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father’s day sportsjam. be there

vol. 2. issue 25

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Pg. 48

endure | excel | achieve

June 9, 2011

California

attack force marin catholic surges. Pg. 34

State track Urban star goes distance. Pg. 16

Wilson gets her title. Pg. 18

FINDING OZZY

s Palo Alto basebaorll’y redemption st Pg. 24

forget rebuilding. casa roble wins fifth sjs crown. Pg. 20


all access

Palo alto’s first CCS baseball title couldn’t have been scripted any better. Page 24

NorCal puts its share of athletes on the podium at state track. Pages 16, 18

First Pitch ��������������������������������������������������������������� 6 Behind the Clipboard ������������������������������������������ 7 Locker Room......................................................... 8 AAA SportStar of the Week............................. 11 Club Scene ����������������������������������������������������������� 12 Wally’s World ������������������������������������������������������ 14 Training Time ������������������������������������������������������� 28 TriStars.................................................................. 30 Health Watch ������������������������������������������������������ 33 Tee2Green ����������������������������������������������������������� 36 Impulse.................................................................. 38 Camps + Clinics ������������������������������������������������� 40 Photo Finish ��������������������������������������������������������� 46

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ON THE COVER

Gaby Chagolla and Case Roble-Orangevale notch first SJS title. Page 20. PHOTO BY JAMES K. LEASH

Marin Catholic-Kentfield’s young offense, veteran defense perfect mix for an NCs crown. Page 34

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Coming in August 2011: The quest for the SportStars Cup

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1000 — For a team state championship. occer has the World Cup. The NHL There are a few details that would need has the Stanley Cup. Hogwarts School to be ironed out. For instance, how we of Witchcraft and Wizardry has the would treat schools which only feature House Cup. boys or girls sports. Because, obviously, So naturally, SportStars wants a cup. And those schools have only half the teams as if we had one, this is the time of year we’d coed high schools. However, rest assured, be awarding it. we’d figure it out. This is a real idea. We’re serious. The Now, let’s say your school is awarded the SportStars Cup needs to be more than Cup. fantasy. It has to happen. If I have any pull Here are some of the things that we’d around here, it will happen. And when it undoubtedly expect you to do with it. does, this is my vision: The SportStars Cup ■ Display it proudly it all major sporting competition will be one that runs the length events on your campus (a given, right?) of the high school sports season, with each ■ Take it — via careful transport — to school earning points via an elaborate scorthe major sporting events against your ing system that SportStars creates. rival school and be sure to rub it in that Schools could keep tabs on the point your school is the baddest in the land. At standings in the pages of SportStars (or on random times during the event — whether our website) and follow the race down to your team is winning or losing (chances the final day of high school competition — are you’ll be winning, anyway) — be sure typically the state golf championship. to the have the student section yell “Cup The school with the most points in the check!,” and then go berserk as a member end would be awarded the SportStars Cup of the section holds it up proudly. in a ceremony that would be nothing short ■ Have your school’s marching/pep of extravagant. There will undoubtedly be band learn the SportStars Cup theme a SportStars Cup montage. It will also have music and play it loudly anytime the Cup is its own theme music — which we would brought into the gym or onto the field? encourage to come as a submission from a ■ In a nod to the tradition of NHL playschool music department. And bonus: Creers spending a day with the Stanley Cup, ating the theme song we eventually choose, we’d like to see the SportStars Cup take a would likely win that school some points few trips with some teams when they travel toward winning the Cup. for premier tournaments, and whatnot. Now on to more details about how a Pictures taken with the SportStars Cup in school would go about winning the Sportfront of important city monuments would Stars Cup. Here’s the rudimentary scoring be a must. table so far. It’s subject to change and sugNow with all that in mind, the Sportgestions. Stars Cup could single-handedly elevate We begin with the basics (and to keep the CIF State Boys Golf Championships to things reasonable, only varsity competition a new level. As it is now, the tournament will count in most circumstances). gets lost in the wake of state track and 50 points — If a school has an athlete Chace@ field championships — which is typically honored as one of our AAA SportStars of SportStarsMag.com thought of as the last big high school sportthe week. ing event of the academic year — often 50 — If a school is represented pictorially (925) 566-8503 being played out during a week of heavy on a cover of the magazine. graduations throughout the state. In fact, it 100 — If a school has an athlete named just happened on June 8. Did you know? as the SportStars Athlete of the Year (fall, But in the SportStars Cup Era, the attenwinter, spring or summer). The same goes tion paid to the event just might change. for Coaches of the Year. If the Cup becomes the benchmark of 100 — For any individual or team league true sporting excellence that we believe it championship should, than the state golf championships 200 — If a school has an athlete awarded would potentially have 2,000 points up for grabs. How great All-State honors. it would be to actually have student sections traveling to 300 — For any team or individual that brings home a secstuffy country clubs with face paint and posters of support tion championship. in the case that the SportStars Cup could hinge on a 15-foot 350 — If a school has any of its teams named as the secputt with a 5-inch break? tion’s scholastic champion for having the highest team GPA A tear would come to our eye. in the section. Why is this valued more than a section chamTo the Class of 2011, congrats and good luck as you tranpionship? Because knowledge is power. Deal with it. sition to the next phase of your life and education. To the 400 — Any individual wins a CIF Northern regional Classes of 2012, 2013 and 2014, start training — SportStars championship. Cup points begin to tally in late August. 500 — Any team claims a CIF NorCal final Hopefully we can find an intern by then willing to keep And, finally the big ones. track of it all. ✪ 700 — For any individual state title.

FIRST PITCH Chace Bryson Editor

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PHONE 925.566.8500 FAX 925.566.8507 Editorial Editor@SportStarsMag.com Editor Chace Bryson. Ext. 104 • Chace@SportStarsMag.com Contributors Bill Kolb, Erik Stordahl, Mike Wolcott, Jim Mannion, Mitch Stephens, Doug Gardner, Matt Smith, Clay Kallam, Jim McCue, Eric Gilmore, Ray Wolfe, Dave Kiefer Photography Butch Noble, Bob Larson, Jonathan Hawthorne, Chris Austria, Darryl Henick, Norbert von der Groeben Creative Department Art@SportStarsMag.com Production Manager Mike DeCicco. Ext. 103 • MikeD@SportStarsMag.com Publisher/President Mike Calamusa. Ext. 106 • Mike@SportStarsMag.com Advertising & Calendar/Classified Sales Sales@SportStarsMag.com Account Executives Mike Wolcott Ext. 109 • MikeW@SportStarsMag.com; Patrick McCormick Ext. 102 • Patrick@SportStarsMag.com; Erik Stordahl • ErikS@Sport StarsMag.com (Special Sections, Calendar, Marketplace sales) Reader Resources/Administration Ad Traffic, Subscription, Calendar & Classified Listings info@SportStarsMag.com • Deb Hollinger. Ext. 101 • Distribution/Delivery Mags@SportStarsMag.com Distribution Manager Butch Noble. Ext. 107 • Butch@SportStarsMag.com Information technology John Bonilla CFO Sharon Calamusa • Sharon@SportStarsMag.com Office Manager/Credit Services Deb Hollinger. Ext. 101 • Deb@SportStarsMag.com Board of Directors Dennis Erokan, CEO, Placemaking Group Roland Roos, CPA, Roland Roos & Co Susan Bonilla, State Assembly Drew Lawler, Managing Director, AJ Lawler Partners Brad Briegleb, Attorney At Law community SportStars™ Magazine A division of Caliente! Communications, LLC 5356 Clayton Rd., Ste. 222 • Concord, CA • 94521 info@SportStarsMag.com www.SportStarsMag.com

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your ticket to bay area sports admit one; rain or shine This Vol. #2, June 2011 Whole No. 25 is published by Caliente! Communications, LLC, 5356 Clayton Rd, Ste. 222, Concord, CA 94521. SportStars™© 2010 by Caliente! Communications, LLC. All rights reserved. Subscription rates: 24 issues, U.S. 3rd class $42 (allow 3 weeks for delivery). 1st class $55. To receive sample issues, please send $3 to cover postage. Back issues are $4 each. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission of Publisher is strictly prohibited. The staff and management, including Board of Directors, of SportStars™© does not advocate or encourage the use of any product or service advertised herein for illegal purposes. Editorial contributions, photos and letters to the editor are welcome and should be addressed to the Editor. All material should be typed, double-spaced on disk or email and will be handled with reasonable care. For materials return, please enclose a stamped, self-addressed envelope. SportStars™© and STARS!™© Clinics are registered trademarks of Caliente! Communications, LLC.

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Your parents are right, football can be dangerous. Should you play? I want to play football but my parents say it’s too dangerous. I think they’re just being overprotective — look how many kids play and don’t get hurt. What should I tell them so they’ll let me play? R.L., Concord   hat’s a more difficult question than you think, for a variety of reasons – but let me start by veering off track for a paragraph or two. I coach girls’ basketball, and girls are about four times as likely to tear an ACL as boys — and that’s a serious, serious injury. If a girl is young enough, or lucky enough, she may live the rest of her life with no real problems; but it’s also possible she’ll have to deal with that knee injury until the day she dies. So even as a girls’ basketball coach, I’ve had to come to terms with the risk/benefit of sports: The risk of a long-term injury is real, but the benefits of athletics are also real, and most girls don’t tear their ACLs. Still, though, it’s as if those who do suffer a severe, and potentially lifelong, injury are a kind of limited human sacrifice so that everyone else can play the sport. That’s really not a simple thing to come to terms with as a coach, and when I see a girl go down, sobbing in agony on the court, it makes me think about whether

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the price of playing the game is really worth it. Football, of course, is the most violent high school sport, and with the increasing emphasis on weight and speed training, high school boys are bigger, stronger and faster than ever before. (I’ve always felt that football is a game designed for 180-pounders, but when the players get much bigger than that, the tendons, ligaments and bones — which are the same strength no matter how big a boy is — are too easily overwhelmed in the constant collisions.) At the same time, football is a great game for teaching the value of hard work, discipline, teamwork and maturity. It’s also a great outlet for a lot of young men with lots of aggression to work out, as well as helping build school and community spirit. So I’ve always felt that playing football was worth the cost in serious injuries, and though I understood why some parents wouldn’t let their sons play, I thought it was the wrong decision — but now I’m not so sure.  The recent studies on Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) seem to indicate that even if a football player avoids multiple concussions, he’s still at risk for some long-term brain damage. And though knee injuries can be serious and

Behind the Clipboard Clay Kallam

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affect quality of life, brain injuries that affect personality are in a different category altogether. On top of that, it takes a lot of maturity for a 15-yearold boy to tell a coach or trainer that he feels a little dizzy, knowing that the proper procedure at that point is to pull the player out of practice (or a game) and not let him play again until he’s seen a doctor. That could be a couple weeks for families that have certain kinds of health insurance, and a couple weeks is a big part of the season. There’s also the wimp factor. Teen-agers feel they are immortal and many feel they are impervious to injury (I had one player tell me she was “indestructible”), and they look down on those who say they’re hurt and can’t play. Even Justin Morneau, an American League MVP, who missed more than half of last baseball season with concussion symptoms, was questioned about how “tough” he was. Put all this together, and the picture isn’t pretty. Though I think football is a great sport for teaching boys how to become men, it’s also a very dangerous one, especially as more and more research comes out about brain damage. I used to think that parents who didn’t let boys play football were wrong; now I’m less certain — and I don’t know that I have an argument that would convince your parents to let you suit up this fall. ✪ Submit a question for Behind the Clipboard, email Coach Kallam at clayk@fullcourt.com

June 9, 2011

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random acts of factness

With her complete-game, two-hit shutout of James Logan-Union City on June 3, Amador Valley-Pleasanton’s Johanna Grauer became the second freshman in as many seasons to be the winning pitcher in the North Coast Section Division I championship. Her counterpart in the game, RaeAnn Garza (pictured), earned the win as a freshman in the 2010 final against Freedom.

rapid fire J.D. Davis Elk Grove baseball

Beach, lake or pool?

Favorite summer cool-down treat

Toughest final?

Summer tourney/ game/match most looking forward to? One thing you’ll improve upon in your game over the summer?

Going on any vacations this summer? 8

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June 9, 2011

Beach

Dominic Artis Salesian-Richmond hoops

Butch No

ble

Liza Katz Miramonte-Orinda hoops

Pool Beach

Ice Jamba Frozen yogurt, Raspberry Vanilla Swirl cream Juice Prey r t e m AP Latin o n o g i Calculus Tr Washington League Playing (against AAU through Cal StateTeam) CP3 at Beach Jam Fullerton

None

Defense/ footwork

Being more Man-to-Man vocal defense

Sea Ranch

Just basketball tournaments

Europe for four weeks

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he said what?!?

“We were still ahead, and I just reminded them that we were still in a good position. It was just about the next play. We need to make the next play.” Marin Catholic-Kentfield boys lacrosse coach Will McGettigan regarding the message he gave to us his team after it had been outscored 3-0 in the third quarter of the North Coast Section Division II title match against AcalanesLafayette.The Vikings entered the fourth up 7-6, and held on for an 8-7 victory. Jonathan Hawthorne

Ways to spice up the Major League baseball draft (all 50 rounds of it) The NBA has a lottery. The NFL gets prime time, real-time TV coverage. Major League Baseball gets a handful of saber-nerds blogging furiously at each other, a 30-second bit on SportsCenter about the No. 1 overall pick, and a pat on the head. Why? Because baseball teams draft roughly 14 gazillion people over three days in June (June 6-8 this year. You just missed it. And you didn’t even know it. So there). 1. Dart round — We all know there’s no such thing as a ‘can’t-miss prospect’ in baseball. Unlike, say, the NFL or the NBA where there is a reasonable expectation that a club’s first-round pick will make it as a pro, at least for a little while, baseball hot shots routinely flame out before they even get past Single-A Burlington. So instead of mulling over picks and trying to separate the wheat from the chaff, just throw a dart at a board-o-prospects and take what comes. 2. Draft-a-Yankee round — Look. Every franchise, at some point or another, is ultimately just a farm club for the Yankees. So, instead of waiting for the Evil Empire to pillage your prospects, you now have a chance to use one of your picks to send a player directly into their minor league system. Eliminate the middle-man. It’s more efficient. 3. Speed round — You get 10 seconds and you have to listen to Jeopardy! music while deliberating over your pick. We’re still considering making you suffer through Alex Trebek’s inanity at the same time. But that could be considered cruel-and-unusual. Actually, we think that rounds 4-50 should ALL be speed rounds. You wanna see some out-of-shape general managers sweat? 4. Fan round — Run a contest. Pick one lucky fan and empower that person to make one of your selections. There are 50 freakin rounds in this thing, people. Who really cares if Milicent from Turlock picks her grandson because he’s ‘such a nice boy, and so polite?’ If Brian Sabean’s recent remarks about Scott Cousins are any indication, baseball could use a little more ‘polite.’ 5. Eliminator round — Remember American Gladiators? Have the GMs compete in a grueling, obstacle-laden race. Make knocking Bud Selig into next season in a ‘play at the plate’ the final challenge (because who wouldn’t stay up late to watch THAT?). Best time gets the No. 1 pick. Our money(ball) is on Billy Beane. Every year. — Bill Kolb Bob Larson photo

Robert Stephenson, Alhambra-Martinez, left, was picked 27th overall by the Cincinnati Reds.

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who’s got next?

nominations: Editor@SportStarsmag.com

brady dragmire

bradshaw christian-Sac . baseball . senior

of the week Most seniors just want to graduate so they can start enjoying their summer and hang out with everyone as much as possible before they leave for college in the fall. For Brady Dragmire, it’s a little different. A recent graduate, he now has the MLB draft on his mind. That’s right. Pro baseball. He led Bradshaw Christian-Sacramento to the SacJoaquin Section Div. VI championship over Delta-Clarksburg on June 1. He gave up only four hits and went 2-for-2 at the plate, stealing two bases. SportStars: You’re a multi-sport athlete (football, basketball, baseball) what’s the hardest thing about that? Brady Dragmire: I’m definitely exhausted. It’s one after another. I’ve done it since I was a freshman. That’s all I’ve ever known. SportStars: Which sport do you prefer? BD: Baseball. It’s been my favorite sport ever since I can remember. There’s something about it. SportStars: Have you made up your mind on MLB vs. college? BD: As of right now, I have a commitment to the University of Nevada-Reno on a baseball scholarship. But I’ve been waiting for the MLB draft. I’ve had some major league scouts come and talk to me. One of the scouts ... said the (I could be taken in the) second or third round. BRADY’S QUICK HITS Game-winning hit, 3-pointer or TD? Walk off grand slam Favorite way to relax: Vacations, mini road trips Favorite ice cream flavor: Mint Mint Chocolate Chip from Coldstone

honorable mention

cimran virdi The Las LomasWalnut Creek junior pole vaulter set the meet record at the NCS Meet of Champions. At 12 feet, nine inches, Virdi set the meet record by six inches.

Robbie tenerowicz The CampolindoMoraga soph had the game-winning single in a NCS quarterfinal against Casa Grande-Petaluma. The hit came with two strikes, two outs in the bottom of the seventh.

danielle henderson Taking care of business in the Sac-Joaquin Section Div. I championship game against Elk Grove, the Sheldon-Sacramento senior belted two three-run homers in a 10-5 win on June 1.

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club scene

CYC wrestlers hold their own as hosts of the Greco World Duals Talented youth wrestlers from around the globe descended upon Concord for the 2011 Greco World Duals hosted by the Community Youth Center. Among the local talent on hand were California Interscholastic Federation state placers, Jesse Baldazo of Liberty-Brentwood, Luke Sheridan (De La Salle-Concord) and Orry Elor (College Park-Pleasant Hill). All three grabbed first-place finishes in their respective events to help lead CYC to a second-place overall finish to an all-star team from Oregon. A visiting all-star team from Germany took third. In what was voted the best match of the tournament, Baldazo avenged his freestyle loss to Oakmont’s Jake Elliott in this year’s state finals by topping Elliott in the semis. For the wrestling novices, the primary difference between freestyle and Greco-Roman is that in Greco, participants may not grasp or hold their opponents below the waist, or grab, hook, or trip their opponents’ legs in any way. Following are the top three finishers in each weight class. ■ 108 lbs/49 Kg: 1. Josh Johnson (Oregon), 2. Grant Boggs (USA All-Star), 3. Javier Vieyra (USA Regional) ■ 115 lbs/52.5 kg: 1. Gabe Schroeck (USA All Star), 2. Alexis Arcigia (Norway), 3. David Conte (CYC) ■ 123 lbs/56 kg: 1. Kevin Coburn (CYC), 2. Cody Hummer (USA Regional), 3. Thaddeus Nelson (Oregon) ■ 130 lbs/59 kg: 1. Peter Russo (Oregon), 2. Jon Jay Chavez (CYC), 3. Martin Ramirez (California) ■ 138 lbs/63 kg: 1. Mike Nagi (Germany/ Hungarian), 2. Blaine Bercino (CYC), 3. Julian Purdy (California) ■ 145 lbs/66 kg: 1. Jacob Falk (USA All Star), 2. Brian Sergi (CYC), 3. Alexander Storck (Germany) ■ 154 lbs/70 kg: 1. Jesse Baldazzo (CYC), 2. Kyle Bateman (Oregon), 3. Jake Elliott (California) ■ 163 lbs/74.5 kg: 1. Matt Hickman (CYC), 2. Zac Brunson (Oregon), 3. Pontus Bergstrom (Norway/Sweden) ■ 174 lbs/79 kg: 1. Daniel Mollerop (Norway/Sweden), 2. Pascal Meul (Germany), 3. Dylan Morris (USA All Star) ■ 190 lbs/86.5 kg: 1. Luke Sheridan (CYC), 2. Mick Dougharity (Oregon), 3. Khymba Johnson (California) ■ 285 lbs/125 kg: 1. Orry Elor (CYC), 2. Chet Spears (Oregon), 3. Dylan Walsh (USA All Stars)

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Butch Noble photo

Matt Hickman (blue) wrestles Zac Brunson in the 163 pound final.

Altimirano punches through Community Youth Center of Concord’s very own boxer Eric Altamirano defeated Philip Fuentes on a unanimous decision, 5-0, on May 28 at the USA Boxing Pacific Region championship in Fresno. Fuentes, the Central California champ, didn’t stand a chance against Altamirano, who won by scores of 23-7, 27-9, 29-14, 31-12 and 45-14. Altamirano now heads to Colorado Springs to compete in the USA National Championships on June 20-26. If he performs well at the National Championships, Altamirano will start to sniff the Olympics as the top two finalists will be invited to the Olympic Trials in Mobile, AL on July 31-Aug. 6.  The road to London is a long one for most but it’s not out of the realm of possibility for CYC’s boxer. Stay tuned for updates on Altamirano’s fight for a spot on an Olympic roster heading to London in the summer of 2012. —SportStars Staff

Butch Noble photo

Blaine Bercino (blue) and Mike Nagi in the 138 pound final. Upload photos and team stats! www.SportStarsMag.com


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Not all triathlons are Ironman, and not all columnists are triathletes

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he challenge jumped out to me in big, blue letters, looking just about as inviting as a coupon from my favorite pizza restaurant. “Complete a triathlon in 15 weeks!” Sounded about right to me. I’m a terrible swimmer, I figured it would take at least a couple of months to push my bike 112 miles, and God only knows how long it would take to walk those final 26. But, upon closer examination, the ad, right here in the pages of our magazine, actually said “We’ll train you to complete a triathlon” in a 15-week program. It sounded intriguing, especially considering SportStars’ new TriStars section and the rather amazing growth the sport of triathlon is enjoying among the age groups featured in our magazine.  So, overcoming a fear of triathlons I’ve had since watching Julie Moss crawl across the finish line of the 1982 Ironman on “Wide World of Sports,” I reached out to Liz Elliott, head coach of the Tri-Valley Triathlon Club, to see if this was something us mere athletic mortals could ever dream of accomplishing. Turns out that, with the proper instruction and motivation, it’s pretty much within anyone’s reach — as long as people understand the word “triathlon” is not a one-sizefits-all proposition. “Many people say to me ‘Wow! You’ve done a triathlon? I could never do that!’” Elliott said. “Usually it has to do with the swim. Many people think that a triathlon is what they see on TV. There are many distances, not just like the Ironman.” Let’s get the Ironman business out of the way right now. Its distances are a 2.4-mile swim, a 112-mile bike ride and a regulation marathon of 26.2 miles. That, my friends, is Mike Pigg territory. However, that’s just one kind of triathlon. There are other events with distances much more plausible to the every-day athlete — say, a sprint triathlon, which could be as little as a 200 yard swim, a 5-to-10 mile bike ride and a 3-mile run. “The sprint and Olympic distances are just combinations of swim, bike and run distances that people usually do on their own for fun,” Elliott said. OK, even I have ridden a bike for 10 miles (a grueling downhill grade, but I made it) and completed a 3-mile run. But has anyone out there ever swam 200 yards for fun? Or, swam 200 yards in their life, period? OK … just about everybody but me. Got it. So, I figured I had my out. But, as it turns

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WALLY’S WORLD Mike Wolcott MikeW@ SportStarsMag.com (925) 566-8500 Ext. 109

out, even a complete lack of swimming ability shouldn’t be enough to stop people from giving the sport a try. “We get people that don’t know how to swim, and swim a mile in open water after three months,” Elliott said. OK, but those are people who are in shape, right? I mean you have to be a finelytuned athlete to even consider learning how to swim that far -- much less do all the running and cycling. Right? Elliott trumped me again. She explained she was a competitive swimmer in college, but afterward, “I was really burnt out, so I ate a lot of Taco Bell, sat around and gained weight.” Finally, she was speaking a language I could understand. In 2003, Elliott, who owns Happy Fish Swim School in Dublin and Fremont, taught a water class to some coaches from the Team in Training organization, and they suggested she join their triathlon program. Elliott’s reaction? “No way. I absolutely hated running, and cycling was boring and hard for me.” The more she talked, the more I began to think I was born to be a triathlete. But, at about the time I would have ordered the extra churro to go with my burrito, that’s when Elliott’s work ethic kicked in. She trained for, and completed, the Wildflower Triathlon at the Olympic distance, and by 2004, she was coaching for Team in Training, and has been helping “beginners” and more experienced triathletes cross the finish line ever since. Right now, she’s gearing up for her new summer high school program with the Tri Valley Tri Club. Boys and girls ages 13-18 are invited to participate. Professional swim, bike, run and triathlon coaches will be on hand to help each participant prepare for, and complete, an actual triathlon in September. And, she promises it’ll be a fun experience in addition to a rewarding one. Elliott said it all really comes down to the basics — finding consistent practice times, going at your own pace, don’t expect to learn it all at once, enjoy working with others and, especially, enjoying yourself while you’re doing it. “It’s just breaking down complex skills into digestible, easy-to-learn chunks,” she said. Once again, she managed to make it all sound just about as easy as a trip to Taco Bell. If you’re interested in learning more about Tri Valley Tri Club’s triathlon class, go to www.trivalleytriclub.com.

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By patrick mccormick | SportStars

As a kid I grew up a music fan and discovered the rock band KISS when I was 9. I love their music, their image and their shows. For some reason, ever since all roads seem to lead to KISS. In fact, they inspired me to start an instructional music DVD company with a good friend of mine. Within the first year I actually worked with Bruce Kulick (KISS guitarist throughout the 80’s). It didn’t take long before I met KISS drummer Eric Singer — the “Catman” — and we worked on a couple of projects together. A few years later I began working with SportStars Magazine. SportStars recently expanded into the Sacramento region. As we began to branch out in that region, I heard about an event called Walk ‘N Rock which raises money for several local children’s charities. With the natural tie in to SportStars’ youth focus, I was curious to learn more. To my surprise, the Rock part of the 2011 Walk ‘N Rock was headlined by KISS.   It was only a matter of time when the SportStars road would lead to KISS, as all roads do, remember. So I called Eric Singer and asked if he would answer a few questions for the magazine. He was not only kind enough to agree, he also included KISS guitarist Tommy Thayer in on the fun. Enjoy reading their responses, and never stop rockin! Patrick McCormick is a sales representative for SportStars. This was actually his final issue with us. There’s no truth to the rumor that his final day here included any fire breathing or major pyrotechnics.

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Did you play a sport in high school? ERIC: Yes TOMMY: Yes, chasing girls.. What sport? ERIC: Wrestling TOMMY: Do you really have to ask? Favorite pro athlete? ERIC: Kobe Bryant TOMMY: Joe Montana. He personally signed a 49ers helmet for me about 15 years ago and I sent him some KISS swag to show my appreciation. Favorite pro team? ERIC: LAKERS! TOMMY: I’ve loved the San Francisco 49ers since a young age. I’m talking about back in the days of John Brodie, Ken Willard, Dave Wilcox and Gene Washington. They were good, but they never quite got there. Out of the four of you, who would win a game of HORSE? ERIC: Probably me TOMMY: It would come down to Eric and I because he’s a hoops fan. I’d probably shut him down in the end, though. What is your favorite sport stadium you’ve ever played in? ERIC: Staples Center, because it is home for us TOMMY: Probably Reliant Stadium in Houston, Texas. We just sold it out (75,000) a couple months ago. Proudest high school moment? ERIC: Graduation was an accomplishment. Stay in school! TOMMY: When I (made out with) the lead cheerleader after the-after-game dance my first band played at in high school. I’m glad her boyfriend (the quarterback) never found out.

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Cole Williams helps deliver athletic notoriety to school more known for its academics

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By mitch stephens | Contributor

he first time The Urban School track and field coach Bill Cirocco witnessed then unknown sophomore Cole Williams step upon the running surface he dropped everything that he was doing. “I thought to myself, ‘Oh my God we have a great athlete here,’ ” Cirocco said. Urban isn’t known for its athletic prowess. Though yes, the Blues do boast WNBA player Jene Morris and one-time, one-year NFL receiver Onome Ojo as alums, the school is better known for its techy, imaginative curriculum — every student is issued at MacBook laptop and given an e-mail address — steep tuition ($32,500 per year), teacher-to-student ratio (1 to 4.5) and 98 percent graduate to four-year university rate. That is until Williams took to the track and the pavement. The strong and poised 6-foot-1½ , 160-pound senior finished off a remarkable two-year prep running career June 4 perched to a place no one, other than perhaps Cirocco, thought possible — a spot on the podium at the California Interscholastic Federation State Track and Field Championships in Clovis. Williams finished fifth in the 800-meter run in 1 minute, 50.95 seconds, just off his personal best set the night before when he recorded the second-best qualifying time at 1:50.57 — the 10th fastest time in the nation at the time. He did that running in the second fastest heat in the history of the prestigious 93-year-old event. All that after leading Urban to its first North Coast Section Division V cross-country title last November in Hayward — he won the individual race — and then the next week placing second himself at the state Division V championships at Woodward Park, also in Clovis. Small school cross-country success has been the staple of Bay Counties League-West rival University-S.F.. For Urban to break into the market and steal some of University’s thunder was major. But for Williams to break in with the big boys and truly elite at the state track and field meet, where all school sizes and divisions are thrown together, is truly uncharted territory. Especially considering he was simply a soccer refuge, talked into the running at the end of his sophomore year by his mother Megan, a marathoner. “It’s been quite a ride,” said Williams, who will run next season at Occidental in Los Angeles. “I’ve loved every minute.”

 From Wiggler To Natural Born and raised an only child in San Francisco, Williams played sports partially because he was naturally athletic and also to combat a fidgety side.

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“I was very wiry and very energetic,” Williams said. “My dad used to call me ‘the Wiggler’ because I never stopped moving as a baby.” His first real love was soccer and by the time he left Live Oak Middle School, Williams was skilled enough to make the varsity team at Urban as a freshman. “I was a reserve as a freshman and started as a sophomore,” Williams said. “But soccer just wasn’t going that great and my mom could sense it. She thought maybe I’d be happier trying something else so she egged me to go out for track. “ He had immediate success in the 1600 and 800 with best times of 4:43 and 2:02, respectively. Though his four-lap time was promising, Williams promised it wouldn’t be his event. “I hated the mile and still do to this day,” he said. “It was so painful for me physically and mentally. I was drawn to the 800.” Cirocco was definitely impressed. “He was fast for sure, but it was his form that was so impressive,” Cirocco said. “He had a natural glide.” More impressive than his stride or cardio vascular system was what Cirocco called an inner clock, a sense of just how fast to run for how long. It’s a quality that usually takes years to learn. “You’d tell him to run a 27-second 200 (meters) and he’d do it on a dime,” Cirocco said. “He’d do it over and over again. ... Like clockwork.” The confidence from his initial track season carried over to the cross-country season in 2009, when he finished second in NCS (D5). It was during this season Cirocco got a sense of Williams’ talent, inexperience and character. “His first cross-country race at College Prep he was leading handily but near the end he took a wrong turn,” Cirocco said. “He eventually got turned the right way but by that time it was too late. He finished second. “Rather than sulk or make excuses, I recall him finding the winner immediately and shaking his hand and congratulating him. He just showed a lot of class and maturity. That’s Cole.”

“I was very wiry and very energetic. My dad used to call me ‘the Wiggler’ because I never stopped moving as a baby.” Cole Williams

“That was fun ”

Iron Man Another mishap occurred at the state crosscountry meet at Woodward Park. Among the leaders in the first mile, his body shut down and he didn’t finish. “That was really disappointing — especially after such a good season,” he said. It happened again at a very inopportune time the following spring. Williams won the NCS Class A championship and then stunned most by placing second among the big boys in the NCS Meet of Champions at Cal’s Edwards Stadium in 1:55.09. Williams had been discovered on the big stage. “That was pretty cool,” he said. But the following week in state trials, his body shut down

Photos by Margaret Gallagher

again late and he finished last during his heat. Out of that it was discovered Williams has an iron deficiency and between iron pills and an inhaler, all breathing problems have been solved. That showed during a near flawless cross-country season, when he won NCS by 14 seconds. The team of Williams, senior Sean Judkins-Boeri and juniors Alex Wu, Whit Henderson and Cole Larsen finished with 64 points to 65 for St. Joseph Notre Dame-Alameda. The next week in Clovis, he erased the bad memory at Woodward Park by placing second over the rolling 3.1-mile

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course in 15:46, just back of winner Billy Gaudreau, of St. Margaret-San Juan Capistrano (15:39). “I had a very good race,” Williams said. “It was a good way to end the year and gave me confidence heading into track.”

Team and school obligations conflicted with many of the top state track and field meets this season, so Williams entered the postseason way under the radar. That changed however, when he obliterated the NCS Class A Meet record of 1:55.74 with a winning time of 1:51.95. And he wasn’t nearly pushed as teammate Larsen placed second in 1:56.88. The nearly four-second record time was the eighth fastest in the state and after breezing to victory at NCS MOC the next week in 1:52.56, Williams was well prepared for his next big leap. Though many believed Williams wasn’t battle-tested enough to face a Southern California contingent considered the deepest and most talented in the nation, Cirocco knew different. “I can tell you this, he won’t be intimidated,” Cirocco said. “He can run in front or from behind. He doesn’t let anyone dictate his race.” Williams didn’t exactly call the shots during trials, but he was indeed pulled. In arguably the best heat of any race of the two-day event, 10 runners broke 1:53.50 and winner Immanuel Hutchinson (San Jacinto-Riverside County) won in a national season best of 1:49.82. Like a wild roller coaster ride, Williams was pushed outside and then he weaved back in. In a remarkable gritty and athletic effort, he finished in 1:50.57 — the second best mark of the day — and when he eventually came off the track he was still weaving and spinning and grinning ear-to-ear. “That,” he said, “was fun! “The pace was crazy-fast but I tried to stay relaxed and with the pack. This definitely gives me a lot of confidence going into the finals.” It looked like it. The pace was similar however the conditions were different — wet and drizzly compared to humid and dry during

trials. Williams stayed with an extremely fast pack and eventually moved up to No. 2 behind Hutchinson (1:49.63) with about 180 to go. But three talented kids — Scripps Ranch-San Diego’s Shyan Vaziri (1:50.21) and the Long Beach Poly duo of Myles Andrews (1:50.63) and Chris Hall (1:50.68) passed Hall, who finished strong but in fifth at 1:50.95. That time would have won state three of the previous four years and 10 of the previous 13. “Fantastic, gritty effort,” Cirocco said. “From Cole Williams, I wouldn’t expect anything else.” ✪ June 9, 2011

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Berkeley hurdler’s drive for a state title ends on high note By mitch stephens | Contributor

It all came down to one 100-meter hurdles race for St. Mary’s-Berkeley junior Trinity Wilson. She’s done probably close to a hundred since she started as a national youth champion at age 12. But when she crossed the line this time, it felt like she’d crossed the Mohave or finished a marathon. She won the California Interscholastic Federation state championship on June 4 in a wind-legal, lifetime-best of 13.41 seconds, holding off national leader Melia Cox (Long Beach Poly), who finished in 13.57. When Wilson crossed the line it hit her harder than she anticipated. She bent at the waist and wept. They were tears of joy. Tears of relief. Tears of redemption. Wilson had spent a season agonizing over a loss to thenClaremont senior and now Stanford freshman Kori Carter on the same Veterans Stadium track at Buchanan High School in Clovis. In that race, Wilson had a tremendous start, led the entire race until Carter caught her and nipped her at the line in wind-aided times of 13.33 and 13.35. Since that time, Wilson has vowed that would never happen again. She openly took a “refuse to lose” stance and backed it up every step of her junior season. She put a lot of pressure on herself to be so perfect. And the culmination of finishing it off, against a vastly-improved Cox, who Wilson handled at the Arcadia Invitational, was simply

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overwhelming. “I wasn’t expecting it,” she said of her tears. “It just happened. I was just so happy. I couldn’t help it. I could just taste it. I knew I was ready.” Her club coach, Curtis Taylor, wasn’t as certain. The Laney College coach, who has helped 13 Bay Area girls rack up 19 gold medals over the past two decades, thought Wilson had let up slightly after her Arcadia victory. In the meantime, Cox started a new nutrition program and dropped pounds and times, all the way to the national lead in both hurdle events. “When Cox’s times improved, that got Trinity’s attention a little,” Taylor said. “She really began to focus. I think she did right in the nick of time. “I’m so happy for her to win today. She’s earned it.” She was definitely focused for the finals. With a steady rain coming down the starter ordered all runners to the block. Wilson looked down over the 10 hurdles toward the finish line and took a giant sigh. She was the last competitor in the blocks. “I just shut it down,” Wilson said. “I thought to myself, ‘Let’s get this party started.’” The fact the drizzle had gotten stronger didn’t deter Wilson. Not like it sometimes would. “Rain freaks out hurdlers and it freaked me out a little too,” she admitted. “But I didn’t care what was out there – thunder, lightning, hail – I wasn’t going to lose.” ✪

Trinity Wilson, St. Mary’s-Berkeley

Bob Larson

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Rock, Brewer among the few to beat the weather and SoCal athletes The 93rd CIF State Track and Field Meet at Veterans Stadium on the campus of Buchanan High School in Fresno delivered as promised on two big counts June 3-4. It was wet, and dominated by Southern California athletes. A steady drizzle in Saturday’s finals hampered some marks – particularly in sprints and jumps – and SoCal athletes or relay teams won all but three of the 32 events, a shocking number really. The lone NorCal male winner was extremely versatile Ian Rock of Davis, who won the pole vault at 16 feet, 2 inches, then quickly scooted to the long jump, where he grabbed a sixth-place medal (top six get medals) for his best of 22-1¾. That is one unique and difficult double considering he had to race between both events, about a 60-yard dash. He took an exhausting 13 vaults to truly earn his gold medal. “It was pretty tiring and stressful going between the two, but I got it done,” said Rock, a Duke-signee. “Winning a state title in this state is a major accomplishment. I’d have to say I earned it.” Ciarra Brewer (James Logan-Union City, triple jump) and Trinity Wilson (St. Mary’sBerkeley, 100-meter hurdles) won female

State Track Notes titles. The vivacious Brewer regained the title she lost last year after winning as a sophomore. The wet conditions bothered the triple jumpers greatly as the Florida-bound Brewer was the only jumper to go over 40 feet. She won at 41-11, well off her best during trials when she went 43-2½. But Brewer also had her right hamstring tighten that night and it got worse throughout the finals. She passed on her final three attempts and took only one long jump and then shut it down completely. She came in seeded second in the long jump at 19-7¼, but did not place. “I’m very grateful and happy to regain my title,” said a subdued Brewer afterward. “I had a wonderful time in high school and feel very blessed and I’m still very hungry to get better and better.” SILVER COUNTRY: Though gold medals were hard to come by for NorCal athletes, a trio of Contra Costa County males took silver and were proud to do so. Dublin senior Keremiah Crockett (triple jump, personal best 49-1¾), Las Lomas-Walnut Creek senior Kenny Grimble (300 hurdles, 37.78) and California-San Ramon junior Noel Frazier (high jump, 6-9) all were somewhat pleased

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Contributed

Ciarra Brewer, James Logan-Union City

with their second-place medals. Crockett and Grimble were seeded 12th and 15th heading into the meet. Grimble had a surprising lead heading into the backstraight against national leader Johnathan Cabral, who kicked it into gear to win going away (36.20). Grimble said second far surpassed his expectations. “I can’t even

put into words how great this is,” he said. ALL SMILES: Holy Names-Oakland sophomore Sasha Wallace anticipated a podium spot in the triple jump — she placed fourth at 39-9½ — but her sixth-place finish in the 100 hurdles was a shocker. She finished in a personal best 14.25. “I didn’t even know I’d be running this event this year,” Wallace said. “No way would I have thought I’d be here. This is unreal. I can’t believe it.”   CCS DISTANCE FEVER: Aptos sophomore Nikki Hiltz (third, 4:43.43), Mountain View junior Allison Sturges (fifth, 4:47.65) and Woodside-Priory junior Chris Waschura (fifth, 4:08.29) all earned medals in the 1,600. Waschura was pulled along by winner Jantzen Oshier (Trabuco Hills), who won in the second best time in state-meet history (4:00.83). SJS MEDALISTS: Besides Rock, JesuitSacramento senior Stephen Boals took fifth in the shot and sixth in the discus. Third-place medals were earned by Granite Bay pole vaulter Katie Zingheim, Elk Grove 300 hurdler Nick Martinez and Davis 3,200 runner Travor Halsted. Granite Bay high jumper Kevin Nielsen and Kennedy-Sacramento 100-meter sprinter Breonntae Snelling took sixth. ✪ — Mitch Stephens

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What started out as a rebuilding year for the Casa Roble softball team turned into an unexpected championship run

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By jim mccue | Contributor

eading into the 2011 season, the Casa Roble-Orangevale softball team could have used name tags at practice to get more familiar with all of the new names and faces on the practice field. When the season ended — with a convincing win in the Sac-Joaquin Section Division II title game — the Rams had made names for themselves and will need no introductions to the teams waiting to knock off the section champs in 2012. The Rams, who came within one victory of earning a shot at the section championship in 2010, graduated six starters and were staring at a rebuilding process. But the young, fresh faces that started their journey with tryouts in the cold of winter slowly came together and got hot to finish the season. “We knew we would have a brand new team and that we could create a team to build on for the future,” head coach Kristen Allen said. “We preached that it was ‘your team’ and you need to decide to make what you want out of it. I think they really took that to heart.” The Rams (20-7, 9-1) took it to heart and parlayed it to a Capital Valley League title and the program’s fifth section crown despite a sluggish start to the season in which the group of two freshman, three sophomores, seven juniors, and two seniors slowly jelled. Allen was confident that the newcomers to the team’s starting lineup could fill many of the statistical and positional voids left by the 2010 graduating class, but the leadership void was a question mark heading into the 2011 season. The Rams’ two seniors—outfielders Gaby Chagolla and Kaileigh Ruiz—did not start as juniors, but stepped into the starting lineup as team leaders. With the abundance of new faces, though, Ruiz felt that this year’s team had more of an all-for-one feeling than the previous season. “Last year, it was clearly the seniors’ team and it felt like we were trying to win for them,” Ruiz said. “This year, everyone hung out together and were good friends on and off the field, so it felt more like we were all playing to win for the whole team.” The total team effort was evident by the contributions of the Rams’ underclassmen. Freshmen Krystal Aubert (.500, 6 home runs, 27 RBI) and Madison Zetz (.360, 5 doubles, 20 RBI) led the offense and anchored the corner infield positions. Sophomore Ali Aguilar (.389, 4 triples, 30 runs) was the team’s “rock in the infield,” according to Allen, and sparked the Rams’ offense from the leadoff spot.

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James K. Leash/Sharp-EyeImages.com

LEFT: The Rams celebrate together following the final out of the Division II final. ABOVE: Casa Roble sophomore Kaitlyn Garcia delivers a pitch in the title game. The win was her 19th of the season.

The biggest contributor, though, may have been sophomore Kaitlyn Garcia, who was Casa Roble’s ace with a 19-7 record and 3.01 ERA, and provided pop in the cleanup spot with a .453 batting average and 20 RBI. “We knew what we had in (Garcia) and that she would come in and be our ace, but we did not expect her bat to help us as much as it did,” Allen said. “We knew she could pitch, but we’ll certainly take both (pitching and hitting) for sure.” Garcia was aware that she would be called upon to assume the pitching workload after the graduation of Whitney Waltrip, so she put in extra work with her ASA travel team and on her own to prepare for the promotion to varsity. The results were undeniable as she shut down the potent offense of Del Oro-Loomis with a two-hit shutout in the section final. “I knew that there would be pressure on me and that I might have to pitch two games in a day on occasion, but I got to see a lot of the hitters I would be facing in ASA ball,” Garcia said. “I worked on keeping the ball down more and getting more movement to keep batters off balance. “In the end, though, I knew that I could trust my teammates behind me and it would be OK.” That trust, and Garcia’s ability, were most evident in Casa Roble’s come-from-behind playoff June 9, 2011

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win over Roseville en route to the cham“I didn’t see us doing as well as we did,” pionship game. Roseville, which had Ruiz said. “Midway through the season, we beaten Casa Roble early in the season, weren’t really doing very well. But we had jumped out to a quick 4-0 lead before a lot of heart, started to come together, and a confident Rams team turned things I think we proved a lot of people wrong.” around to win 5-4. Allen believes that her team may have “At the start of the Roseville game, we benefited from entering the postseason looked like the young, unsure team when “under the radar,” as the Rams’ underdog we gave up four runs in the first inning,” status allowed them to play the biggest Allen said. “After that, though, the girls games of the season like any other game. decided that we were going to be the team “I think we were almost naïve to what that we were capable of being and everywe were going into,” Allen said of the one thought, ‘Hey, we can do this.’” Rams’ playoff run. “The whole season, we Confidence in teammates is easier just focused on our 14 players and went when those teammates are familiar. out and played.” Where many of the players on the 2011 When the 2012 season opens, Casa Roteam were known from their previous ble will be much more familiar with one action on the varsity or junior varsity another, but the defending section chamsquads, Zetz was a complete unknown pions will also be no strangers to the rest on the first day of tryouts. All it took was of the Division II teams that will surely a day or two of seeing the freshman field have their sights set on denying the type James K. Leash/Sharp-EyeImages.com and hit for Kristen Allen and sister/coach of dynasty that won Casa Roble three Ashley Allen to know that they had an Madison Zetz was a surprise for the consecutive titles in the late 90s. Rams in 2011. The freshman hit .360 impact varsity player in Zetz. Allen and the Rams understand that with five doubles and 20 RBI. “Generally, we have at least heard the the name tags they could have used at name of the players that are trying out the start of this season will likely be refor the team, but we had never seen her play or knew anything placed by bull’s-eyes on their uniforms next year. about her,” Allen said. “Right away, we knew she would be on “It will be OK to be have the target on our backs next year,” Althe varsity team and she was an awesome addition to the infield len said. “Our girls know that we just expect them to go out and and our team.” play our game like we can. Obviously, things will change, but I While Allen and her team quickly realized that they could be think we have a pretty good shot at contending the next few years. successful despite their youth and inexperience, few could have “It will be hard to repeat, but there is no reason that we predicted the level of success the Rams attained. can’t.” ✪

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NorCal Softball Top 15 Final season rankings. Teams from the Central Section are not considered. 1. San Benito-Hollister............................. 29-1 2. Sheldon-Sacramento........................... 27-6 3. Archbishop Mitty-San Jose.................. 28-3 4. Elk Grove.............................................. 28-6  5. Valley Christian-San Jose.................... 25-6 6. Rodriguez-Fairfield............................... 28-3  7. Johansen-Modesto.............................. 27-4 8. Amador Valley-Pleasanton.................. 20-5 9. Sierra-Manteca..................................26-2-1  10. Gilroy................................................... 25-5 11. James Logan-Union City................... 23-4 12. Pleasant Grove-Elk Grove............... 18-10 13. Whitney-Rocklin................................. 25-7 14. Capuchino-San Bruno....................... 22-6 15. Merrill West-Tracy.............................. 24-6

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After more than a year & 2,000 miles, Ozzy Braff was finally in a place where he could deliver Palo Alto its first baseball title

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By david kiefer | Contributor

alo Alto can be a trap. It’s full of quiet neighborhoods and stately homes. Of green parks and tree-lined streets. Of high-achieving schools and high-achieving citizens. But trouble lurks just below the surface. For the young, Palo Alto can be a dangerous place. Not in crime, but in stress — to keep up, to perform, to succeed. At Palo Alto High, students regularly place among the nation’s best in math, science, physics, linguistics, and collaborative problem-solving. At crosstown Gunn High, suicides have reached crisis proportions amidst some of the highest test scores in the country. In Palo Alto and elsewhere among the Bay Area’s high-income public and private prep schools, average is unacceptable.

Norbert von der Groeben

Austin “Ozzy” Braff watches the flight of the ball as it heads toward right field for a bloop single that would score B.J. Boyd for the game-winning hit in the Central Coast Section Division I championship game at San Jose Municipal Stadium on May 28.

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The Palo Alto baseball team celebrates its first section crown with the traditional dog pile in the middle of the diamond.

“Ozzy was a 15-year-old who made a mistake. He could have seen it as a problem or an opportunity. He chose the latter, and by working hard at something, he showed kids that they don’t have to stay down. They can pull themselves back up. Through baseball, Ozzy helped reassure himself of who he really was.” Palo Alto assistant coach Dick Held Support Your Local Business • Say You Found Them In SportStars™

In this context, Palo Alto High junior Austin “Ozzy” Braff provided his own response. It wasn’t rebellion. After all, how do you fight success with success? Rather, he provided his version of it — on his own terms — by driving in the winning run in the Vikings’ 5-4 final-inning Central Coast Section Division I championship baseball victory over San BenitoHollister at San Jose Municipal Stadium on May 28. The CCS championship was the first ever for Palo Alto baseball during a historic academic year in which Viking teams won their first state titles in football and girls’ volleyball, and first CCS crown in girls’ basketball. For the Braff family, Ozzy could now share championship tales with his senior brother T.J. who recovered two fumbles, forced a fumble, made a team-high 16 tackles, and helped stuff a two-point conversion try to preserve Paly’s colossal 15-13 upset of Centennial-Corona in the state Division I football bowl — all while Ozzy cheered from the stands in Carson’s Home

Norbert von der Groeben

Depot Center. When Ozzy fisted a one-out single in the bottom of the seventh inning to drive in B.J. Boyd from second with the championship-winning run, T.J. was in the on-deck circle. “I wasn’t too nervous because I knew my brother was behind me,” Ozzy said after emerging from the celebratory dog pile. ■■■ In triumph, as in harder times, the Braffs stuck together. T.J. never lost faith in his brother. It was just a matter of whether Ozzy would regain faith in himself. Ozzy, who attended St. Francis-Mountain View through his sophomore year, had gotten into trouble. Ozzy prefers to avoid the specifics, but allowed that there were many factors that led up to it, among them an overemphasis on baseball, a lack of communication, and living up to high standards. Problems felt overwhelming. Ozzy felt trapped. He June 9, 2011

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Palo Alto catcher Will Glazler tags out San Benito’s Dustin Rovella along the first base line during the CCS final. needed to escape. His family agreed. Leave the bad influences, change the routine, regroup. “I could tell he wasn’t happy,” his father, Jon Braff, said. “As difficult a decision as it was, we felt it would be better for him to go away, to figure out what was important to him.” The Braffs found that retreat in “Idaho’s Friendliest City,” Bonners Ferry, a town of 2,500 about 30 miles from the Canadian border. While T.J., a strong safety and tight end, was helping Palo Alto to a 14-0 football season, Ozzy was at a boarding school and playing linebacker for nearby Bonners Ferry High. Something happened there that even Ozzy can’t fully explain. Somewhere between the cliff dives into deep blue alpine lakes and winning the Intermountain League Defensive Player of the Year award (he also was named to the All-Idaho 26

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3A second team), Ozzy could feel a transformation. The tensions, the stress, the walls. They all melted away under the big sky and the crystal nights. A part of him remained there even after he returned home. And when he did, he was different. Everyone could sense it. He was a boy then, unmistakably a man now. “It was just being up there and opening up to a whole different culture,” he said. “People had a lot of different talents. It made me realize there’s a lot more to life, and I shouldn’t be afraid to experience it. It opened me up to a lot of new things.” And gave him an appreciation for the old. What did he learn from the experience? “How lucky I am,” he said. ■■■ Palo Alto baseball had gone through some rough times, too. The Vikings had rifled through five coaches in six years,

Norbert von der Groeben

largely because griping influential parents drove them off, and the program underperformed. Erich Raich, however, was undeterred. A coach at West Valley College and with PCB, a national-level traveling club team, Raich felt the program could win. “You knew the talent was there,” he said. “You always could see the potential.” It wasn’t necessarily what Raich did as much as the leadership he portrayed and stability he provided. Ozzy was unavailable for the first nine games until his eligibility was cleared by the CCS, but it was obvious from his first practice that he needed to be featured prominently in the lineup. As soon as Braff was available, Raich put Ozzy at shortstop and moved Jack Wittee to second base. This reunited the old Palo Alto National Little League All-Stars infield of Ozzy and Wittee in the middle and T.J. at first base. Upload photos and team stats! www.SportStarsMag.com


And at No. 3 in the batting order, Ozzy provided protection for T.J. at cleanup. Ozzy hit .413 with one home run and 21 RBI, and T.J., who will play baseball at Santa Clara University, hit .449 with six homers and 42 RBI. Palo Alto (28-9) beat regular-season champion WilcoxSanta Clara in the Santa Clara Valley Athletic League tournament, but the CCS field was lethal. West Catholic Athletic League teams had claimed the past six CCS Division I titles and monopolized the past three finals matchups. No public school had won a Division I title since 2004, and there was little hope for anything different while St. Francis held Baseball America’s No. 1 ranking for several weeks. But St. Francis and Serra, teams that have won a combined 10 CCS titles, were upset in the first round. Defending champion Archbishop Mitty took out Valley Christian in the quarterfinals, only to be eliminated by Palo Alto in the semis, setting up an all-public school final. ■■■ Throughout the season, Ozzy approached longtime assistant coach Dick Held before each game to ask what he should concentrate on that day. This time, Held told him, “You’ve been preparing for this game your whole life. Now is your chance to enjoy it.” A hopeful public address announcer introduced both teams during a downpour, and the game was delayed nearly two hours before the first pitch. But some on the Palo Alto side saw the rain as a sign. After all, the Vikings won the state football title in a storm. The game rocked back and forth, with two lead changes in the fourth, followed by a Haybaler run on a two-out single in the fifth to tie the score, 4-4. San Benito then unveiled its secret weapon, Arizona Statebound pitcher Darin Gillies. The right-hander broke his throwing wrist a month earlier when hit by a pitch. His cast had just come off days earlier. Raich figured Gillies’ wrist would be too fragile to throw an effective breaking ball, so he told his team to look for fastballs. Boyd greeted Gillies with a double off the left-field wall, but the rest of the Vikings were held hitless over the next 2 1/3 innings. In the seventh, with Boyd on second with one out after a two-base error and an intentional walk, Raich told Braff to look for a steal of third. But Ozzy immediately corrected him. “No, Coach,” he said. “I got it.” After sitting on a first-pitch fastball, Braff didn’t wait for another, swinging at an inside curve that jammed him. But he got enough to send it into short right field. The throw home was off-line and nowhere near in time to catch Boyd, who scored standing up from second. The championship was Palo Alto’s. And the hero was Ozzy, the Vikings’ comeback kid. “It’s always good to share a championship with your teammates,” T.J. said. “But it’s even better when it’s with your brother.” ■■■ Held, the assistant coach, has been around baseball long enough to recognize that the game’s most significant moments are not always the most obvious. “For me, who wins and loses CCS is not all that important in the grand scheme of things,” he said. “But for Ozzy to get the hit that won the championship … that was the way I would’ve scripted it.” All season, Held provided Braff with wise words before games. This time, the coach again took him aside afterward, to let him know how special the moment had been. “In our community, we need to distinguish failing from being a failure,” Held explained. “We adults try so hard to protect our kids and avoid failing. But, in reality, we’re doing them a

NorCal Baseball Top 15 Records are through June 6. Teams from the Central Section are not considered. 1. St. Francis-Mountain View..............................25-6 2. Palo Alto...........................................................28-9 3. Archbishop Mitty-San Jose......................... 26-6-1 4. St. Mary’s-Stockton.........................................22-9 Contributed

5. Jesuit-Carmichael ..........................................24-7

T.J., the older Braff brother, not only batted cleanup for the Vikings baseball team, but was also a twoway force on the football field for a Palo Alto team which won the CIF Division I state bowl game.

6. James Logan-Union City................................24-4

great disservice. Failing is part of life. The key is: What are you going to do about it? “Ozzy was a 15-year-old who made a mistake. He could have seen it as a problem or an opportunity. He chose the latter, and by working hard at something, he showed kids that they don’t have to stay down. They can pull themselves back up. “Through baseball, Ozzy helped reassure himself of who he really was.” A winner. ✪

10. Alameda.........................................................25-2

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7. San Benito-Hollister........................................22-9 8. Campolindo-Moraga.......................................19-8 9. De La Salle-Concord.......................................20-8 11. Wilcox-Santa Clara........................................26-8 12. Turlock...........................................................24-8 13. Monterey........................................................27-5 14. Oak Ridge-El Dorado Hills..........................21-11 15. Elk Grove.......................................................23-7

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Young athletes aren’t elite; they’re just kids, and should train accordingly Just because a 14- or 15-yearold kid happens to excel at a given sport and play at a high level does not earn them the designation of ‘elite.’

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outh Training in general is a term-crazy industry. I see it all the time in the way coaches, trainers and parents deal with young athletes. In a recent column, I explained about how some coaches use the word ‘peaking’ with their young athletes, and the problem with trying to get their teenagers ready to climax for one particular competition or meet at season’s end. Another term thrown around in such a carefree manner is “elite.” I get asked this question all the time: “Tim, I like and appreciate your developmental strategies, but how do I get faster results with my young elite athlete?” Here’s my answer — and you better be ready to hear and receive this message — young athletes aren’t elite. Without question, this is the most misunderstood issue to the whole young athlete enigma. Just because a 14- or 15-year-old kid happens to excel at a given sport and play at a high level does not earn them the designation of ‘elite.’ The status of ‘elite athlete’ is reserved, not for adult athletes only, but for those individuals whose life and purpose revolves around succeeding in a particular sport. That shouldn’t be confused with the desire to succeed — many young athletes have that. But when the

moniker of ‘elite’ is applied to a young athlete’s name, coaches and trainers automatically change the way they train them and this is a huge mistake. They go from seeking skill development into pushing for strength and power gains immediately, from teaching movement economy into looking to elicit optimal speed enhancement. They forget that the athlete in front of them is a young organism with nervous system and structural training necessities which are critical to their overall athletic development and safety. Even more importantly, coaches, parents and trainers don’t realize that an ‘elite athlete’s’ nutritional direction is critically monitored. Restorative factors are part of the training process. Mental and emotional stress levels are scrutinized and kept in check. All of these multiple interactive concerns are factored into the analysis and programming for ‘elite athletes’. With young athletes, they are almost all but forgotten. Here’s a look at a typical training day for elite athletes I have trained: 7 a.m. – wake and pre-workout meal; 8 a.m. – training session 1; 9 a.m. – restorative session; 10 a.m. – post training meal; 11 a.m. – nap; 1 p.m.

Training Time Tim Rudd for IYCA

June 9, 2011

– early afternoon meal; 2 p.m. – decompress with reading or video games; 4 p.m. – pre-workout meal; 5 p.m. – training session 2; 7 p.m. – post-training meal; 9 p.m. – bed. Now here’s a look at a typical day for the high school athletes I train: 6 a.m. – wake and shower; 7 a.m. – quick takeaway breakfast; 8 a.m. – classes; Noon – lunch; 1 p.m. – classes; 3 p.m. – practice or team training; 6 p.m. – dinner; 7 p.m. – homework; 11 p.m. – bed This is not the life of an elite athlete … this is the life of a typical kid. I don’t want you to think for a second that I don’t believe in solid training habits for young athletes and give you the impression that I don’t want your young athletes to train hard and get stronger. But anyone who eats 2 – 4 meals per day (each typically involving poor nutrition), gets minimal sleep, no restoration and deals with the mental/emotional stress of school, girlfriends/boyfriends and an often intense-filled social life cannot legitimately be labeled as an elite athlete. Moreover, they can’t be trained like one either. ✪ Tim Rudd is an International Youth Conditioning Association specialist in youth conditioning (level 3), speed and agility (level 2), and nutrition specialist (level 1). You can contact him with questions or feedback at tim@fit2thecore.com.

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Rollo in the

DEEP

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Alamo seventh grader forges a nationally-ranked young triathlon career

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By timothy carlson | Contributor

ake Rollo is one of the best triathletes for his age in the East Bay. In fact, the 13-year-old Alamo resident is ranked ninth nationally in the USA Triathlon 15-and-under rankings and has been setting age group marks since he started triathlon at the age of 11 in 2009 at the Ice Breakers sprint triathlon (200 meter swim, 6-mile bike, 2-mile run) at Lake Folsom in Granite Bay. He finished third — in the 19-and-under category. Since then, he has done 20 multisport races, competing for the Forward Motion race club of Danville, and has shown repeatedly that he can compete with triathletes much older. At the 2010 USA Triathlon Junior Nationals Youth Elite race in San Diego, he finished 20th of 75 finishers ages 15 and under. At the 2010 Marin Olympic Distance Triathlon, he was 20th and first in the 19-and-under category with a time of 2 hours, 21 minutes. This year, at the Wildflower Triathlon Festival he won his age group and was ninth overall in 59:47 at the mountain bike sprint distance race. The next day he placed 60th overall and first in his age group in a fine time of 2:26:22 — the second fastest time ever on that course for a 14-and under competitor.   Like many triathletes who get a fast start in the sport of swim-bike-run, Jake began his athletic life swimming — first with a recreational club, and four years ago under the coaching of Heidi McMillan, and now Todd Krohn of the Walnut Creek Aquabears. He has always shown that the longer the distance, the better he does. At the 1.5-mile Alcatraz Challenge swim this year, he was

the youngest competitor in the race and was first out of the water before finishing second overall in 31:05. Now he is focused on breaking the five-minute barrier for the 500-yard freestyle. Just recently, Rollo set a mark of 18:02 for the 1,500 meters at the Senior Swim Meet in Pleasanton. That is a time that would place the seventh-grader at Stone Valley Middle School in the lead of the elite wave of many championshipcaliberm Olympic-distance triathlons. Rollo started in sports like many California kids with soccer and t-ball. But at age 7, his father signed him up for recreational swimming with the Rudgear Meadows Swim Team in Walnut Creek. Oddly, at first he was one of the slowest. “Back then I was extremely slow because everything we did at that age was sprint distances – 25 meters up to age 9 when we did 50 meters,” said Rollo. “I loved it because the social side was great and I wasn’t focused just on winning and losing. “Later I discovered that my strength wasn’t fast twitch sprinting muscles. Later I found that I had slow twitch endurance muscles and the longer the race, the better I’d do.” When he was 10, Jake joined the Aqua Bears USA Swimming squad. “I had wanted to quit that season but my dad bribed me with a new swim bag and I got hooked on longer distances,” said Jake. “I started at the 200-yard freestyle and I was really slow, and then at the next practices coach got me into doing the 500 and I’ve loved that race ever since. “Then they started me swimming progressively longer until I reached the mile. I was 11 when I first did the 1,650-yard event at a last chance meet in Nevada and I destroyed everybody by at least two minutes. I felt pretty good about myself.” Jake gives credit to his sister, Emily, for inspiring him to

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take on swimming and then triathlon. “My mom and dad were never worried about me doing triathlons at a young age because my sister had done it all before me,” he said. “When my dad first asked me if I wanted to do a triathlon when I was 11, at first I hesitated. But then I decided that I could because she had done it at my age. I feel that my sister set my goals for me in swimming and triathlon. Whatever she did became my goal.” He gets some notice at school for his accomplishments in triathlon — but nothing like the attention that the most popular sports team gets. “People in my classes are very impressed with my ability to use my endurance,” he says. “But kids at my school are not really focused on that stuff. They are more into lacrosse.”  When you first ask him, Rollo says he isn’t so much focused on long term goals in sports. But after a while he admits he has some dreams. “In swimming one of my number one goals is to win my age group at the Far Western Championship. That may not happen soon. Another of my goals is to get a college scholarship in swimming.” He has some goals in triathlon, too. “I would love to be a youth national champion in the 15-and-under. I have a shot at that for two more years at least, although it’s contested at the super sprint distance a quarter of the Olympic distance. I do better at longer distances. But that’s the way it is.” He does have one longer term goal he has shared with his father, Jason, who works in Silicon Valley. “Long term?,” says Jason. “Represent his country in an Olympic event.” ✪

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Concord Police Assoc. readies for its annual Fourth of July 5K For the second time in as many years, the Concord Police Association is putting on its Stars & Stripes 5K Run/Walk. Held at Todos Santos Plaza in downtown Concord on July 4th, the event will benefit the Monument Crisis Center of Concord & Concord Police Association Fund. The entry fee is $30 but if you register before June 13 it’s $25 per participant. Awards will be given out to the top performers. The first male and female to cross the finish line will receive shoe certificates donated by Roadrunner Sports. The Top 3 finishers in each age division will have a medal draped around their neck for their achievement. Divisions are as follows: 10-and-under, 11-14, 15-18, 19-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, 70+ Come out, bring the family and make it a daylong event. A pancake breakfast will kick things off at 7:30 a.m. and will run to 11 a.m.. The 5K Run/ Walk will commence at 8:30, with registration going on between 7-8 a.m.. Following the run will be the annual Singing Flag and fireworks to cap off what should be a spectacular summer day. Concord Police Association is looking for sponsors for the 5K Run/Walk. To find out more info on how to get involved, visit their website at www.concordjuly4th.com. ✪ — SportStars Staff

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Tim’s Trail Tales In our May 12 issue, our TriSTARS section featured 23-year-old Concord resident Tim Ritter and his quest to hike the length of the 2,600-mile Pacific Crest Trail in support of the non-profit charity Walking for their Water. Our goal is to periodically update you on his progress. If you missed the introductory story, you can find it online at SportStarsMag.com. THE OPENING LEG: Tim began his trek on May 8 at the Mexico border and worked his way through desert terrain and low foothills for the first week. He was treated to a not-so-friendly storm and actually sought refuge off the trail to spend a night in Palm Desert. By May 19 he reached the San Jacinto Mountain Range and reached an elevation of about 8,000 feet. “I spent the two days enjoying long panoramas from several awesome ridge line vistas,” he reported via his blog. “All while enduring freezing night time temperatures, falling ice, snow-covered trail, mud, and several steep climbs. I loved it all. It felt like I had finally reached the real PCT.” THE DEHYDRATION: Self-admitted poor hydrating habits turned into a very serious situation for Tim shortly after his stretch atop the San Jacinto range. Unbeknownst to Tim, he was growing severely dehydrated during his hike and it was slowly robbing him of any appetite. This, in turn, caused his body to become extremely malnourished and it finally shut down. On May 22, approximately 240 miles

into the trail, he noticed that his legs were physically shrinking and was convinced that he was in a critical state. He notified family members that he needed to be extracted and was picked up in White Water, CA (north of Palm Springs). He returned home to Concord where he spent more than a week recovering after losing 17 pounds in 15 days. “I was starving out there and I got out and got help before it was too late,” he said. UNDETERRED: It took nearly two full days for Tim’s appetite to fully return, but once it did he engaged in a massive eating binge that helped him return to his original hiking weight of 178 pounds. He is now fully prepared to return to the trail on June 13, three days after celebrating his 24th birthday— obviously with a considerably more conscious hydration plan that will add some weight to his pack, but help him avoid the pitfalls he fell into the first time. Because of the record snowpack in the High Sierra’s, which would lead to a very grueling stretch not far from where he exited the trail, Tim thinks it’s best he skip ahead. “I will restart my hike at Burney Falls where the elevation is lower, and hike north to Canada,” he writes. “Then I will drive back to Southern California to resume my hike at Cajon Junction (mile 355) and hike north through the Sierras to Burney Falls. Therefore, I will hike the entire trail, but Burney Falls will replace the Canadian border as my finish line.” ✪

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Beat the heat

Know the signs and treatments of heat illness

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ummer and its hot temperatures are right around the corner. At least, we think they are. So now’s as good a time as any to talk about the dangers of heat illness. When exercising in the heat one should take into consideration the possibility of heat illness. Heat illness could vary from minor heat rash to heat cramps, heat exhaustion, or even heat stroke. While heat rash may be a rather minor form of heat illness, heat stroke on the other hand could be fatal. What is the difference between these forms of heat illness? HEAT RASH, also referred to as prickly heat, is the result of unevaporated sweat on the skin causing a continuously wet surface. Heat rash has the appearance of a red raised rash with a prickling and tingling sensation during sweating. A simple way to prevent this is to continually towel sweat off the body. HEAT CRAMPS are very painful muscle twitches and spasms brought on by an imbalance in water and electrolytes. Hard work or exercise in the heat can cause profuse sweating which results in this imbalance. Taking in adequate amounts of water and increasing electrolytes may help prevent heat cramps. Being accustomed to exercising in hot temperatures is to your advantage also. If you are experiencing heat cramps, drink adequate amounts of water and stretch the involved muscle. Ask your athletic trainer for an ice massage to the affected muscle, this also may help. HEAT EXHAUSTION, the result of water loss, is characterized by a slightly elevated body temperature with dizziness, fatigue,

weakness, and poor coordination. Someone suffering from heat exhaustion has a pale, clammy appearance. Profuse sweating, diarrhea, or intestinal infections are the main sources of water loss in the body. Proper water consumption as well as taking breaks during exercise are both good ways to prevent heat exhaustion. Fluid replacement and cooling elevated body temperature as soon as possible are crucial, therefore if you are experiencing any of these symptoms notify your athletic trainer immediately. HEAT STROKE is a very serious form of heat illness. It can strike suddenly and without any warning and may result in death. It is characterized by a sudden collapse with loss of consciousness. Someone with heatstroke has skin that is hot, red, and dry with a body temperature of at least 106° F. This is considered to be a medical emergency — contact the athletic trainer and call 911 immediately. Heat illness may be preventable if certain measures are taken. It is crucial to consume adequate amounts of water, take breaks and wear the proper clothing in hot weather. If you plan to be exercising in hot weather use your head and follow these guidelines, they are simple and may even save your life.

Health Watch Bruce Valentine

Bruce Valentine is a physical therapist assistant for the Sports Medicine For Young Athletes, a division of Children’s Hospital Oakland with a facility also located in Walnut Creek. If you have questions or comments regarding the “Health Watch” column, write the Sports Medicine For Young Athletes staff at Health@SportStarsMag.com.

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June 9, 2011

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Rise of the WILDCATS 34

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Marin Catholic-Kentfield went from also-rans to NCS champions

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By Chace Bryson | Editor

t was late in the third quarter of the North Coast Section Division II boys lacrosse final and Michael Podshadley was under fire. The Marin Catholic-Kentfield goalkeeper had seen three shots find the back of the goal, and a once comfortable halftime lead for the Wildcats had all but vanished. It was time for a reality check. Otherwise, it was going to be host Acalanes-Lafayette celebrating its first section title upon the conclusion of the May 27 match. “It was pretty scary,” said Podshadley, a senior in his third year of starting in goal for Marin Catholic. “Especially for the defense, because Acalanes had the momentum and our offense had kind of shut down.” Wildcats coach Will McGettigan wasn’t feeling any better about the situation. “Honestly, I thought it was slipping away from us for awhile there.” A 7-3 lead had quickly become 7-6, and momentum was clearly in Acalanes’ favor. This was close to uncharted territory for the Wildcats. One-goal games were not something they’d seen a lot of during a season in which they won 15 Upload photos and team stats! www.SportStarsMag.com


games by an average margin of nearly six goals. And even if Marin Catholic had played in a number of tight contests earlier in the year, it was still dealing with the pressure of playing for its first lacrosse title in what was the inaugural year for Division II competition. The Wildcats’ trip to the postseason in 2010 was a short-lived appearance in which they lost 14-2 to eventual Division I champion De La Salle. That result was most certainly still fresh in the minds of McGettigan and his returning players when they showed up for the season’s first workout back in early February. And as the roster began to take shape, one thing was clear, more firepower had arrived. A talented crop of freshmen weren’t just playing their way onto the team, they were playing their way into the starting lineup. “The freshmen didn’t play like freshmen,” McGettigan said. They weren’t playing like freshman in the final against Acalanes, either. Midfielder Chris Hill lead the team with three of its eight goals, and fellow freshman midfielder Nick Hallmark chipped in one as well. In the end, however, when the wheels were threatening to come off and roll down Pleasant Hill Drive, it was a veteran that made the big play for the Wildcats. Tommy Rooney scored what would amount to the gamesaving goal in Marin Catholic’s 8-7 defeat of the Dons. “Near the end, we knew we had to step up and make a play,” Rooney said. “I just saw my opportunity and made it happen.” Still, Rooney credited a lot of moving parts which lead to his goal. “(Acalanes) was playing a zone defense, and the way to beat a zone is to move the ball quickly and force players to make a mistake and get out of position,” the junior attacker and offensive captain said. “My man got caught a little too far out pressing the wing and I was able to get into the crease and one of my teammates found me. In the end, it was basically the whole team offense working well that created the hole in the defense.” Meanwhile, Podshadley and the senior-laden Marin Catholic defense buckled down and made sure Rooney’s goal would be the difference. For Podshadley, it was the perfect cap to a three-year run that gave him a front row seat to the program’s re-invention — a process which began with the arrival of McGettigan prior to the start of the 2010 season. “My first year on varsity (in 2009), we didn’t even make NCS,” the goalie said. “In fact, we lost in the first round of the Marin Catholic Athletic League playoffs.” McGettigan, an East Coast native who played four years of college lacrosse at Brown University, showed up in Kentfield with a message that basically boiled down to: ‘There’s talent here to win if that’s what you want to do.’ And so the Wildcats flipped the switch. “Lacrosse on the West Coast has kind of been known for being relaxed and not too competitive,” Podshadley said. “Having an East Coast lacrosse player take over the team made a big difference because it’s all about winning and very intense. It brought a lot of intensity to our team.” The 2011 group didn’t immediately fall into winning ways. In fact, as the mixture of freshmen and seniors worked towards meshing, Marin Catholic began the season 1-3. With three freshmen starting on the offensive end of the field, and the defense almost completely comprised of seniors, McGettigan had to be patient and let the team find a comfort zone on the field. “It took a little while,” the coach said. “All the freshmen had grown up playing together, so they knew each other’s tendencies, but it takes some time for everyone to understand the schemes and where we’re trying to attack. That happens with

Jonathan Hawthorne

far left: Marin Catholic senior Ross McLaughlin maneuvers away from a pair of Acalanes players during the North Coast Section Division II championship on May 28. ABOVE: Freshman midfielder Chris Hill (left) led the Wildcats with three goals in the title match which ended in celebration after an 8-7 win. every team. It takes a couple of games and a good amount of practice.” On March 8, the Wildcats defeated Bishop O’Dowd 9-3 to begin an eight-game winning streak. The seventh game of that stretch was a 16-11 win over University-S.F. on April 15. It was that win which really showed McGettigan this team had championship potential. “University is good program and we won that game by a decent margin,” McGettigan said. “Everything clicked in that game and for the rest of the season that game became the benchmark for how well we could play.” The win streak came to an end with a 13-11 loss to Central Coast Section powerhouse Bellarmine-San Jose. And although it was a loss, being able to stay close with the Bells helped boost Marin Catholic’s confidence even more.

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The Wildcats would suffer just one loss the rest of the season, an 11-5 hiccup against Novato on May 12. Once in the playoffs, they defeated Piedmont 13-9 and Miramonte-Orinda 10-6 to reach the finals. “Even though we lost, that Bellarmine game really showed us we could play with any team,” Rooney said. “I think we came out of that really believing we had a shot at North Coast.” Which takes us back to the start of the fourth quarter against Acalanes, and explains why the Wildcats didn’t press the panic button. The moment Rooney picked up that goal, Marin Catholic was reassured that it belonged. “We really did hunker down and get back to playing our game,” Rooney said. “I was proud with how we came together and focused.” ✪

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tee2green

Garrick continues a stellar 2011 with top round at CIF/ NCGA NorCals By Chace Bryson | Editor Jonathan Garrick and his St. Francis-Mountain View teammates broke new ground this season. The Lancers became the first team in West Catholic Athletic League history to finish the regular season undefeated in dual matches, and secured a co-championship at the WCAL tournament. However, after his team hit a speed bump at the Central Coast Section championships, Garrick found himself competing as an individual at the California Interscholastic Federation/Northern California Golf Association regional championships. No matter, though. Garrick proceeded to carve up Chico’s Butte Creek Country Club. The junior opened his round with three birdies over the first five holes before settling into a stream of pars on the back nine. He then sunk an 18-foot uphill birdie putt on hole No. 18 to finish with 4-under 68. “I started off pretty well,” Garrick said a few weeks after his May 23 performance. “Obviously you love to have three birdies in five holes, but my best rounds have tended to come when I start out slow. I prefer to start out steady and finish strong in the end. ... It was a pretty solid day, though. I drove it well and putted well.” Garrick’s score was two strokes better than second-place Nico Galletti of Foothill-Pleasanton. Both would advance to the CIF state championships at Poppy Hills Golf Course in Pebble Beach on June 8. Galletti, however, got to advance with his Foothill teammates after they finished third overall. De La Salle-Concord and Robert Louis Stevenson-Pebble Beach finished first and second, respectively. Garrick is certainly enjoying a quality stretch in a young career which began at age 8. That was when he began playing competitively, but he actually first swung a golf club even earlier. “I picked up a club for the first time around 13 years ago,” Garrick said. “My grandfather got me into the game when we still lived in Chicago.” It’s going to be a busy June for Garrick as he will travel to American Junior Golf Association tournaments in both North Carolina and Oregon. Later in the summer he’ll attempt to qualify for the United State Golf Association Jr. Amateur — he qualified last year and exited the match play event in the third round — as well as the U.S. Amateur. ✪

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Contributed

Jonathan Garrick of St. Francis-Mountain View.

Quick hits with Jonathan Garrick ■ Best 18-hole round: 7-under (65), Greyhawk GC (Arizona) ■ Toughest course played: Karsten Creek (Oklahoma) ■ Stroke play/Match play: Stroke play ■ Best celebrity golf moment: Did a clinic with Tiger Woods in third grade (2004). He pulled me up to hit a couple shots (a draw and a fade), and I somehow managed to pull them off. ■ Best feeling you can remember on a golf course: Playing in tournament when I was 14. I started off with triple bogey. Came back with five birdies in a row, and made one more to finish with a 69. ■ Average driving distance: 280 yards ■ Averages putts/round: 28, give or take ■ Favorite on-course snack: PB&J ■ Dream foursome: Brooklyn Decker, Tiger Woods, Nick Watney.

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tee2green

Dormann plays key role in fostering growth in girls golf When board member of The First Tee of Tri-Valley and former LPGA player Dana Dormannn picked up golf in high school, she was the only girl on her team as well as the only girl in the entire league. “It was challenging, but also rewarding when you have obstacles in front of you to know that you can overcome them,” Dormann said. “The opportunities that the girls have now weren’t available when I was playing junior golf, so I’ve been trying to pave the road a little bit and make it easier for them.”  Since retiring from the LPGA Tour, Dormann has worked as the site director for Pleasanton’s LPGA-USGA Girls Golf program. Dormann helped to start The First Tee of the Tri-Valley chapter in 2004 and is still an active member of the Board of Directors today.  DormanN Dana’s desire to give back to the community and girls has helped to grow the program, which has 170 girls as members. The goal at the chapter is to have at least 45 percent of their participants be female. Dana’s promotion of the sport and work through the LPGA-USGA has been one of the single motivating factors increasing golf popularity with young girls at the chapter.    Dana believes their success is due to the social atmosphere they create when young girls join the program.  “Some of these girls did not know each other before joining the program,” Dormann said. “They develop a bond and end up seeing each other outside the program for social time and golf. What the girls are figuring out is it is a great way to spend time with other people and develop a sport they can play for the rest of their lives. At the end of the day, the relationships formed at the clinics, classes and on the golf course are what makes it so much fun.   “Our goal for the program is getting girls started younger and having fun. Get them excited about participating and introducing the social aspect with their peers.”  Dana believes they have been successful with retention because they divide the girls into small groups so that everyone has an opportunity to get to know each other and share more about who they are.  Dana says, “They get comfortable with coming to class and know they will get to enjoy time together.” The next phase of their program is to help the girls if they want to move to the next level and improve their golf skills. They provide help in educating them on the process to play college golf as well as support to help them achieve their goals. Dana is very proud of the fact that over the past nine years the program has been up and running 10 girls have gone on to play Division I golf with many others at the Division II level.   When Dana is asked why she does this for the chapter, her answer is simple. “Golf has been a big part of my life,” she said. “I’m grateful for the opportunity to share my love of the game and in some way give back to my community and growing girls’ golf. I just

First Tee Files

Cathy Wagner

love seeing the girls come off the course and being happy — they are really enjoying it!” Visit our web site (thefirstteetrivalley.org) for details on becoming a member of our Girls Golf Club of Pleasanton and joining our monthly meetings. Visit lpgafoundation.org/girls golf/find.aspx to view an entire list of girls golf sites. First Tee Files is a rotating column featuring the executive directors of four Bay Area chapters of The First Tee. Cathy Wagner is actually the West Regional Director of the First Tee, and guest starring in place of The First Tee Tri-Valley director, Dan McKegney. Find out more on each chapter at: www.TheFirstTeeContraCosta.org, www.TheFirstTee Oakland.org, www.TheFirstTeeSanJose.org and www.The FirstTeeTriValley.org.

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impulse Listen. We have reasons up the wazoo why you have to come to our next SportsJam, the Father’s Day Free-For-All. In short: food, live music, epic games and challenges, prizes galore, fast cars, awesome exhibitions and jet packs. OK, that last one might not actually be there. Need more info? You’re in luck! Cabernet Indoor Sports and Umigo Indoor Kart Racing were kind enough (crazy enough?) to let us transform their parking lot into an epic playground where thousands can play, compete, dance, chow down, laugh, jump and sing. Cabernet is going to be hosting baseball tournament games throughout the weekend, so be sure to stop by and check out the madness. Across the way from Cabernet is Umigo. Their karts are uber-fast and they’ll have them on display. Let the games begin...

SPORTS

CARS

Golf

Baseball

Get your golf game goin’ with the chipping contest with First Tee Tri Valley. They teach kids of all ages how to drive, chip and putt their way to Pebble Beach while teaching them valuable lessons on and off the course. This is one of many respected and reputable First Tee chapters in the country located near the Pleasanton Fairgrounds. Challenge a friend to the chipping contest. Chipping doesn’t tickle your fancy? Then hit up Coach Rick’s golf section. This personal golf coach has expertise that spans the entire East Bay and he has years of experience on the links. He’ll have his putting green set up and can teach you a thing or two so you can stop three-putting and start posting birdies. Challenge your friends to a friendly match of putting and claim bragging rights.

Come out to Cabernet and bust out the lumber. They’re putting on a home run derby contest with targets. Hit a target, win a prize. It’s that simple. If you’re not the second coming of Pujols or A-Rod, maybe it’s Lincecum or Cahill to whom you strike a resemblance. Lock and load with the speed pitch competition. We’ll have a radar gun clocking every pitch. First one to hit 100 mph gets a signed ball from ... umm, well, we’ll cross that bridge if we have to. Heck, if you hit 100 mph, we’ll personally drive you to the A’s-Giants game so you can pitch the ninth (not really). Maybe you’re a speed demon with flames bursting from each foot. Test out your legs in the base running competition. Steal second base, and third if you’re feeling lucky. Just don’t steal all the bases ... we have to return those at the end of the day.

Tennis USTA is bringing their fast-serve machine, so now would be the perfect time to show off your return skills in front of the ladies. Show everyone you have what it takes to return speedy serves up to 100 mph while doing your best Federer or Nadal impression.

Lacrosse Ironhead Lacrosse will be out and they want to see how fast you can throw a lacrosse ball. They’ll have the radar gun ready, so wind up, let ‘er rip and aim for triple digits. Ironhead is an indoor lacrosse league in the Tri-Valley area. They’ll have plenty of info so you can sign up and join the party.

Football If you’ve got anything left in the tank, enter the football throwing competition and chuck the ball as far as you can. The SportStars record is 70 yards. Hah, yeah right. Imagine one of us actually being good at something sports related.

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Soccer Calling all Peles and Messis: show up to the Free-For-All to show off your futbol skills. Outlast your foes in the juggling competition or in the dribbling obstacle course. Not challenging enough? Test your goalscoring skills against a pro goalkeeper. Who knows? If you can pass all three challenges, you might just get signed by a pro team right then and there (but don’t hold your breath).

Basketball If you’ve got ice in your veins and you think you can stand up to the pressure, then step up to the line in the free throw competition. Show everyone you’re the next MJ, Kobe or LeBron by staring your competition down and nailing shot after shot. Maybe dialing from long distance is your game. Knock down as many treys as you can in the 3-point shootout. Prove to everyone you can shoot the lights out just like Mullin, Bird, Curry and all the other greats.

You know those slick rides that are getting featured on American Idol? Check ‘em out in person. They’ll have their latest models out on display and will be on the ready to answer any and all questions.

Hot Rods You’re a classy person, so maybe the latest and greatest in the world of cars isn’t your thing. You’re an old school dude with a passion for greased lightning and American graffiti (young folks, it’s OK if you don’t understand). Check out all the classics and ham it up with the owners of each ride.

TVQMA TVQMA will have their quarter midgets on display. Ooh and aah with the rest of them and find out how you can get involved in racing one of these bad boys.

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impulse

Tieni Duro

Bikes

Our friends over at the Tieni Duro racing team will be out with their riders and info on how to join the fun. Find out about the cool races they compete in throughout Nor Cal, and what makes them a staple for being the fastest dudes and dudettes on the course.

Food, music & more!

CC Composite

Just like at the last SportsJam, Contra Costa Composite High School Mountain Bike Team is busting out the mountain bike skills course. Bring your own bike and see if you’ve got what it takes to master the frustrating and tricky course. Don’t have a bike? It’s all good! Watch in awe as their own riders show off their mad biking skills and chop through the course like it’s yesterday’s leftovers.

demos Skate Street Science They’re bringing out the ramps and boxes and are ready to put on an exhibition that rivals the X-Games. These pros will be grinding and laying out so many tricks that you’ll want to buy a board and start landing tricks of your own.

Cyclone Martial Arts Cyclone Martial Arts will be putting on demos throughout the day. Watch them kick through boards, chop through cement blocks and wax on/wax off. To get more info on how to become a member, just ask one of them. Don’t worry. They won’t mistake you for a cement block.

Game Truck For all you non-athletes, we’ve got your back! Hit up the Game Truck and play video games until you’ve sprained your thumbs. This is most likely where you’ll find SportStars reps serving total ownage on its competition. You’ve been warned. Bring 15 of your friends so you can ALL play at ONCE. Seriously, this might be the coolest thing we’ve ever seen, well ... ever.

SportStars Prize Packages Oh yeah, don’t forget to stop by our booth and show us some love. Before you give us some dap, fill out an entry form for a chance to win one of our three super cool, wicked awesome, totally bodacious prize packages! For the outdoorsy type, you’re gonna want the Adventure package. The Endurance prize pack is ideal for those who crave marathons and long bike rides. Maybe you’re the country club type and you need some new gear? Then enter to win the Golf/Tennis prize package. Complete with a golf bag, free round of golf for any foursome, Prince tennis racket and bag along with other goodies.

Gamespeed The experts at Gamespeed will be on hand to go through skills and drills. Baseball, softball, football, lacrosse ... whatever the sport, they’ve got your back.

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Highway 4

sponsors Comcast Wanna be on TV? Everyone does so you’ll have to get in line. Stop by the Comcast booth and see what they’ve got in store for upcoming high school sporting events.

eTeam Hit up the eTeam booth for info on how to raise money for your sports program or organization. They’re the experts of fund-raising and are passionate about youth sports in the community.

GolfSmith One of the leaders in golf merchandising, GolfSmith will be on hand. Be sure to ask ‘em about all the best deals, and get more info on the Taylormade R11 driver and other hot items.

The Pitching Center Run by ex-Major Leaguer Jason Sekany, The Pitching Center will be at the Free-For-All as well. Learn to pitch like the pros and be sure to stop by their booth for more info.

Big O Tires Look, we love youth sports but there’s one company who goes just as BIG as we do. We’re talkin’ about Big O Tires. A staple for excellence in tires and customer service, their experts will be on hand at the event ready to tell you about special deals.

If you need a break from all the prizes you keep racking up, then shake your tailfeather on the dance floor. Local band Highway 4 will be laying down the classic tracks, if you can keep up with them They’ll be playing throughout the day so be sure to grab a friend so you’re not dancing alone. They play everything from The Beatles and Tom Petty to Green Day and Journey.

SportClips Get your summer buzzcut at the Free-For-All. Sporty, the mascot from SportClips, will be there chomping off locks all day long. Be sure to hit him up for a FREE cut.

Pit Stop BBQ Need more grub? It’s your lucky day. Pit Stop BBQ is a Livermore mainstay and they’re coming with a truck packed to the gills with pulled pork, tri-tip, cornbread and all the fixins.

Rockstar Need something to wash down all that BBQ goodness? Stop by the Rockstar booth and not only get your thirst quenched, but get charged and fueled to sprint up Mt. Diablo a few times. — Erik Stordahl

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camps + clinics BASEBALL/SOFTBALL Golden Era Baseball Based in the East Bay, we offer several instructional-based programs as well as 9U thru 18U Club Teams. We are currently taking sign-ups for our Spring Hitting Classes. Please see our website for full details: www. GoldenEraBaseball. com The Pitching Center We develop baseball players to their full potential. The Pitching Center has grown to become the Total Player Center (TPC), a full-service baseball and softball training academy. Age- and skill-specific programs are available for students ages 8 – High School. Info: 925-416-1600, thepitchingcenter. com SportForm Based in Concord, SportForm provides individual and team instruction in baseball, softball, lacrosse. Highly trained professionals provide accelerated and advanced skills clinics. Prepare to Perform! Info: 925-459-2880. City of Walnut Creek Baseball is Fun Beginner Camp. July 25-Aug. 4, 9 a.m.-noon, Mon.-Thur. at Tice Valley Park; Extended day/week available w/Deluxe Sport Option. Ages 5-9. $35/$75. Registration: www.walnut creeksportsleague.com, 925-952-4450. All American Softball 2011 Softball Summer Day Camp at Alyce Norman Bryte Playfields. Girls of all ages welcome. Camp features a college softball Q&A with our AllAmerican staff. $250/athlete; $150/ athlete when registering 6 or more at one time. Info: 916-374-1907, www. softballschool.com. BASKETBALL City of Walnut Creek Basketball is Fun Beginner Camp. July 11-21 at Tice Valley Park; extended day/week available with Deluxe Sport Option. Ages 5-12. $35/$65 per week. Registration and info: www.walnut creeksportsleague.com, 925-952-4450. Saint Mary’s College camps Spend your June and July learning fundamentals or honing your skills at McKeon Pavilion. Plenty of options are available. Registration and info: 925-6314386, smccamps@ stmarys- ca.edu; www.smcgaels.com. Bladium Triple Threat Academy Alameda’s Bladium Sports & Fitness

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Club hosts multiple hoops camps for ages 6-12. Designed for players of ALL skill levels. Registration: AlamedaSales@ bladium. com, 510-814-4999; www. bladium.com. CHEER CheerGyms.com We offer the best clinics in California! Customize your clinic to fit your needs from basic stunting techniques or working on twist cradles out of one leg stunts, we take your team to the next level! Info: 866685-7615, www. CheerGyms.com East Bay Sports Academy Recreational, competitive athletes benefit from training with the best coaches. Our 10,000-squarefoot facility is clean and bright with the newest equipment. Info: (925) 680-9999, www.EastBaySportsAcademy.com. EQUESTRIAN Earthquake Arabians We are hosting camps throughout spring and summer at their facility in the Morgan Territory. Camps are June 13-17 and June 2024. Size is limited so sign up now! Info/Registration: 925-3607454 or www.EarthquakeArabians.com for more info. Kelly Maddox Riding Academy Develop new friendships with other horse-crazy kids. Weekly activities include learning horse colors, markings and breeds; arts and crafts; a farrier demonstration and human horse show; bareback riding and more! Info: 925575- 4818, www.KellyMaddoxTraining. com Franklin Canyon Stables Based in Martinez, we provide two covered arenas and easy access to trails. Beginning riders or experienced equestrians, we have a place for you. Instruction in horsemanship on the ground and in the saddle while having fun. Info: 925- 2281801; http://www.kimshorsetraining. com/franklin_canyon.html Castle Rock Arabians Activities for tweens and teenagers, where we build team spirit through various team activities on horseback. Visit the ranch by appointment. Info: 925-933-3701, www.

castlerockarabians.com FITNESS Children’s Hospital The “Sport Speed Camp” presented by the Children’s Hospital Oakland Sports Medicine is being held in three two-week sessions: June 20-July 1, July 11-22, and Aug. 1-12. All camp sessions are Monday-Friday from 2-4 p.m. The camp will be at the Derby Street Athletic Field, 1900 Derby Street, Berkeley. Cost is just $250 per athlete and space is limited to 25 athletes per camp session. Info/Registration: call 510-428-3558 and hit option 3. Fit 2 The Core As a Youth Conditioning, Speed/Agility and Nutrition Specialist with the IYCA, Fit2-The-Core Training Systems offers an innovative approach to getting young athletes back on the field post-rehabilitation, and continuing the process by progressing their bodies to handle what they must endure on the field or court. Info: 925639-0907. Walnut Creek Sports & Fitness We offer more than 70 group classes per week. Members also enjoy our heated pool, sauna, spa, and steam-room. Massage, skincare and chiropractic services are available. Call us today for your free week pass! Info: 925-9326400, www.wcsf.net ENRICHMENT Dianne Adair Programs We offer a wide variety of enrichment programs for your child, during the school year and throughout summer. Activities include: Homework help, 4th & Up Club, art and crafts, science, sports, and games. Summer camps include weekly field trips. Info: www. dianneadair.org. E.Nopi and Palm Academy Palm Academy’s “Summer Camp Spectacular” offers day camps with oneweek or one- day programs to provide the flexibility for your busy schedule. Abrakadoodle Art Camps inspire kids to reach beyond and create art that is unique to them. Info: Palm Academy, Fremont, (510) 9799794 or E.Nopi, Newark, (510)79ENOPI (36674) FUZE Fit For A Kid FUZE is a privately held, DOJ-certified youth-only health club and curricula

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camps + clinics

Camptastic! modeled after the principles of the Positive Coaching Alliance. FUZE enhances athletic development, socialization and self-esteem. Info: 888FIT 4 A KID; www. fuzefit.com FOOTBALL NorCal Football Camps Led by Marin Catholic High coach, Ken Peralta (San Francisco 49ers High School Coach of the Year) Camps serve youth ages of 714. We help each child reach his full potential as a football player and young person. Info: 650-2453608 . www. norcalfootballcamps.com Diablo Football Camps Contact and non-contact camps are available for players ages 6-14 in June. The camps take place at Freedom Basin in Oakley. Info and registration: www. diablofootball.com/camps.php; 925-625- 2222, www.DiabloFootball. com GOLF Dave DeLong Junior Golf Camp This camp is for advanced and beginning junior golfers. Camps are designed for golfers 7-15. Camps include a 4 to 1 ratio of students to teachers where safety is the top priority as well as player development and enjoyment. Boundary Oak Course, Walnut Creek. Info: 925-997-3683; www. delonggolf.com Coach Rick Golf Learn to play on the course, where it matters with Coach Rick! Golfers of all ages can sign up for clinics offered by Coach Rick starting now throughout summer. Info: (510) 917-6442 • www. ThePersonalGolfCoach.com The First Tee-Contra Costa The First Tee Summer Camp is a youth development program for boys and girls 7-18. Participants learn about golf and life skills and values inherent to the game, rules and etiquette. Summer camps at Diablo Creek Golf Course in Concord. Info: www.thefirstteecontracosta.org; angela@thefirstteecontracosta.org or 925-686-6262 x0. The First Tee-Oakland The First Tee of Oakland has delivered

■ For more camps and clinics listings, visit the SportStars Virtual Campsite at http://www. sportstarsmag.com/camps_and_clinics. ■ Want to get your camp listed online or in the magazine. Or both! Call us at 925-566-8500.

The First Tee Life Skills Experience to over 262 participants. Each receive a min. 12 hours of instruction over an 8-week period. Instruction is at three Oakland courses: Metropolitan Golf Links, Lake Chabot GC and Montclair GC. Info: 510352-2002; www. thefirstteeoakland.org. The First Tee-San Jose The First Tee of San Jose develops youth through the game of golf throughout Silicon Valley. Participants learn to appreciate diversity, resolve conflicts, build confidence and set goals. We welcome participants ranging from second to 12th grade. Scholarships available. Info: 408-2882973; www. thefirstteesanjose.org. The First Tee-Tri-Valley The First Tee of the Tri-Valley offers seasonal The First Tee Life Skills Experience Classes and Summer Camps for ages 7-17, held at the Pleasanton Golf Center on the Alameda County Fairgrounds. Summer classes begin on June 14. Junior Golf Summer Camps are held weekly. Info: 925.462.7201, www. TheFirstTeeTriValley.org LACROSSE Atherton Lacrosse Our lacrosse camps are designed for boys and girls ages 5-14, who are beginner or intermediate players. Our group of coaches and staff are leaders in the lacrosse community. Info: 888- 526-3330, www. AthertonLacrosse.com. SportForm Based in Concord, SportForm provides Individual and team instruction in baseball, softball and lacrosse. Highly trained professionals provide accelerated and advanced skills clinics. Prepare to Preform! Info: 925-459-2880. Vitality Lacrosse Vitality offers summer league programs in four Bay Area regions, all of which come together on July 30 for the Bay Area Summer League

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Championships on Treasure Island. Locations include: Marin County, Peninsula, East Bay and Petaluma. League runs six weeks starting June 20. Info: 888-501-4999, www. VitalityLacrosse.com. MARTIAL ARTS United States Karate Systems Adult and children’s programs, kick box fitness, mixed martial arts. Providing excellence in martial arts instruction and services for the entire family. 925-682-9517; www. usksmartialarts.com MOTORSPORTS Keigwins@theTrack We conduct motorcycle schools and practice events (“track days”) at famous racetracks in the West for experienced motorcyclists looking to improve skills and build confidence. Riders provide their own motorcycles and protective gear. Keigwins@ theTrack takes care of everything else. Info: www. keigwin.com or 650-9495609. OUTDOOR SPORTS Bear Valley Mountain Bear Valley has six camps with multiple sessions including: Soccer, Archery, Tennis, Climbing, Cycling and Day Camp. Summer Camps offer outdoor rec programs for the whole family; overnight resident skill camps and day camps, too. Age groups and activities vary by camp. Info: www.bearvalley.com University of Surfing Instructor Matt Cole offers lessons/ camps in Pacifica. 650-359-1425, mattcolesurfs@hotmail.com; http:// universityofsurfing.com/index.html. SOCCER Heritage Soccer Club A Pleasant Hill/Martinez based competitive soccer club welcomes players ages 8-18. Learn new skills and hone existing ones from top flight coaching staff with years of experience spanning the high school and college ranks. June is the third annual 6v6 Blowout Tournament. Info: www.heritagesc.com.

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camps + clinics SoccerInsight.net 2011 Summer Camp Available to ages 5-12, the SoccerInsight.net camps are offered over two weeks in June and three weeks in August. The camps are held from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. @ Paul Goode Field, The Presidio in San Francisco. Info:415595- 3760, www.soccerinsight.net. SWIMMING-DIVING Walnut Creek Swim Club WCSC is a recreational team sponsored by the City of Walnut Creek celebrating its 50th anniversary. Led by the experience of coach Brad Hoy, the staff is the finest in the area. WCSC believes in finding the healthy balance between competition and family fun. Info: 925-766-5664 Sherman Swim School We are a Lafayette swimming and diving school celebrating our 50th year. Our year-round schedule allows children and adults to learn, retain, and improve their swim skills with little interruption. Info: 925283-2100, www.ShermanSwim.com California Sports Center Among the many camps offered by San Jose’s Cal Sports Center includes its Swim Summer Camps at Sunnyvale Swim Center on the campus of Fremont High. The camps are held from either 9 a.m.-noon, or 9 a.m.-4 p.m. for ages 6-14. Info: 408-732-2257, www. CalSportsCenter.com TENNIS Summer Tennis at Valley Vista ClubSport Valley Vista has successfully hosted summer tennis camps in Walnut Creek for more than 30 years, with expert instruction. Info: 925-934-4050, www.clubsports.com VOLLEYBALL Pacific Rim Volleyball We offer several skill-based camps and clinics, including setting camp, hitting camp and an all-skills camp. Campers will be evaluated and placed in a group that challenges their level of play. Registration for beach volleyball is going on now as well. Info: www. pacificrimvolleyball.com U.S. Youth Volleyball League USYVL hosts series of Summer camps

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in several Northern and Southern California locations. We’re the leader in developing, maintaining youth volleyball leagues for boys and girls ages 7-15. With an emphasis on positive reinforcement, we seek to build confidence and self-esteem in each child. Info: 1-888-988-7985 or www. USYVL.org. WRESTLING Creighton Wrestling The Creighton School of Wrestling in Mountain View offers its 2011 youth and elite summer camps from June 20-July 9. Both camps take place at the JLS Middle School Wrestling Room in Palo Alto. Guest clinicians include NCAAchampion wrestlers Tony Davis, Gerry Abas and Jordan Leen. Info: creightonschoolofwrestling@yahoo. com; http://CreightonSchoolofWrestling. com Community Youth Center The CYC in Concord offers three types of week-long wrestling camps. Elementary Camp for ages 5-10 runs July 5-8. All Corners Camp for ages 11-18 runs July 18-22, and Advanced Camp serves the same age group and runs Aug. 8-12. Camps are 9 a.m.-3 p.m. daily at the CYC. Info: 925-671-7070, Ext. 229, www. communityyouthcenter.com. MULTI-SPORT De La Salle sports camps The school’s Athletic Summer Camps begin June 13 and run in week-long sessions through June 30. Camps are for incoming fourth-throughninth graders in the sports of football, track and field, lacrosse, wrestling, volleyball, baseball, water polo, soccer, and strength and conditioning. Information: (925) 2888100, ext. 7090. Cal Athletic Camps Cal Camps are offered in a variety of sports for girls and boys

5-19, with week-long, half-day, full-day and overnight options, and several choices for adults. Most camps take place on campus in Berkeley from June through August. Camp sports include: baseball, basketball, rowing/crew, field hockey, football, golf, rugby, soccer, strength & conditioning, swimming, tennis, volleyball and water polo. Info calcamps@berkeley.edu. City of Concord Skyhawks Sports Skyhawks Sports and the City of Concord have teamed up to provide safe, fun and skill-focused sports camps this summer for ages 4-12. Camps range from soccer to lacrosse to our popular multi-sport camp where kids sample three different sports (Soccer, Basketball, and Baseball) in one camp. Info: www. concordreg.org or (925) 671-3404. Renaissance ClubSport Spring and summer Sports camps are led by seasoned directors. Sports Day Camp is for children 5-12 and focuses on a different sport each day including: football, soccer, swimming, basketball, bocce, kickball, racquetball and karate. Summer camps run June 13 thru Aug. 19. Info: 925-942-6344. www. clubsports.com Cabernet Indoor Sports Come Play Soccer, Baseball, Basketball, Football, Lacrosse, Dodgeball, Capture the Flag, Futsal and much more at the world’s greatest summer camp experience in Livermore. Available to kids ages 5 & up, Monday-Friday from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. running from June 13-Aug. 19. More info: www.cabernetindoorsports.com Velocity Sports Performance The Dublin-based Velocity’s Sports Specific Summer Camps is looking for boys and girls ages 8-14 who are dedicated to making themselves better as athletes. Camps are typically 4-5 days long and begin June 20, running through mid-August. They include soccer, basketball, football, baseball and softball. The price is $200 for non-members per week, $150 for Velocity members or $50 per session. Information: (925) 8330100.

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Pick your favorites and we’ll get you hooked up! ❒❒ ❒❒ ❒❒ ❒❒ ❒❒ ❒❒ ❒❒ ❒❒ ❒❒ ❒❒ ❒❒ ❒❒ ❒❒ ❒❒ ❒❒ ❒❒

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Apparel Automotive Camps & Clinics Endurance/Outdoor/Adventure Events Fun/Entertainment Fundraising Golf/Tennis Gyms/Health Clubs Health & Nutrition Home Improvement Martial Arts Restaurants Sporting Goods Teams/Clubs/ Leagues Travel & Leisure

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A A A Northern California,

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Comcast Hometown Network.... 12 ❒❒

Greenhorn Creek Golf Club......... 37 ❒❒

Sky High Sports......................... 33

Nevada & Utah.......................... 10 ❒❒

Community Youth Center............. 7 ❒❒

Halo Headband.......................... 42 ❒❒

Sport Clips................................. 19 Sports Jam Cabernet: Father’s Day

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Aabco Printing......................... 43 ❒❒

Concord Police Association......... 43 ❒❒

Heavenly Greens........................ 23 ❒❒

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Alameda County Fair................. 47 ❒❒

Crowne Plaza............................. 43 ❒❒

Home Team Sports Photography.. 42

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Back Forty B B Q.......................... 7 ❒❒

Dave Delong School Of Golf....... 36 ❒❒

Jory’s Flowers............................ 43

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Big 5 Sporting Goods................... 3 ❒❒

Diablo Car Wash & Detail Center....43 ❒❒

Kaiser Permanente.................... 34

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Big C Athletic Club..................... 26 ❒❒

Diablo Rock Gym....................... 33 ❒❒

Kelly Maddox Equestrian Training.... 42

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Big O Tires.................................... 2 ❒❒

Diablo Trophies & Awards.......... 33 ❒❒

Kinders B B Q............................. 22

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Bob Larson Sports Action

E Teamsponsor........................... 45 ❒❒

Livermore Auto Group............... 32

Photography............................. 41 ❒❒

East Bay Sports Academy........... 28 ❒❒

Lone Tree Golf Course................. 37

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Cabernet Indoor Sports.............. 40 ❒❒

Eden Medical Center.................. 27 ❒❒

McCoveys................................... 22

Excellence In Sport Performance.35 ❒❒

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Cheer Gyms............................... 14 ❒❒ Clayton/Countrywood Fitness

Free- For- All.............................. 48 ❒❒

Sports Stars Magazine............... 43

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Team Zero Video Productions..... 41

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The First Tee Of Contra Costa...... 37

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The First Tee Of The Tri Valley...... 37

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Tpc / The Pitching Center........... 40

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Tri Valley Tri Club........................ 29

Mt. Diablo Soccer....................... 41 ❒❒ Peninsula Building Materials..... 43 ❒❒

Velocity Sports Performance...... 33

Usks Concord............................ 40

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Fit 2 The Core............................. 33 ❒❒

Centers...................................... 33 ❒❒

Franklin Canyon Golf Course...... 37 ❒❒

Rocco’s Pizza.............................. 33 ❒❒

Walnut Creek Sports & Fitness... 31

Club Sports Renaissance............ 18 ❒❒

Golden Era Baseball................... 33 ❒❒

Scandia Family Center............... 28 ❒❒

Wingstop Restaurants................. 5

June 9, 2011

Upload photos and team stats! www.SportStarsMag.com


Carondelet-Concord’s Christiana Castello makes a sweeping tag just a little too late as Milaina Harrington of Pinole Valley-Pinole slides safely into second base during their North Coast Section Division II semifinal on May 25. Carondelet won the game 6-5 in a 10-inning thriller. The Cougars advanced to the final where they finished runners-up to Petaluma. Photo by BOB LARSON

Want to submit your pic for Photo Finish? Send it to us at editor@SportStarsMag.com. Photos must be 300 dpi and at least 10 inches wide in the jpeg format. Please identify every person in the photo and include your contact information. 46

SportStars™

June 9, 2011

Upload photos and team stats! www.SportStarsMag.com


CA Issue 25, 06.09.2011  

California Edition 25

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