points. The dog who got 1st only beat him by 1 point, keep up the good work Shane… and Chiko too of course

To the new members my name is Ella Sweeney; both I and Lyn Forwood run the shop. If the table is not set up just ask your instructor or Wally at the sign in table. I might not be there very often for a wee while as I have had a shoulder replacement and tendon fixed and will have my left arm in a sling for a while but just ask if you want anything?

s many of you know, we have a small shop (table) and sell many items at low prices to our members. Things like leads, collars, halti’s and treats as well as pigs ears.

• At Mid Week Trial on 25/4/2012 Marla came 1st in Judith Walders UD Ring on 188 points

Leah

SOME CLUB SHOP TABLE ITEMS

• Royal Bathurst on 27/4/2012 Marla came 1st again in Charlie Giles UD Ring on 190 points • At Northern Suburbs Marla came 2nd in Vicki Etheringtons UDX Ring on 185 points On the same day Marla came 2nd in Vicki’s UD Ring on 185 points so happy with that.

Chicko

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Pa n t r y

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“Can I get a cushion.”

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• They have a big meaty taste that dogs can’t resist. • Our locally produced treats contain 50% Australian meat and use human quality natural ingredients. • Provide nutritional balance suited for Dogs, including 25% protein

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Dumbells Various Sizes

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Please contact Ella at ella.sweeney@bigpond.com

Wet Weather Exemptions W “All I’m saying is, if one of your balloons pop, I’ll make the mess but you’ll be cleaning it up.”

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Annette & Tully

e have been given an exemption to train during wet weather in certain circumstances? If it has been dry at Lomatia Park while raining further up the mountain or when the message on the council phone number is an old one we may send a text message to 19922767 with Dog Training in subject area and a company called Bounce Back will then tell you if we can use the oval that night the call will cost 55 cents.

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Upcoming Events A

s I mentioned last month the next big event is our Obedience Trial held in July. We will be happy to get some names from members who would like to help out in some way, from Stewarding to just helping with morning tea etc.

Schnauzers are Friendly Yet loyal and True But we like to be spoiled

Anyone interested in helping please either send me your details at ella.sweeney@ bigpond.com or give Bill Sweeney your name and phone number at training, we appreciate it very much.

And doted on too! An ideal pet. Wherever you live…

If you have a dog you want to enter as well that’s fine too. Just bring or borrow a crate for your dog for when you are working.

We’re great little friends With so much love to give

If you need one we need to have names and numbers as we have lunch catered for all judges and helpers .

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Includes Verse and Envelope Enquiries: sofalegs@ozemail.com.au or see Lynn on Training nights.

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Q’s without A’s

Shane Grundy & Hachiko’s Story continued

• Why do Kamikaze Pilots wear helmets?

who frequented the Shibuya train station had seen Hachikō and Professor Ueno together each day. They brought Hachikō treats and food to nourish him during his wait.

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Vehicle safety Checks

• Why do people pay to go up high buildings then use binoculars to look down at things on the ground?

Have you looked on the back page to see if a photo of your dog is on it?

This continued for 10 years, with Hachikō appearing only in the evening time, precisely when the train was due at the station. That same year, another of Ueno’s faithful students (who had become something of an expert on the Akita breed) saw the dog at the station and followed him to the Kobayashi home where he learned the history of Hachikō’s life.

Teachers and parents used Hachikō’s vigil as an example for children to follow. A well-known Japanese artist rendered a sculpture of the dog, and throughout the country a new awareness of the Akita breed grew. Eventually, Hachikō’s legendary faithfulness became a national symbol of loyalty. Chiko is now three and has just began to do obedience trials, his first trial was at Erskine Park in the CCD ring, he did well with a second place, I was extremely happy and proud of my little mate.

Shortly after this meeting, the former student published a documented census of Akitas in Japan. His research found only 30 purebred Akitas remaining, including Hachikō from Shibuya Station. Professor Ueno’s former student returned frequently to visit the dog and over the years published several articles about Hachikō’s remarkable loyalty. In 1932 one of these articles, published in Tokyo’s largest newspaper, threw the dog into the national spotlight. Hachikō became a national sensation. His faithfulness to his master’s memory impressed the people of Japan as a spirit of family loyalty all should strive to achieve.

Big Win BIG WIN AT THE ROYAL EASTER SHOW IN SYDNEY 2012 IN AGILITY Congratulations to Nicola Read and her dyamic duo her dogs Coogee & Puzzel they were both entered in the Masters Jumping and Puzzel came 1st and Coogee came 2nd wow great work from both the boy’s and Nicola what a great effort we are all proud of you. Ella Sweeney OAM

Nicola in action with one of the boys

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Dog’s Delish

SPRINGWOOD DISTRICT DOG TRAINING CLUB INC

August 2011-2012 Annual General Meeting: The AGM for Springwood Dog Training Club was held on the 25th August 2011. We had several new members attend our meeting. It was great to see them and thank you for coming along. Committee for 2012 is: Lynn Olson Vicki Finn Leanne Brown Ella Sweeney Bill & Ella Sweeney Robyn Assar Trevor Mawer Paul Kelly Dorothy Luker Wally Campbell Sarah Visser Ella Sweeney & Lynn Forward Ella Sweeney Nicola Read Ron Amann David Brown Charnie Cameron, Vicki Cooper, John & Gail Cameron, Paul & Maryjka Kelly

Annual General Meeting held at the clubhouse on 23rd August 2012 at 7:30pm. There will be no dog training on that night. Web Site: Email:

SDDTC

Honary Members: Pam Waters, Lesley Piggott.

www.sddtc.org info@sddtc.org

Training Nights at Lomatia Park Agility: Monday 7:30pm Obedience: Thursday 7:30pm Wet weather call Bounce back on 19922767 text dogtraining and you will get a message back whether the oval is open or not.

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Proud to Sponsor

Dot Luker, Ann Moy, Ron Amann, Wally Campbell.

Sponsored by

500

1 packet of digestive Biscuits

• Mix together • Spead onto a biscuit tray • Cook at 180° for 20 minutes or until golden brown

ELLA’S VERSION mmm... I sent Bill to get me the ingredients for the above recipe he brought back 2 packets of arrowroot biscuits and the 2 sardines so knowing my big girls have a big appetite thought I would just double everything up so I did.

G

Ingredients:

Directions:

2 Packets arrowroot Biscuits

• Mixed it up on a tray and baked… just a wee bit too long?

2 tins of sardines 1 tin mussles

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$125

Directions:

2 eggs

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They will all be working hard for our club and representing you. Remember you are always welcome to attend our club’s General meetings at the Red Cross Hall Springwood on the 3rd Tuesday of the month at 7:30pm. Except December.

SPR IN

President: Vice President: Secretary: Treasurer: Obedience Trial Manager: Obedience Trial Secretary: Agility Trial Manager 2012: Agility Trial Secretary 2012: Trophy Officer: Table Manager Obedience: Table Manager Agility: Shop Manager: Website and Newsletter Co-Ordinator: Chief Instructor Agility Chief Instructor Obedience Sporting Representative General Committee:

THIS IS A TRUE AND TRIED ONE FROM LEANNE BROWN

INCL. GST

8 eggs

• Still when cool my dogs went bananas for them. • Some bits were soft and chewy others crispy and Bill put heaps in the freezer.

“Tip out the bikkies, add the sardines. Boy this is hard work. I could really do with a pair of thumbs right about now. That must be why that Gordon Ramsay guy is always so angry, he hasn’t got any thumbs either.”

• All in all dogs seem to love the fish flavour?

465 Great Western Highway Faulconbridge

4751 6119

Fax 4751 1745 spc@springwoodprinting.com.au

Shane Grundy

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ooch Sc Issue No. 20

May 2012

p

M O NTHLY

SPRINGWOOD DISTRICT DOG TRAINING CLUB INC.

Shane Grundy & Hachiko’s Story Our Hachikō, a beautiful German Shepherd, was born 9th March 2009 at Orange NSW to a breeder that was the sister of a family friend.

Dog Friendly places for a Holiday S

ituated in the leafy suburb of Shoal bay and only a 7 minute stroll to the village centre and five minutes drive to the very popular Nelsons Bay, Bali Hai is a very comfortable 3 bedroom house sleeping up to nine people. It’s the ideal place for exploring the Port Stephens Area. Take a Dolphin watch tour, a four wheel driving tour or a boat cruise. Stroll along the seafront or take the dogs to the many dog friendly beaches or one of the walks in the area. The Port Stephens area is famous for it’s attractions for families and couple alike. Shoal Bay Port Stephens. www.shoal-bay.com phone: 0421 510 955

Dog Of The Month? If this photo shows your dog and you claim it at the table by the end of the month from Ella, Leanne or Wally, you can then pick a small gift out of our raffle box.

Prior to the arrival of Chiko our house was filled with the pita patter of 12 paws, there was Bear, a Rottweiler X Shepherd, Bonnie a Rottweiler and Grace our Dalmatian. We lost Bonnie on Boxing Day 2007 and Bear a couple of months after that, a pretty horrible time as many of you would understand. This left Grace the lone dog and she fretted pretty badly, and I missed the companionship of the larger dogs in the yard and around the shed, as Grace was happy in bed or in the house with my wife Samantha. In June 2009 the surprise was unveiled when I was coaxed into a trip to Orange. This is where we first met all the pups. We had the pick of the boys and there were three to choose from. After some time watching them we chose a pup that was extremely calm, easy going and a gorgeous fluff ball. We had to leave him there as I was going overseas for a few weeks. Back home and the next day we were off first thing to get the boy. Prior to his arrival home we had to pick a name, the breeder informed us it had to start with a H so the

DISCLAIMER PLEASE NOTE: News, views and opinions in this newsletter are those of the correspondent’s and not necessarily those of the club, editor, committee and publicity officer. The Springwood District Dog Training club INC reserves the right of rejection of material.

search began. We settled on the name Hachikō. The name was chosen after reading the story of a remarkable dog. Here it is: In 1924, Hachikō was brought to Tokyo by his owner, Hidesaburo Ueno, a professor in the agriculture department at the University of Tokyo. During his owner’s life Hachikō saw him off from the front door and greeted him at the end of the day at the nearby Shibuya rail Station. The pair continued their daily routine until May 1925, when Professor Ueno did not return on the usual train one evening. The professor had suffered a stroke at the university that day. He died and never returned to the train station where his friend was waiting. Hachikō was given away after his master’s death, but he routinely escaped, showing up again and again at his old home. Eventually, Hachikō apparently realized that Professor Ueno no longer lived at the house. So he went to look for his master at the train station where he had accompanied him so many times before. Each day, Hachikō waited for Professor Ueno to return. And each day he did not see his friend among the commuters at the station. The permanent fixture at the train station that was Hachikō attracted the attention of other commuters. Many of the people Continued page 3

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Pooch Scoop May 2012