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mlk hoops ready to throw down. Pg. 22

vol. 3. issue 39

FREE

January 12, 2012

endure | excel | achieve

california

on a mission San Ramon Valley girls soccer focused on prize .

Pg. 14

acl 101

get to know your knee. Pg. 10

three spree

terra Nova girls hoops rides high with vaunted trio. Pg. 18

TOP 20

boys, girls hoops . Pgs. 22, 24

Second state title is squarely in Jake Elliott’s sights. Pg. 26


all access

MAKE NO MISTAKE: IT’S ALL ABOUT JAKE

PHONE 925.566.8500 FAX 925.566.8507 Editorial Editor@SportStarsOnline.com Editor Chace Bryson. Ext. 104 • Chace@SportStarsOnline.com Contributors Bill Kolb, Erik Stordahl, Mitch Stephens, Doug Gardner, Matt Smith, Clay Kallam, Jim McCue, Eric Gilmore, Dave Kiefer, Liz Elliott, Tim Rudd, Jonathan Okanes Photography Butch Noble, Bob Larson, Jonathan Hawthorne, Darryl Henick, Norbert von der Groeben, Phillip Walton

Oakmont’s standout wrestler won’t be overlooked this season.

Creative Department Art@SportStarsOnline.com Production Manager Mike DeCicco. Ext. 103 • MikeD@SportStarsOnline.com

Pg. 26

Publisher/President Mike Calamusa. Ext. 106 • Mike@SportStarsOnline.com

Chris Scott

big dreams: San Ramon Valley girls soccer and Reilly Parker, above, know exactly what they want out of this season. Pg. 14 respect: Terra Nova is used to being lightly regarded, but that’s about to change. Pg. 18 in the paint moving up: Deer Valley-Antioch continues to build Bay Valley Athletic League credibility. Pg. 22 prime time: The best MLK girls game might be Carondelet vs. St. Mary’s-Stockton. Pg. 24 First Pitch.................................................. 6 Locker Room........................................... 8 Health Watch.........................................10 SportStars of the Week.......................11 In the Paint.............................................22 Behind the Clipboard...........................30 TriSteps....................................................32 Training Time..........................................33 Camps + Clinics....................................34 Impulse....................................................37 Photo Finish............................................38

James K. Leash

ON THE COVER: Oakmont’s Jake Elliott. Photo by James K. Leash

Advertising & Calendar/Classified Sales Sales@SportStarsOnline.com Account Executives Erik Stordahl • Erik@SportStars Online.com (Special Sections, Calendar, Marketplace sales), Phillip Walton • PWalton@SportStarsOnline.com (Sacramento Sales), Breck Phillip • BreckPhillip@gmail.com (Sacramento Sales), Stacey Harris • SHarris@SportStarsOnline.com. Reader Resources/Administration Ad Traffic, Subscription, Calendar & Classified Listings info@SportStarsOnline.com • Deb Hollinger. Ext. 101 • Distribution/Delivery Mags@SportStarsOnline.com Distribution Manager Butch Noble. Ext. 107 • Butch@SportStarsOnline.com Information technology John Bonilla CFO Sharon Calamusa • Sharon@SportStarsOnline.com Office Manager/Credit Services Deb Hollinger. Ext. 101 • Deb@SportStarsOnline.com Board of Directors Dennis Erokan, CEO, Placemaking Group Roland Roos, CPA, Roland Roos & Co Susan Bonilla, State Assembly Drew Lawler, Managing Director, AJ Lawler Partners Brad Briegleb, Attorney At Law community SportStars™ Magazine A division of Caliente! Communications, LLC 5356 Clayton Rd., Ste. 222 • Concord, CA • 94521 info@SportStarsOnline.com www.SportStarsOnline.com

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your ticket to bay area sports admit one; rain or shine This Vol. #3, January 2012 Whole No. 39 is published by Caliente! Communications, LLC, 5356 Clayton Rd, Ste. 222, Concord, CA 94521. SportStars™© 2010 by Caliente! Communications, LLC. All rights reserved. Subscription rates: 24 issues, U.S. 3rd class $42 (allow 3 weeks for delivery). 1st class $55. To receive sample issues, please send $3 to cover postage. Back issues are $4 each. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission of Publisher is strictly prohibited. The staff and management, including Board of Directors, of SportStars™© does not advocate or encourage the use of any product or service advertised herein for illegal purposes. Editorial contributions, photos and letters to the editor are welcome and should be addressed to the Editor. All material should be typed, double-spaced on disk or email and will be handled with reasonable care. For materials return, please enclose a stamped, self-addressed envelope. SportStars™© and STARS!™© Clinics are registered trademarks of Caliente! Communications, LLC.

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Jamboree’s most lasting moment came after games ended

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sk high school girls basketball fans from Northern California the first word that comes to mind when one mentions West Coast Jamboree tournament. I’d venture to guess 7 out of 10 would answer with the word “Big.” Big isn’t necessarily a bad thing. In fact, there are definite positives to the masses of teams that descend upon the East Bay during the final week of December each year. A couple of examples of big being better? 1) The tournament organizers can draw up brackets that stress competitive equity, allowing schools of all enrollment and pedigree to take part in the event. And, 2) By being able to invite several high-profile programs, there has been no shortage to the amount of talent the tournament has showcased over the years. But “Big” also requires the games be spread among gyms across the East Bay. In some cases, different brackets of the Jamboree can be played more than 30 miles from each other. This year, the distance between the Diamond Division at Liberty-Brentwood and the Platinum Division at Miramonte-Orinda was a whopping 41 miles. Those sort of distances act as a deterrent for coaches, players and fans to visit more sites during the tournament. There also seems to be a bit of intimacy lost in an event spread out so much. It means a lesser chance for shared experiences among the massive girls basketball community that attends each year. While a two-thirds full Miramonte gymnasium was a good crowd for the championship game of the Platinum Division (the marquee bracket each year), it wasn’t enough considering the state’s No. 1 (Windward-L.A.) and No. 7 (Bishop O’Dowd-Oakland) teams were squaring off. And though the game was very good (Windward prevailed 65-58), it was a ceremony afterward that should have had the eyes of the entire Jamboree upon it. Vallejo High did not attend the Jamboree this year. The last time the Apaches participated was in 2009. The coach of that team was Jim Capoot, a Vallejo police officer who tragically lost his life after being shot while pursuing a bank robbery suspect on Nov. 17. As several glowing stories of Capoot were told in the wake of his death, it became apparent how devoted he was, not only to his family and profession, but also to the several kids he mentored as a basketball coach. The greater Northern California girls basketball community mourned the loss, and it spurred an idea from Dave Jackson and Harold Abend, two of the Jamboree’s organizing partners. “I said to Dave, it would be nice if we could do something to honor Jim,” Abend said. “He coached in the tournament and his daughters played in the tournament. It’d be good to do something to keep Jim’s memory alive in the basketball community.” That conversation started the framework for the West Coast Jamboree’s Jim Capoot Memorial Award. O.C. Jones gladly offered to sponsor the award and Abend put toChace@ gether the criteria needed to win it. SportStarsOnline.com “I wanted it to go to a player who exhibits inspirational play and sportsmanship,” Abend said. (925) 566-8503 The organizers went a step further, though, by inviting Jennifer Capoot (Jim’s wife) and his former Vallejo assistant coach Debbie Tucker to be on hand to present the award. Both accepted. After the MVP award had been handed to Windward sophomore Jordin Canada, Abend called the two special guests to the floor, along with O.C. Jones representative Mike Crowley and named Bishop O’Dowd junior Oderah Chidom — who had scored just four points that night, but played remarkable defense — as the first recipient of the memorial award. Many of the spectators stood in applause as Chidom was hugged by Jennifer Capoot. “She basically just told me I had a great tournament and that she was proud of me,” Chidom said of her exchange with Capoot, who would later tell Abend that after he watched Chidom play during Phillip Walton the game felt the Dragons forward was a perfect recipient. “(Jim Capoot) provided a lot of inspiration The presentation of the West Coast Jamboree’s Jim Capoot Memorial Award. From left to right, Debbie Tucker, Jennifer and motivation to his players. To win the award, and Capoot, Oderah Chidom, Mike Crowley and Harold Abend. carry on a legacy like that is an honor.” ✪

First Pitch Chace Bryson Editor

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words from the world or wrestling Every sport has it’s own special lingo: a controlled vocabulary that precisely expresses specific things to the “in” crowd, and often means next-to-nothing to casual observers. And with the meat of the wrestling season upon us, we figured it was a good time to share our Top Five wrestling words. 1. Cradle: A move that some wrestlers use to rock their opponents to sleep. If you’re in one, chances are the person holding you ain’t singing a lullaby. Oh, and you’re probably gonna lose. 2. Cross Face: Not the nickname of a kid with an oddly religious birthmark on his mug. A move whereby one wrestler presses his forearm hard across the other wrestler’s face. This often results in bloody, and sometimes broken, noses. One of our personal favorites. 3. Whizzer: Not to be confused with Wizard (it’s not Lord of the Rings, people) or the Whizzinator (this is a family magazine). A defensive move wrestlers use to try to block opponents’ shots. Often accompanied by the word “HARD!” from the coaching corner, and followed by lots of circling and scrambling.

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4. Neutral: The standing position in which both wrestlers start every freestyle match. Wrestlers are allowed to choose this position when they have the option in the second and third periods. Also: The way many sports fans feel about wrestling, mostly because they don’t know enough and just don’t get it. Silly sports fans. 5. Barbecue: You know, what wrestlers can’t eat in the preseason. Or the postseason. Or pretty much any season. Definitely not during wrestling season. And we probably shouldn’t put it in here because it’ll make them drool. We only tease because we care, guys and gals. Now wipe your chins. — Bill Kolb, photo by Jonathan Hawthorne

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rapidFIRE Favorite TV Show? College GameDay

Aaron Young, Vista del Lago football

Modern Family

One item your school cafeteria needs

First word that comes to mind when you hear ‘Tim Tebow’

Worst How far will consequence the 49ers go in of a lost bet the playoffs

NCAA FB: Playoffs or BCS?

Lose in Super Bowl

Playoffs

Better pizza

Leader

Lose in NFC title game

Playoffs

Smoothies

Tim Tebow?

Lose to Saints

Playoffs

Smoothies

Winner

Most of my paycheck (on BCS title game)

$5

Marissa Neel, SRV swimming

SportsCenter

I didn’t lose; teammate had to get reverse mohawk

Mitch Kranson, De La Salle baseball

We’re putting the finishing touches on the next issue. Can you guess who’s on the cover? Tim Tebow? :-), Tina S. Photo courtesy of Andrew Mason/MaxDenver.com. Special thanks to Rupert, George

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ACLs 101:

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The basics on the ligament and how tears are treated

against the risk of instability and cartilage damCL tears in the pediatric and adolescent population are becoming increasingly age when considering an ACL reconstruction in common. Children as young as 7 years of pediatric and adolescent patients. age are presenting with these injuries. This is due Over the past several years, orthopedic surto a combination of factors: increasing knowledge geons have developed special techniques that of these injuries, improved MRI machines, and allow for ACL reconstructions with minimal risk children’s increasing participation in high-level, of growth plate damage. This has allowed even the high-impact activities at younger and younger youngest patients to safely undergo ACL reconages. struction. The majority of these surgeries are done Many people have heard of professional athletes with small incisions with the help of an arthroending their season due to an ACL injury, but scope (camera), and are done on an outpatient what does the ACL actually do and how is it basis. During the surgery, the entire knee joint is healed? viewed, and other injuries can be fixed at the same ACL stands for “anterior cruciate ligament,” time. and it is one of the four main ligaments The type of tissue that is generally of the knee. The ACL’s job is to provide Unlike other areas used to create a new ACL in patients stability to the knee (allowing an athlete of the body, with open growth plates is your own to cut and pivot) by preventing the hamstring tendons. In adult patients, femur (thigh bone) from moving indecomplete tears of a portion of your own patellar tendon pendently of the tibia (shin bone). the ACL do not with pieces of bone attached to either Unlike other areas of the body, heal on their own, end (i.e. bone-tendon-bone graft) can complete tears of the ACL do not be used, but these types of grafts have heal on their own, and it’s a popular and it’s a popular misconception that ACL’s are actually been shown to damage the growth misconception that plates of children. Another option repaired (sewn together). Once an ACL is completely torn it needs to be reACL’s are actually which can be used is tissue from a placed. While many parents and young cadaver. The advantages of cadaver repaired (sewn athletes want an ACL reconstruction so tendons are that it makes the surgery that they can get back to playing sports together). Once an quicker and less painful, and preserves quickly, the real reason for an ACL ACL is completely your own tissue. Unfortunately, the reconstruction below the age of 35 is to disadvantage of using cadaver tendons torn it needs prevent early onset of arthritis. is that studies have shown a four times If you try to play sports without an to be replaced. higher rate of re-tearing the ACL in ACL, something else in the knee tries to While many parents younger patients. function (unsuccessfully) as the ACL. After surgery, most patients can imUnfortunately, this ends up being the and young athletes mediately walk with the help of a brace meniscus which is the cartilage “cushwant an ACL and crutches. Physical therapy is usually ion” in between the femur and tibia started immediately. Most patients bones.  The meniscus is not designed to reconstruction so can begin running after three months, give stability to the knee during cutting/ that they can get and return to sports after six to nine pivoting. As a result, a knee without an months. back to playing ACL ends up putting too much stress new techniques available to on the meniscus which causes it to tear. sports quickly, the us With today, ACL injuries can be treated In the past, many surgeons were real reason for an in our young pediatric and adolescent hesitant to operate on young patients because their growth plates were open, ACL reconstruction athletes with minimal risk of injury to and there was a risk of damaging these growth plate. Not only can we get below the age of 35 the growth plates during an ACL reconour young athletes back on the field, struction. Damaging the growth plates is to prevent early but more importantly, prevent further leads to the potential risks of one leg bepain, degeneration, and instability in onset of arthritis. ing shorter than the other, the leg bendthe future. ✪ ing backwards abnormally, or a person Dr. Nirav K. Pandya is a pediatric developing “knock-knees.” Therefore, orthopedic surgeon specializing in pediatric sports injuries at many surgeons kept children in a brace and out of sporting Children’s Hospital in Oakland. He sees patients and operactivities until their growth plates were closed, sometimes ates in Oakland and our facility in Walnut Creek. If you have for several years. Not surprisingly, these studies found that any questions or comments regarding the “Health Watch” patients continued to have instability even with bracing, and column, write the Sports Medicine for Young Athletes staff at had a very high likelihood of meniscal tears/cartilage injury. The risk of potential growth plate injury has to be balanced Health@SportsStarsOnline.com.

Health Watch Dr. Nirav K. Pandya

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brandon brown california . senior . soccer

Chris Goodman / FJPhotoGuy.com Like us on Facebook

BRANDON’S QUICK HITS Favorite team: Chicago Bears Favorite subject in school: Psychology Favorite Starbucks item: Caramel Frappuccino

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Any team can win at home. That’s why winning on the road is more special. Playing on the road is like a second home for the undefeated California-San Ramon boys soccer team. They recently lit up Granada-Livermore (6-0 on Jan. 3) and snuck past Amador Valley-Pleasanton (3-2 on Jan. 5). Senior forward Brandon Brown had three goals and two assists over the two games. He scored the gamewinning goal with just over a minute left against Amador Valley. SportStars: Why are you guys so good? Brandon Brown: We’re a very tight team and everyone is good friends. Everyone is straightforward; we don’t hold back. SSM: What makes your team road warriors? BB: We go in with our backs against the wall and go all out. I love going in there and shutting down the fans. SSM: You were upset by De La Salle in the NCS quarters last year. How bad do you want to get back at them? BB: We’re definitely looking forward to playing them. … It was devastating. It was a really terrible loss. We learned anything can happen during a game. You just gotta keep fighting for the win.

honorable mention

jennifer plantenga In a close match against Amador Valley on Jan. 6, the Granada senior scored 18 points and picked up 15 boards as the Matadors escaped with a 52-43 win.

victor pereira The Newark Memorial-Newark senior made his trip to Clovis worth it as he won the 160-pound title at the Doc Buchanan Invitational on Jan. 7. He defeated Javier Mandera (Roseburg, Ore) 10-2 in the final.

francesca panella The CarondeletConcord sophomore had a helping hand in both goals (goal, assist) as the Cougars handed San Ramon Valley-Danville its first loss of the season on Jan. 3.

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An early-season loss to a recent nemesis won’t shake the chemistry of the state-ranked San Ramon Valley girls, nor will it derail their title hopes

Story by Erik Stordahl Photos by Chris Scott/ CalSportsPhoto.com

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D

arkness had already permeated the Danville skies as the fog started rolling in. The game just ended and the last thing the San Ramon Valley girls soccer team wanted to do was shake hands with the other team. The other team was Carondelet-Concord, East Bay Athletic League foe and reigning North Coast Section Division I champion. They defeated San Ramon Valley 2-1 in an EBAL game on Jan. 3. And who did they beat in last year’s epic final? You guessed it. “It is the worst feeling in the entire world to have our first loss (of the season) to Carondelet,” junior midfielder Alyssa Alarab said. “I mean they’re a great team, it’s just with everything last year (that happened). It hurts.” The previously unbeaten Wolves circled this game on their calendar at the season’s onset with revenge in mind. Last year, they surrendered a goal to the Cougars with five seconds left in the NCS final on a cold, rainy night in Concord. Carondelet didn’t get the memo that it’s now SRV’s turn to shine in the spotlight. The last two years the Wolves suffered defeat in the NCS final, losing to Castro Valley in 2010. They entered the first week of 2012 ranked No. 3 in California and eighth in the U.S according to the ESPN/POWERADE FAB 50 rankings. Yet solving Carondelet continues to be a problem. “All we think about when we play them is the last five seconds of the NCS championship when they scored that goal in overtime,” senior forward Reilly Parker said. “And that was kind of our motivation going into tonight. And now we’re not able to forget it.” Despite San Ramon Valley’s bulletin board material, it was Carondelet who stormed to a

quick 2-0 lead 15 minutes into the match as the Cougars took advantage of a couple SRV miscues. “I personally don’t think our team came out with the right mindset and heart,” Alarab said. “That’s why they got those two goals, and they earned those two goals. Our team was just unlucky. We just couldn’t quite get that goal the rest of the game. But it happens and we’re just gonna work on it.” The Wolves quickly responded, cutting the lead in half, but they couldn’t find the equalizer even though they dominated time of possession. “I wanted this one pretty badly for sure,” SRV coach Mark Jones said. “We’ve had a good rivalry. … Last year (Carondelet) kind of had their way with us, but in previous years we got results against them.” On the bright side for Jones, he has a roster full of experience, which will know how to pick up any pieces and move forward — even with the knowledge it won’t have starting goalkeeper Beth Ritter for six weeks after

LEFT: Alyssa Alarab dribbles up field in the Wolves match against Carondelet on Jan. 3. Alarab is one of six San Ramon Valley players who share the same club soccer team, the Mustang Blast of Danville. ABOVE: SRV goalkeeper Beth Ritter dives for a loose ball against Carondelet. The game was her last before undergoing a meniscus surgery that could sideline her for the remainder of the season.

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SOCCER IN FULL SWING

There's roughly one month left in the regular season, as winter soccer playoffs begin Feb. 14 for the NCS and Feb. 21 for the Central Coast Section. To see a list and breakdown of the top boys and girls contenders for each section, visit SportStarsOnline.com.

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a knee surgery on Jan. 5. Fortunately, the Wolves aren’t just an experienced team, they’re also a deep one. Jones’ squad is packed to the gills with 19 players, 17 field players and two goalkeepers. “I could play all field players every game,” Jones said. “If it wasn’t just to take away from the chemistry of getting people 20 minutes to get the flow of the game. If anybody gets injured, if anybody drops in, we really don’t drop that much in quality of play.” Quality of play from 11 players is considered a luxury. But what Jones has is a murderer’s row. His girls are well aware of the talent that’s on the field. “We really don’t have a weakest link,” senior goalkeeper Beth Ritter said. “It makes it fun and it also makes it competitive at practice, which is good because it boosts us to play harder.” Without that weak link, this team is commanding attention regionally, and for some, nationally. Just about every player plays club soccer and competes in national tournaments during the summer. Parker verbally committed to North Carolina, the mecca of women’s collegiate soccer, as a freshman. Ritter is heading to UC-Santa Barbara in the fall. To say they eat, breathe and sleep soccer is an understatement. It’s because of the team’s depth that lends itself to state and national accolades. But Jones says that’s not something that concerns his team. “We don’t care about that stuff too much,” Jones said. “This game certainly makes it so you don’t matter as much because if you lose a game you drop out of the Top 20. “Honestly, we’ve never talked about it. There hasn’t been one whisper of rankings or where we’re at. All we care about is winning EBAL and winning another NCS championship.” His players feel the same way. “I wouldn’t say we think of ourselves as the greatest team ever,” Parker said. “We don’t think that at all. We just come out and we play games and we have fun.” Perhaps the reason these girls play with a loose, free-flowing mentality is because they play with each other year round. Six of the Wolves (Alarab, Parker

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and Ritter along with juniors Morgan Idso, Alexa Vandevanter and Hannah Koski) play for the Mustang Blast, a premier club soccer team in Danville. That yearlong commitment goes a long way in establishing chemistry and special bonds on and off the field. It also elevates them to national recognition. “We’ve kind of grown up knowing each other,” Ritter said. “A lot of it is just knowing each other, and chemistry on the field is 100 percent from bonding.” It may come off as cliche, but bonding pays off huge dividends as the season progresses. “We’re obviously here to win,” Parker said. “But our goal as captains this season is to bring the team together as best friends.” “Chemistry is kind of always put before winning on this team,” Alarab added. “It’s most important that everyone’s just happy with each other.” Of course all great teams need great coaches and the Wolves readily admit they’re happy with Jones at the helm. “I can say not one other team in this league, let alone probably in this state has a coaching staff like ours,” Parker said. “They are so about having fun but winning at the same time.” Jones and his staff know these girls enroll in a grueling club schedule for nine months. And while the high school season shouldn’t be treated like a vacation, they still manage to make practices and games fun and appealing without sacrificing the competitive spirit. Clearly, the girls don’t have a problem with that. With roughly six weeks remaining in the season, it’s clear there’s much soccer left to be played. SRV will get another chance for retribution against Carondelet on Jan. 26. Who knows? Both could meet a third time in the NCS playoffs. The SRV girls wouldn’t have it any other way. Regardless how the rest of the season plays out, the Wolves’ chemistry and teamwork will stay constant. “Overall, if you love who you’re playing with and you’re playing with your best friends, you’re gonna fight harder for, obviously, the people you care about most,” Parker said. “That’s kind of what our goal’s been, and it’s definitely been succeeding.” ✪

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Triple

Shot Terra Nova is a NorCal power thanks to a stellar trio of senior guards

T

he Miami Heat could learn a lot from the Terra Nova High School girls basketball team. Like the NBA’s Heat, the Pacifica school features its own Big

Three. But unlike the Heat, Terra Nova’s Big Three has learned to complement each other and has mastered the art of playing together. Looking for answers, LeBron? Check with Terilyn Moe. Seeking the magic formula, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh? Watch Ivonne Cook Taylor and Jayzyl Tauala. The Big Three has not only returned Terra Nova to prominence, it has transformed the team into the strongest public school program in the Central Coast Section and one that aims to advance deep into the Northern California Division III playoffs. Seniors Moe, Cook Taylor, and Tauala comprise a versatile backcourt of major-college recruits in a starting lineup made up of four guards. The 12-player roster, in fact, lists nine guards, no centers, and no one over 5-foot-11. Yet even with size disadvantages and the program’s relative anonymity, the Tigers are ranked No. 18 in the state, No. 5 in NorCal, No. 4 in the Bay Area, No. 2 in the CCS, and No. 1 in San Mateo County, by Cal-Hi Sports. Not bad for a program that hasn’t won a CCS title since 1997. “We want to make a name for ourselves,” Cook Taylor said. “We’re just a public school that no one’s ever heard of.”

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terilyn moe January 12, 2012

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Terra Nova (8-3) indeed drew attention over four glorious days at the massive West Coast Jamboree in the East Bay, Dec. 27-30, 2011. Playing in the Platinum Division — the highest level among the tournament’s 14 divisions — the Tigers advanced to the semifinals at Miramonte High in Orinda before losing to two of the state’s top teams in competitive games to finish fourth. Moe had performances of 22, 21 and 20 points. Cook Taylor had three double-doubles, including 12 points and 13 rebounds in a 70-55 semifinal loss to state No. 6 Bishop O’Dowd of Oakland, in which Terra Nova led at the half. And Tauala went for 19 points against O’Dowd and 21 in a 66-60 third-place, overtime loss to state No. 10 Berkeley. The Tigers already had beaten San Diego power Mission Bay, 66-61, and Bullis School of Potomac, Md., 59-55. “People were doubting us,” said Tauala, of those who wondered how Terra Nova got into the top draw. “You don’t know how good you are if you don’t challenge yourself,” Moe said. “We realized we were better than we thought.” Moe will play at University of Nevada next season, Cook Taylor at Texas Tech, and Tauala at San Jose State. Coach Kareem Summerville wonders if there is another school in the section that can claim three Division I recruits, 20

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or at least three from the same backcourt. All three come from Daly City and all three have played together since the sixth grade with San Francisco’s Mission Rec club team. They not only can beat you with speed, but with power. They drive past you, and shoot over you. The difference between Terra Nova and, say, the recent dynasty from Westmoor-Daly City — another guard-oriented north county team that won a league record 49 consecutive Peninsula Athletic League games in the mid-2000s — is that the Tigers can match up with bigger teams because of their physical play. In its day, Westmoor ran into CCS roadblocks in the form of opponents from the rugged West Catholic Athletic League. And Terra Nova did so last season, losing to St. Ignatius-San Francisco in the section semifinals, despite 36 points and 23 rebounds from Cook Taylor. But the Tigers already own victories this season over prominent WCAL teams St. Francis-Mountain View and Presentation-San Jose, and even performed well in a rematch with the section’s top team, state No. 17 St. Ignatius, before losing 68-60. The Big Three has proven it can dazzle and handle its business. Moe (22.8 points, 5.2 rebounds, 4.3 assists, 2.9 steals) can lead the team up

ABOVE: Jayzyl Taulua cracks a smile during a Terra Nova practice on Jan. 7. Taulua, who has committed to San Jose State, is described by coach Kareem Summerville as a “pure shooter,” who makes the most of the defensive attention paid to her backcourt teammates Ivonne Cook Taylor and Terilyn Moe. RIGHT: Cook Taylor dribbles around a defender during the same practice. The Texas Techbound guard averaged 13.8 points, 11.9 rebounds and 3.4 assists through the teams first 11 games.

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You don’t know how good you are if you don’t challenge yourself. We realized we were better than we thought.” Terilyn Moe

the floor, break down a defender, or shoot from the wing. With or without the ball, Moe always is in the flow of the game. “She’s a strong shooter and she can get to the line,” Summerville said. “Those are her best assets. She knows how to use her body to shield her defender well and can create her own shots.” Cook Taylor (13.8 points, 11.9 rebounds, 3.4 assists, 2.5 steals) is the reigning County Player of the Year and can dribble faster than most people can run. The quietest of the three, she is basketball’s version of the five-tool player, with no discernible weaknesses. “Once she touches the ball, her separation is so quick, sometimes she leaves the other players at halfcourt and she’s already making a layup – she’s so explosive to the basket,” Summerville said. Tauala (11.2 points, 2.3 steals), like Cook Taylor, a transfer from Sacred Heart Cathedral-San Francisco, can shoot or drive and takes advantage of the extra attention her teammates receive. “She can be just a pure shooter,” Summerville said. “Teams key on Terilyn and Ivonne. They don’t realize there is another threat.” Because Terra Nova likes to fast break and has a small lineup, opponents mistakenly assume the Tigers can’t function in the halfcourt game, even with a converted guard — 5-9 Lynette Mackey — and a converted small forward — 5-11 sophomore Kristina Smathers — assuming the roles of post players. That’s why the Tigers can battle toe-to-toe with the bigger and deeper teams. “We really don’t have a strong post, but we try to disguise it by playing Jayzyl and Terilyn there so they can get people in foul trouble,” Summerville said. “It forces the other teams to use their second and third players off the bench instead of their starters. Because their starters are always in foul trouble.” Each of the Big Three has some amount of size, strength and inside presence, despite being perimeter players. Their advantage down low is their ability to get to spots faster inside the lane. “They don’t look like they’re quick,” Summerville said. “But all three of them are quick to the basket. So, they get matchup problems.” So, how can teams defend the Tigers? Most will try man-to-man “until they figure out they can’t guard us,” Summerville said, and switch to a zone, which leaves them vulnerable to the Tigers’ outside shooting. The press doesn’t work so well either, not with Cook Taylor outrunning the fastest of defenders. For years, the northern San Mateo County coastal school was something of a regional power. From 1978-99, the Tigers won at least one game in every CCS tournament, setting a section record since broken by Archbishop Mitty-San Jose. And the Tigers captured a single-division section title in 1979 and Division IV crowns in 1996 and ’97. But the Tigers fell upon some hard times since, before regenerating under fourth-year coach Summerville, with help from the Big Three. “We bond as a family,” Tauala said. “We call each other sisters.” And better yet, “We make each other better,” she said. Miami Heat, take note. ✪ Support Your Local Business • Say You Found Them In SportStars™

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in the paint

All records through Jan. 7 Rank (Last Wk.) School........................... Record 1 (1) Archbishop Mitty-San Jose .............10-1 2 (2) Salesian-Richmond..........................12-2 3 (3) De La Salle-Concord........................10-2 4 (4) Sheldon-Sacramento.......................11-3 5 (8) Newark Memorial-Newark...............10-4 6 (5) Jesuit-Sacramento...........................13-3 7 (6) Bishop O’Dowd-Oakland..................8-4 8 (12) Pleasant Grove-Elk Grove...............15-1 9 (11) Antelope............................................15-1 10 (9) Sacramento......................................10-4 11 (15) Sacred Heart Cathedral-S.F.............10-1 12 (13) Burbank-Sacrametno.......................11-4 13 (7) McClymonds-Oakland......................8-7 14 (10) Franklin-Elk Grove............................11-4 15 (14) Deer Valley-Antioch..........................10-5 16 (NR) San Leandro.....................................11-2 17 (NR) Serra-San Mateo..............................10-2 18 (19) Chico.................................................12-2 19 (NR) Piedmont Hills-San Jose..................12-0 20 (NR) Monte Vista-Danville.........................9-4 ■ DROPPED OUT: No. 16 Vanden-Fairfield, No. 17 Freedom-Oakley, No. 18 Dublin, No. 20 Berkeley. ■ BIGGEST MOVER: San Leandro enters the poll at 16 with it’s only losses this season coming to No. 1 Mitty (80-70) and No. 7 Bishop O’Dowd (72-50). Newark Memorial also jumped three spots inside the Top 10, going from No. 8 to No. 5 after knocking off previous No. 5 Jesuit (56-50) on Jan. 7. ■ TEAMS REMAINING FROM PRESEASON TOP 20: 13 ■ KNOCKING AT THE DOOR: Vanden-Fairfield (14-2), Freedom-Oakley (11-4), Foothill-Sacramento (12-3), Heritage-Brentwood (12-3), CenterAntelope (12-3).

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LEFT: Deer Valley senior guard Olajuwon Garner (5) is in his fourth and final season on varsity for the Wolverines. This year he may have his strongest backcourt partner to date in Kendall Smith. Gardner leads the team in scoring at 19 points per game, while Smith is second at 14.9. RIGHT: The Wolverines huddle during a timeout at the NorCal Tip-Off Classic at Newark Memorial High on Nov. 26. The game was their season-opener, which they lost to the host Cougars 74-58. Phillip Walton photos

Deer Valley looks to further boost image in another stacked MLK event By Chace Bryson | Editor At the outset of the 2008-09 school year, North Coast Section realignment allowed for the heavily-respected athletic programs of De La Salle High to take its talents to the East Bay Athletic League. While many viewed the EBAL as a logical fit for the East Bay power, some wondered how the view of the Bay Valley Athletic League — the league the Concord school left behind — might change when it came to boys basketball. Having De La Salle as part of your league certainly gives it instant credibility, but could the six remaining schools in East Contra Costa County maintain that reputation? Whether the news made it out of the East Bay or not, the answer was clearly yes. The league has sent four of its six teams to the playoffs in all but one of the year since the Spartans left town, and if the first half of the 2011-12 season is any indication, it appears there will more of the same this February. Four BVAL program entered the second week of January with at least 10 wins. In fact, the programs of HeritageBrentwood, Liberty-Brentwood, Freedom-Oakley and Deer

Valley-Antioch had a combined mark of 46-15 through Jan. 7. And there aren’t a lot of cream puffs on either of the teams schedules. Deer Valley continues that trend when it takes on FranklinElk Grove — which with a record of 11-4 is ranked No. 14 in the SportStars NorCal Top 20 — on Jan. 16 as part of the 16th Annual Martin Luther King Classic Showcase hosted by De La Salle. “There’s a lot of good leagues out there,” Deer Valley coach LeChet Phillips said. “I still believe that we’re one of the toughest leagues in Northern California. My objective (this year) was to go out and play teams from some of those leagues so I can come back here and say that we can compete with those teams.” The Wolverines (10-5) struggled out of the gate in November, suffering losses to Newark Memorial (another MLK participant) and McClymonds-Oakland. Since then it’s notched a key win over West Coast Athletic League power Serra-San Mateo, won the St. Francis Holiday Tournament by besting El Camino-South S.F. (10-3), and suffered strong losses to Damien-La Verne (13-1) and Foothill-Sacramento (12-3). Leading the way for the Wolverines is a backcourt tandem

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in the paint

of senior Olajuwon Garner and junior Kendall Smith. According to Phillips, there’s still room for them to grow as a duo as this is really the first year that they’ve had extended time on the floor together. “They’re just now getting used each other and learning how to play off one another,” the coach said. “They complement each other really well, and are just good kids who each have a serious competitive fire.” The two guards also benefit from the team’s third captain, Marcus Lee, a 6-foot-9, 220 pound junior center. The Wolverines’ slow start coincided with Lee’s slow start to the season. After a sluggish two games, he has sprung to life. Through 15 games, Lee is averaging a double-double of 12.3 points and 14.9 rebounds. Perhaps his biggest presences is on the defensive end where he’s posted double-digit blocks on multiple occasions. “He’s really grown since the beginning of the season,” Phillips said. “He was deferring to the older kids in the past, and now he’s really stepping up and going full bore for us. I couldn’t be happier with what he’s doing right now.” What will make Phillips and the rest of the BVAL happiest is a win over Franklin, another nonleague notch in the league’s belt. QUICKLY: Four of the Top 10 teams in the most recent SportStars NorCal rankings will be playing at the MLK event. The premier game at 5:30 will feature No. 1 Archbishop Mitty-San Jose against No. 3 De La Salle-Concord. It will be the East Bay’s best chance to view Mitty’s super recruit (ranked Top 10 in the nation among juniors), center Aaron Gordon, on a big stage against top competition. ✪

16th MLK Classic Showcase

■ THE BASICS: Jan. 16 at Haas Pavilion, Berkeley ■ BOYS MATCHUPS: Berekely vs. St. Mary’s-Berkeley, 10:30 a.m.; Lake Oswego (Ore.) vs. Newark Memorial-Newark, 2 p.m.; Franklin-Elk Grove vs. Deer Valley-Antioch, 3:30 p.m.; Archbishop Mitty-San Jose vs. De La Salle-Concord, 5:30 p.m.; Sacramento vs. SalesianRichmond, 7:15 p.m. ■ GIRLS MATCHUP: St. Mary’s-Stockton vs. Carondelet-Concord, 12:15 p.m. ■ THE PRICES: Tickets at the gate will be $10/adult and $5/students, seniors and childen. There is also a new $15 all-day pass with chair-back seating available.

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in the paint

Carondelet/St. Mary’s-Stockton matchup is MLK’s hidden gem By clay kallam | Contributor

All records through Jan. 7 Rank (Last Wk.) School........................... Record 1. (1) St. Mary’s-Stockton..........................6-3 2. (2) Bishop O’Dowd-Oakland..................11-2 3. (3) Carondelet-Concord.........................10-2 4. (4) Berkeley............................................11-1 5. (6) Sacramento......................................8-6 6. (11) Lincoln-Stockton...............................9-1 7. (8) Miramonte-Orinda............................14-0 8. (13) Archbishop Mitty-San Jose..............8-4 9. (5) St. Ignatius-S.F..................................10-2 10. (7) Terra Nova-Pacifica..........................8-3 11. (17) Mission San Jose-Fremont..............14-1 12. (NR) Pleasant Grove-Elk Grove...............7-5 13. (10) Modesto Christian.............................10-4 14. (NR) Granada-Livermore .........................12-2 15. (NR) St. Mary’s-Berkeley..........................7-5 16. (NR) River City-West Sacramento...........16-1 17. (9) Salesian-Richmond..........................11-2 18. (NR) Brookside Christian-Stockton...........12-2 19. (12) Dougherty Valley-San Ramon.........8-6 20. (NR) Casa Grande-Petaluma...................14-1 ■ DROPPED OUT: No. 14 Deer Valley-Antioch, No. 15 Kennedy-Sacramento, No. 16 Santa Cruz, No. 18 Amador Valley-Pleasanton, No. 19 Pleasant Valley-Chico, No. 20 Heritage-Brentwood. ■ BIGGEST MOVER: Pleasant Grove, from unranked to No. 12. All the losses are to good teams; the win over Modesto Christian was pivotal. ■ TEAMS STILL RANKED FROM PRESEASON TOP 20: 15 KNOCKING AT THE DOOR: Heritage-Brentwood (13-1), Presentation-San Jose (9-5), KennedySacramento (11-4), Santa Cruz (13-1), El Camino-Sacramento (13-3), Monte Vista-Danville (11-3), Pleasant Valley-Chico (11-2), Deer ValleyAntioch (9-5), Amador Valley-Pleasanton (9-4), Palo Alto (9-2), San Marin-Novato (15-1), Maria Carrillo-Santa Rosa (10-3).

It’s too bad this game is likely to get lost in the shuffle. Sure, a few girls’ basketball faithful will make their way to Haas Pavilion on Jan. 16 to see St. Mary’s-Stockton and Carondelet-Concord — two of Northern California’s most consistent and most talented powers — play at 12:15 in the Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Classic in Berkeley. But all the other games are boys’ games, which explains the early starting time, and there will be more than a few fans there who will view a girls’ basketball game as an excuse to go get a burger at Kip’s. But those who leave, or don’t pay attention, will be missing a premier matchup between two of the top girls’ teams in Northern California, and one that will pit the super-talented guards of Carondelet against the rightfully-feared St. Mary’s press. On top of that, this could well be a preview of the California Interscholastic Federation Division II Northern regional championship game, as both these teams are favored not only to win section titles, but also advance to the finals. Why? Let’s start with Carondelet, and guard Hannah Huffman, who will take her strength, skill and speed to Notre Dame next year. Huffman is a matchup nightmare, too quick for bigger players and too strong for quicker ones. She can shoot 3-pointers, post up, get to the rim off the bounce,

defend and rebound. Oh, and she also rises to the occasion when the pressure mounts. Making sure she gets the ball is sophomore Natalie Romeo, who led the Cougars to the state title game as a freshman point guard, and has embraced the challenge of doing more this year after Erica Payne took her post game to Stanford. “It’s still an adjustment we’re trying to make,” says Carondelet coach Margaret Gartner about the absence of Payne. After all, before Payne, the Cougars could look inside to Jayne Appel, now with the San Antonio Silverstars of the WNBA, so it’s been eight years since they haven’t had a dominant post presence. “Everyone has to rebound,” says Gartner, before pointing out “St. Mary’s doesn’t have much size either.” The Rams do have sophomore power forward Charise Holloway, a transfer from Modesto Christian, who plays much bigger than her 5-9 listed height. And junior Courtney Range is 6-2, though she’s more comfortable attacking from the wing than starting on the block. Still, Range is a factor on the top of the bewildering variety of St. Mary’s presses, and the strategy Gartner employed to beat it the last time the two teams played, back in 2006, won’t quite work. “We put in a special press-breaker: Throw a deep pass to Jayne (Appel) and everybody take off,” she says. “We won’t

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in the paint Natalie Romeo and her Carondelet teammates are hoping to get the best of St. Mary’s-Stockton in the first meeting of the two powerhouse programs since 2006. The Jan. 16 game may also be a preview of the CIF Division II NorCal championship this season. Phillip Walton

be using that this year” – unless she can somehow slip Appel back into a Carondelet uniform. But even though, St. Mary’s and Carondelet haven’t played since 2006, it’s not as if the Cougars haven’t seen their press. “We’ve scrimmaged them every year,” Gartner said. “We do scramble (press) a little bit ourselves, so it won’t be that foreign to us.” Carondelet will also have to look out for the rain of 3-pointers that will be launched by every player on the St. Mary’s roster, and players like Reggie Camera have no hesitation about firing away from well in back of the high school 3-point line. So expect a lot of points. That 2006 game ended with St. Mary’s winning 89-61, and in 2005, when the two teams waged an epic battle featuring Appel (29 points, 20 rebounds) and Jacki Gemelos (27 points), the final was won by Carondelet, 72-63. Hopefully, there will be a gym full of fans to watch these two teams go at it again on Jan. 16, and hopefully some doubters about the quality of girls’ basketball will stick around long enough to get a chance to be seriously impressed.

MORE MID-JANUARY MATCHUPS The Common Good Classic at Antelope High School will also toss a couple girls’ games into a mix that highlights boys, and the feature game will be at 2 p.m. Jan. 14 when Berkeley and Lincoln-Stockton meet in what could be another NorCal final preview — this time for Division I. The Yellowjackets appear to have weathered the loss of three Div.-I players and have lost only to nationally-ranked No. 3 Windward-L.A.. Lincoln, on the other hand, has a lot of firepower back from a 27-5 team that lost to Berkeley by 10 a season ago. Also on tap Jan. 14 is Del Oro-Loomis vs. Oak Ridge-El Dorado Hills, which brings together two of the top teams from the Sacramento area at 5:30, and then on Jan. 16, Kennedy-Sacramento and St. Francis-Sacramento will play the 2:30 game, matching two more teams with aspirations of a deep postseason run. On Jan. 21, the Campolindo Shootout will have a seven-game all-girls’ lineup that begins with Castro Valley taking on surprising Heritage-Brentwood at 10:30 a.m., and features Berkeley vs. St. Mary’s-Berkeley at 5:30. The latter game could be enlivened by the presence of St. Mary’s 6-1 guard Gabby Green, who as of Jan. 10 had yet to play this season due to a summer ankle injury. As she is one of the top young players in the country, her return would ratchet up the intensity even further in this intracity matchup. ✪

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Jake Elliott didn’t appear on anybody’s radar at the start of 2011— then he won a state championship

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By jim mccue | Contributor

ake Elliott’s journey to the 2011 California Interscholastic Federation state title may have brought more joy to the Oakmont High wrestler of Roseville than his time standing atop the podium at Bakersfield’s Rabobank Arena. For Elliott, the appeal of the sport has always been the work and preparation involved more than the aftermath of a competitive match. “(Sports) came naturally to me, but there was something different about having to work so hard individually to get better,” Elliott said of his introduction to wrestling in the sixth grade. “Because it is such an individual sport, you are on your own, and success comes based on the work that you put into it. It’s your job alone to get the job done.” As a junior, Elliott experienced lots of success — a Sierra Foothill League title, Sac-Joaquin Section championship, and state title in the 145-pound division — as the result of that hard work. Because the 2011 state meet was his first trip to Bakersfield, many observers viewed Elliott’s ascent to the top of his weight class as a Cinderella story along the lines of an unknown competitor “coming out of nowhere” to become a champion. While Elliott quickly tired of the “out of nowhere” stories, Oakmont wrestling coach Dave Wells understood why so many people outside of the Sacramento region viewed his wrestler’s rise as unexpected. “The preseason rankings list the top 20 in each division, and then mentions a few others,” Wells said of wrestlers expected to end up at the state meet. “Jake was not in the rankings. So, to many people, he did come out of nowhere. To come from a program other than some of the powerhouse schools and win state in your first trip was a big surprise to those who did not know Jake.”

James K. Leash

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Since defeating Liberty-Brentwood’s Jesse Baldazo 4-2 to win the 145-pound state title and cap a 39-1 junior season, Elliott has been reminded of the potential fleeting nature of success. Less than a month after the state meet, he travelled to North Dakota for the Fargo Junior & Cadet National Championships — a freestyle wrestling showcase in which no more than four wrestlers per state can qualify in each weight class. Jake’s return to Fargo (he competed in Fargo after his sophomore season in the 130-pound weight division) turned out to be a rude, but welcome wake-up call that a championship-caliber wrestler can never stop training to stay in form. Elliott said he took three weeks off from training after the state meet and took an ill-advised “break” with the thought that a second trip to Fargo would be easier the second time around and with a CIF title in hand. “I expected that it would be enough to just go out and wrestle tough, but wound up kind of getting a punch in the mouth,” Elliott said winning only three of his first five matches at the 2011 Fargo event. “It really showed me what happens if you don’t properly train and prepare for every meet and every match.” Elliott resumed his training in earnest after returning from Fargo, hitting the mat with local wrestlers from Sierra College and Sac City College to return to form over the summer. Still, more adversity hit Elliott at the start of the school year. The senior was forced to miss both school and valuable training due to a bout with mononucleosis and has fought to regain all of his strength with a cautious physical regimen. “Mentally, he’s good to go, but we’re focusing right now on getting him back on the mat at full strength to peak at the right time,” Wells said of Elliott’s slightly limited winter tournament schedule. Elliott’s move to 152 pounds has not slowed him. He won the Vista del Lago Tournament in Folsom and the Zinkin Classic at Buchanan in Clovis. The Zinkin success was especially significant as Elliott dominated foes from the traditionally strong Central Section, including a convincing 13-3 victory over Clovis’s Colby Thompson in the final. Elliott hopes to compete in this weekend’s Temecula Valley Tournament — a statewide showcase tournament held in Southern California each year—but coach and wrestler may opt for more time

Oakmont wrester Jake Elliott leaps into the arms of his father and assistant coach, Stu, following his semifinal win at the 2011 CIF State Wrestling Championships. Stu Elliott, who wrestled in high school and became a European champion during his time stationed overseas for the Army, encouraged his son to try wrestling when Jake was in the sixth grade.

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The Bakersfield Californian/ZUMAPRESS.com

January 12, 2012

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WORTH THE WEIGHT?

The results page from your local wrestling tournament looks a little different this year. Can’t spot the change? It’s the weight classes. The effect has been to more evenly distribute the weight classes, which had previously emphasized lighter classes. Everything got a little heavier, and the number of heavier classes has increased. Old Weight New Weight 103 106 112 113 119 120 125 126 130 132 135 138 140 145 145 152 152 160 160 170 171 182 189 195 215 220 275 285

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training before jumping back into fierce competition. Success on the mat was not always as common for Elliott. His entrance into the sport in the sixth grade resulted in a shaky start. Jake’s father, Stu Elliott, introduced his son to the sport that he loved upon returning home in 2006 from a military tour in Iraq. “The first year, I was an assistant coach at Eich (Intermediate School) and Jake maybe won one match all season,” Stu said. “I was afraid that he might not be enjoying getting a bit beat up on the mat, but he really latched on to the sport.” The slow start maybe shouldn’t have been a surprise for an Elliott on the mat. Stu, who wrestled with limited acclaim in high school enlisted in the Army after a brief stint at college. While stationed in Baumholder, Germany, Stu’s love for wrestling was rekindled when he had the opportunity to start a new “career” on the mat by competing for the Army in European competitions. He eventually enjoyed the success that eluded him in high school, winning a European title in freestyle wrestling. “I fell in love with wrestling again in the Army and now I can’t get out of it,” said Stu, who now assists at Oakmont. Stu has had a front row seat to witness Jake’s success at the high school level. He’s enjoyed seeing the transformation of his son from a novice to state champion, and says that Jake continues to refine his game. “It’s fun to watch him grow and become the dynamic wrestler he is now,” Stu said of Jake’s development. “His mental toughness is beyond what it was even a year ago. I used to be on edge a lot during his matches, but I can sit back and enjoy it now.” Both Stu Elliott and Wells agree that Jake is at the top of his game, physically and mentally. Elliott is able to score from any position, and has a steadiness that allows him to appear to score when he needs the points. Those close to Jake believe that he has elevated his mental game to the point where he feeds off of the pressure of big matches and expectations. “He doesn’t seem to get rattled,” Wells said of Jake’s maturity on the mat. “He just feeds off the pressure.” While Wells and Jake Elliott have real hopes of a repeat at the state meet,

It’s fun to watch him grow and become the dynamic wrestler he is now. His mental toughness is beyond what it was even a year ago. I used to be on edge a lot during his matches, but I can sit back and enjoy it now.” Stu Elliott both know that the going will be very difficult in the 152-pound division. Lemoore’s Isaiah Martinez captured the 140-pound CIF state title to cap a 50-0 sophomore season in 2011, and the junior shows no signs of slowing in 2012. Add Bakersfield junior Coleman Hammond, a 145-pound national champion as a sophomore, and the fight for the top of the podium at state is sure to be a challenge. “Things really have to come together to succeed at state,” said Wells, who placed twice at the state meet while competing for El Modena-Orange in Southern California in the mid-90s. “I think that Jake’s better this year, but it may be more of a challenge to repeat.” Jake understands the difficult road ahead to reach his goal of a second state title, but is relishing being the hunted rather than the hunter this year. “I know that a lot of guys are gunning for me, but I’m not afraid of any guy in the state,” Elliott said. “If you want to beat me, you better wrestle tough and be ready for a hard fight.” ✪

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As always, there are a host of grapplers from throughout Northern California who have legitimate shots at making deep runs come late March. Here is a weight-by-weight list of northern wrestlers to keep an eye on in the coming months (with 2011 section and/or state placing in parentheses), and a handful of teams that will make some noise in Bakersfield. 106 — Isaiah Locsin, Live Oak (1st CCS, 2nd CIF, ), Christian Lizarraga, San Marin-Novato (1st NCS), Chris Caldwell, Las Lomas (2nd NCS), Troy Lakin, Clayton Valley-Concord (3rd NCS). 113 — Emilio Saavedra, Modesto (1st SJS, 3rd CIF,), Juan Garza, Oakdale (5th SJS), Tommy Yozzo, Amador Valley-Pleasanton (7th NCS) 120 — Hermilio Esquivel, Orland (1st NS, 5th CIF) Connor Pollack, Folsom (3rd SJS), Ty Stevenson, McKinleyville (1st NCS), Joe Ramirez, De La Salle-Concord (1st NCS), Corbin Lee, Mission San Jose-Fremont (6th NCS), Mason Sauseda, Chico (2nd NS), Kasey Klaus, Vacaville (3rd SJS) 126 — Martin Ramirez, Elk Grove (1st SJS, 3rd CIF), Jake Smith, Newark Memorial-Newark (1st Virginia 3A), Joe Moita, DLS (1st NCS) 132 — Adam Pain, Rodriguez-Fairfield (5th SJS, 6th CIF), Paul Fox, Gilroy (8th CIF, 1st CCS), Jon Jay Chavez, DLS (2nd NCS, 119), Jacob Pratt, Newark Memorial (3rd NCS 130), Roman Garcia, Freedom-Oakley (3rd NCS, 119), Lake Gee, Oroville (3rd NS) 138 — Nikko Villareal, Girloy (3rd CIF, 1st CCS), Shayne Tucker, Bella VistaFair Oaks (1st SJS, 4th CIF), Brian Sergi, College Park-Pleasant Hill (1st NCS), Xavier Johnson, Freedom (3rd NCS) 145 — Adam Hendrickson, Healdsburg (1st NCS, 6th CIF), Austin Branum, Del OroLoomis (1st SJS, 5th CIF), Christian Wathen, Orland (1st NS), Pang Lee, Chico (2nd NS) 152 — Jake Elliot, Oakmont-Roseville (1st SJS 152, 1st CIF), Keaton Subjeck, Oak Ridge-El Dorado Hills (2nd SJS 160, 8th CIF), Alex Abono, DLS (1st NCS, 4th CIF), Kai Loechler, Vacaville (2nd SJS 140), 160 — Victor Pereira, Newark Memorial (1st NCS, 2nd CIF), Dustin Harris, Oakdale (3rd SJS), Matt Tsarnas, Healdsburg (2nd NCS), Peter Santos, Oakmont (5th SJS) 170 — James Wilson, McNair-Stockton (2nd SJS, 4th CIF), Dylan Morris, RedwoodLarkspur (3rd NCS) 182 — Jordan Sepeda, Natomas-Sacramento (1st SJS), Jariah Booker, Las PlumasOroville (2nd NS), Ricardo Sandoval, Healdsburg (1st NCS) 195 — Danny Chaid, Bellarmine-San Jose (8th CIF, 1st CCS), Khymba Johnson, Center-Antelope (2nd SJS), Anthony Navarro, Rancho Cotate-Rohnert Park (2nd NCS) 220 — Austin Lobsinger, West Valley-Cottonwood (1st NS, 2nd CIF), Justin Walker, DLS (1st NCS, 7th CIF), Josh Letuligasenoa, Elk Grove (3rd SJS), Alex Encarnacion, College Park (3rd NCS), Kyle Clark, Antioch (2nd NCS) 285 — John Schupp, Vacaville (1st SJS, 5th CIF), Mike Lowman, Foothill-Sacramento (3rd SJS), Scott Nelson, West Valley (2nd NS), Eric Chavez, Healdsburg (2nd NCS).

TEAMS TO WATCH

1. Vacaville, Sac Joaquin 3. Gilroy, Central Coast 2. De La Salle, North Coast 4. Elk Grove, Sac Joaquin 5. Orland, Northern 6. Healdsburg, North Coast 7. Folsom, Sac Joaquin 8. Newark Memorial, North Coast 9. Bella Vista-Fair Oaks, Sac Joaquin 10. College Park, North Coast

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De La Salle’s Joe Moita, left raises his hands in celebration after defeating Enrique Barajas of Arroyo-San Lorenzo in the 2011 North Coast Section 125-pound final. Moita and his De La Salle teammates won the NCS team title last season and have the potential to be a top contender again this year. Photo: Bob Larson. Story: Bill Kolb.

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Getting to practice on time should always mean early and ready to go It’s probably going to be my first year on varsity this spring, and I’m a little nervous. What do varsity coaches want from their players? K.L., Windsor

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hat’s a very good question, and in fact, it’s so good, it’s going to take more than one of these columns to answer it — but first, I’ll start with the obvious. What do coaches want from their players? Production. It doesn’t matter what the sport, coaches want players who do things that help their team win, and obviously physical talent has a lot to do with it. If your fastball sits around 90, or you can high jump 6-10, then the odds are your coach will like you a lot. But setting aside talent, there are at least three things that all coaches want from their varsity players, and I first heard this from John Madden when he was coach of the Raiders. “I only have three rules,” he said. “Be on time; pay attention; and play like hell.” It might seem that has answered K.L.’s question, but as always, nothing is ever as simple as it seems — so we’ll start with “be on time.” Practice starts at 4: What time do you get there? What does “there” mean? Does that mean on the field ready to practice? Does that mean in the locker room getting your shoes on? Or does that mean being somewhere within shouting distance of the gym? That’s pretty obvious, really, but it’s important. What a coach means by “be on time for practice” is “be there 15 minutes early completely suited up.” So if practice starts at 4, you should be on the field (if it’s not oc-

cupied) at 3:45. A lot of girls get to practice 15 minutes early, but rather than go out and throw the ball around, say, they sit and pretend to stretch while talking as if they hadn’t been talking all day. Get there 15 minutes early, and then put in 15 extra minutes of work. If you have 40 practices during the season, that’s ten extra hours of practice time, and trust me, that’s a lot. Now let’s back this up a little. If you want to be on the field at 3:45, what time do you need to be in the locker room changing? Probably no later than 3:30, given that lots of your friends are hanging around, and lots of talking will take place. Give yourself time, and you can enjoy a couple minutes telling everyone how well your fantasy baseball team is doing while changing for practice. So if you need to be in the locker room at 3:30, what time do you need to start heading to the gym from your locker? At some schools, 3:29 gives you plenty of breathing room; at others, you might have to start the trek at 3:20. And if school gets out at 3:15, that means there’s not much time to talk to teachers or figure out who to call about the geometry homework. Sure, everyone will be on time to the bus when you get out of class early, but the coach is going to notice who’s on time to practice — and if you want to maximize your opportunities, make sure you’re always there 15 minutes early, and you’re always ready to go. ✪

Behind the Clipboard Clay Kallam

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Clay Kallam is an assistant athletic director and girls varsity basketball coach at Bentley High in Lafayette. To submit a question for Behind the Clipboard, email Coach Kallam at clayk@fullcourt.com.

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Performance, health suffer without good form

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he three “F”s of successful triathlon training and racing are fun, fitness and form. We have discussed fitness and fun. To perform and feel better during and after each swim, bike and run, as well as putting it all together for a successful triathlon race now and into the future, form is the key.  

For Performance During training and racing, a triathlete needs to think about form as a triathlete. Proper form for a triathlete spans the entire race. What you do in the swim affects the run.  What you do on the bike affects the swim and run, and vice versa.   Plan ahead with muscle and muscle group usage. As a private swim coach, I have worked with some really great, fast runners that say to me, “I am a good runner, but I just can’t seem to put together a good run at the end of a triathlon.”   Usually these athletes run their half marathon a good 10-15 minutes slower in a triathlon than they do in a straight half marathon. When I watch them in the pool, these runners usually have their heads up very high most of the time, and are using their lower back and hamstrings way too much. Swimming a mile with your head up not only equals a slower swim time, it also means that by the time you even begin the run, your lower back and hamstrings — the muscles most used in the run — are fatigued. The lesson here is swim with your upper body and a relaxed neck. Save your neck for the bike and lower body for the run.  

Improper form can also close down lung function. When you are the most tired or anxious, focus on your form. During a race or a difficult training, when you are tired or feeling down, your first instinct will be to double over and walk. Doubling over is exactly the opposite of what you want to do. Keeping your arms bent less than 90 degrees and your shoulders open, especially during those last few miles of the run, will open your chest cavity, expand lung capacity, and will give you something on which to focus. You will move forward easier than you imagined.  

Liz Elliott

For Longevity Correct form in the swim, bike and run is critical to stave off injuries, help you perform better during training and racing, and recover better after training and over all. Your body is made to move! It is made to be active every day. However, each joint and muscle is made to move a particular way and serve a particular movement function.  Repeatedly forcing your joints and muscles to move in ways not suited can only last for a short period before something breaks or inflames.  The most important reason to learn and maintain proper form that most people overlook, especially on the run, is to prevent long-term injury or illness. The most common reason people stop being active altogether is joint injuries. Knees, hips and shoulders are most common. These injuries are not from “overuse”, which you may have heard. They are from improper form over time.    Don’t run through pain. Pain is a sign that something is wrong. Muscle soreness is good, but pain is bad. If you are hurting anywhere directly after working out, and/or you can’t function in your normal life due to your training, you are moving something wrong.  You may be working out too long and too hard, but most likely you are performing some part of one of the disciplines improperly. In the next column, we will focus on how to learn proper form, and moreover, how to maintain it.  ✪ Liz Elliott is the head coach of the Tri-Valley Triathlon Club based in Dublin. Liz specializes in preparing beginner triathletes for their first race(s). Liz completed her second Ironman in August, bettering her performance in every aspect of the race. Contact her at HYPERLINK “mailto:liz@ trivalleytriclub.com” liz@trivalleytriclub.com. Find the first series of TriSteps columns in issues #28, 31, 33, 35 and 37. All can be accessed at www.SportStarsOnline.com.

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Speed training relatable to one’s sport needs to involve CHAOS I

In reality if coaches get them strong and powerful, teach them how to move in a static and very predictable environment, and it doesn’t increase their sport speed performance ... then what good is it?

was developed by one of the top strength ’ve written in this magazine many times about increasing the speed and conditioning experts in the world, of your young athletes and how it’s Robert dos Remedios, and a concept that much more than going through sprint, I’ve been using in my training programs for cone and ladder drills. There are many years with great success. more components to speed such as Conscious to subconscious mobility, strength, coordination and Have unpredictability power. All of which are vital to the Active to Reactive speed development process. Open Drills When teaching these concepts, Slow to fast coaches and trainers need to make sure Now I’ve written before about how that there is a functional crossover from Tim Rudd for IYCA movement training should be taught as a the gym to your young athlete’s sport skill, with the long term development and performance. In other words, trainers success of the athlete in mind. So in simple get them mobile, strong and increase their power and terms, we need to teach the athlete how to crawl also teach them how to accelerate and decelerate in all before they can walk, then walk before they run. directions. But how do coaches take these very static So coaches should start with very conscious and rehearsed skills and transfer them to sport success? and predictable skill sets which are very static and In reality if coaches get them strong and powerful, predictable in nature. These would be considered “Closed Chain Skills”, which are traditional drills teach them how to move in a static and very predictthat are considered programmed. These can be masable environment, and it doesn’t increase their sport tered due to the lack of reactive demands. However, speed performance ... then what good is it? closed chain skills do not provide the necessary Well that’s where the CHAOS in speed training stimulus to promote “real life” reaction time training comes into play, and really is an important aspect that is essential for sport speed development. They of making sure there is a progressive system of are, however, a very important part of the learning both strength and power training and movement and performance enhancement process. adequacy training — as each directly and positively Unfortunately many coaches and trainers skip effects sports speed. The CHAOS training concept

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Training Time

this step by going right to reactive type skills first. The problem is, it just becomes a cool looking drill, no skill development (motor pattern development) is acquired, and the athlete will not improve their sport speed because they haven’t mastered the appropriate motor patterns. Once the athlete has mastered the closed chain skills, then we would introduce “Open Chain Skills” in a seven-phase progressive sequence. These require that trained motor patterns react and adapt to new and unforeseen situations. This is when it can be easily made sport specific to the demands of the sport. Practicing these concepts in a progressive open chain manner will improve an athlete’s anticipation and reactive abilities dramatically. In a nutshell, CHAOS training is practicing open chain skills that provide an outside stimulus for athletes to recognize, process and react accordingly. It’s vital to train them as close to the actual speed demands of their sport as possible. This develops the decision-making reaction time process for a chaotic environment that is the true nature of all sports. ✪

Tim Rudd is an International Youth Conditioning Association specialist in youth conditioning (level 3), speed and agility (level 2), and nutrition specialist (level 1). For more information on anything you read in Training Time, email him at tim@fit2thecore.com.

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camps + clinics BASEBALL/SOFTBALL Golden Era Baseball Based in the East Bay, we offer several instructional-based programs as well as 9U thru 18U Club Teams. We are currently taking sign-ups for our Hitting Classes. Please see our website for full details: www.GoldenEraBaseball.com. The Pitching Center We develop baseball players to their full potential. The Pitching Center has grown to become the Total Player Center (TPC), a full service baseball and softball training academy. Age- and skill-specific programs are available for students ages 8-high school. Info: 925-416-1600, www. thepitchingcenter. com. SportForm Based in Concord, SportForm provides individual and

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team instruction in baseball, softball, lacrosse. Highly trained professionals provide accelerated and advanced skills clinics. Prepare to Perform! Info: 925-459-2880. All American Softball Girls of all ages welcome. Check into our six-week softball improvement program for all ages. Info: 916-374-1907, www.softballschool.com. BASKETBALL Bladium Triple Threat Academy Alameda’s Bladium Sports & Fitness Club hosts multiple hoops camps for ages 6-12. Designed for players of ALL skill levels. Registration: AlamedaSales@bladium.com, 510-814-4999; www.bladium.com. Mike Allen Sports Learn the basics of basketball, sharpen your skills and improve daily at the Ballin’ Ambassadors basketball clinics! Hosted by MIke

Allen Sports in the South Bay, registration is easy. Go to www.mikeallensports.com to reserve your spot. 408-2794123. CHEER CheerGyms.com We offer the best clinics in California! Customize your clinic to fit your needs. Whether basic stunting techniques or working on twist cradles out of one leg stunts, we take your team to the next level! Info: 866-6857615, www.CheerGyms.com. East Bay Sports Academy Recreational, competitive athletes benefit from training with the best coaches. Our 10,000-square-foot facility is clean and bright, with the newest equipment. Info: 925 680-9999, www.EastBaySportsAcademy.com. EQUESTRIAN Kelly Maddox Riding Academy Develop new friendships with other horse-crazy kids. Weekly activities include learning horse colors, markings and breeds; art and crafts; a farrier demonstration and human horse show; bareback riding and more! Info: 925-575-4818, www.KellyMaddoxTraining.com. Franklin Canyon Stables Based in Martinez, we provide two covered arenas and easy access to trails. Whether beginning rider or experienced equestrian, we have a place for you. Instruction in horsemanship on the ground and in the saddle, all while having fun. Info: 925-228-1801; www.kimshorsetraining. com/franklin_canyon.html. Castle Rock Arabians Activities for tweens and teenagers, where we build team spirit through various team activities on horseback. Visit the ranch by appointment. Info: 925-9333701, www. castlerockarabians.com. Earthquake Arabians New camps are always right around the corner for Earthquake Arabians! Horsin’ Around Fall Camp: Nov. 21-23. Christmas Break Camps: Dec. 19-23 and Dec. 26-30. Registration is OPEN. Log on to www. earthquakearabians.com for more info. 925-360-7454. FITNESS Aspire Pilates Dramatically increase core strength, power, flexibility, balance, focus and joint stability, while preventing injury. Aspire prides itself on helping propel athletes to the next level by addressing muscular imbalances, helping athletes increase body awareness, correcting faulty body mechanics, and accessing untapped strength. Info: 925-680-4400, www.AspirePilatesCenter.com. Fit 2 The Core As a Youth Conditioning, Speed/Agility and Nutrition Specialist with the IYCA, Fit 2 The Core Training Systems Boot Camps offer an innovative approach to getting young athletes back on the field post-rehabilitation, and continuing the process by progressing their bodies to handle what they must endure on the field or court. Info:

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camps + clinics 925-639-0907, http://f2cbootcamps.com. TransForm FX At TransForm FX Fitness Boot Camp, we believe that parents can take better care of their kids when they take care of their own health and fitness. This is the reason we have designed our adult fitness boot camp workouts to fit your busy lifestyle. Each boot camp workout is carefully designed to help you burn fat and increase your cardiovascular endurance in less time. Info: 925-289-8042; www.transformfxfitness.com. Walnut Creek Sports & Fitness We offer more than 70 group classes per week. Members also enjoy our heated pool, sauna, spa and steam room. Massage, skincare and chiropractic services are available. Call us today for your free one week pass! Info: 925-932-6400, www.wcsf. net. ENRICHMENT Dianne Adair Enrichment Programs We offer a wide variety of enrichment programs for your child during the school year. Activities include: Homework help, 4th & Up Club, art and crafts, science, sports and games. Info: www.dianneadair. org. E.Nopi and Palm Academy Concentration is on early literacy, critical thinking, problem solving, social understanding, physical coordination, creativity, cooperation and self control. Programs serve children from infancy to preschool, kindergarten, and through 12th grade. Students learn at their own pace. Locations: Fremont, 510-979-9794; Newark (E.Nopi), 510793-6674; Pleasanton, 925-461-6284. FUZE Fit For A Kid! FUZE is a privately-held, DOJ-certified, youth-only health club and curricula modeled after the principles of the Positive Coaching Alliance. FUZE enhances athletic development, socialization and self-esteem. Info: 408358-7529; www.fuzefit.com. GOLF Dave DeLong Junior Golf Camp For advanced and beginning junior golfers, and designed for golfers 7-15. Camps include a 4 to 1 ratio of students to teachers. Safety is top priority, as are player development and enjoyment. Boundary Oak Golf Course, Walnut Creek. Info: 925-997-3683; www. delonggolf.com. Coach Rick Golf Learn to play on the course, where it matters. Golfers of all ages can sign up. For more info, call 510-917-6442; www.ThePersonalGolfCoach.com. The First Tee - Contra Costa The First Tee is a youth development program for boys and girls 7-18. Participants learn about golf and life skills and values inherent to the game, rules and etiquette. Instruction occurs at Diablo Creek Golf Course in Concord. Info: 925-686-6262, Ext. 0, angela@thefirstteecontracosta.org; www. thefirstteecontracosta.org. The First Tee - Oakland The First Tee of Oakland has delivered The First Tee Life Skills Experience to

more than 262 participants. Each receives a minimum of 12 hours of instruction over an 8-week period. Instruction is at three Oakland courses: Metropolitan Golf Links, Lake Chabot GC and Montclair GC. Info: 510-352-2002; www. thefirstteeoakland.org. The First Tee - San Jose The First Tee of San Jose develops youth throughout Silicon Valley, through the game of golf. Participants learn to appreciate diversity, resolve conflicts, build confidence and set goals. We welcome participants ranging from second to 12th grade. Scholarships available. Info: 408-288-2973; www. thefirstteesanjose.org. The First Tee - Tri-Valley The First Tee of the Tri-Valley offers The First Tee Life Skills Experience Classes seasonally, for ages 7-17, at the Pleasanton Golf Center on the Alameda County Fairgrounds. Info: 925-462-7201, www.TheFirstTeeTriValley. org. LACROSSE Atherton Lacrosse Our lacrosse camps are designed for boys and girls ages 5-14, who are beginner or intermediate players. Our group of coaches and staff are leaders in the lacrosse community. Info: 888-526-3330, www. AthertonLacrosse.com. Sportform Based in Concord, Sportform provides individual and team instruction in baseball, softball and lacrosse. Highly trained professionals provide accelerated and advanced skills clinics. Prepare to Perform! Info: 925-459-2880, www.sportform.co. MARTIAL ARTS United States Karate Systems USKS offers adult and children’s programs, kickboxing fitness, mixed martial arts. Providing excellence in martial arts instruction and services for the entire family. 925-682-9517; www. usksmartialarts.com.

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camps + clinics MOTORSPORTS Keigwins@theTrack We conduct motorcycle schools and practice events (“track days”) in the West at famous race tracks. For experienced motorcyclists looking to improve skills and build confidence. Riders provide their own motorcycles and protective gear. Keigwins@theTrack takes care of everything else. Info: www.keigwin. com; 650-949-5609. Umigo You’ll learn passing techniques, cornering techniques, throttle & breaking techniques, advance seat position, kart operation, kart control, real racing, and improving your lap times. Racers must be at least 10 years old and at least four feet, 10 inches tall. Two- and four-day camps are available. Info: www.umigoracing.com. OUTDOOR SPORTS Bear Valley Mountain Soccer, Archery, Tennis, Climbing, Cycling ... If there’s an outdoor activity you enjoy, there’s a good chance you can do it Bear Valley Mountain. Info: www.bearvalley.com. University of Surfing Instructor Matt Cole offers lessons/camps in Pacifica. 650-359-1425, mattcolesurfs@ hotmail.com; www.universityofsurfing.com. SOCCER Heritage Soccer Club The Pleasant Hill/Martinez-based competitive soccer club welcomes players ages 8-18. Top-flight coaching staff with experience spanning years in the high school and college ranks teach new skills and help hone existing ones. Info: www.heritagesc. com. SWIMMING/DIVING Walnut Creek Swim Club WCSC is a recreational team, celebrating

its 50th anniversary. Led by the experience of coach Brad Hoy, the staff is the finest in the area. WCSC believes in finding the healthy balance between competition and family fun. Sponsored by the City of Walnut Creek, Info: 925-766-5664, www. walnutcreekswimclub.org. Sherman Swim School We are a Lafayette swimming and diving school celebrating our 50th year. Our yearround schedule allows children and adults to learn, retain, and improve their swim skills with little interruption. Info: 925-283-2100, www.ShermanSwim.com. VOLLEYBALL Pacific Rim Volleyball We offer several skill-based camps and clinics, including setting camp, hitting camp and an all-skills camp. Campers will be evaluated and placed in a group that challenges their level of play. Registration for beach volleyball is going on now as well. Info: www. pacificrimvolleyball.com. U.S. Youth Volleyball League We’re the leader in developing and maintaining youth volleyball leagues for boys and girls ages 7-15. With an emphasis on positive reinforcement, we seek to build confidence and self-esteem in each child. Info: 1-888-988-7985; www.USYVL.org. MULTI-SPORT City of Concord Skyhawks Sports Skyhawks Sports and the City of Concord have teamed up to provide safe, fun and skills-focused sports camps for ages 4-12. Camps range from soccer to lacrosse to our popular multi-sport camp where kids sample three different sports (Soccer, Basketball, and Baseball) in one camp. Info: 925-671-3404; www.concordreg.org.

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❒❒ A Higher Perspective.......................................12 ❒❒ Kaiser Permanente.........................................17 ❒❒ Army National Guard Recruiter........................5 ❒❒ Kinders B B Q.....................................................3 ❒❒ Aspire Pilates Center.......................................34 ❒❒ Law Offices Of Frankel & Goldware................34 ❒❒ Back Forty B B Q..............................................23 ❒❒ Max Miller’s Clinic Of Champions....................35 ❒❒ Big C Athletic Club...........................................32 ❒❒ Mc Coveys........................................................12 ❒❒ Big O Tires..........................................................2 ❒❒ Mountain Mike’s Pizza....................................13 ❒❒ Cal Bears..........................................................16 ❒❒ Mt. Diablo Memory Center ❒❒ Cheer Gyms.....................................................10

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❒❒ Children’s Hospital And Research Center........33 ❒❒ Niles Personal Fitness......................................30 ❒❒ Renaisssance Club Sport.................................27 ❒❒ Rocco’s Pizza....................................................36 ❒❒ Community Youth Center...............................35 ❒❒ Rockin Jump....................................................12 ❒❒ Crowne Plaza..................................................35 ❒❒ Scandia Family Center.....................................34 ❒❒ Diablo Car Wash..............................................35 ❒❒ Simply Selling Shirts.......................................30 ❒❒ Diablo Rock Gym.............................................30 ❒❒ Sky High Sports...............................................30 ❒❒ Diablo Trophies & Awards...............................30 ❒❒ Sports Stars Magazine....................................31 ❒❒ E Teamsponsor................................................39 ❒❒ Sutter Urgent Care..........................................40 ❒❒ East Bay Sports Academy...............................25 ❒❒ United States Youth Volleyball League.............7 ❒❒ Excellence In Sport Performance....................24 ❒❒ Usks Concord.................................................34 ❒❒ Fit 2 The Core...................................................23 ❒❒ Velocity Sports Performance..........................30 ❒❒ Heritage Soccer Club.......................................15 ❒❒ Velocity Sports Performance............................6 ❒❒ Home Team Sports Photography...................30 ❒❒ Walnut Creek Soccer Club...............................15 ❒❒ Image Imprint.................................................32 ❒❒ Walnut Creek Sports & Fitness........................28

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impulse Welcome to Impulse, your one-stop shop for all the latest and greatest in gadgets, gizmos and gear. Compiled by staff writer Erik Stordahl, Impulse provides you with what’s currently hot on the market. This week, we’ve got a real smorgasbord on the docket ranging from fun in the snow to getting your head examined to winning an iPad 2. Enjoy!

USKS

Our friends at United States Karate Systems are hosting an event — ‘Just for Kicks.’ Zing! No, seriously. That’s the name. USKS is celebrating their 25th anniversary with their annual benefit ‘Just For Kicks.’ The event will be held at Berean Christian High School in Walnut Creek on Jan. 28. It’ll benefit local food banks and promises to be a real kick in the head. Sorry, couldn’t resist. For more info, reach ‘em at www. usksmartialarts.com

y a w a e v i g iPad You filled out the reader survey, you fought the food fight, you’ve been patient and now you WANT THAT IPAD. We received a ton of responses to our reader survey and now we have a winner! Congrats to Vince Turner of Livermore!

A Higher Perspective

Do you have a fear of clutch free throws? Upset over a lack of playing time? Stressed having so many hours of practice and homework that you feel like you’re gonna explode? Then make an appointment with Lucy, pronto! Lucy runs A Higher Perspective and she wants to help athletes heal with mind and body therapy. Give her a call at (925) 820-1949 to set up an appointment, or visit www.ahigherperspective.com

Alpine Adventures

Now that you got all the snow gear you could hope for, it’s time to put it to good use. Planning a trip to the mountains can be time consuming and costly, so hitch a ride with Alpine Adventures! Registration is now open. Ski the lofty, powdery slopes of Squaw Valley, Alpine Meadows, Sugar Bowl plus the beginner’s program at Boreal. Alpine Adventures will pick you up and take you straight to the action. For more info, hit up www.Alpine AdventuresOnline.com.

Gabby Kaplan, a member of the MVLA Lightning girls under-15 team.

! e r o l a g s b u l C r Socce

Photo by Norbert von der Groeben

Looking to get your soccer fix this spring? Then be sure to sign up with one of the many teams in your area. Signups and registration are going on now for every club imaginable: Heritage, Walnut Creek Soccer Club, Diablo FC, Mustang Soccer, etc. Find the club that’s right for you. There are also loads of camps and clinics going on, so be sure to look in to those too.

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Lawrence Otis (left) of McCymonds-Oakland and Armani Hampton of Sheldon-Sacramento battle for the rebound during a NorCal Tip-Off Classic game at Newark Memorial High on Nov. 26, 2011. Sheldon won the game 45-43. Photo by Phillip Walton

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CA Issue 39, Jan. 12, 2012  

CA Issue 39

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