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Content 6 - Senior Fitness 12 - Seasonal Depression 14 - Amarillo Senior Citizen Association 16 - Living Will 20 - Olive Health 22 - Directory of Services President Gene Lara 806-231-0562

Volume 2 Issue 6 September 201 2010

Sales Eric Muehlhausen Linda Williams Pat Wallace

Editor Camey Maldonado Contact Information 806-231-9822 806-231-0562

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Camey Editor for Silver Magazine

It all sounded so official in 1979, with words and phrases like "whereof"' and "hereunto" and "joint resolution." But when President Jimmy Carter signed the proclamation creating a National Grandparents Day, little did anyone know how it would grow. At the time, Carter said the holiday would recognize "the importance and worth of the 17 million grandparents in our nation." Now a generation later, there are more than 70 million grandparents in the United States. That's a lot of recognition. And a lot of gifts, cards, and flowers, too. On September 12, 2010, Grandparents Day will reach its 31st anniversary. Like Mother's Day and Father's Day, it's a time for family celebration, and a chance to honor the important role grandparents play in children's lives. In that original proclamation, Carter wrote that because grandparents "are usually free to love and guide and befriend the young without having to take daily responsibility for them, they can often reach out past pride and fear of failure and close the space between generations." Today, though, an increasing number of grandparents have actually assumed daily responsibility for their grandchildren. According to AARP, 4.5 million children are being raised in households headed by grandparents. For those kids and millions of others, grandparents create special relationships and impart lessons that last a lifetime. As Carter wrote, "Grandparents are our continuing tie to the near-past, to the events and beliefs and experiences that so strongly affect our lives and the world around us." Happy Grandparents Day! And thank you for all you do!

Camey


Senior Exercise & Fitness Tips

Thinking about how to begin a fitness routine? Good for you! As you grow older, leading an active lifestyle is more important than ever. Regular exercise helps seniors maintain health, boost energy, and improve confidence. The good news is—no matter your age, your health, or your fitness level—you can benefit from moving more. Whether you are generally healthy or are managing an illness, there are big and small ways to get more active and boost your fitness level. Exercise is the key to healthy aging Have you heard exercise is important for older adults, but don’t know where to begin? You’re not alone. Many seniors feel discouraged by fitness barriers, such as chronic health conditions or concerns about injury or falls. If you’ve never exercised before, you may not know where to begin. Or maybe an ongoing health problem or disability is keeping you from getting active. Perhaps you think you’re too old or frail. The truth is that you can’t afford not to get moving. Exercise is the key to staying strong, energetic, and healthy, as you get older. It can help you manage the symptoms of illness and pain, maintain your independence, and even reverse some of the symptoms of aging. And not only is exercise good for your body—it’s good for your mind, mood, and memory.


5 Myths about Exercise and Older Adults Myth 1: There’s no point to exercising. I’m going to get old anyway. Fact: Exercise and strength training helps you look and feel younger and stay active longer. Regular physical activity lowers your risk for a variety of conditions, including Alzheimer’s and dementia, heart disease, diabetes, colon cancer, high blood pressure, and obesity. Myth 2: Elderly people shouldn’t exercise. They should save their strength and rest. Fact: Research shows that a sedentary lifestyle is unhealthy for the elderly. Period. Inactivity often causes seniors to lose the ability to do things on their own and can lead to more hospitalizations, doctor visits, and use of medicines for illnesses. Myth 3: Exercise puts me at risk of falling down. Fact: Regular exercise, by building strength and stamina, prevents loss of bone mass and improves balance, actually reducing your risk of falling. Myth 4: It’s too late. I’m already too old, to start exercising Fact: You’re never too old to exercise! If you’ve never exercised before, or it’s been a while, start with light walking and other gentle activities. Myth 5: I’m disabled. I can’t exercise sitting down. Fact: Chair-bound people face special challenges but can lift light weights, stretch, and do chair aerobics to increase range of motion, improve muscle tone, and promote cardiovascular health.


which can prevent memory loss, cognitive decline, and dementia. Exercise may even help slow the progression of brain disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease. Senior exercise and fitness: Tips for getting started safely Are you ready to begin an exercise program? Congratulations! Committing to a routine of physical activity is one of the healthiest decisions you can make. Before you get moving, consider how best to be safe.

As you age, regular exercise is more important than ever to your body and mind. Exercise helps seniors maintain or lose weight. As metabolism naturally slows with age, maintaining a healthy weight is a challenge. Exercise helps increase metabolism and builds muscle mass, helping to burn more calories. When your body reaches a healthy weight, overall wellness improves. Exercise reduces the impact of illness and chronic disease. Among the many benefits of exercise for seniors include improved immune function, better heart health and blood pressure, better bone density, and better digestive functioning. Seniors who exercise also have a lowered risk of several chronic conditions including Alzheimer’s disease, diabetes, obesity, heart disease, osteoporosis, and colon cancer. Exercise enhances mobility, flexibility, and balance in seniors. Exercise improves your strength, flexibility and posture, which in turn will help with balance, coordination, and reducing the risk of falls. Strength training also helps alleviate the symptoms of chronic conditions such as arthritis. Mental health benefits of senior exercise and fitness Exercise improves your sleep. Poor sleep is not an automatic consequence of aging and quality sleep is important for your overall health. Exercise often improves sleep, helping you fall asleep more quickly and sleep more deeply. Exercise boosts mood and self-confidence. Endorphins produced by exercise can actually help you feel better and reduce feelings of sadness or depression. Being active and feeling strong naturally helps you feel more self confident and sure of yourself. Exercise is good for the brain. Exercise benefits regular brain functions and can help keep the brain active,

Get medical clearance from your doctor before starting an exercise program, especially if you have a preexisting condition. Ask if there are any activities you should avoid. Consider health concerns. Keep in mind how your ongoing health problems affect your workouts. For example, diabetics may need to adjust the timing of medication and meal plans when setting an exercise schedule. Above all, if something feels wrong, such as sharp pain or unusual shortness of breath, simply stop. You may need to scale back or try another activity. Start slow. If you haven’t been active in a while, it can be harmful to go “all out.” Instead, build up your exercise program little by little. Try spacing workouts in ten-minute increments twice a day. Or try just one class each week. Prevent crash-and-burn fatigue by warming up, cooling down, and keeping water handy. Recognize problems. Exercise should never hurt or make you feel lousy. Stop exercising immediately and call your doctor if you feel dizzy or short of breath, develop chest pain or pressure, break out in a cold sweat, or experience pain. Also stop if a joint is red, swollen, or tender to touch.


Senior fitness and exercise: Tips for building a balanced exercise plan Staying active is not a science. Just remember that mixing different types of exercise helps both reduce monotony and improve your overall health. Here is an overview of the four building blocks of senior fitness and how they can help your body. The 1st building block of senior fitness: Cardio endurance exercise What is it: Uses large muscle groups in rhythmic motions over a period of time. This type of exercise increases your body’s ability to deliver oxygen and nutrients to tissues and to remove waste over sustained periods of time. Cardio workouts get your heart pumping and you may even feel a little short of breath.

Why it’s good for seniors: Helps elderly people prevent loss of bone mass, builds muscle, and improves balance—both important in staying active and preventing risk of falling. Building up strength will help seniors stay independent and make day-to-day activities easier such as opening a jar, getting in and out of a car, and lifting objects. The 3rd building block of senior fitness: Flexibility What is it: Challenges the joint’s ability to move freely through a full range of motion (ROM). Can be done through static stretches (stationary), and ballistic stretches (moving or bouncing) to keep muscles and joints supple so they are less prone to injury. Why it’s good for seniors: Helps body stay limber and increases range of movement for ordinary physical activities such as looking behind you while driving, tying shoes, shampooing your hair, and playing with grandchildren.

Why it’s good for seniors: Helps lessen fatigue and shortness of breath. Promotes independence by improving endurance for daily activities such as walking, house cleaning, and errands. Cardio includes walking, stair climbing, swimming, hiking, cycling, rowing, tennis, and dancing.

The 4th building block of senior fitness: Balance What is it: Maintains standing and stability under a variety of conditions including static (stationary) and dynamic (moving) balance.

The 2nd building block of senior fitness: Strength training What is it: Builds up muscle with repetitive motion using weight or external resistance from body weight, machines, or elastic bands.

Why it’s good for seniors: Improves balance, posture, and quality of walking. Also reduces risk of falling and fear of falls. Try yoga, Tai Chi, and posture exercises to gain confidence with balance.


September 2010

Silver Calendar

SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 4 THE HIGH PLAINS DOG SHOW AMARILLO CIVIC CENTER REGENCY ROOM, N&S EXHIBIT HALLS SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 5 THE HIGH PLAINS DOG SHOW AMARILLO CIVIC CENTER REGENCY ROOM, N&S EXHIBIT HALLS THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 9 5:00PM AMARILLO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE BBQ COOK OFF 10TH & POLK $23.00 PER PERSON FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 10 6:30PM-8:30PM CHRISTMAS IN ACTION VOLUNTEER BANQUET POLK STREET UNITED METHODIST CHURCH FREE TO ATTEND

AMARILLO COLLEGE 2-MILE WALK DONATIONS ACCEPTED

APPRECIATION BANQUET AMARILLO CIVIC CENTER HERITAGE HALL 7:00PM $15.00 FOR AMARILLO CASA ANNUAL NON-VOLUNTEERS FUNDRAISER NIGHT AT CASABLANCA FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 17 OESCHGER’S HOME 8:00PM $50.00 PER PERSON OPENING NIGHT AMARILLO SYMPHONY 7:00PM GLOBE NEWS CENTER RT 66 ROLLER DERBY AMARILLO CIVIC SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 18 CENTER 9:00AM-7:00PM NORTH EXHIBIT HALL TOP OF TEXAS CAR SHOW $13.00 PER PERSON THOMPSON PARK FREE TO ATTEND 7:00PM AMARILLO TEA PARTY 10:00AM PATRIOTS TRI STATE FAIR PARADE “STAND UP FOR DOWNTOWN AMARILLO AMERICA” RALLY AMARILLO CIVIC 8:00PM CENTER OPENING NIGHT AUDITORIUM AMARILLO SYMPHONY $9.00 PER PERSON GLOBE NEWS CENTER

7:30PM SHARK FIGHTS AMARILLO CIVIC CENTER SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 11 COLISEUM 8:00AM-6:00PM RANGE FROM $40.00AMARILLO HUMANE $150.00 PER PERSON SOCIETY RABIES CLINIC AMARILLO CIVIC 9:30PM CENTER LITTLE BIG TOWN SOUTH EXHIBIT HALL CONCERT TRI STATE FAIR GROUNDS 9:00AM $20.00 PER PERSON MEMORY WALK BENEFITING THURSDAY ALZHEIMER’S SEPTEMBER 16 ASSOCIATION 11:30PM MEMORIAL PARK AT RSVP VOLUNTEER

SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 19 1:00PM-3:30PM 2ND ANNUAL WESTMINSTER DOG SHOW WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH FREE TO ATTEND, FREE TO COMPETE MONDAY SEPTEMBER 20 9:00AM-12:00PM SENIOR CITIZEN’S DAY HEALTH FAIR & PROGRAM AMARILLO TRI STATE FAIR FREE TO ATTEND


TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 21 7:30PM BB KING IN CONCERT AMARILLO CIVIC CENTER $45.00 - $75.00 PER PERSON FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 24 7:05PM “OPENING NIGHT” AMARILLO BULLS HOCKEY AMARILLO CIVIC CENTER COLISEUM SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 25 8:00AM-6:30PM JUST BETWEEN FRIENDS TRADE SHOW AMARILLO CIVIC CENTER REGENCY ROOM 8:00AM-11:00AM PUNT, PASS & KICK COMPETITION BOYS & GIRLS AGES 8-15 DICK BIVINS STADIUM FREE TO COMPETE 9:00AM RACE FOR THE CURE DOWNTOWN AMARILLO $25.00 TO RACE 3:00PM-7:00PM LLANO CEMETERY TOUR BY TWILIGHT LLANO CEMETERY $5.00 PER PERSON SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 26 10:00AM-3:00PM JUST BETWEEN FRIENDS TRADE SHOW AMARILLO CIVIC CENTER REGENCY ROOM WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 29 HISPANIC FLAMENCO BALLET AMARILLO CIVIC CENTER AUDITORIUM SATURDAY OCTOBER 2 RT 66 ROLLER DERBY AMARILLO CIVIC CENTER NORTH EXHIBIT HALL $13.00 PER PERSON


When S.A.D. is More Than Sad As fall approaches and the seasons change there are many things to enjoy, like cooler temperatures and the beautiful fall colors of the landscape as it changes. But for many, the changing of the seasons is a more ominous Rodney B. Young, MD, FAAFP occasion marked by Associate Professor and Regional Chair fatigue, moodiness, Department of Family and Community irritability, sadness, Medicine and for many, overt Texas Tech University HSC School of depression. This Medicine seasonal pattern symptom complex, when recurrent year after year around the same time of year, is termed Seasonal Affective Disorder (often abbreviated and called “SAD”.) But don’t brush it off as just a seasonal funk you have to overcome or just endure. There are a number of effective medical and non-medical treatments that can help keep your mood and energy level on an even keel throughout the year. Although the specific cause of seasonal affective disorder remains uncertain, both genetics and body chemistry appear to play a role. As the days become shorter, the body’s natural biological clock is altered by decreased exposure to natural light, potentially affecting melatonin levels and the sleep-wake cycle, and contributing to a depressed mood. Serotonin levels, another brain chemical that helps to regulate mood, can also be altered by changes in sunlight exposure contributing to this seasonal depression. SAD is more common in areas further from the equator where daylight exposure is lower, slightly more common in women, and some studies suggest it’s more common in those with a family member also affected, though it’s not as clear whether this is due to their common genetics or similar surroundings. But SAD is more than just sadness. It’s a type of depression, and can be associated with the same serious outcomes as other types of depression. Some people experience suicidal thoughts. Others use or abuse alcohol or other substances to try to control their symptoms. And most have trouble maintaining their normal work activities and performance. This can worsen irritability, and lead to page 12 Silver

social withdrawal and isolation. If you or a loved one experiences these symptoms, you should seek help from a doctor or mental health care provider. Keep a symptom diary that includes things like the type of symptom (i.e.- fatigue, irritability, depression, insomnia), when the symptoms began, how severe they are, and how much they affect your ability to concentrate and function normally. If there are certain times of the day or certain factors that seem to make the symptoms better or worse, you should record that as well. It’s also helpful to know if there are other major stressors in your life, if you’ve had any significant recent life changes, or any recent medication changes. There are many steps you can take on your own that can help if you suspect you have seasonal affective disorder. Open windows and blinds, spend more time outdoors during the day, go on walks and expose yourself more to natural light. It is particularly helpful to your circadian rhythm to do this during the morning hours when there is abundant light but less intense UV radiation. Regular exercise is also very helpful with stress reduction, and improves mood, sleep quality, and overall sense of wellbeing. And don’t worry if you aren’t ready to teach aerobics classes or run a marathon. Even a few minutes of moderate exercise, such as brisk walking, that you gradually increase over time, as you are able, can pay big dividends in your mood and overall health. Your doctor may recommend a number of different treatment options to help your symptoms. Daily use of a high quality light therapy box during the season of the year that you experience these symptoms can mimic outdoor light and cause a change in the brain chemicals linked to mood. Before you buy a light therapy unit, be sure to see a doctor or mental health provider, since these units are not all created equal and a high quality unit is needed to achieve the desired result. They may also recommend treatment with a medication for depression or insomnia. There are a number of different drugs that have been helpful for seasonal affective disorder, though what works for one person will not always work for another, so dose adjustments or changes in medication are sometimes necessary. If you suspect you may have seasonal affective disorder, you don’t just have to suffer through it or grin and bear it. There are many things you can do to help yourself, and your doctor has additional treatment options to help you treat this common condition. For more information, visit www.familydoctor.org


Remember the do-wop sounds of the 50’s? Slick cars? Poodle skirts? Add to that the fun of a little black jack and Texas hold ‘em along with big ole’ juicy hamburgers and beer with ice cream for dessert. Why it sounds like “Greased Lightning”.

ms that have become be support the programs so very important to our members and our community. We have to remember that we are all getting older and ASCA has provided the destination of choice for people over 55 for more than 35 years.

The first annual 50’s fest – Greased Lightning benefitting the Amarillo Senior Citizens Association will be held at the wonderful Vintage Autohaus and Imports at 8201 Amarillo Blvd. West, 79124 on Saturday, September 25, 2010, from 7:00 p.m. until midnight.. There will also be a silent auction made possible by the generous businesses of Amarillo and the members of Amarillo Senior Citizens Association. “It’s long over due…a community event to highlight Amarillo Senior Citizens Association,” said Judy Whiteley, event chairperson. “ASCA has been around since the early 70’s and serves the seniors of our community by providing a nutritious meal six days a week and provides a place for games, activities, exercise and socialization.” Judy continues, “We don’t receive any federal funding for our programs so we depend solely on donations and the annual dues of $40 each member pays.” The mission of Amarillo Senior Citizens Association is to help senior citizens maintain independence, wellness, and quality of life through programs and services that meet their present and future needs. More than 800 members, all aged 45 and older, know the importance of having a place to go to socialize and enjoy activities that they enjoy with their peers. For more information contact Jelaine Workman at “Playing bridge, other card games, shooting pool or 374-5500 or Judy Whiteley at 354-5215. billiards, playing dominos, line dancing and having lunch are all part of a day at ASCA.” said Jelaine Workman, Executive Director. “Our senior nutrition program is so important to our members, but is also open to the public for those who enjoy a good ole home cooked meal. We are fortunate that United Way of Amarillo and Canyon help support the nutrition program so that we can keep our suggested donation affordable for our members. This noon meal is the only meal many of our members have during the day.” Proceeds from the Greased Lightning 50’s fest will help to


The Advantages Of Living Wills And Living Trusts Planning for the future basically involves a number of benefits. For one, it prepares you and your family for the inevitable. Aside from that, it allows you to formulate your decisions level-headedly. Then again, it is not unlikely for the task to become too emotionally charged at times, which makes it all the more fitting to get it done with a sound mind. But before you proceed with putting things in order ahead of time, it would certainly be a good idea to be familiar with the advantages of living wills and living trusts. Living Wills A living will contains instructions concerning your health care preferences in black and white. Your immediate family members, as well as your health care provider, will refer to these directives if you’re incapable of making or expressing your decisions about medical treatment. Anyone who has reached the legal age of 18 – or 19, in certain states – may draw up his or her own living will, provided that he or she is also of sound mind. The biggest advantage of making a living will is that it allows you to voice out your preferences on the subject of life support measures and other medical treatment options. Even though your family and friends may not hold the same philosophy about the matter, the creation of such a legal document gives you an opportunity to confer with them and explain your choices. You also get the chance to justify how your morals and values influenced your decisions. This furnishes them with a better insight into what you would ultimately want to come about in such difficult situations. Without a living will, your immediate family members could face the possibility of paying large hospital bills. Aside from that, your savings account could also be used up to the point of bankruptcy. So, in a way, the creation of a living will makes it possible for you to safeguard your family from the additional burden of searching for financial resources to pay for your hospital confinement and medical treatment – provided that the chances of recovering from your condition are very slim.

On top of the financial encumbrance, living wills also take away the likelihood of disagreements when trying to reach a consensus about your medical treatment. So instead of fighting against each other to determine what’s best for you, your family can concentrate more on accepting the inevitability of death. Living Trusts A living trust is a legally binding arrangement that places all your assets in a trust. More often than not, the grantor or creator also serves as the trustee. Although, you may also appoint another person or institution to act as one in case you lose interest in the duty or become incapacitated to fulfill your obligations. Speaking of its advantages, a living trust allows you to manage your properties for the purpose of generating profits for your beneficiaries. In addition, it makes it possible for you to conserve or look after your assets’ growth. Another obvious advantages of living trusts are the probability of reducing estate taxes and controlling the administration or use of the assets long after the grantor has departed from the world of the living. These legal documents also offer protection for the beneficiaries against creditors. The advantages of living wills and living trusts are indeed numerous. So before its too late, safeguard yourself and your family from the harsh reality of the inevitable and from the fact that things could turn out real bad without proper planning.


Are Your Records Organized for an Emergency? If you were incapacitated, would anyone be able to find your important records and take care of your family’s financial or business matters? Having important papers organized and accessible in advance can be very important in an emergency or crisis situation. Consider the following for organizing your important records. Location. Options for storage might include a home safe, fire-security box or offsite location such as a safety deposit box. The storage container should be securable and fire resistant. Shoeboxes or cardboard boxes in the closet or under the bed are not appropriate. Who knows? Does someone in addition to your spouse know where these papers are kept? Consider making a list of such papers and records, and on the list state where these documents can be found. Then advise a trusted third party – an attorney, CPA, relative, or family friend – where this list is kept. The general idea is that someone not domiciled in your residence know about this list and how to access it. This decision requires a certain comfort level, and you alone are able to make that determination. Which papers? Regardless of who knows what, organized records are always a plus. The following items might be part of your “important documents” list: safety deposit box key life insurance policies deeds, contracts, leases, titles, mortgage(s), loan notes banking, savings, investment and retirement account(s) records will burial arrangements all other insurance policies (health, auto, home, etc.) birth certificates Beyond however you decide to store your personal records, and whatever you decide to include, one fact is clear. If important legal, business and personal documents are organized and accessible, the handling of a crisis situation is made much easier.

Getting to know about Alzheimer’s The largest number of people diagnosed with dementia fall into the category of Alzheimer’s. What is it? A dreadful devastating illness that traps the mind so you can’t remember what happened just a few minutes ago. It robs you of precious time communicating with your loved ones. Is it curable? No. There are medicines that slow the progress of the disease in order to “buy some quality time”. They can give you a few more years to share with your family and participate in activities. How do you find it? First of all we look at lab work and see what is normal and what is fixable. Things like thyroid or vitamin deficiency can cause symptoms that reduce one’s ability to think (cognition). Depression is another problem that is fixable and often looks like Alzheimer’s at first. Imaging tests such as CT scans and PET scans can show other problems in the brain that could cause symptoms. When the other problems are fixed and the person still shows problems with memory and ability to think out step wise problems then we try medication. Usually we see a definite improvement. For more information contact the Alzheimer’s Academy at the Texas Tech Health Sciences University Medical School Geriatric Division at 1400 Coulter. We can help you find local resources and providers skilled in diagnosing this illness. The sooner you or your loved one gets started on treatment the more quality time you may have with them. 356-4637


8

Tricks Every Grandparent Should Know

Kids expect a lot from their grandparents — love, snacks, and undivided attention, for starters, but so much more, too. These eight tricks of the trade will serve you in almost any situation, and make any grandparent a great one.

chock-full of fascinating art, history, and trivia. Impress the kids with your knowledge and they'll marvel at what they've learned. They'll certainly never view a buck the same way again!

How to Bake a Mean Chocolate Chip Cookie Every grandparent ought to know how to bake a batch of chocolate chip cookies. These perennial favorites are pretty simple to make from scratch, too, so you can avoid the supermarket break-and-bake packages. The next time the grandkids visit, serve these cookies with a glass of milk and let them marvel at your baking skill

How to Assemble a Great Care Package Everyone loves receiving mail — especially packages filled with goodies. Surprise your grandkids who live far away, or who may be off at summer camp, with a care package just for them. It is easy — just find a box and fill it with everything from books and candy to puzzles and toys. You can also craft a box around a theme, like a package for the college freshman. Whatever you include, you're bound to put a smile on your grandchild's face

How to Surprise Them With a Special Day Kids love surprises, especially when a grandparent pulls up in their driveway to sweep them off for a well-planned, one-onone day of activities. There's plenty of ways to keep them guessing what's next; just get creative with your planning — and introduce something new when they least expect it. How to Wow Them With Just $1 A dollar bill isn't just legal tender. Believe it or not, it's

How to Organize a Family Trip The fondest and most memorable vacations are those filled with activities, adventures, and good food. Take on the role of social director and plan a trip your brood will never forget. Do your homework before you go to locate the best excursions and restaurants for kids, but remember: You've got to fill up the daytime and the nighttime hours, and every hour in between. How to Have Fun, Even in the Rain Don't let a little rain dampen your day — embrace the weather instead! Have the kids don their raincoats and boots and head outside for tap dancing, camping out, and painting with raindrops. The next time the forecast calls for showers, they'll know how to show their love for raindrops — and for grandma and grandpa. How to Tell the Perfect Bedtime Story It's not only bedtime; it's story time as well. Finding the right book to read is key; it should calm kids down and set them up for sweet dreams. As you surely know, reading aloud to children is one of the best things you can do for them. It's also a great way to bond. How to Do Magic You may not be ready to open in Vegas, but with a little practice, you can learn some pretty neat tricks that will amaze your grandkids. Once you've captured your audience's attention, explain how the trick was done so they can try it themselves. We guarantee they'll be back for more.


Olive Facts & The Nutritional Value of Olives The range of this interesting fruit goes much further than the traditional black and green olive. They come in a range of colors and flavors, depending on where they were grown and how they were processed. Black olives start out as unripe green olives, which are then cured and oxidized to get their smooth black color and flavor. Green olives are Olive Facts not oxidized, and are slightly more salty than black Olives have been enjoyed for at least seven thouolives. Aphissa olives are a tender, earthy variety, sand years. Native to the Mediterranean, their brown in color. The fruitiest, richest olives are popularity quickly spread from Crete to Egypt, Greece, Palestine, and Asia Minor for flavor, useful- Kalamata olives. These dark purple fruits are harvested when they are fully ripe. Manzanilla lness, and olive nutrition. In the 15th and 16th centuries, olives were introduced to America by the olives are small green Spanish olives. They are slightly bitter and smoky in flavor. Picholines come Spanish and Portuguese. The olive tree, Olea eurofrom France. They are green, salty, and slightly paea, is today cultivated primarily in Spain, Italy, creamy. Greece, and Turkey for both olives and olive oil. California is the only place where they are grown in America. Olives are an incredible little fruit. Often overlooked as a mere pizza topping or cocktail garnish, their unique flavor as well as the olive nutrition are reasons enough to take another look at the this unique fruit.

Olives are in a class of fruits called drupes, along with apricots, peaches, cherries, and plums. A drupe is characterized by a large seed surrounded by fleshy meat. Unlike other drupes they are extremely bitter, so much so that they cannot be eaten directly off the tree. They have to be processed first - usually by soaking or curing in oil, water, salt, or a lye solution.


Heath Benefits of Olives Olives are known, and perhaps avoided, for their high fat content. There is not much focus put on the nutrition in olives. It is true, they are a very good source of oleic acid, a nutritious monounsaturated fat, also called omega-9 fatty acid. Seventy five percent of the olive fruit is oleic acid. Monounsaturated fat is actually required by the body. It is extremely important for proper cellular function, as it is a key component of cell membranes, as well as other parts within the cell, protecting the mitochondria and the cell's DNA. Also, with its oily consistency, oleic acid helps lower blood cholesterol levels. The nutritional value of olives also includes the high vitamin E content. The primary fat-soluble antioxidant, vitamin E works to prevent free radical damage in fatty areas of the body. It neutralizes free radicals which are naturally produced by cells during energy production, before they can affect other cells. Olives also have high amounts of polyphenols and flavonoids, which also act as antioxidants. The combination of strong antioxidants, with the cellular protection of oleic acid, makes this food a powerful degenerative disease preventing fruit. Olives also are good sources of iron, copper, and dietary fiber. One cup provides 25% of the daily recommended amount of iron, 20% of vitamin E, 17% of dietary fiber, and 17% of copper. Adding Olives to Your Diet It is simple to add olive nutrition to your diet as this fruit is both versatile and full of flavor. Olives can be mixed into soups, stews, salads and stir-fries. They are also wonderful baked. Use the more delicate varieties such as manzanilla or picholine olives with fish and chicken; try the more robust olives - kalamata and amphissa, for meats or red sauces. You can also make an olive tapenade by mixing pitted olives, garlic, olive oil, capers, and lemon juice in the blender. Experiment with spices and fresh herbs, or roasted red pepper and then spread on sandwiches, or fresh bread, fish, or lamb. Olives can be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator. Enjoy them knowing the nutritional value of olives. Black and green olives are great, but try other varieties to see which ones you prefer


Directory of Services

ASSISTED LIVING & INDEPENDENT LIVING COMMUNITIES: THE ARBORS 1910 MEDI PARK AMARILLO, TEXAS 806-467-4700 THE CLAIRMONT 4707 BELL ST. AMARILLO, TEXAS 806-353-0052 CHILDERS PLACE 6600 KILGORE AMARILLO, TEXAS 79106 806-350-2200 www.bivinsfoundations.org

THE CRAIG METHODIST RETIREMENT COMMUNITY 5500 W. 9TH AVENUE AMARILLO, TEXAS 79106 806-352-7244 www.sears-methodist.com

CONNER HOUSE 2 COTTONWOOD DRIVE CANYON, TEXAS 806-655-5965 MEREDITH HOUSE 812 W 25TH STREET PAMPA, TEXAS 806-665-5668 POTTER HOUSE 6800 PLUM CREEK DRIVE AMARILLO, TEXAS 806-353-5185

COUNSELING SERVICES: CENTER 1300 WALLACE BLVD ALZHEIMER’S’ AMARILLO, TEXAS ASSOCIATION TH 415 SW 8 AVE STE 79106 806-359-7681 300 AMARILLO, TEXAS www.amaspeechheari ng.org 79101 806-373-5313 JO WYATT CLINIC www.alz.org/txstar 1411 AMARILLO FAMILY SUPPORT BLVD EAST AMARILLO, TEXAS SERVICES 806-351-7200 1001 S. POLK STREET AMARILLO, TEXAS TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF 79101 DISABILITY 806-342-2500 3501-L WEST 45TH www.fss-ama.org AMARILLO, TEXAS 806-376-7214 EMERGENCY CARE www.dads.state.tx.us SERVICES: AMARILLO URGENT CARE 1915 COULTER AMARILLO, TEXAS 806-352-5400

OUTREACH HEALTH SERVICES 1616 S KENTUCKY STE 140A AMARILLO, TEXAS 79102 806-353-9907

AMARILLO SENIOR CARE www.outreachhealth.com CLINIC 14 MEDICAL DRIVE AMARILLO, TEXAS HOME HEALTHCARE SERVICES: 806-358-8300 TRIUMPH HEALTHCARE 7501 WALLACE BLVD AMARILLO, TEXAS 79124 806-468-9185 HEALTH SERVICES: AMARILLO SPEECH, HEARING & LANGUAGE

COMPASSION HOME CARE 1301 S. COULTER STE 402 AMARILLO, TEXAS 79106 806-351-8522 www.compassionhom ecare.us GOODCARE HEALTH SERVICES 4107 S.W. 49TH AMARILLO, TEXAS 806-373-7373 INTERIM HEALTHCARE 1901 MEDI PARK AMARILLO, TEXAS 806-467-1156 SHEPARD’S CROOK HOME HEALTH 2311 SOUTHWEST 7TH AVENUE AMARILLO, TX 79106-6601 (806) 358-9548 www.shepards-nursing.com

LONG TERM CARE:

ABUNDANT ACCOLADE HOME QUALITY LIVING CARE 6402 OAKHURST 6300 I-40 WEST, STE DR 210 AMARILLO, TEXAS AMARILLO, TEXAS 79109 79106 (806)-358-9807 806-352-3900 ODYSSEY CENTRAL LINE HEALTHCARE INFUSION 6900 I-40 WEST STE 1301 S. COULTER 150 STE 201 AMARILLO, TEXAS AMARILLO, TEXAS 806-372-7696 806-352-1212


MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES:

RETRIED & SENIOR VOLUNTEER SERVICES 321 SW 7TH AVENUE AMARILLO, TEXAS 79101 806-373-8389 Larue.johnson@ pcsvcs.org

MEALS ON WHEELS 219 W. 7TH AMARILLO, TEXAS 79101 806-374-1521 WEST TEXAS GROCERY DELIVERY AMARILLO, TEXAS 806-433-1403 PHARMACIES:

MOBILITY SERVICES: OPEN ROAD MOBILITY 6103 STAR LANE AMARILLO, TEXAS 79109 806-353-2747

HOME NURSES: NURSES UNLIMITED 4037 W 50TH AMARILLO, TEXAS 79109 806-467-0672 1-888-859-0631

AVONDALE PHARMACY 5135 PLAINS AMARILLO, TEXAS 806-352-2708 D&S PHARMACY 3324 S. GEORGIA 806-352-2711 3500 N.E. 24TH 806-383-3377 SOUTHPARK PHARMACY 5901 S. BELL AMARILLO, TEXAS 806-358-2428 REHABILITATION:

NUTRITION: FAITH CITY MISSION 401 SOUTH EAST 2ND AMARILLO, TEXAS 79105 806-373-6402

NORTHWEST TEXAS REHABILITATION HOSPITAL 7200 W. 9TH AMARILLO, TEXAS 79106 806-468-2900

RESPIRATORY SERVICES: STATE AGENCIES: QUALITY RESPIRATORY SERVICES & REPAIR 6633 CANYON DRIVE AMARILLO, TEXAS 806-352-4140 SENIOR CITIZEN’S SERVICES: ADULT PROTECTIVE SERVICES 7132 W. I-40 # B AMARILLO, TEXAS 806-463-5114 AREA AGENCY ON AGING 415 WEST 8TH PO BOX 9257 AMARILLO, TEXAS 79105 806-331-2227 www.theprp.org PANHANDLE SUPPORT SERVICES 1502 SOUTH CLEVELAND AMARILLO, TEXAS 79102 806-373-0392 www.pcsvcs.org WIDOWED PERSONS SERVICE OF AMARILLO 2207 WEST 7TH- THE CANYONS AMARILLO, TEXAS 79106 806-374-9772

ELDER ABUSE HOTLINE 1-800-252-5400 FOOD STAMPS 1-806-376-7214 MEDICARE HOTLINE 1-800-633-4227 SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION

1-800-772-1213 TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF AGING & DISABILITY HOTLINE 1-800-252-9240 TEXAS VETERAN COMMISSION 1-800-252-3036 TEMPORARY ASSISTANCE SERVICES: AMERICAN RED CROSS 806-376-6309 SALVATION ARMY

806-373-6631 TRANSPORTATION: LE FLEUR

TRANSPORTATION

OF TEXAS 900 S. NELSON AMARILLO, TEXAS 79104 806-367-1476 www.LeFleur.net

Directory of Services

AMARILLO SENIOR CITIZENS ASSOCIATION 1220 SOUTH POLK AMARILLO, TEXAS 79101 806-372-3381

HIGH PLAINS FOOD BANK 815 ROSS STREET AMARILLO, TEXAS 79102 806-374-8562



Silver Magazine September Issue