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FREE

Santa Barbara

NOV. 24-DEC. 2, 2021 VOL. 36 • NO. 828

2021

HEROES Giving Thanks for Our

Incredible Neighbors NEWS: Haobsh Takes the Stand in triple-murder trial food & Drink: Mizuba Tea Masters Matcha arts: Lum Art Ping Pong Paella Party


Together we give. Together we save lives.

Together we save lives. Join ASAP Cats November 30th for a very special Giving Tuesday. Together we give. Every donation will be matched up to $37,500!!

2

THE INDEPENDENT

NOVEMBER 24, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


Wrap up your holiday shopping with something memorable for everyone on your list. Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit

with special guest Shawn Colvin Feb 26 / Arlington Theatre

An Evening with

Colson Whitehead

Apr 28 / Granada Th

eatre

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater Apr 13 & 14 / Granada Theatre

Joshua Bell, violin Peter Dugan, piano Feb 3 / Granada Theatre

Yamato: The n Drummers of Japa Tenmei (Destiny) Feb 5 / Campb

ell Hall

oln Jazz at Linc estra Center Orch n Marsalis o with Wynt a Theatre r Feb 4 / G

anad

Roxane Gay

Roxane with One N Feb 25 / Granada Theatre

Ballet Hispánico Noche de Oro: A Celebration of 50 Years Jan 21 / Granada Theatre

Banff Mountain Film Festival World Tour Feb 22 & 23 Arlington Theatre

(805) 893-3535 www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu INDEPENDENT.COM

Gift certificates available online!

NOVEMBER 24, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

3


DONATION DRIVE-THRU & HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS ADOPTION FESTIVAL Saturday, December 4, 10am-2pm

Help raise resources for pet families in need and inspire forever homes for adoptable animals from local shelters and rescue groups.

Thank you, sponsors!

Where & When At two locations from 10am to 2pm. Drop off pet food and monetary donations and meet adoptable dogs, cats and bunnies. Plus, enjoy family photos with Santa!

Earl Warren Showgrounds 3400 Calle Real, Santa Barbara

The Elks Lodge

1309 N. Bradley Road, Santa Maria

Find more drop-off locations and event details on our website!

care4paws.org/holidaydrive 4

THE INDEPENDENT

NOVEMBER 24, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Publisher Brandi Rivera

COVER STORY 21 2021 Local Heroes

Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Tyler Hayden and Matt Kettmann Associate Editor Jackson Friedman Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura News Reporters Ryan P. Cruz, Jun Starkey Executive Arts Editor Charles Donelan Arts Writer Josef Woodard Calendar Editor Terry Ortega Sports Editor John Zant Sports Writer Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin

Giving Thanks for Our Incredible Neighbors

Copy Editor Tessa Reeg Creative Director Caitlin Fitch Graphic Designer Ricky Barajas Production Designer Ava Talehakimi

by Indy Staff

Web Content Managers Celina Garcia, Caitlin Kelley Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Christine S. Cowles, Roger Durling, Marsha Gray, Betsy J. Green, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell

NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

Contributors Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, John Dickson, Leslie Dinaberg, Camille Garcia, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Tom Jacobs, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Carolina Starin, Ethan Stewart, Tom Tomorrow, Maggie Yates

Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Lee Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Tonea Songer Sales Administrator Graham Brown

Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Accounting Administrator Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman

Angry Poodle Barbecue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Editorial Interns Nicholas Liu, Caleb Rodriguez, Kat Sophia Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Photography Editor Emeritus Paul Wellman Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill

Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Izzy and Maeve McKinley

Print subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2021 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386. Contact information: 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com, sales@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/about-us

OBITUARIES.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Restaurant Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

ARTS LIFE.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 ASTROLOGY.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 ON THE COVER: Photos by Erick Madrid. Design by Caitlin Fitch.

SHOOTING OUR LOCAL HEROES A loyal reader of the Santa Barbara Independent since he moved to town a quarter century ago, Erick Madrid always looked forward to reading our Local Heroes issue, which comes out each Wednesday before Thanksgiving and was the first-ever issue of the newspaper back in 1986. This year, Madrid was tapped for the assignment of shooting all of the Hero portraits, a roundup that requires lots of patience, poise, and logistics. “I was honored to receive this assignment, then immediately felt the pressure!” explained Madrid. He decided to ask our longtime staff photographer Paul Wellman, who left the paper in early 2020, for advice. “He was a great help,” said Madrid. “Thank you, Paul!” Once the photo sessions started lining up, Madrid explained, “It was a great time. Getting to know the Heroes a bit and then shooting them was a great experience.” It made him wonder, what actually makes a Local Hero? “After shooting all of them, the answer came,” he said. “It’s pretty simple: They’re just good people, day in and day out. To me, this hits the heart of photojournalism. Getting to know the people in your community, then taking their picture. People like this affect everyone’s lives on a daily basis, and that’s truly heroic.” Follow him on Instagram at @erickmadrid43.

COURTESY

TABLE of CONTENTS

volume 36, # 828, Nov. 24-Dec 2, 2021

INSTAGRAM | @SBINDEPENDENT TWITTER | @SBINDYNEWS FACEBOOK | SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT NEWSLETTER | INDEPENDENT.COM/NEWSLETTERS SUBSCRIBE | INDEPENDENT.COM/SUBSCRIBE

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NOVEMBER 24, 2021

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6

THE INDEPENDENT

NOVEMBER 24, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


NOV. 18- 24, 2021

NEWS of the WEEK by RYAN P. CRUZ, TYLER HAYDEN, JUN STARKEY, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF

NEWS BRIEFS

COURTS & CRIME

Pierre Haobsh Takes Stand for First Time in Han Murder Trial

COU RTESY OF S.B. ZO O

COMMUNITY

Defense Team Calls Witnesses as Case Enters Final Week ccused triple-murderer Pierre Haobsh took the stand for the first time in the bench trial that will decide if he is guilty of killing former business associate and herbalist Dr. Henry Han; his wife, Jennie Yu; and their 5-year-old daughter, Emily Han, in March 2016. Haobsh was the second witness called by the defense team of Christine Voss and Michael Hanley on Monday, after a meandering back-and-forth questioning of the defense’s expert witness, Dr. Brent Turvey, which took most of the day. Turvey, a forensic scientist who joined the trial via Zoom from Aguascalientes, Mexico, specializes in crime scene reconstruction and investigation science and was called up to testify in opposition to the prosecution’s firearms expert Dave Barber, who matched casings found at the scene to the Ruger .22 pistol found in Haobsh’s car when he was arrested. According to Turvey, who cited a report that was criticized by the FBI and the Department of Justice, the current methodology used to examine and make a ballistics match is not accurate enough to scientifically call for “match.” He repeatedly said that “law enforcement” standards were not reliable, even leading to prosecutor Hilary Dozer asking if he had a “problem” with law enforcement. “I have a problem with police officers calling themselves scientists when they are not,” Turvey said. His testimony was peppered with longwinded, winding non-answers and objections from both sides, leading to several terse exchanges between the witness, Dozer, Han-

RYAN P. C RUZ PHOTOS

A

by Ryan P. Cruz and Jun Starkey

Gail, the S.B. Zoo’s female Asian small-clawed otter, has given birth to four healthy pups, the zoo announced 11/18. Gail, Peeta (the dad), and Berbudi (Gail’s older brother) will all raise the pups together, the zoo said, and the group will remain off exhibit for one to two months while the young ones mature. S.B.’s otters are part of the Species Survival Plan, a cooperative conservation program run by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA), which ensures genetic diversity among zoos, sustains populations, and guards against extinction.

PUBLIC SAFETY

FINAL WITNESS? Accused killer Pierre Haobsh took the stand for the first time Monday and will likely be the final witness in the trial.

from Turvey, the defense called up Haobsh himself, who will likely be the final witness in the trial. In a short-lived testimony cut off by the court’s evening recess, Voss lobbed softballs to her client, asking about his life growing up and business ventures leading up to and shortly after Haobsh met Han in 2014. Born in Plano, Texas, Haobsh said he grew up all across the country—living in Georgia for a time and later attending a boarding school in Concord, Massachusetts—and described himself as always having a “thirst for learning.” When he lived in Tempe, Arizona, Haobsh said he spent a lot of time at Arizona State University’s library, reading textbooks for fun and buying course materials so he could study at home. As he describes himself to the court in Judge Hill’s Department 2 courtroom, he is composed and intelligent; he sounds as if he could be an expert witness called up to testify instead of a 31-yearold facing a triple-homicide charge. He talks about static fields, permanent magnets, ON THE OFFENSE: Prosecutor Hilary Dozer spent much of Monday mathematical concepts, and cross-examining the defense’s expert witness, Dr. Brent Turvey, a forensic designing computer models. scientist who joined the trial via Zoom. He says he never just took ley, and Judge Brian Hill—who at one point what textbooks say at face value — he precalled Turvey’s remarks “caustic.” ferred to actually perform the experiments After more than five hours of testimony himself. Textbooks say water boils at 212

degrees Fahrenheit, but you could actually boil it at room temperature without a burner, he says, because it’s actually about pressure, not heat. He talks about his mother dying of cancer when he was around 18, and how he never went past a high-school level education, though he learned about high-concept science and new energy technology through reading and online research. He talks about moving to Arizona near the end of 2012 to pursue a “permanent magnet” energy concept, which ended up with him earning a $15,000-permonth salary and a Shelby GT500 that came as a “signing bonus” with a company called Revolutionary Energy Machines. The company never was able to make a machine that worked on a large enough scale, but it was through this company that he would eventually meet Dr. Han at a meetup Haobsh called a “business incubator,” where startups and investors would brainstorm and network their newest ventures. The two would eventually become part of a project looking to create lab-grown synthetic CBD, with Haobsh working in the lab to create the cannabinoids on a large scale, and Han providing herbalist experience and paying Haobsh a salary in exchange. They hoped to use the CBD oils for new medicines through Han’s herbal medicine business. Haobsh will return to the stand Tuesday morning, and Judge Hill will decide his fate in the non-jury trial shortly after closing arguments. n

Three S.B. Police officers and an area business owner rescued a man trapped in a burning home on the 700 block of Spring Street on 11/18 before the fire was put out by city firefighters. Due to the severity of the fire, officers immediately started evacuations of nearby residences and buildings. The man in the house was transported to the hospital and treated for minor injuries and smoke inhalation. Three officers sustained minor cuts and smoke inhalation, with one seeking medical care. The incident is under investigation. Full story at independent.com/ spring-st-rescue.

POLITICS Isla Vista Community Services District cofounder and SBCC trustee Jonathan Abboud is the first candidate to officially announce a campaign for the 37th District State Assembly seat in the 2022 election. Abboud came in fourth place during the 2020 primary race for the same seat, which went to current 37th District Assemblymember Steve Bennett. But with California currently in the process of redrawing district lines, the 37th District would no longer include western Ventura County, where Bennett resides, meaning the district could be left without an incumbent. Full story at independent .com/jonathan-abboud.

COURTS & CRIME Santa Barbara County District Attorney Joyce E. Dudley announced that a felony complaint has been filed against Jose Fermin Lopez Jr., 24, of S.B., the driver involved in the fatal head-on collision on Carrillo Street on 11/15 that resulted in the death of retired UCSB administrator Steven Carlson, 71. Lopez is charged with the murder, gross vehicular manslaughter while intoxicated, driving under the influence of alcohol causing injury, and driving with a .08 percent or higher blood alcohol content causing injury. Lopez’s bail has been set at $2 million. n

For the latest news and longer versions of many of these stories, visit independent.com/news. INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 24, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

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NOV. 18- 24, 2021

COURTS & CRIME

Ely Case Scheduled for Trial

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NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D INFRASTRUCTURE

Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

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Elim Chan

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BETTER LIVING: Though both are compromises, Carbajal affirmed “both bills mean the quality of life will improve for all Americans in a dramatic way, in a way we haven’t seen in decades.”

‘This Is Huge’ Rep. Carbajal Talks Infrastructure Bills

T

by Jean Yamamura

his is going to be big for the country and the Central Coast, most significantly in the money it brings and jobs, jobs, jobs,” said Salud Carbajal, as he Monday-morning quarterbacked the $1 trillion infrastructure bill signed into law by President Joe Biden last week. It could have been a better bill, Carbajal critiqued, and he blamed “some colleagues on the other side of the aisle who didn’t want larger investments in green infrastructure provisions.” Nonetheless, “This was the greenest proposal ever seen,” he asserted. In addition to the $110 billion the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act holds for highways, bridges, and roads, it has even more for rail transportation, electrifying school and public buses, internet connections, electric-vehicle charging stations, developing clean energy sources, and Superfund cleanup. Water was another important aspect, especially for drought-troubled states like California, with investments for clean water, wastewater, and replacing aging infrastructure, such as lead pipes. And many of its original climate-change content made it into the Build Back Better bill, Carbajal noted, President Biden’s second infrastructure bill that is now headed for a Senate reconciliation vote that allows a simple majority win. Carbajal is a member of the bipartisan Problem Solvers Caucus, and eight of its 13 Republican members voted for the first infrastructure bill. “The bill came out of the Senate with huge bipartisan support,” Carbajal said of Democrats’ success. “Then, when it got to the House, [Minority Leader Kevin] McCarthy, in his usual way, polarized the hell out of it — in the toxic gridlock way that he knows how to do best — to try to make it a partisan issue in the House. That was really unfortunate.” Carbajal pointed out that the vote reflected on McCarthy’s leadership: “Even his own members defied his actions and voted for it.” A major holdout for the bill was a Democrat, Senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia. Carbajal played in the charity baseball game between Republicans and Democrats where images of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi wag-

ging her finger while on the phone went viral. Media reports quickly identified the listener as Senator Manchin, and Pelosi was quoted as telling him to take pride in what he’d already accomplished. Manchin voted for the bill, his support necessary in a Senate tied 50-50. The second bill—a social infrastructure bill of about $2 trillion in size—would give middle-class working families a “huge tax break,” Carbajal said. “What this is going to do is extend the child tax credit, increase universal pre-kindergarten, and fund childcare so that families don’t pay more than 7 percent of their income,” said Carbajal. These everyday costs for young families will translate to preschool for 3- and 4-year-olds and a 7 percent cap on childcare costs for households earning up to $300,000. Important to Santa Barbara, where housing is so costly, the bill would earmark $150 billion for new housing, grant funding, a low-income housing tax credit, and a “major, major dent in addressing housing needs on the Central Coast and throughout the country,” said the congressmember. The Pell Grant education program would double to $11 billion over four years’ time, and places like Cuyama, which Carbajal represented while a county supervisor, would benefit from broadband connectivity funding of $65 billion nationwide. Carbajal said his first bill when he was elected to Congress in 2017 was to ban new offshore oil drilling in federal waters off the California coast. That zone expands in the upcoming bill to the Atlantic and Pacific coasts and eastern Gulf of Mexico, and it repeals oil and gas permits in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. In their place are investments in alternative energy, reforestation, and even an electric bicycle tax credit. “This is huge: $550 billion for climate and renewable energy,” Carbajal exclaimed. The best news, said Carbajal, taking a breath, is it’s all paid for. “Look at the CBO,” he advised when a reporter expressed doubt. According to the Congressional Budget Office analysis, he said, “The IRS is getting $44 billion to go after the big cheaters. If you consider the projected revenues brought in by the IRS from big corporate companies that are evading paying their fair share of taxes, this is completely paid for.” n

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Festive Fridays

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NOVEMBER 24, 2021

• State & Fig • The Barber Shop • The Crafter’s Library • Urban Optics • Waterhouse Gallery • 1114 Sports Bar & Games

THE INDEPENDENT

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Ring in the Holiday Season with AWC-SB

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11/16/2021 3:54:31 PM

Wednesday, December 1st 5 - 7:30 p.m. at Villa Wine Bar 618 Anacapa Street #A, Santa Barbara

The Association for Women in Communications, SB will be honoring Kristine Schwarz with the Lois Phillips Founder’s Award and Amy Marie Orozco as AWC-SB Member of the Year.

COU RTESY

What We Do Matters

memorial for the 23 victims lost in Montecito’s 1/9 Debris Flow in 2018 has been relocated from San Ysidro Ranch to Lower Manning Park, more than two years after the seventon memorial sculpture was installed at the ranch in 2019. Susan Venable, a metalworking artist based out of Santa Barbara, created the memorial sculpture soon after joining the Bucket Brigade, a volSupervisor Das Williams and artist Susan Venable unteer group responding to the disaster and picking through the ruins of more than ranch, Venable relocated the bench to 130 destroyed homes. Montecito resident Lower Manning Park, at her own expense. Joan Chackel donated the boulder that Despite an initial refusal from Santa Barwould become the memorial to Venable, bara Parks and Recreation, Venable reached after it came to rest on her property on Hot out to County Supervisor Das Williams, who was able to help her accomplish the Springs Road following the mudslide. Once the memorial was completed, Ven- relocation. “We were alarmed when it got able coordinated with the ownership of San moved at the ranch,” Williams said. “Now Ysidro Ranch to have it installed on March thousands of parents can use it as they’re 20, 2019. There it remained for more than watching their kids, and this will have a two years until this earlier month, accord- spirit of remembrance for the people we ing to Venable, when the memorial was lost.” moved behind a large hedge by the ranch The memorial now sits just outside the playground at Lower Manning Park, where without any notification. A spokesperson for San Ysidro Ranch Venable said it can now be enjoyed by parexplained the move was to put the memo- ents, kids, and residents alike. “This is the rial closer to public access trails. But decid- perfect spot for it to be forever,” Venable said. ing the memorial would be better suited “I think we went from ruin to remembrance.” in a public location rather than the private —Jun Starkey

HOUSING

Murillo, Gutierrez Float 2 Percent Rent Cap

I Holiday Party

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AWC Members $25 Guests $40 RSVP before 11/30 at AWC S B.OR G

see covid health policy at awcsb.org 10

THE INDEPENDENT

NOVEMBER 24, 2021

n one of her last actions as Santa Barbara mayor, Cathy Murillo — alongside her colleague Councilmember Oscar Gutierrez—is proposing a citywide 2 percent cap on annual rent increases, a reduction from the current 5 percent cap imposed by California in 2019 to address the state’s housing crisis. Murillo and Gutierrez, who plan to bring the discussion before the council at its December 7 meeting, say further lowering the ceiling is necessary to protect local renters. “What works in other parts of the state won’t necessarily work in Santa Barbara because rents here are so high,” said Gutierrez. “The cost of living here is continually going up and up and up.” Murillo said having more protections for tenants is “critical” and the time for the city to act is now, “with a low vacancy rate and the housing market so tight.” Stabilizing rents also prevents homelessness, she said, suggesting as well that the city create a registry of rental units in order to “monitor evictions, prevent

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conversions to vacation rentals, and also to monitor properties as SB 9”—the new state law that allows homeowners to subdivide their lots—“goes into effect.” Laura Bode, head of Santa Barbara Rental Property Association, said she fails to see the logic of the city capping rents while it authorizes “big utility companies’ massive rate increases.” She argued that the 2 percent limit would unfairly impact small mom-and-pop landlords who would lose the revenue needed to keep their units up to habitability standards and force them to sell to “wealthy developers.” Gutierrez explained the proposal came from a groundswell of requests from tenants looking to the city for help. Everyone suffers when residents move away, he continued—businesses lose their workforce, families are uprooted, and neighborhoods stop being neighborhoods. “I even hear people say they don’t feel like making new friends because in a few months, they’re gone,” Gutierrez said. —Tyler Hayden

ay Party d i l o


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D HOUSING

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ore than 20 protesters, made up of activists and tenants of the Sandpiper Property Management Company, rallied outside its office Friday, admonishing the company’s lack of response to tenants on issues including PUBLIC SHAMING: Protesters rallied outside Sandpiper Property Management rising rent, disabilCompany’s office Friday. ity accommodations, and renovations on decaying structures. a few months now, saying climbing up to “Sandpiper, shame on you! Repair the his apartment every day is stressful and plumbing! Fix the leaking roof! Change the physically draining for him and his family. old carpets!” a chorus of tenants and local “We’ve been living in our apartment for 10 activists chanted, demanding any kind of years and have been applying for a groundresponse from their landlord. “Answer your floor apartment since May,” Delgado said. emails! Answer your phone! Slum lords!” “Two ground-floor apartments have been The Santa Barbara Tenants’ Union orga- available and leased without us being notinized and attended the protest on behalf fied or even considered.” of the many tenants who have complained Wendy Santamaria, organizer of the to the union regarding Sandpiper’s man- S.B. branch of CAUSE, also attended as a agement. Representatives from the Santa form of support to tenants, discussing how Barbara branch of the Central Coast Alli- the city could do more to prevent renters ance United for a Sustainable Economy from being taken advantage of by predatory (CAUSE) also attended the event in sup- property owners. Unless tenants have the port of tenants. time and the means to take their landlord “Your tenants are your employers,” to court, Santamaria said, there is essentially David Herrera, campaign leader of the no recourse for them. tenants’ union, shouted outside the Sand“Remember when you’re sitting at home piper office; anyone inside gave no sign of with your family, and you have food and a acknowledgement through its locked doors home,” said Estella Montano, a Sandpiper and covered windows. “The tenants pay resident who has complained for months your salaries!” that the staircase outside her home was Henry Delgado and his sister have crumbling and unsafe, “that you have it lived in their San Pascual apartment for because of these people here.” over 10 years, with the property recently The Independent reached out to Sandbeing acquired by Sandpiper. Delgado lives piper management for comment but on the second floor and said he has been received no response before deadline. requesting a ground-floor apartment for —Jun Starkey

COMMUNITY

J U N STAR KEY

Protesters Slam Sandpiper

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La Playa Stadium Reopens to Public

Pamela Larsson-Toscher, Jennifer LeMay, Dan Levin, Michael Long, Mark

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Barbara Parmet, Tom Pazderka, Angela Perko, James Petrucci, Gail Pine,

anta Barbara City College’s La Playa Stadium, which boasts some of the most breathtaking views for weekend fitness warriors, has reopened to the public after a long hiatus due to COVID and the installation of new synthetic turf. As of November 20, the stadium’s popular stairs and track will now be open to the public on weekends and holidays and daily during SBCC winter break. The stadium has been closed to the public for much of the pandemic, though the public was once again granted daily access to its stairs this summer. For those who used the stadium as their spiritual retreat — a roosting spot for runners, joggers, yoga stretchers, exhibitionists, firefighters trying to look busy, or those seeking somehow to connect with other like-minded members of the Lycra tribe — it has seemed much, much longer. It is notable that the announcement of the reopening was made by Summers Case,

public info apparatchik for the City of Santa Barbara and not from City College itself. The closure of the track has been a subject of subliminal but simmering tension between the two governmental bodies, with those in City Hall growing increasingly restive with the campus’s insistence on keeping the track closed to the public. The grand reopening took place with no other ceremonial fanfare than the rising of the sun on Saturday morning. To the extent that there was ever a normal to return to, the announcement marks one small step in that general direction. Following the city’s announcement, Ryan Grant, SBCC’s Men’s Athletic Program Assistant, clarified that the turf field remains offlimits to the public and that “there will be no public access on any section of the track while any SBCC PE classes or athletic teams are using the facility.” —Nick Welsh

Lozano, Lizabeth Madal, Larry McAdams, Virginia McCracken, Susan McDonnell, Kerry Methner, Zoe Nathan, John Nava, Amber O’Neill, Hank Pitcher, Maria Rendón, Chris Rupp, Linda Saccoccio, Blakeney Sanford, Sharon Schock, Paul Schurch, Lanny Sherwin, Leslie Lewis Sigler, Kerrie Smith, Libby Smith, Catherine Steininger, Nicole Strasburg, Marlene Struss, Bart Tarman, Andrew Thill, James David Thomas, Susan Tibbles, Dug Uyesaka, Sue Van Horsen, Sarah Vedder, Nina Warner, Monica Wiesblott, Joyce Wilson, Sara Woodburn, Sara Yerkes

11 EAST ANA PAMU ST. S AN TA B ARBARA , CA 93101 (805 ) 730- 1460 www.s ullivan go ss.co m INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 24, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

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NOV. 18- 24, 2021

COURTS & CRIME

Owners Sue After Chihuahua Killed

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ff-leash areas for dogs come with risks, as Dorrie and Harold Powell witnessed on March 9, 2020, when their chihuahua, ChiChi, was killed by four Rhodesian ridgebacks on what their lawsuit calls “Mesa Beach.” The Powells have sued owner Edmund Marroquin for allegedly violating an off-leash ordinance, seeking punitive damages for gross negligence. The Powells allege that after Marroquin’s large dogs ran up to them, one “seized ChiChi in its mouth and bit down, shaking her like a rag doll.” Their legal papers state Dorrie picked up ChiChi, raising her above the pack, while the ridgebacks “growled and snarled toward her.” Harold chased the dogs back down the beach toward Marroquin, who was “a considerable distance away” and unaware of the attack. ChiChi died in Dorrie’s arms shortly after. The plaintiffs cite a county ordinance that requires that “all caretakers maintain voice control of their dog(s) at all times” and that “the caretaker … shall carry a leash for each dog and shall leash the dog(s) at the first sign of aggression or loss of voice control.” According to the Powells’ attorney, Marroquin had “no sufficient leashes for his animals.” The complaint also states the beach allows three dogs per owner, but Marroquin had four.

From Marroquin’s perspective, the risk is mutual when you bring dogs to an offleash beach. This is “the spirit of the ordinance,” he said, adding that he wouldn’t take his own kids to an off-leash beach. And while the complaint alleges that Marroquin’s dogs have attacked small animals before, Marroquin insists that while they have chased rabbits, they have “never caught one; never hurt one.” Marroquin is an anesthesiologist and breeds Rhodesian ridgebacks. His business’s webpage states his dogs “are not bred as hunting dogs, only as show dogs and family dogs.” Expressing his shock at the incident, Marroquin explained he has taken his dogs to off-leash areas such as Mesa Beach and Douglas Family Preserve since he moved from San Francisco in 2016. “No dog or person has ever been hurt,” he said. He expressed remorse that a dog was killed and claims that he reached out to Harold Powell following the incident, offering to pay for ChiChi, but Powell declined. Judge Colleen Sterne heard Marroquin’s response to the Powells’ lawsuit in November and is allowing the Powells to clarify and reframe their complaint by November —Caleb Rodriguez 30.

ENVIRONMENT

Gaviota Wildlife Corridor Inches Forward

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he wildlife corridor Gaviota residents have been demanding of Caltrans for two years is starting to take shape as Caltrans begins a series of stakeholder meetings to outline possible projects. The carcasses of bear, deer, squirrels, birds, and reptiles are regularly smeared onto Highway 101, which divides the coast from the mountains. Finding endangered mountain lions dead at Gaviota Pass upped the ante for all involved, and the first of four meetings will take ROADKILL MAP: Stakeholder meetings will begin as Caltrans place on December 2, Caltrans’ studies a wildlife corridor to pass under the 101 in the Gaviota John Olejnik told the Board of region. This map shows roadkill reported in the area recently. Supervisors last week. A scientific and technical consultant eras and examining the existing tunnels and group, ICF Jones & Stokes, will conduct the culverts to see if any could be improved to study over the next year at a cost of $327,000, accommodate wildlife. He also acknowlCaltrans spokesperson Jim Shivers said. edged the need for funding the passageCaltrans could not specify the study meth- way. Recent crossings built in Santa Cruz ods, but needs and locations were among County and along State Route 46 between them, said Doug Campbell of the Coastal San Luis Obispo and Kern counties were Ranches Conservancy. His group appealed partly funded by nonprofit groups. a Caltrans culvert project in 2020, assertThe stakeholder group includes the ing it could fulfill the need for a wildlife Coastal Ranches Conservancy, Gaviota passage at a spot where animals regularly Coast Conservancy, Santa Barbara County became roadkill. Creating a corridor there and the Association of Governments, State would cost millions more, Caltrans stated, Parks, Fish & Wildlife, Coastal Commisinstead substituting this study to determine sion, and Chumash individuals from Santa the best location for a wildlife corridor in Ynez and the Coastal Band. Members of the the Gaviota area. public who wish to take part may contact Campbell believed the study would the county or Caltrans District 5, Shivers involve spotting wildlife on remote cam- said. —Jean Yamamura 12

THE INDEPENDENT

NOVEMBER 24, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D COURTS & CRIME

Sheriff Celebrates Opening of New North County Jail PHOTOS COU RTESY OF S.B. COU NTY SH ER I F F ’S OF F IC E

But the Battle Continues over Who Will Be Inside

by Nick Welsh bankruptcy and the need t might not have been to accommodate the wildMoses descending life on the site, including hawks, owls, and a feral kitfrom Mt. Sinai holding the 10 Commandten his rescuers dubbed “El ments aloft, but by Santa Chapo.” Barbara standards, it was Last week’s event came at in some ways the next a time when Brown — now best thing. Last Thursday, about to run for his fifth Sheriff Bill Brown held a term — finds himself ceremonial ribbon cutting increasingly under fire. The more liberal South Coast for the new North County Jail he promised to build supervisors wonder how when he first ran for office many jail beds are actually needed. Money that could in 2006. Fifteen years later, 400 people showed up to be spent on beds, they celebrate an accomplishargue, should go instead to ment that eluded two fordiversion and prevention mer sheriffs, Jim Thomas programs that might keep and Jim Anderson. people out of jail in the first During his remarks, place. Brown points to a jump in murders and gun Brown spoke about how violence, arguing that natuhe had traveled around ral fluctuations in the crime the country, inspecting other facilities to find what rate require more beds than worked and what didn’t. the diversion-minded South JAIL UNVEILED: Sheriff Bill Brown and County General Services Director Janette Pell did the honors at last Thursday’s ribbon cutting for the new North County Jail. “We wanted it to be bright, County supervisors contend modern, and clean. We is warranted. Without the certainly didn’t want it to have the appearance of an assem- laws and criminal justice enforcement infrastructure that threat of incarceration, Brown argues, many offenders will blage of cages,” he said. “There’s not a single metal bar in this enforces them. refuse treatment for drug and alcohol addiction. Nationally and locally, the cripplingly high costs of incarBut the real problem, at least according to County Probajail. We wanted it to be a place of inspiration and learning and hope.” To underscore this point, Brown noted, the Latin ceration coupled with the Black Lives Matter movement tion Chief Tanja Heitman, is that COVID, has resulted in phrase Faber est quisque fortunae suae had been inscribed and the urgent safety restrictions demanded by COVID people who are not being arrested for drug- and alcoholover the archway of the entrance: “Every person is the archi- have created a new right-meets-left coalition dedicated related offenses. Instead, they are cited and released. Pretect of their own destiny.” to keeping all but the most dangerous of defendants out COVID, she said, many of these defendants would have Brown also borrowed a line from Nelson Mandela, who of jail. When the COVID curtain fell, the average daily been arrested, booked, and then — assuming nonviolent had famously remarked, “It is said that no one truly knows population of the County Jail plunged from 950 to less than criminal histories — they would have been assessed for a a nation until one has been inside its jails.” By that measure- 600. A majority of supervisors pushed Brown hard to keep pre-trial diversion program into the appropriate treatment ment, Santa Barbara’s main jail just off Calle Real — built that number down. The new numbers demonstrated, they and recovery program. Thanks to COVID, she stated, that in 1971 — has long reflected poorly on the Santa Barbara insisted, that public safety did not require so many people level of assessment is not happening. Likewise, 24 of the community. It has been the subject of “cruel and inhuman” be locked up. county’s 86 rehab beds have been shut down; for one, the provider — Salvation Army — can’t muster enough of a staff lawsuits almost from the day it opened. A hodgepodge of That argument remains far from resolved. improvised wings and hallways, it was stitched together What no one contests, however, is that the new North to meet minimal staffing requirements. over time to deal with the chronic overcrowding. In less dire County Jail will be infinitely safer and saner than the presIn the meantime, the presiding judge of the Santa Barbara terms, Brown likes to describe the jail as the county’s version ent jail. It boasts more natural sunlight and carpeted floors court system issued on October 26 an advisory notice statof the Winchester Mystery House. to dampen the noise, and it will provide therapy dogs and ing that cash bail can now be issued for low-level offenses cats for the people incarcerated there. It also has better for which a warrant — typically for failure to appear — has sightlines, so it will require fewer deputies to oversee inmate been issued. Under the county’s interpretation of statesafety and allow remedial programs without as much risk. wide emergency orders, cash bail had been prohibited in The price tag, however, has been astronomically steep. such cases. Since then, about five more defendants are now The initial ballpark estimate had been $77 million. The being booked into the County Jail than are being released. first conceptual budget was $96.1 million. But when actual Before then, the number leaving and entering the jail a bids started to come in, the price tag was $110 million. day had been the same. In two weeks, the jail population Today — after multiple delays, bankruptcies, and some size expanded by 78 inmates. The vast majority of these major litigation that’s yet to be resolved — the final costs are are charged with felonies and are unsentenced and awaitpegged at $120 million. The jail’s December 2021 opening ing trial. Twenty-eight have been legally determined to be incompetent to stand trial. Of these, typically, only 8 percent was originally slated to be in April 2019. And that doesn’t count the roughly $20 million a year it will be sentenced to state prison. The rest will be released back to their community of origin. will cost to staff and operate the facility. —Sheriff Bill Brown In the meantime, Brown and the supervisors will conBrown, one of the county’s most accomplished political actors at any level of government, used every tool at his dis- tinue to debate who should be put in County Jail, for what posal to get the jail built. When the first state grant for $56 charges, and for how long. Brown, as elected sheriff, controls When Brown first ran for countywide office, he preached million didn’t pan out, Brown put a sales tax initiative before the jail. The supervisors, however, control his purse strings. the gospel of diversion, recovery, prevention — anything county voters in 2010; that failed miserably. Ultimately, With the new jail, however, Brown is convinced he can that would lower the jail’s stubborn recidivism rate. He however, Brown — an influential figure in statewide law provide the following: “enhanced safety and convenience for promised his new jail, which was built to house 376 inmates, enforcement circles — secured an $86 million state grant the community, better working conditions for our incredwould embody these core values. In the years since, how- that would cover 80 percent of construction costs. ible custody staff, and more opportunities for revitalized But it was plagued by delays and challenges, including lives, lower rates of addiction and recidivism, and a future ever, the political winds blowing on criminal justice have shifted dramatically. Today, the perceived problem is the a 287-day halt when the architectural company declared filled with happiness, hope, sobriety, and success.” n

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‘There’s not a single metal bar in this jail. We wanted it to be a place of inspiration and learning and hope.’

INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 24, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

13


OPINIONS

CHRISTOPHER WEYANT

Letters

The Arlington Theatre

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Encanto* (PG): Fri-Sun: 12:00, 1:20, 2:35, 3:55, 5:10, 6:30, 7:45. Mon-Thur: 1:20, 2:35, 3:55, 5:10, 6:30, 7:45. King Richard (PG13): Fri-Thur: 1:10, 4:20, 7:30.

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Resident Evil* (R): Fri-Sun: 1:00, 4:10, 7:00, 10:05. Mon-Thur: 2:00, 5:00, 8:10. House of Gucci* (R): Fri-Sun: 12:30, 3:30, 6:40, 8:00, 9:30. Mon-Thur: 1:30, 4:30, 8:00. Ghostbusters: Afterlife* (PG13): Fri-Sun: 11:40, 1:10, 2:40, 4:00, 5:30, 6:50, 8:20, 9:40. Mon-Thur: 1:10, 2:40, 4:00, 5:30, 6:50, 8:20. Eternals (PG13): Fri-Sun: 11:50, 3:10, 6:30, 9:50. Mon-Thur: 1:00, 4:20, 7:45. Dune (PG): Fri-Sun: 1:20, 4:40. Mon-Thur: 1:20, 4:40, 7:30.

HITCHCOCK 371 South Hitchcock Way SANTA BARBARA 805-682-6512

Julia (PG13): Fri-Sun: 2:30, 5:00, 7:30. Tue:-Thur 5:00, 7:30. The French Dispatch (R): Fri-Sun: 2:45, 5:15, 7:45. Tue-Thur: 5:15, 7:45.

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Ghostbusters: Afterlife* (PG13): Fri-Wed: 1:30, 4:30, 7:30. 14

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Eternals (PG13): Fri-Thur: 1:40, 5:00, 8:20. Dune (PG13): Fri-Wed: 2:20, 8:00. Thur: 2:20. Venom Let There Be Carnage (PG13): Fri-Thur: 5:40. Resident Evil* (R): Fri/Sat: 1:30, 2:45(LP), 4:00, 5:15(LP), 6:30, 7:45(LP), 9:00. Sun-Thur: 1:30, 2:45(LP), 4:00, 5:15(LP), 6:30, 7:45(LP). Wolf (R): Thur: 8:00.

F I E S TA 5 916 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-0455

Encanto* (PG): Fri-Sun: 11:10, 12:20, 1:45, 3:10, 4:40, 5:45, 7:15, 8:20. Mon-Wed: 1:45, 3:10, 4:40, 5:45, 7:15, 8:20.Thur: 1:45, 3:10, 4:40, 5:45, 7:15, 8:20. Ghostbusters: Afterlife* (PG13): Fri-Sun: 11:30, 12:30, 2:30, 3:30, 5:30, 6:30, 8:30. Mon-Wed: 1:30, 2:30, 3:30, 5:30, 6:30, 8:30. Thur: 2:05, 3:30, 4:55, 6:30, 7:45. Clifford (G): Fri, Sun: 11:20, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00. Sat: 11:20, 2:00, 7:35. Mon/Tue: 2:30, 4:30, 7:00. Wed: 2:30. Thur: 2:00. Sing 2: Early Access (PG): Sat: 5:00. Christmas w/the Chosen:The Messengers* (NR): Wed/Thur: 4:30, 7:05.

PA S E O N U E V O 8 WEST DE LA GUERRA STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7451

House of Gucci* (R): Fri-Thur: 1:20, 3:05, 4:45, 6:30, 8:15. King Richard (PG13): Fri-Thur: 1:10, 4:30, 7:45. Belfast (PG13): Fri-Thur: 5:05. No Time To Die (PG13): Fri-Thur: 1:30, 7:30. NOVEMBER 24, 2021

District Divisions

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he California Voting Rights Act was created to ensure that protected classes (low income and people of color) had opportunities for equitable representation at all levels of elected government. History has demonstrated that when up to the ruling class, protected-class voices are unfairly drowned through racist policies. Unfortunately, history is repeating itself with the new maps for the Santa Barbara Unified School District. Current maps drawn by Cooperative Strategies belittle the voices of the protected classes while lifting the voices of the wealthy communities within the district. Pairing low-income, Latinx, immigrant neighborhoods with multimillion-dollar households is a dangerous scenario that will wipe any real chance of representation for both the Eastside and Westside neighborhoods. And although the district consists of 60 percent Latinx students, not one map fairly protects their choices for representation. What’s worse is the discourse at school board meetings. One commentator went on to speak about the need to stop bussing kids from wealthy neighborhoods to low-income neighborhoods, to maintain them within their school boundary lines, and that this disrupts the harmony among communities. Fortunately, schools don’t vote; people do. Sad to say, I am not surprised with these comments. This is the same language being used across the country by right-wing activists to elicit fear and anger. It’s dangerous rhetoric that is xenophobic, borders on racism, and resembles the previous administration’s “send them back to their country” comments. This is not what the California Voting Rights Act was intended to be or do. This discussion should be civil and mindful of those who have been unfairly underrepresented. Equity in representation is necessary to protect the interests of all students. I am asking the district reject all current maps drawn by Cooperative Strategies and allow residents to create their own maps. Lastly, I urge the Board of Trustees to create minority majority districts that give protected classes the opportunity for fair representa—Eder Gaona-Macedo, S.B. tion.

Out on a Bike

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y family and I visited Santa Barbara over Veterans Day weekend, our first time since before the pandemic. If anything, S.B. just keeps getting better.

Since the city has become more bike friendly, we bring our e-bikes as a fun way to get around the city, see the sights, shop, and explore without worrying about parking or traffic. We especially love the new walkable, bikeable stretch of State Street, which makes the downtown area much more pleasant than it was before, and we hope the changes are here to stay. We hope the city can continue these improvements by adding more bike racks and filling in some of the gaps in the bike lane network. Our family has loved Santa Barbara for a long time. I didn’t think it was possible, but we love it even more now! —John Lloyd, Sierra Madre, CA

Thankful

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anta Barbara Audubon Society protects area birdlife and habitat and connects people with birds through education, conservation, and science. We have much to be thankful for. We give gratitude to the Independent for publication of Hugh Ranson’s beautiful and informative monthly column, Santa Barbara Birding, which plants a seed for novice birders to learn about birdlife and delights all birders, from beginners to experts, with local stories. During this season of appreciation, we thank each of our dedicated volunteers for their grace and unwavering commitment to protecting birds. To those of you do so much “behind the scenes” to keep everything running smoothly (you know who you are), you are extraordinary! We are infinitely grateful for our generous members, guardian angel donors, community partners, and grantors. Because of you, Audubon can continue our important work to protect birds, nurture environmental stewardship of their habitats, and connect people with birds and nature.

—Katherine Emery, Exec. Dir., S.B. Audubon Society

For the Record

¶ In last week’s news story about Santa Barbara writing an ordinance regarding SB 9, the requirement that the newly split lots be as large as or larger than the surrounding 20 would be a citywide rule, not just in the coastal zone. Also, if a second home were built on a coastal zone lot under this pending rule, it must be priced for a low-income household.

The Independent welcomes letters of less than 250 words that include a daytime phone number for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Send to: Letters, S.B. Independent, 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; or fax: 965-5518; or email: letters@independent.com. Unabridged versions and more letters appear at independent.com/opinions.

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Opinions

angry poodle barbecue

A Dog’s Prayer

PRAY FOR RAIN: These days, sometimes I find myself praying for rain. Sometimes, I pray for a heart attack instead. Mostly, I don’t pray

at all. This Sunday, however, I found myself attending church services at the True Vine Bible Fellowship in Lompoc. I was told the new pastor, James Earl Cray, packed a 20,000-volt preaching style. Mostly I was on hand to witness what I was hoping would be a carefully choreographed act of grace designed to tear down the walls. But the not-guilty-on-all-counts verdict had just been rendered after the Kyle Rittenhouse trial in Kenosha, Wisconsin. Final arguments were also still underway in the murder trial of three white men accused of shooting a 25-year-old Black jogger in Georgia — Ahmaud Arbery — whom they had chased down the road in two trucks, cornered in a ditch, then shot and killed. They likewise have claimed self-defense. Given the peculiarities of Georgia law, they have a better than average chance of prevailing. Pastor Cray presides over a predominantly Black congregation in a town with the largest Black population in Santa Barbara County. A onetime college football star, Cray had NFL aspirations until Jesus intervened. He was 22 years old when that happened. Cray, now 37, hasn’t looked back since, arriving in Lompoc from a small town in Georgia early last November. I, along with other first-

timers, could not have been more warmly received. Just for showing up, we got a brief standing ovation. Maybe 125 people thronged into the church gymnasium. Showing us to our seats were ushers wearing the sort of white cotton gloves I last wore when receiving first communion. Having attended Catholic school for eight years, I’ve been successfully inoculated against anything remotely religious or spiritual. The services I attended as a kid reeked of shame and judgment, stifled farts, and awkward handshakes. By contrast, the True Vine service burst with joy, perseverance, and gratitude in the face of hardship. Hands filled the air. Kids danced. No one looked askance. The big news was that a delegation from the Old Mission was on hand, led by Father Larry, now the de facto community ambassador for the parish. Father Larry and the Old Mission were teaming up with Endowment for Youth — a nonprofit dedicated to expanding educational opportunities for young Black students — to donate $65,000. Coastal Hills Credit Union handed over a check for $40,000. That $110,000 will be used to pay off the $500,000 debt True Vine now owes on the property, a sprawling piece of real estate that practically explodes with potential as a community center. In addition, another $30,000 has been donated in the form of youth scholarships; six students have been strategically

selected — all colors of the rainbow — to work together to host a teen summit sometime next year. The theme — the mantra — is “Refuse Hate, Embrace Love.” With the improved liquidity, Cray outlined a host of programs he hopes to launch that will make high school graduation and college enrollment the rule — not the exception — for families now struggling to pay for diapers and infant formula. Father Larry, bedecked in his brown Franciscan robe with white rope circumnavigating his waist, held his arms in the air, palms flat out in supplication. For the past seven months, he, Father Dan, and Father John from the Old Mission have been meeting regularly with Pastor Cray as part of an ecumenical bridgebuilding designed to combat intolerance of all stripes. Who knows where it will all wind up? But this Sunday, Father Larry — better known for the gentle poetry he reads from the pulpit — found himself exuberantly high fiving an elegantly dressed Black woman standing in front of him and belting out some serious gratitude to the True Vine congregation. “I’m so blessed,” he testified. The feeling, of course, was mutual. When Cray asked his congregation to “go crazy” with gratitude, they readily obliged. Cray, it turns out, grew up about 80 miles from where Arbery was shot. He’d been back home over the past weekend to attend a football game. He recounted how, at the airport on the way home, three shots were accidentally discharged in someone’s luggage. He’d been simmering over recent events. Kyle Rit-

tenhouse. Ahmaud Arbery. A host of other cases. Two hundred and forty-five years after Thomas Jefferson signed the Declaration of Independence, he preached, “We have not taken one inch of a step forward.” On the plane back, Cray found himself forced to sit next to a “Caucasian couple.” The wife, he said, wanted to chat. He decidedly did not. His heart was troubled. Plus, he had Sunday’s sermon to write. It was all about fighting racism and division by reaching out and shaking hands. He quoted liberally from Amos, a “nobody” in the Bible, who called out the rich and powerful hypocrites who betrayed their professed love of God by their deeds. The woman sitting next to him wouldn’t leave him alone, Cray recounted. She pestered him with intrusive questions. Even after putting on his headphones, she tapped his shoulder to ask just one more thing. But naturally, there would be others. By the time the plane landed in L.A., Cray had finished much of the sermon. Upon arriving, the woman stood and extended her hand. She had no idea what the sermon was about. Simplified, it was “shake hands with people who don’t look like you.” But Cray, his heart troubled, pondered whether to take it. She clinched the deal with, “I’m praying your tomorrow is a blessing for you.” They shook hands. Who knows what, if anything, will come from any of this? Most definitely, a seed got planted. Will anything grow? A bush? —Nick Welsh I’ll be praying for rain.

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1st THURSDAY MAR 5, 5-8PM st

1 THURSDAY 1st Thursday Barbara. On and cultural FREE access State Street

is an evening of art and culture in Downtown Santa the first Thursday of each month, participating galleries art venues are open from 5-8 PM offering the public to art in a fun and social environment. In addition, comes alive with performances and interactive exhibits.

PARTICIPATING VENUES

MICHELTORENA STREET

3 4

Arlington Arli i

1

2

SOLA STREET

7

Vic TThe he New New V 5 6 Granada Gra 10

ANAPAMU STREET 8 9

11

15 useum Museum/ 14 M Library

13

CHAPALA STREET

18 16 17 Arcada La L LaArcada ada

Cou House Court

FFIGUEROA IGUER O STREET

19

CARRILLO STREET 20

22

Paseo 24Nu uevo Nuevo 25

obero Lobero

CANON PERDIDO STREET AN N 27 28

DE LA GUERRA STREET

Cityy Hall

29

26

GA STREET ORTEGA

HALEY STREET

EAST GUTIERREZ STREET

1 SBIFF’S SANTA BARBARA FILMMAKER SCREENING SERIES SBIFF Eduction Center, 1330 State Street 2 THE SHOPS AT ARLINGTON PLAZA 1324 State Street 3 THOMAS REYNOLDS GALLERY 1331 State Street, 415-676-7689 4 SANTA BARBARA FINE ART 1321 State Street, 805-845-4270 5 DOMECÍL 1221 State Street, Suite 7 6 LONETREE 1221 State Street, Suite 24 7 CHRIST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 36 East Victoria Street, 805-957-4200 8 MERITAGE WINE MARKET 18 West Anapamu Street, 805-845-0777 9 10 WEST GALLERY 10 West Anapamu Street, 805-770-7711 10 SULLIVAN GOSS – AN AMERICAN GALLERY 11 East Anapamu Street, 805-730-1460 11 CHANNING PEAKE GALLERY 105 East Anapamu Street, 805-568-3990 12 COLETTE COSENTINO ATELIER + GALLERY 11 West Anapamu Street, 805-570-9863 13 CRUSH BAR & TAP 1129 State Street, Suite A, 805-770-8077 14 SANTA BARBARA MUSEUM OF ART 1130 State Street, 805-963-4364 15 FAULKNER GALLERY 40 East Anapamu Street, in the SB Public Library

ANACAPA STREET T R EET

FIG AVENUE

COTA STREET

30

GARDEN STREET

23

STATE STREET

21

County Administrative

SANTA BARBARA STREET

DE LA VINA STREET

12

VICTORIA STREET

ART CRAWL Meet at Stairs to SBMA, 1130 State Street, 5:30 PM

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16 SANTA BARBARA ARTS 1114 State Street, La Arcada Court #24, 805-884-1938 17 WATERHOUSE GALLERY 1114 State Street, La Arcada Court #9, 805-962-8885 18 GALLERY 113 1114 State Street, La Arcada Court #8, 805-965-6611 19 SANTA BARBARA TRAVEL BUREAU 1028 State Street, 805-966-3116 LOCALS’ COLLECTIVE 20 931 State Street 21 SLINGSHOT GALLERY 220 West Canon Perdido Street, Suite A, 805-770-3878 22 THE YES STORE 101 Paseo Nuevo 23 ANNA JANELLE JEWELRY 711 Paseo Nuevo, 805-560-2300 24 SILENT NIGHT SILENT DISCO Center Court at Paseo Nuevo 25 MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART SANTA BARBARA 653 Paseo Nuevo Terrace, 805-966-5373 26 IDYLL MERCANTILE 703 Chapala Street 27 GRASSINI FAMILY VINEYARDS 24 El Paseo, 805-897-3366 28 JAMIE SLONE WINES 23 East de la Guerra Street, 805-560-6555 29 CHANUKAH MENORAH LIGHTING CEREMONY Storke Placita, 700 State Street 30 SANTA BARBARA HISTORICAL MUSEUM 136 East de la Guerra Street, 805-966-1601

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STATE STREET PROMENADE MARKET State Street, 1000 Block, 3:00 - 8:00 PM SBCC TROMBONE CHOIR Corner of State and Anapamu Street, 5:00 - 7:00 PM SANTA BARBARA REVELS Performing at the State Street Promenade Market, 6:00 - 7:30 PM


A H nnH arkey Ann H arkey nn arkey A H Ann Harkey 13 November 1947 - 03 November 2021

Survived by her loving husband, Ron Harkey and the children she adored, Aaron 1947 Harkey,-Damon Harkey and Ruth Harkey McCombs 13 soNovember 03 November 2021 13and November 2021 so many she 1947 touched-in03 her November magnificent circle of love Survived by her loving husband, Ron Harkey by her loving husband, Harkey and the children she soSurvived adored, Aaron Harkey, DamonRon Harkey and Ruth Harkey McCombs 7 and the children she and so adored, Aaron Harkey, Damon Harkey and RuthofHarkey so many she touched in-her magnificent circle love McCombs 13 November 1947 03 November 2021 and so many she touched in her magnificent circle of love

From a post by her son, Aaron...

Survived by her1947 loving husband, Ron Harkey 2021 7 13 November - 03 November 7

and thethe children she so adored, Aaron Damon IHarkey and Ruth HarkeyinMcCombs I am thinking today how sometimes least expected things can be theHarkey, greatest blessings. am thinking of my mother the hour that she got ready for her last morning walk I am picturing my pop a callshe from an old of theirs, lying in bedof with by her loving Roncircle Harkey andtaking soSurvived many touched infriend herhusband, magnificent love his earbuds and her, maybe finishing their From a post by heryesterday. son, Aaron... From by her son,getting Aaron... last cupa ofpostcoffee before up. I think about how she spent her last hour in this house hearing him, revel in theirHarkey good fortune and his happiness. I wonder and the children she so adored, Aaron Harkey, Damon Harkey and Ruth McCombs how many times she glanced at him or mouthed, “Stop, now!” as he praised her many virtues and said aloud that he was living his best she life with the woman II am thinking today how how sometimes sometimesthe theleast leastexpected expected things can be the greatest I am thinking of mother my the that hourshe that got for ready for her andthings so many she touched inblessings. herI magnificent circle of mother lovein theinhour am thinking today can be the greatest blessings. am thinking of my got ready her oflast hismorning dreams after winning the life lottery. If you have been in a room with them both for any period of time, you have seen her in this moment. Embarrassed walk yesterday. yesterday.IIam ampicturing picturingmy mypop poptaking takinga call a call from an friend of theirs, in with bed with his earbuds andmaybe her, maybe finishing their last pleased. morning“Iwalk from oldold friend ofblessed theirs, lyinglying bed earbuds and her, finishing their but and ambefore like getting Lou Gehrig, the luckiest man on the faceher oflast theanhour earth. How am I in to him, have hadhis that phone call?” he shouts today almost not last cup of coffee up. I think about how she spent in this house hearing revel in their good fortune and his happiness. I post by hergetting son, Aaron... last From cup ofacoffee before up. I think about how she spent her last hour in this house hearing him, revel in their good fortune and his happiness. I wonderwonder athow random. No arguments here. Very Popa.“Stop, No now!” rebuttals from any her of us.many We have all been--you maybe most andliving longesthisof best us all--so blessed. And I she glanced glanced himororblessed, mouthed, praised virtues he living was lifethe with the woman how many many times times she atathim mouthed, “Stop, now!” as as he he praised her many virtues andand saidsaid aloudaloud that that he was his best life with woman am thinking about her gentle touch and pleased smile and the underlying flirtation that always seemed a fabric of your relationship, vibing as she gently put ofof his dreams aftertoday winning the lifelottery. lottery. Ifyou youexpected havebeen been a room with them both for Iany of oftime, you have seen her thisshemoment. I am thinking howthe sometimes theIfleast things can bewith the greatest blessings. am period thinking myhave mother theinhour gotEmbarrassed readyEmbarrassed for her his dreams after winning life have in in a room them both for any period of time, you seeninher thisinthat moment. your socks on before stepping out. From a post by her son, Aaron... and pleased. “I am am likeyesterday. LouGehrig, Gehrig, the luckiestmy man of from the earth. blessed am Ihave to have that heher,shouts almost morning walk I amthe picturing pop taking a ofcallthe anHow oldHow friend of am theirs, in bedhad with hisphone earbuds maybetoday finishing andlast pleased. “I like Lou luckiest man onon thethe faceface earth. blessed I tolying had that phone call?” call?” heand shouts today almost buttheir notbut not atat random. arguments here.Very Very blessed,about Popa.how Noshe rebuttals ofinus. have all been--you most and longest ofhis us happiness. all--so last cup No of coffee before getting up. Iblessed, think spent from herfrom last hour thisWe house him,maybe revelmaybe inmost their goodlongest fortune andall--so I wonder random. No arguments here. Popa. No rebuttals anyany of us. We have allhearing been--you and of us blessed.blessed. And IAnd I Iam am thinking that when yousometimes left house, Mom, you were probably already forward to seemed coming Thinking that, itvibing isbest beautiful and I thinking am thinking today how the least expected things the greatest blessings. Iand am thinking ofofthat my in thehis hour that she got ready how manyabout times shegentle glanced atthe him orpleased mouthed, “Stop, now!” ascan he be praised herlooking many virtues said aloud was living life with the woman about her gentle touch and smile and the underlying flirtation that always ahome. fabric ofhemother your relationship, vibing as sheremarkable gently puther am thinking her touch and pleased smile and the underlying flirtation that always seemed a fabric your relationship, as she gently put for that you were able to leave him with a touch and look that conveyed love beyond measure. The kind of love that can make a man scream his good fortune last morning walk yesterday. I am from anthem old friend theirs, lyingof in bedyou with hisseen earbuds maybeEmbarrassed finishing their ofsocks his dreams after winning lifepicturing lottery. If my you pop havetaking been ina acall room with both forof any period time, have her inand thisher, moment. your on before before stepping out.the your socks stepping out. evenlast as cup he’s his heart wrecked. are wrecked, and I want tohour know you have of the luckiest kidscall?” and he a batch oftoday thehisluckiest grandkids ofhad coffee before up.And I think about how on shethe spent lastearth. inthat this house him, their good fortune happiness. I wonder and pleased. “I am likegetting Lou Gehrig, theweluckiest man faceher ofyou the How blessed amhearing I three to have hadrevel thatinphone shoutsand almost but not that have ever gotten to come together as a family. how many times she glanced at him or mouthed, “Stop, now!” as he praised her many virtues and said aloud that he was living his best life with the random. that No when arguments here. Very blessed, Popa. No rebuttals from any looking of us. We have allcoming been--you maybe most and longest all--so blessed. Andwoman I amatthinking house, Mom, you were probably already forward to home. Thinking that, it is beautiful and remarkable II am that when you youleft leftthe the house, Mom, you were probably already looking forward to coming home. Thinking that, itofisusbeautiful and remarkable of his dreams after winning the life lottery. If you have been in a room with them both for any period of time, you have seen her in this moment. Embarrassed am thinking about her gentle touch and pleased smile and the underlying flirtation that always seemed a fabric of your relationship, vibing as she gently put that you were able to leave him with a touch and look that conveyed love beyond measure. The kind of love that can make a man scream his good fortune that you to leave him with a touch and look that conveyed love beyond measure. The kind of love that can make a man scream his good fortune Ieven am thinking even though you held aare healthy disdain for social media and 21st technology (even some 20th century, let’s bethe honest), italmost isgrandkids your socks on“Ihis before stepping out. and am like Lou Gehrig, the luckiest man onI the faceyouofyou How blessed am had thatand phone call?” today but not even aspleased. he’s hadthat heart wrecked. And wewe and want totheknow that youcentury havehave three ofI to theofhave luckiest kids aand batch ofhe theshouts grandkids as his heart wrecked. And arewrecked, wrecked, and I want toearth. know that you three the luckiest kids a batch ofluckiest luckiest somehow miraculous that there are many of my friends (and Damon’s and Ruth’s) that sought shelter in your kitchens and valued your attention, and they at have random. here. Very blessed, that have ever No gotten toto come asasa afamily. that ever gottenarguments cometogether together family.Popa. No rebuttals from any of us. We have all been--you maybe most and longest of us all--so blessed. And I I am that when left theand house, Mom, you werethe probably looking forward to coming home. Thinking that,relationship, it is beautiful and as remarkable willam have athinking chance to think ofyou youtouch today andpleased remember because of underlying it. alreadyflirtation thinking about her gentle smile and that always seemed a fabric of your vibing she gently put that you were able to leave him with a touch and look that conveyed love beyond measure. The kind of love that can make a man scream his good fortune II am am thinking that even though you held a healthy disdain for social media and 21st century technology (even some 20th century, let’s be honest), it is your socks on before stepping out. thinking that even though you held a healthy disdain for social media and 21st century technology (even some 20th century, let’s be honest), it is even asmiraculous he’s his heart And we are wrecked, and I did wantfor you toand know that you have the kitchens luckiest and a batch of You the luckiest somehow that are many friends Damon’s and Ruth’s) that sought insoofyour and valued your and grandkids they But mostly, I amhad thinking of wrecked. you, all you (and gave and me the three ofsought us.shelter I three am happy tokitchens be kids grateful now.attention, taught me,and realized somehow miraculous that there there areMom, manyofand ofmy my friends (and Damon’s and Ruth’s) that shelter in your andright valued your attention, they that have ever gotten to come together as a family. will have a chance to think of you today and remember because of it. that you HAD to teach me, from the moment that Damon was born, that love and empathy were muscles and would have to be my strength. When we I am thinking that when you left the house, Mom, you were probably already looking forward to coming home. Thinking that, it is beautiful and remarkable will have a chance to think of you today and remember because of it. moved aparthim andwith I just missedand taking piece offlove thebeyond board, measure. I learnedThe fromkind you ofthat not make broken.a man scream his good fortune thatand youeverything were able tofellleave a touch lookmy thatown conveyed lovebent thatiscan I am thinking that even though you held a healthy disdain for social media and 21st century technology (even some 20th century, let’s be honest), itrealized is But mostly, I am thinking of you, Mom, and all you gave and did for me and the three of us. I am so happy to be grateful right now. taught me,luckiest as he’sI am hadthinking his heartofwrecked. Andand we are wrecked, and Idid want to know that ofyou of the toluckiest kids and aYou batch of taught the grandkids Buteven mostly, you, are Mom, all you gave(and andDamon’s for you me and the three us.have Ishelter amthree soinhappy be grateful right now. You me,they realized somehow miraculous that there many of my friends and Ruth’s) that sought your kitchens and valued your attention, and that you HAD to teach me, from the moment that Damon was born, that love and empathy were muscles and would have to be my strength. When we Ithat am thinking how good it was to call you Tuesday night and have you actually answer your own phone and how I laughed to myself and at you as you that have ever gotten to come together as a family. youhave HAD to teach me, from thetoday moment Damon was ofborn, love and empathy were muscles and would have to be my strength. When we will a me chance to think and that remember because it.offthat moved and everything apartasofand I justto missed taking own piececalling the board,you I learned from you that bent is notdreams, broken. and how happy I felt signing off struggled to put on fell speaker Iyou tried that my I was only II loved youfrom andyou to have moved and everything fell apart and I justexplain missed taking my own piece offtothetellboard, learned that sweet bent is not broken. withI am a feeling thatthat you even and though Pop wereyou truly and warm the 21st housecentury and lifetechnology of your dreams, just 20th down century, the streetlet’s from thinking heldhappy a healthy disdainand forsafe, socialfinally mediainand (even some be Carla honest),and it isSteve, mostly,how I amgood thinking ofto you, and allnight youand gavehave and you did for me and the three us. Iphone am soand happy grateful taught me, realized I amBut thinking it was call Mom, you Tuesday actually answer yourofown howtoI be laughed to right myselfnow. andYou at you as you and from Ruthie and Steve and Dean. somehow miraculous that there arethe many of my friends (andwas Damon’s and Ruth’s) that sought shelter inand your kitchens and valued youratWhen attention, and they Istruggled am thinking how good it was call you Tuesday night have you tothat actually answer your own and how I laughed tobe happy myself you as that you HAD to speaker teach me, born, empathy weretophone muscles would have to my strength. we you to put me on astofrom I tried to moment explain that IDamon wasand only calling telllove youand I loved you and have sweet dreams, and how Iand felt signing off will have a chance to think of you today and remember because of it. struggled toand putthat meyou on speaker aswere I tried explain that I was you loved you havebent sweet happy felt signing everything apart and Itojust missed taking my own piece offtothe board, II learned from youtodreams, that is dreams, not broken. withmoved a feeling andfellPop truly happy and warm andonly safe,calling finally intell the house and life ofand your just down theand streethow from CarlaI and Steve, off That was just 12 hours before youwere weretruly assassinated by chaos and entropy, stoleninbythethehouse shadow inlifetheof form ofdreams, a box just truckdown as you stepped into Carla that last with a feeling that you and Pop happy and warm and safe, finally and your the street from and Steve, and from Ruthie and Steve and Dean. crosswalk on your way back home. There is no sense to be made of this. When I picked up Cora from school yesterday at lunch she said that this was mostly, I am thinking of you, Mom, and all you gave and did for me and the three of us. I am so happy to be grateful right now. You taught me, the realized andBut from Ruthie and Steve and Dean. I am thinking how good it was to call you Tuesday night and have you actually answer your own phone and how I laughed to myself and at you as younot way things are supposed to go. She is right. that you HAD to teach me, from the moment that Damon was born, that love and empathy were muscles and would have to be my strength. When we me on speaker to explain calling to by tell the youshadow I loved in youtheand to of have sweet dreams, andstepped how happy I feltlast signing off Thatstruggled was justto12puthours before you as wereI tried assassinated by that chaosI was and only entropy, stolen form a box truck as you into that moved everything fell apart and just missed my own piece off theinby board, I learned from you dreams, that bent isdown notshe with feeling that and PopThere wereassassinated happy and warm and safe, finally the and in life of your just the Carla That wasaand just 12 hours before you were chaos entropy, stolen thehouse shadow the form of a at box truck asbroken. youstreet stepped lastSteve, crosswalk on your way you back home. isItruly no sense to by betaking made ofand this. When I picked up Cora from school yesterday lunch said thatfrom thisinto wasthat notand the Icrosswalk am thinking that our sail and wheel and rudder are gone. Torn free and lost in one rogue swell, and that even so we will float to safe harbor. You designed the and from Ruthie and Steve and Dean. way back way thingsonareyour supposed to go.home. She isThere right. is no sense to be made of this. When I picked up Cora from school yesterday at lunch she said that this was not the ship, Mom, you infused every timber and joint with the steel of your love. And, we will always continue loving you and each other. We will find our way. I am thinking how good it was way things are supposed to go. She tois call right.you Tuesday night and have you actually answer your own phone and how I laughed to myself and at you as you That wasto just hours before you by chaos entropy, by theswell, shadow theand form a box truck asto you stepped into thatI last struggled put me onsailspeaker as Iwere tried to explain that I wasand calling you I loved you tosoofhave sweet dreams, howYou happy felt the signing off I am thinking that12 our and wheel andassassinated rudder are gone. Torn freeonly and lost stolen in toonetell rogue andin that even we will float safeand harbor. designed Thank you to everyone that has reached out to our family and my father as this news has spread. It means so much. And, Mom, whenever I am worried crosswalk on your way back home. There is no sense to be made of this. When I picked up Cora from school yesterday at lunch she said that this was not the ship, Mom, you infused every timber and joint with the steel of your love. And, we will always continue loving you and each other. We will find our way. with a feeling that you and Pop were truly happy and warm and safe, finally in the house and life of your dreams, just down the street from Carla andthe Steve, I am thinking that our sail and wheel and rudder are gone. Torn free and lost in one rogue swell, and that even so we will float to safe harbor. You designed that I won’t find my way through or when I question myself as a parent, I will remember whose son I am. I will remember who my mother is. Thank you for way things are supposed to go. She is right. andMom, from Ruthie and every Steve timber and Dean. ship, you infused and joint with the steel of your love. And, we will always continue loving you and each other. We will find our way. loving all of us,that andhasforreached giving out us everything we and havemy thatfather is true good has to offer in this world.so much. And, Mom, whenever I am worried ThankPop, youand to everyone to our family as and this news spread. It means I am thinking that our sail and wheel and rudder are gone. Torn free and lost in one rogue swell, and that will float to harbor. You designed the that I won’t find my way through or when I question myself as a parent, I will remember whose son I am. Ithe willeven remember who myMom, mother is.stepped Thank you for last Thatyou wastojust 12 hours you wereout assassinated by chaos andfather entropy, stolen by has the spread. shadowItinmeans form ofwea box truck assafe you that Thank everyone thatbefore has reached to our family and my as this news so so much. And, whenever Iinto am worried ship, Mom, you infused every timber and joint with the steel of your love. And, we will always continue loving you and each other. We will find our way. loving Pop, and all of us, and for giving us everything we have that is true and good to offer in this world. crosswalk on your home. There Iisquestion no sensemyself to be made of this.IWhen I picked whose up Cora lunch said is.that this was that I won’t find my way way back through or when as a parent, will remember sonfrom I am.school I willyesterday rememberatwho my she mother Thank you not for the way things are supposed to go. She is right. loving Pop, and all of us, and for giving us everything we have that is true and good to offer in this world. Thank you to everyone that has reached out to our family and my father as this news has spread. It means so much. And, Mom, whenever I am worried that I won’t find my way through or when I question myself as a parent, I will remember whose son I am. I will remember who my mother is. Thank you for I am thinking that our sail and wheel and rudder are gone. Torn free and lost in one rogue swell, and that even so we will float to safe harbor. You designed the loving Pop, and all of us, and for giving us everything we have that is true and good to offer in this world. ship, Mom, you infused every timber and joint with the steel of your love. And, we will always continue loving you and each other. We will find our way.

7

7

7 7 7

7

Thank you to everyone that has reached out to our family and my father as this news has spread. It means so much. And, Mom, whenever I am worried that I won’t find my way through or when I question myself as a parent, I will remember whose son I am. I will remember who my mother is. Thank you for loving Pop, and all of us, and for giving us everything we have that is true and good to offer in this world.

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To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

obituaries Josephine Sneddon

Richard William Jensen

Josephine Sneddon was born on March 26, 1929 in Santa Barbara to Nellie Pommier and Herbert Lausch. She died at the age of 92 on November 5, 2021 of congestive heart failure. At the age of 2 Josephine was adopted by Nellie Pommier’s second husband John Mercado who taught her to speak Spanish. Josephine worked as a waitress at the El Patio restaurant for years and then at the West Beach Motor Lodge for Mr. and Mrs. Gildea. She was an avid sailor and tennis player. But her favorite pastime was gardening and walking her dog in Shoreline Park. Josephine was a direct descendant of Maria de los Angeles, daughter of Chumash Chief of Dos Pueblos, Daniel Hill, Nicolas Den and Jose Francisco Ortega. Josephine was married to Albert La Cava and then to Robert Sneddon. She is survived by her husband Robert Sneddon, son Robert La Cava (Orien Armstrong), Sisters, Margaret Baker and Dolores La Cava. She was preceded in death by her brother Jack Mercado. Josephine died exactly as she wished – peacefully at home. Donations may be made to Hospice of Santa Barbara.

Richard William Jensen was laid to rest at Santa Barbara Cemetery in a private ceremony for the immediate family. Present were wife Bonnie, daughters Heidi Winston, Erin Jensen, sons-in-law Ronald and Noe along with grandsons Royce, Blaise and Richard. An honor guard provided a traditional interment and a bugler played “Taps.” Rev. Julia Hamilton officiated the family sharing and prayer closing. “Dick” as he was affectionately called, passed away November 29, 2020, from kidney disease. He lived a full and active 83 years having overcome a hospital staff infection in midlife, and rheumatic fever in childhood. He will always be remembered for his infectious smile, the twinkle in his eye, and his go-to response of being “100%“. Dick took an active volunteer role on many boards of non-profits serving the Santa Barbara community over the course of his life. He was ten years with creation of the city’s first privately funded park that opened in 1985, and which ultimately expanded and became Elings Park in 1999. He also served and contributed to the recent PARC Cabrillo Bathhouse renovations at East Beach. He saw it as paying it forward in gratitude for his own years in idyllic Santa Barbara. Helping to secure equality and fairness for

3/26/1929 - 11/5/2021

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8/21/1937 - 11/29/2021

NOVEMBER 24, 2021

all in health, social, and climate impacts was at the heart of Dick’s participation for over half of a century. Going forward in these urgent times, and to honor Dick, please consider the SB League of Women Voters, Community Environmental Council and Planned Parenthood CCC for their resilience and pertinency of mission.

Carolyn Jeanne Nielsen 1937 - 2021

Carolyn Nielsen passed away peacefully at home on the morning of November 5, 2021, surrounded by her partner (Belinda Salazar), family (Izzy Jones, niece Janie Jones) and close friends (Connie Feeley & Annabelle Amos). She struggled with Alzheimer’s disease for six years. Carolyn was born in Toledo, Ohio in 1937 to Chester and Margaret Nielsen. She had one sibling, a sister Marcia Kay Nielsen. The family moved to North Hollywood, CA in 1946 where she attended elementary school and then went to North Hollywood High School. She first attended Pre- Nursing classes at Los Angeles Valley Junior College in 1955 but soon moved on to Technical Illustration at both Pasadena City & Glendale City Colleges. Carolyn joined the Navy Reserves in 1957 and retired in 1978 having achieved the rank of Chief Petty Officer. She held a private pilot’s

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license for single engine airplanes. In 1962, she moved to Santa Barbara. She came on a weekend to visit and fell in love with the city. She returned to North Hollywood to pack her belongings and moved to Santa Barbara and found work as a Drafter for Honeywell Information Systems, Goleta General Electric, Harvey Radio, Intelex Incorporated, and Renco Corporation in Goleta. Her work at Renco motivated her to pursue a degree in Electrical Engineering from UCSB at the age of 35. She fulfilled this goal in 1977. Subsequently, she began working at SBRC in January 1978. SBRC evolved into Raytheon where she retired in 1998. Carolyn loved being retired and she used this time to become a gifted watercolor artist. She honed her skills at gardening, as well as in reading, entertaining, and spoiling her cats (Toby and Sofi). Even though Carolyn knew no one in Santa Barbara, she quickly made it a home with friends that turned into family. She & Belinda owned a cabin up by Yosemite at Pine Mountain Lake that brought them much joy which they shared with family and friends. Her love for the outdoors motivated her to hike, windsurf, sail, golf, swim, bike, picnics, and walking. She & Belinda traveled all over the world even to the bottom tip of Antarctica. She had an extreme love for singing so she joined Sweet Adelines in 1978. After performing in many shows she retired from Sweet Adelines in 2010. Carolyn is survived by her partner Belinda

Salazar of 38 years, Vi Benavides (Debbie) of 60 years, sister-in-law Sharon Salazar, nieces & nephews Janie Jones, Jason (Christy) Salazar, Bryan (Eve) Salazar, Derric (Jenna) Salazar, Rosemarie (Larry) Moreland, Louie (Marie) Salazar, & Marissa (John) Barron, great nieces & nephews. My appreciation & gratitude goes out to Connie Feeley, Annabelle Amos, & Yolanda Torres for helping me care for Carolyn. The past 2 weeks prior to her passing the attentive care she had from VNA (Hospice), (Bethann, Karen, Bruce, Rebecca, & Martha), along with Izzy Jones (great-niece). Memorial service will be held on November 27, 2021. Mass will be held at Saint Raphael Church at 5444 Hollister Ave., S.B. at 10:00 a.m. Grave site at Calvary Cemetery 199 N. Hope St., S.B. with Military Honors at 11:30 a.m. Reception at Mulligans Café & Bar 3500 McCaw Ave., S.B. 1:00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, please make donations to: Visiting Nurses Association; Hearts Therapeutic; or Animal Shelter Assistance Program, Alzheimer’s Assoc., or St. Raphael Church.

Continued on p. 16


To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

obituaries Julie Vanderwilt

4/12/1945 - 11/16/2021

Julie wanted a short, simple obituary – maybe a sentence or two, plus a picture. I must apologize to her, because I cannot capture that Vanderwilt essence in a brief written piece. Julie was taken from us too soon by multiple myeloma. Although she faced this disease with fierce determination and strength, she lost her battle against it. She chose to donate her body to UC San Diego in order to further research on the disease that claimed her life. To all who knew her, Julie was a jovial soul who had many artistic interests: mosaics; fused glass; jewelry and most recently quilting. With each new endeavor, she intently focused all her efforts on that undertaking until she had mastered it. Her completed designs in all facets of her art show elevated skills – displaying impressive imagination and creativity. An avid sports enthusiast, she loved horseback riding; racquetball and ultimately became an enthusiastic pickle ball player. She was an IT manager in charge of finances for Mission Research Corporation for over 30 years – a genuine trailblazer in that field. Her support of animal rescue organizations gave her joyful purpose. Neighbors were in awe of the Garden of Eden she created in her front yard. Everyone who strolled along her street admired the lush magnificence of thriving plants plus an abundance feline figurines. Julie absolutely loved cats. In fact, her favorite coffee cup proudly states, “Crazy Cat Lady”. Friends will remember her as generous and kind to others. She is survived by her older brother, Jim Colvin and

two nephews, Mike and Alan Colvin. Julie truly enjoyed her time here on earth, approaching life’s experiences with childlike wonder. She delighted in each new adventure but always appreciated the simple things in life. Her friends will smile when they think of her – she has filled our memories with funny stories that we will cherish for the rest of our lives. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to honor Julie’s love of all things feline: Save LA Cougars Campaign – www.savelacougars.org or Best Friends Animal Sanctuary Feline Projects – www. bestfriends.org.

Dorris West Goodrich 2/3/1920 - 10/22/2021

Dorris West Goodrich, long-time Santa Barbara resident, passed away peacefully on October 22, 2021, at the age of 101. She was known for her creativity, kindness, enthusiasm, empathy, sense of humor, and inter-generational friendships…and for earning her PhD five years before her late husband of 67 years, UCSB China scholar and California native Chauncey S. Goodrich, Jr., even while rearing the first two of their four children. Dorris was born on February 3, 1920, in Palouse, Washington, a farming town near the Idaho border, and at home (above a car-repair business) because the local hospital was full of influenza patients. She was not destined agricultural life, however, like her Uncle Clayton, nor did she follow her parents’ commercial pursuits — they ran the town’s West’s Grocery for many decades. After graduating from high school in 1937 she

attended business school, as had her father, learning shorthand, accounting, and legal stenography. She used those skills to pay her way through Washington State University in Pullman (at 35 cents per hour for secretarial services). She majored in sociology, and graduated in 1942. World War Two caused a shortage of college teachers, and for graduate school Dorris accepted the best offer — a half-time teaching position, at $600 per year, at the University of Minnesota. Her mentor there was editor of the American Sociological Review, and she became his assistant. She also ushered for the Minneapolis Symphony, where she once chatted with the great baritone, activist, and fellow Phi Beta Kappan, Paul Robeson. More significantly, in Minneapolis she met Chauncey, introduced by Robert Heilbroner, the economic historian and lifelong friend who would soon write the million-selling “The Worldly Philosophers.” Chauncey was then in the Army, having been trained as an interpreter of Japanese. He and Dorris married in 1945, but within months Chauncey was deployed overseas. Dorris soon found she was pregnant, and returned home to Palouse to have baby Anne. Fortunately, the Armistice was signed before Chauncey reached Japan, though he wouldn’t return to the U.S. and see Anne until she was six months old. Dorris would bear three more children while her husband worked on his doctorate at U.C. Berkeley. She finished her own in 1952 — the first PhD awarded to a woman by the sociology department. Dorris had no qualms about giving up a career for motherhood, however, later saying she predated “feminism” and had zero regrets. Her academic accomplishments, while compressed into just a few years, have remained relevant. In 2017, she was contacted by a student in

India hoping to access a copy of her dissertation, on Anglo-Indians as an ethnic group (son David made sure the dissertation, within weeks, was published online and made freely available); in 2019, an article Dorris published in 1945 was cited by a modern researcher as perhaps the first essay describing how an academic journal decides which articles to print — revealing, wrote the researcher, “what goes on behind the curtain.” Dorris was, in brief, ahead of her (scholastic) time, but her deepest impact was on family and friends. While she often played the “trailing spouse,” as when Chauncey, in 1960, took a three-year position at Cambridge University, or, in 1968, traveled to Taiwan on sabbatical to do research, Dorris did more than adapt. She wrote a book, never published, on the British education system, improved her mahjong skills (like Anne, she was famously good at Scrabble), cooked on a Chinese gas grill, and was much praised and appreciated for her long, detailed letters. Her correspondence, perfectly typed and proofread, is notable for its clarity, volume, and empathy. Throughout her life Dorris was heavily involved in high-level crafting, from professional-quality embroidering, to polished-rock mosaics, to the paper-applique decorative arts. Her fascination with psychology bloomed in her later years with an interest in C.G. Jung’s work, kindled by Chauncey’s parents’ friendship with, and analysis by, the great psychologist in Zurich in the 1920s. But Dorris never sat still, intellectually; in her 70s and 80s she researched and wrote a heavily illustrated book, also unpublished, on “The Annunciation,” tracing how this Christian image has changed across the centuries. Dorris surprised everyone by thriving after the death of Chauncey, at 93, in 2013.

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She had many visitors at her room in Valle Verde, both in person and by phone; she had mentored peers and young people for more than half a century, some of them living in the Goodrich home for months at a time. International visitors were also frequent, due to Chauncey’s Chinese scholarship and the friends the couple met during international vacations or while overseeing college students through UCSB’s Education Abroad program. Many analysts and psychologists (including former daughter-in-law Cheryl Yund Goodrich, an adopted child in all but name) also visited while passing through Santa Barbara. The great happiness of Dorris’ last years, however, was getting acquainted with the family of an older sister given up for adoption by her parents in 1918. Eileen not only survived into her 90s, but thrived — and not only closely resembled Dorris, but led a parallel life by likewise earning Phi Beta Kappa honors, going into education, getting an advanced degree, and writing books. Tracked down by K. Eileen Allen’s descendants, Dorris discovered that her late sister’s grandson lived only a few miles away, in Hope Ranch, a coincidence that led to an unexpected family reunion about which Dorris, then 99, would talk, with unrestrained delight, for many months. A circle had been closed, for Eileen’s side of the family as well as Dorris’, in a fitting capstone to a well-lived life. Dorris is survived by her four children, Anne, David, John, and Chris, 10 grandchildren, 9 great-grandchildren, numerous nieces and nephews, including Nancy West Gonzalez of Orcutt, and the “new family” mentioned above. Her belief in education suggests she would happily be memorialized through contributions in her name to state university scholarship funds.

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Legal protection for what really matters

VICTORIES FOR OUR COAST & CLIMATE

Katie Davis Koehn

OSPR

ADVANCING OFFSHORE WIND Renewable Energy in California

NEW UNDERWATER PARK Chumash Heritage Sanctuary

STOPPING EXXONMOBIL Protecting Our Water, Wildlife & Climate

For years, EDC has worked to advance California’s transition to responsible, renewable offshore wind energy. The Biden Administration recently announced two offshore wind energy areas off the California Coast, and EDC has been engaging with state and federal agencies and nonprofit partners to ensure the projects are sited to avoid and designed to minimize impacts to coastal and marine environments and other ocean users.

EDC is continuing our work to protect the coast from the threat of oil and gas development while preserving the sacred submerged sites of the Chumash Peoples, important oceanographic features, and prime habitat for marine life through the creation of the Chumash Heritage National Marine Sanctuary (NMS). Nominated by our partners, the Northern Chumash Tribal Council, this sanctuary would bridge the gap between the Channel Islands NMS and Monterey Bay NMS.

With the help of our clients and partners, EDC convinced the Santa Barbara County Planning Commission to recommend denial of ExxonMobil’s dangerous proposal to restart drilling from three platforms in the Santa Barbara Channel and truck the oil through the Gaviota Coast, along Hwy 101 and Route 166 for seven years. This was a huge victory, but we will continue our work to completely stop this project and protect our public safety, clean air, water, wildlife, and our climate.

906 Garden Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101 (805) 963-1622

(From L to R) Linda Krop, Betsy Weber, Owen Bailey, Jessica Dias, Kristen Hislop, Maggie Hall, Rachel Kondor, Daniel Elkin and Brian Trautwein. Not pictured: Pearl Lee & Alicia Roessler. 20

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NOVEMBER 24, 2021

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C O V E R

S T O R Y

HEROES 2021

by Nick Welsh, Matt Kettmann, Tyler Hayden, Jean Yamamura, Charles Donelan, Ryan P. Cruz, Jun Starkey, and Caleb Rodriguez

T

Photography by Erick Madrid his issue marks the Santa Barbara Inde-

pendent’s 35th year of publishing. From our very first issue in 1986, we have celebrated each Thanksgiving by honoring some of the many people who make Santa Barbara a true and whole community of

neighbors. Their daily lives, at work or as volunteers, support our foundational belief that we are all here to help one another. Many of you, our Independent readers, have, over the years, sent in thousands of nominations telling us about those who have directly affected your lives. To you, we

also give thanks, for these have expanded our own understanding of what a true local hero is. We hope, by publishing a few of these stories each year, the Independent can shine light on those among us who bring moments of hope and joy to us all.

Special thanks to the Hutton Parker Foundation INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 24, 2021

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21


HEROES

Aaliyah and Bella Rubio Youth Makers Market Entrepreneurs

F

Bella (left) and Aaliyah Rubio

or sisters Aaliyah and Bella Rubio, the boredom that came with the pandemic forced them to embrace their creativity. Inspired by other small-business creators on TikTok — part of a wave of people monetizing their hobbies in the face of economic hardship — Aaliyah and Bella enlisted the help of their mother, Cecilia Rubio, to organize the Youth Makers Market, which made its debut in September at the Santa Barbara Community Arts Workshop. Aaliyah, 13, makes beaded jewelry: bracelets, necklaces, rings, and anklets. She learned by watching videos on social media and turned her free time into something that was not only fun but taught her how to be a young entrepreneur. Bella, 11, started by making resin-based hair products like brushes and barrettes, but after working with different materials, from plastic resin to honey-based, she transitioned into a natural honey-maker, keeping hives and selling honey by the jar under the business name Honey by Lyla. Since then, Youth Makers Market has boomed to create a space for like-minded youth and to encourage them to set out and create small businesses of their own. There were 17 youth vendors in the first event: canvas artists, jewelers, fashion designers, and chefs who all set up booths and sold their wares at the Community Arts Workshop. For a special Día de los Muertos community event at Ortega Park, the market was set up across the street in the parking lot of Paragon Gym. At its latest event on November 21, the market changed locations to Santa Barbara High School’s senior parking lot, to accommodate the growing list of nearly 40 vendors. The sign-ups for the December market have already reached nearly 70 potential vendors, and the Rubios have even begun to receive requests from people in other communities who want to start their own version of a Youth Makers Market.

IINSPIRING CREATIVITY Workshops • Gifts • Party Goo s 3554 State Street 805-679-5288 Wednesday thru Saturday: 10a-5:30p Sunday: 10a-2p

KIDS CRAFT $10 Ages 5+ Clay Pot Gingerbread House Sat. 11/27 11a-12:30p Paper Wreath Craft Sat. 12/11 11a-12:30p

HAPPY HOUR CRAFT $15 All Ages Advent Calendar Sat. 11/27 11a-12:30p Hanukkah Banner or Christmas Wood Decor Sun. 11/28 11a-12:30p P

*RSVP Recommend for all events

Christmas Village Thurs. 12/16 3:30p-5p Sun. 12/19 2p-3:30p Stamped Gift Tag w/Treat Bag (Set of 3) Thurs. 12/23 3:30p-5p Happy New Year Banner Thurs. 12/30 3:30p-5p

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WORKSHOPS All Ages Holiday Explosion Cards $35 Thurs. 12/2 4:30p-6p Sat. 12/4 4:30p-6p Paper Wreath Craft $25 Sun. 12/5 2p-3:30p Sat. 12/11 11a-12:30p Holiday Cards (Set of 16) $35 Thurs. 12/9 4:30p-6p Sat. 12/11 4:30p-6p Holiday Memory Book $35 Sat. 12/18 4:30p-6p Wed. 12/22 4:30p-6p


HEROES HEROES

Carolina Arias Virus variant Detective

W

hen a strange virus in Wuhan was first reported, Carolina Arias wondered

what path it would take. At UC San Francisco, she had worked on viral research with Joe DeRisi, a pioneer in genomics, and knew COVID virus outbreaks often come to nothing. But then COVID-19 began exploding around the world. By then, she was running a lab at UC Santa Barbara, continuing her search for antivirals, specifically ones that could weaken the herpes and Zika viruses. But when COVID-19 was identified as similar to SARS, and was soon found in California, Arias told her husband, scientist Diego Acosta-Alvear, that they’d better go for a last night out. “I didn’t think we’d have many more free evenings,” she said. Arias understood immediately that our community would have no immunity to the new virus. As a scientist, her reaction was to get to work. Arias cooperated with Acosta-Alvear and colleagues Max Wilson and Ken Kosik to develop a rapid test at a time when the country was struggling for resources. They shared it publicly and successfully surveilled UCSB campus residents and employees for infection. Within a year, as expected, more-contagious variants began evolving. California labs were taking weeks to sequence the virus genome, while doctors and patients waited for the results. As one doctor working on the COVID front lines described Arias’s contribution, “It was her sacrifices that have been critical to our community’s safety and success. Arias, and her graduate students, patiently worked seven days a week, behind the scenes, to provide our community and its clinicians with the critical variant testing information needed.” Doctors throughout Santa Barbara relied on her work. “This is what I’ve been training for my whole life,” she said. “There was no question whether we were going to do it or not.”

The Elements of Art Studio FREE FAMILY RESOURCE CENTER THURSDAYS, 5 – 7 PM SATURDAYS & SUNDAYS, 12 – 4 PM

The Elements of Art Studio explores line, shape, and color, inspired by modern and contemporary works currently on view. Create your own art project and then look for the elements of art in the Museum’s galleries. The Family Resource Center is a free, interactive space for all ages designed for the hands-on exploration of themes resonating from Museum’s exhibitions. Staffed by a Museum Teaching Artist, and accessible to all, the Family Resource Center offers a welcoming opportunity to engage with art. Santa Barbara Museum of Art | 1130 State Street | Santa Barbara, CA 93101 | www.sbma.net |

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NOVEMBER 24, 2021

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HEROES

Cottage Hospital Environmental Services Department On the Front lines of Cleanliness

T

he 151 members of Cottage’s Environmental Services Department have always worked

valiantly to keep every one of the hospital’s 529 patient rooms and its more than a million square feet of space clean and sanitary. But since the COVID curtain fell, their work has taken on a more dangerous edge, yet they have bravely gone into rooms that most mere mortals would not dare to enter. “This was something new and scary,” acknowledged Flavid Montoya, department manager. “We had the conversation with our staff. We were not going to ask them to do anything that we weren’t willing to do ourselves.” Clearly it worked. During the first year of the pandemic, Cottage’s rating for cleanliness was 10 percent higher than the national average, and it was one of only two hospitals nationally to win the prestigious Environmental Services Department of the Year award by the Association for Health Care Environment. Montoya and his boss, Jo D’Ambrosio, have been rigorous about staff training and inspections, everyone wears N95 masks, and an emphasis is placed on hand sanitizing. All rooms are dosed with electrostatic sprayers, leaving the disinfectant mist clinging to every nook and cranny. Underlying all this preventative work is the culture of employee engagement. Workers are encouraged to ask questions and speak their concerns. “People need to have the right information,” Montoya said. The Environmental Services teams have close working relationships with the nurses, and, with support of other hospital experts, all questions are answered directly. At a time when many hospitals are struggling to maintain even minimal staffing levels, Cottage’s Environmental Services has posted 94.5 percent worker retention. As intense as the crisis has been, Montoya understands the need for balance. He encourages the staff to keep things light. For him, that means chicken wings. “I eat a lot of chicken wings,” he said with a laugh. “I’m a big fan.”

Silvia Ramirez and Julio Rea

23rd Annual

Santa Barbara Empty Bowls Support our neighbors in need at the beloved community soup fundraiser.

Sun, Dec 5 • 11am-3pm Foodbank Warehouse • 4554 Hollister (next to Page Youth Center)

• Gourmet soup to go • Festive raffle

FoodbankSBC.org/SBEB21

• Exclusive restaurant discounts • Warehouse tours

David and Julie Siegel • Thomchin Family Foundation Mary and Don Thompson • Carolyn and Philip Wyatt

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• Choose your bowl • Handmade holiday marketplace

Tickets: $30

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• Join friends in person

Katherine Bower • Susan and Jeff Bridges • Barbara Ford • NS Ceramic Leon and Elizabeth Olson • Maryan Schall • Village Properties

NOVEMBER 24, 2021

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HEROES HEROES

Doctors Without Walls Vaccinating Those Without Homes

G

etting COVID vaccines into patients’ arms has proved much tougher than

anticipated even for medical professionals operating out of modern offices. Then imagine the challenges for medical practitioners who must beat the bushes at homeless encampments, searching for people to vaccinate. That’s pretty much a routine experience for the four medical outreach workers deployed by Doctors Without Walls. Nine times a week, they pack into a van and make the rounds at various parks, beaches, and parking lots to treat a population that’s famously wary of established medical interventions. “We meet them where they’re at,” said Dr. Chelsea Dean, a primary care doctor with the county’s Public Health Department and the project’s medical co-director. The patients Dean and her three colleagues see share many of the same concerns about the vaccine as the population at large— unknown side effects. But they also have an experience of “feeling less than” when in the presence of traditional practitioners. That’s why the outreach team— which includes Cathy Mollkoy, a retired emergency room nurse; Lynn Matis, a retired MFT from Sansum; and student coordinator Oscar Delgadillo — began spreading the word about the vaccine months before it first became available in February. By the time the first dose arrived, they had 200 people signed up. It didn’t hurt that Mollkoy, who had been administering flu shots to people on the streets, was known, trusted, and liked. As a result, Doctors Without Walls managed to vaccinate more than 50 percent of the South Coast’s unhoused population. Given the logistical challenges of administering two doses, the crew opted to use Johnson & Johnson’s one-shot vaccine. Now, the focus is on administering booster shots. Dean, who began volunteering with Doctors Without Walls a year after arriving in town in 2016, said, “It’s been incredible. It’s made me a better doctor.”

From left, Oscar Delgadillo, Cathy Mollkoy, Lynn Matis, and Dr. Chelsea Dean

Erik Talkin Foodbank Visionary

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ne in four of our neighbors relies on food from the Foodbank of Santa Barbara County.

That statistic never fails to shock, and the need only doubled during these days of COVID, as the Foodbank distributes more than 20 million pounds of food each year through more than 300 nonprofit partners. But that’s only half the battle, said Erik Talkin, who’s been the organization’s CEO since 2008. “You don’t change someone’s life by just giving them a bag of food,” said Talkin, who’s expanded elementary education programs to 21 sites and enhanced programs in both Spanish and Mixteco for farmworkers, among other strategies. “You have to give people the skills and the education to use that food to keep their meals healthy. We are teaching people to eat healthy even if they don’t have much money for food.” Talkin, who was born in the United States but raised in England, landed in Santa Barbara in 1998, first working for the Civic Light Opera. In 2002, he started serving the homeless population as the leader of the Community Kitchen of Santa Barbara, which became the Casa Esperanza shelter. “When they started receiving a lot of fresh produce from the Foodbank, I saw how healthy a lot of the homeless people became,” recalled Talkin. “It made me realize that if we can get much healthier food to people at an early age, it can make a real change in their lives.” When the Foodbank’s top post opened in 2008, Talkin got the gig and turned the organization into a national nutrition leader. “Once I got into food and nutrition, it seemed to click,” said Talkin, who’s written books for adults and children about nutrition and food insecurity. “Food is something you can use as a tool to make a deep impact on people’s lives.” With the economic effects of COVID expected to linger for years, the work continues, including a forthcoming capital campaign for a new warehouse in Goleta. Said Talkin, “There is just this huge need.”

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NOVEMBER 24, 2021

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HEROES

Fabian ‘Fabs’ De La Cruz Creative YMCA Counselor

F

abian “fabs” De La Cruz began working for the YMCA when he was 18 years old,

in his senior year of high school. Now at 21, De La Cruz has a reputation as a creative and adaptive counselor, finding new ways to engage with kids while protecting them during the COVID pandemic. De La Cruz moved to Santa Barbara with his family from Mexico when he was 5 years old, living downtown before eventually settling on the Westside, where his mother enrolled him in kindergarten at Monroe Elementary. “I was able to get the support that I needed and the resources,” he said, “and if it weren’t for that, I wouldn’t be where I am today.” De La Cruz began at the YMCA as a part-time soccer coach during his senior year of high school. During his first summer, he became a summer camp counselor, which allowed him to explore new ways to interact meaningfully with children, especially when the pandemic began. De La Cruz had to find ways for kids to interact with one another without risking their safety, keeping in mind the need for social distancing and mask wearing. He initiated activities such as talent shows and dance battles, encouraging the kids to create and teach their own choreography. He also began a “community circle,” which allowed counselors to check in with their kids and encourage them to talk about themselves. “At the end of the day, we want to be there and provide the support,” De La Cruz said. His creative approach was so successful that De La Cruz was soon promoted to camp coordinator, and he has also been appointed as program director for all after-school activities at Peabody Charter School. De La Cruz said he wants to be an example to children of what dedication can accomplish. “Following my dreams is my service to them,” he said.

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HEROES

Jacob and Joseph Mansbach Brothers Fighting Food Insecurity

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wo brothers times 10 years equals one million meals.

That’s the Mansbach formula, through which Anacapa School students Jacob (a senior) and Joseph Mansbach (a sophomore) have fundraised $125,000 over the past decade to support the Foodbank of Santa Barbara County. Their efforts started in 2012 with an 8-year-old Jacob, who wanted to run the Santa Barbara Triathlon with his dad and decided to personally raise $4,500 for the Foodbank, which was that year’s beneficiary. He was inspired by having volunteered for one of the organization’s distribution events called Picnics in the Park. By knocking on doors and setting up tables outside of grocery stores, Jacob then raised $10,000 in 2013. The next year, his brother Joseph, who’d reached 8 years old, joined the cause. Together, they’ve enlisted dozens of families to run their first triathlons while raising more money for the Foodbank along the way. They topped the $125,000 cumulative mark after this year’s race, though they had to adopt digital fundraising strategy since their usual in-person campaigns were hampered by the pandemic. In 2014, they also started Saturday Family Day at the Foodbank, for which more than 2,000 kids have volunteered at both the North and South County locations, sorting produce and putting goods in crates. Altogether, their volunteers have logged more than 7,000 hours and helped distribute a half million pounds of food. Though this originally began as a fun thing to do for 8-year-olds, both brothers now understand that their fundraising and volunteer efforts create real results. “More and more, I really saw the impacts of the work we are doing and the impact that food insecurity has on our community,” said Jacob. “For me, it’s such an important problem to solve.”

Jacob (left) and Joseph Mansbach

The Franklin School PTA would like to thank the dedicated teachers and staff who have gone above and beyond to make Franklin so special. The last 19 months have been difficult for students but this amazing team has put students first.

You are truly appreciated!

Patty Aguilar Mario Acosta Ricardo Alcaraz Estela Angeles Gabe Avila Katie Booser Michelle Boyd Tammy Brown Brendan Carroll Luz Castro Cathy Christman Adoni Coronado James Coronado Patty Coronado

Megan Crooks Maggie Cuevas Mary Denny Jordan Fearer Maria Flores Jeff Furst Rosa Gallegos Ariana Garcia-Olivo Leslie Gascoigne Rose Marie Gil Tammy Gillen Lydia Godinez Pedro Guillen Pedro Guillen Jr.

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HEROES

Leslie Meadowcroft-Schipper Tools for a Trade

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or more than 20 years, TRADART, founded by Leslie Meadowcroft-Schipper, has been working to preserve the industrial arts and skilled trade programs in the Santa Barbara Unified School District by providing supplies, materials, funding, and support. Meadowcroft-Schipper was born in Seattle but moved to Switzerland soon after, where she said trade schools were much more common for high-school-age students. Industrial arts programs can be beneficial for all students, she believed, and to not include them would be a disservice to young people. Since the Santa Barbara school district lacked many such programs, she established the TRADART foundation in 2000, which now provides three high schools (Santa Barbara, San Marcos, and Dos Pueblos) and three junior highs (La Cumbre, La Colina, and Goleta Valley) with funding and professional oversight for workshops. In 2005, the TRADART foundation’s current financial officer, Don Gordon, created Tools for Schools, which provides building materials and other supplies to junior high and high schools throughout the district. #sbindy Courses such as woodshop not only provide hands-on experience, Meadowcroft-Schipper said, but they also sharpen a student’s math skills and encourage creativity and critical thinking. Students can gain confidence in their own abilities, Gordon said, by completing a project from start to finish. Through supervision from the TRADART foundation, in 2016, students at San Marcos, Dos Pueblos, and Santa Barbara high schools each began constructing tiny homes, which were completed and sold in 2018. When the COVID-19 pandemic hit, the foundation enabled schools to give take home kits for students to create their own tool kits, which included glue, a ruler, and a mallet. MeadowcroftSchipper said students had to record their process of assembling their kits and provide explanations as part of the assignment. This year, all classes are at capacity. “What’s so rewarding is to see students so proud of their work,” Meadowcroft-Schipper said. “Every student that comes to that class stays.”

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HEROES HEROES

George Kaufmann Support, Education, Advocacy

G

eorge A. Kaufmann was at the top of his game — vice president for a major phar-

maceutical company in Kalamazoo, Michigan — when his world exploded. His 19-year-old son began showing signs of the mental-health disorder schizophrenia, which would profoundly disrupt his family’s life for decades. The year was 1994. “The mental-health system was not a system at all, so much as a collection of dysfunctional services,” Kaufmann quickly concluded. Families such as his were in desperate need of education, support, and advocacy. To rectify these deficiencies, he brought his lifetime of corporate marketing skills. He began working with the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), first in Kalamazoo and then in Santa Barbara, where his family moved in 1999. Kaufmann dived into the fundraising effort that resulted in the Mental Wellness Center in downtown Santa Barbara, which offers 50 housing units for those struggling with mental illness. In 2014, Kaufmann took over as president of NAMI’s Santa Barbara chapter, and it soon became a relentless and credible force in moving county government forward. Most supervisors can’t remember a time when they weren’t getting lobbied by Kaufmann, who was always pushing for better programs and more funding. In public testimony, Kaufmann was a master of the two-minute pitch. But it was the personal stories — told by family members cast adrift by an incomprehensible system — that sealed the deal. Kaufmann takes special pride in the success of new initiatives undertaken with law enforcement that have effectively reduced the number of mentally ill people in county jail. Much, however, still needs to be done. His own son — whom Kaufmann described as his mentor and guide — found his way out of 10 years of homelessness, addiction, and despair. Not all stories have such happy endings. “That’s the best experience you’re ever going to hear,” Kaufmann said. That’s one reason why he keeps on going.

Sasha Ablitt The Planet Protector

T

he driveway at Ablitt’s Fine Cleaners hummed with the determined energy

of a preschool rummage sale. It was another Planet Protector event where a handful of volunteers cheerfully sorted through bags of thin-film plastics brought in by people hoping to have them recycled rather than ending up in the county dump. This service was started by Sasha Ablitt, who runs her family business and has spent years finding ways to make it greener. Every month, 2,000 pounds of recyclable plastics are sent to a plant in Riverside to be processed and eventually made into decking boards. Clearly, not all plastics are created equal. The differences are subtle and take a little education to discern, which is what the Planet Protector volunteers are able to explain. “See those blue-and-white Amazon shipping bags?” Ablitt said, pointing to a mound in the corner. It turns out that not all Amazon bags are recyclable, and it takes some training to learn which ones are. The Ablitt family has been in the dry-cleaning business for generations, and in Santa Barbara since 1949. Her father, Neil Ablitt, retired in 2002, and Sasha took over. She first switched from the petroleum-based cleaner her father used to a liquid silicone that degrades safely. Then she tackled the plastic bags used to cover cleaned items. For the first 12 years, the business collected the plastics at its counter, but all too often a bag held someone’s moldy lunch, so it had to be trashed. Nevertheless, Ablitt had almost reached her goal of recycling more plastic than the business used when the pandemic shutdown hit. When she reopened the popular service, she expanded it into an educational program, Planet Protectors’ email notification list (ablitts.com/ film-plastic-recycling/), and enlisted dozens of hands-on volunteers. Ablitt now intends to find a recycler to take Type 5 plastics, which are now being plowed into our landfill. If anyone can do it, she can.

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HEROES HEROES

Kostis Protopapas Conductor

A

sk anyone in Santa Barbara’s performing arts scene about how effective

organizations responded to the pandemic, and Opera Santa Barbara General and Artistic Director Kostis Protopapas is bound to come up. His vision and persistence led Opera Santa Barbara (OSB) to a series of remarkable firsts that helped us see light at the end of this long theaterdarkening tunnel. In addition to lobbying on behalf of the performing arts at the local and state level, Protopapas conceived and executed multiple plans that allowed performers and audiences to return in safety well ahead of what most observers considered possible. In December 2020, in the depths of a pre-vaccine surge, Protopapas created drivein opera—live performances on an outdoor stage in the parking lot of the Ventura Fairgrounds. While the vast majority of orchestras and opera companies were relying on Zoom and other digital media, Opera Santa Barbara was selling tickets and parking cars for the first of two successful performances, Carmen in December 2020, and Don Pasquale in April 2021. When vaccinations made a safe return to indoor performances possible, Protopapas again set the pace with an exciting and innovative production of Wagner’s Das Rheingold at the Lobero Theatre on June 27, 2021, the first production in that venue since OSB’s Il postino in early March 2020. Already this season, the company has scored artistic and popular triumphs with Cruzar la Cara de la Luna, a mariachi opera at the Granada on October 1, and the double bill of Il tabarro and El amor brujo at the Lobero for Halloween weekend. Looking ahead to three more productions scheduled in 2022, it’s clear that under Kostis Protopapas, Opera Santa Barbara has taken a position of inspiring leadership in our arts community.

Tony Becerra Martial Arts Transformer

T

ony Becerra began learning karate at Koei-Kan on Santa Barbara’s Westside in 1985,

and more than 30 years later, he now runs the dojo, training hundreds of kids every year in the martial arts. At Koei-Kan, and as head of the South Coast Youth Community Cultural Center, Becerra understands the importance of affordability in lower-income communities. Classes for the youth center are as low as $10 a month, and at the karate academy, Becerra works with families in need to provide discounts for training. Kids need a physical and mental outlet, Becerra said, and martial arts was the perfect fit for children who were pent up at home during the pandemic. “They can have a true sense of themselves, build confidence,” Becerra said. “They experience all the different emotions: anger, fear, and stress. Being exposed to these emotions helps them get a grip on them.” Becerra said living in the Westside neighborhood has exposed him to the dangers and temptations a lot of youth in the area face, and that providing a space for them to learn and just being a supportive adult has helped change a lot of lives. “I’ve seen a lot of kids fall by the wayside,” Becerra said. He takes pride in reaching the kids who have come in with behavioral issues, and after working together have turned it around and earned praise from parents and teachers. “It’s an amazing transformation,” he said. During the past two years, Becerra has made a priority to maintain the access and affordability of his classes, holding outdoor classes in local parks. Often, these park days would be the only times the children would have an opportunity to play face-to-face with their peers. Becerra also serves as president at Page Youth Center; has chaired several nonprofit organizations, including the Santa Barbara Junior Chamber Jaycees; established the South Coast Wrestling Club; and has been the co-chair of the Santa Barbara Easter Relays Committee for many years.

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NOVEMBER 24, 2021

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“OPERA SANTA BARBARA IS ON A ROLL!” – The Santa Barbara Independent

Semele HANDEL GOES TO HOLLYWOOD

A 90 MINUTE OPERA

JAN 14 & 16, 2022 LOBERO THEATRE

Kostis Protopapas, Artistic | General Director

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NOVEMBER 24, 2021

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nes

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pendent with of this week’s Inde t, and hear The Indy, a podcas urnalists about straight from our jo more. the cover story and Listen at

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HEROES HEROES

Spencer the Gardener Bandleader

O

rganic gangster, original Gardener, and cultural custodian of the

Santa Barbara sound Spencer Barnitz has played music and made people dance since the 1970s. No Fiesta would be complete without the Annual Unofficial Official Start of Fiesta Wednesday-night dance party in the beer garden at Casa de la Guerra (or more recently in the yard next to The Pickle Room). Untold numbers of Santa Barbara residents have celebrated important life milestones by hiring Spencer and his band to play their unique mix of ska, cumbia, and rock. Born and raised surfside, Spencer followed his muse to London in the 1980s, where he played music with The Tan and absorbed the scene that produced the Clash, the Specials, and the Pogues as a direct participant. Upon returning to Santa Barbara, he established his identity as Spencer the Gardener by landscaping and gigging here and in Ventura until the name stuck. Following a series of successful recordings for all ages, Spencer found he was a hit with little kids, and for a while, his music took that direction. In 2007, his Thanksgiving-themed music video “The Gobble Song” went viral on YouTube, landing multiple Santa Barbara personalities on that website’s homepage for the holiday. Today, he’s still making music with his friends and will be the subject of an upcoming documentary titled Hello Santa Barbara. The film will reflect Spencer’s vision, which he describes as “a Latin, Big Band spy movie set on a moody tropical beach.” His friend and former bandmate in the Tan Brad Nack says that he “has proven that you can ‘make it’ in the music business right here in Santa Barbara,” adding that Spencer “has inspired countless artists who have helped make Santa Barbara music go global.”

Javier Cruz Transitioning to Empowerment

A

t San Marcos High School, Javier Cruz, Ed. D, is known for making

the greater Santa Barbara community his classroom. He manages the BEST Transition Program, an acronym for Building Essential Skills Today, which involves special-education high school graduates in community classes, volunteering, and social development experiences as part of their transition to adulthood. “A lot of our students have struggled with traditional academics … I try to make sure we’re not stuck at our desks, but they get to use their hands to build things and go out in the community and learn functional skills,” said Cruz. “Our class is the community. Our class is the bus. Our class is Vons. Those are the places our students can learn these skills they use every day.” Cruz’s career journey began with a fervent desire to help others. “I knew education was a way I could do that—helping people be more independent and take care of themselves,” said Cruz. First working at a Camarillo continuation school, then for the Arc of Ventura County, before coming to San Marcos, Cruz empowered students to be agents of their own desires. “Seeing the joy on people’s faces when they could do things they wanted to do and go places they wanted to go really affected me.” On Fridays, Cruz takes the class to Vons, where they have the opportunity to budget, shop for, and purchase ingredients for cooking lessons, often using his own money to buy the supplies. “I care about what the students do during the day,” said Cruz. “I want students to know that whatever is happening in the world, they can come to the program where there are adults and teachers who love them, who care about them, and accept them for who they are every time they walk through the door.”

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NOVEMBER 24, 2021

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33


HEROES

Lisa Stratton Putting Back What Belongs

R

estoration” is a rather boring word for what Lisa Stratton actually does. In

reality, through the magic of science and the art of fundraising, she resuscitates small worlds, breathing life back into ecosystems co-opted and degraded by people and placing them once more in the capable hands of nature. Stratton began her career on Catalina Island before moving with her husband to his hometown of Santa Barbara to raise their children. In 2005, she became director of ecosystem management at UCSB’s Cheadle Center for Biodiversity and Ecological Restoration, a position she has held since, rehabilitating wetlands up and down the Santa Barbara coast and acting as a guiding force behind the university’s many land stewardship efforts. Her latest — and arguably greatest — achievement is leading the $23 million transformation now taking place at 100 acres of North Campus property. The beautiful estuarine and upland habitat at the upper arm of the Devereux Slough, which had been scraped and bulldozed beyond recognition in the 1960s to build a flood-prone golf course, is again quietly teeming with native flora and fauna. Particularly exciting is the presence of Ventura marsh milkvetch, once thought to be extinct, and the riot of birds that have repopulated the area—from secretive, ground-nesting species like rails and bitterns to their bolder brethren soaring above, including red-tailed hawks and white-tailed kites. Rare burrowing owls are also making a comeback. While Stratton’s team is putting the finishing touches on the trails and bridges that allow students and others to access the area, she recognizes their work at the newly christened North Campus Open Space is far from over. She’s again pounding the pavement for capital, this time to pay for long-term operations and to endow teaching positions or fellowships. Whatever it takes to maintain the “living laboratory vision” for the property, Stratton said. “We want to teach students here, out in the field,” she said. “We want to mentor those who crave that experience.”

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In 2020, the Mickey Flacks Fund supported the in-depth coverage of the Lompoc Prison COVID Outbreak, the Force Files, a look into police use-of-force incidents, and many other issues. To make a contribution visit sbcan.org/journalism_fund To read articles supported by the Flacks Fund go to independent.com/ mickeyflacks


HEROES HEROES

Onalisa Hoodes Finder of Lost Dogs

T

illy, Olive, Lizzy, and many other dogs who found themselves lost and scared

l i a t k c o C y Holida C l a s s om Live on Zo

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December 9 • 6pm Tickets include : Live Zoom Holiday Cocktail Class taught by The Good Lion Holiday Cocktail Kit (ingredients for 2 cocktails) Holiday Cocktail Recipe Tickets: $55

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COURTESY PHOTO

have Onalisa Hoodes to thank for getting them back home safe and sound. Hoodes, along with friend Maddy Segal, is the guiding force behind the all-volunteer Facebook page “Santa Barbara Lost & Found Pet Resource and Network,” which offers panicked owners support, advice, and phone numbers for those critical first hours and instantly puts the word out that a search is on. “Nobody knows what to do when they lose a dog,” Hoodes said. “We wanted to create a place for owners to go when they feel so vulnerable and overwhelmed.” Hoodes’s day job is as a top administrator at the Santa Barbara Police Department, where she’s worked for more than three decades. It was about 10 years ago that she became involved in dog rescue and was introduced to two nonprofits—Dog Days Search & Rescue (DDSR) and From Lost to Found—that taught her the techniques she uses to get pets back. That includes scent trails, traps, and the tried-and-true method of big, bright posters. The most important thing Hoodes tells people is to never chase a dog. “It’s counterintuitive, but it’s the worst possible thing you can do,” she explained. Along with DDSR, Shadow’s Fund, and the Keep Me Home Program, Hoodes has also developed a handout for new shelter-dog owners on how to keep their pet from running away in the first place. But Hoodes, a current boardmember of the Santa Ynez Valley Humane Society, doesn’t just stay behind the keyboard. She often personally leads searches into the early hours of the morning, makes connections with shelters, and coordinates across social media. Not long ago she guided the effort to rescue a pit bull mix named Lucas, who had fallen off the Shoreline bluffs and broken two legs and a hip. She helped raise $24,000 for his medical bills, and Lucas has since been adopted. “The work is exhausting and emotionally draining, but it’s worth it when you can be part of reuniting a lost pet with its owner,” said Hoodes, who was quick to credit those who’ve searched alongside her. “It’s truly a community effort,” she said.

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LOBERO.ORG 805.963.0761 DEC 3

KERRY IRISH PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS

Brett Dennen

Smart Alec presents

See the World Tour with Sophia Boro

With a successful string of albums and four Top Ten AAA singles, Dennen has cemented himself as a fixture in American folk music. The singer/songwriter is intent on exploring the world and examining himself in the process. Hence, See The World.

Starring World Champion Dancers: Tyler Schwartz and Emily MacConnell

DEC 5

Adrianne Lenker DEC 8

with Ellen Kempner

DEC 7 “Few modern voices are as powerful as Marc Broussard’s soulful bayou-bred baritone.” – The Washington Times

An Evening with

Marc Broussard

DEC 11

with Jamie McLean Band

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An Evening with

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DEC 14

JAN 21

The Robert Cray Band

The five-time GRAMMY® Award winner has created a sound that rises from American roots and arrives today both fresh and familiar. “After nearly 40 years, Robert Cray remains as viable as ever. In a world turned upside down, his music continues to serve as comfort food for the soul.” - Something Else!

DEC 23

Anaïs Mitchell + Bonny Light Horseman

Esteemed singer-songwriter of the Tony Award winning smash “Hadestown,” with fellow astral folk supergroup musicians Eric D. Johnson and Josh Kaufman.

JAN 29

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Men At Work

GRAMMY® Award winning, multi-platinum selling act, with numerous dearly loved songs, such as “Down Under,” “Who Can It Be Now,” and “Overkill.”

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LOBERO THEATRE ENDOWMENT FOR AMERICAN ROOTS MUSIC INDEPENDENT.COM

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The Bentson Foundation

John C. Mithun Foundation


EVERY CHILD DESERVES TO PLAY The Vision: In partnership with Parks & Recreation and the City of Santa Barbara, Gwendolyn Strong Foundation is building the first inclusive playground in the region. Innovative, imaginative and sensory-rich, Gwendolyn’s Playground is re-imagining the public play space and creating a new model to spark a sense of adventure in us all.


EVERY CHILD DESERVES TO PLAY. Playgrounds are vital public spaces for community connection and social development. Yet, the average playground is not designed to meet the needs of all those who want to play, particularly the one in four of us living with a disability. Inclusive play helps develop a true understanding of the world and encourages appreciation of the differences between people. More importantly, inclusive play recognizes our similarities and builds a more compassionate society.

WHEN EVERYONE PLAYS, WE ALL WIN!

A more inclusive future begins with inclusive experiences in childhood

Gwendolyn’s Playground will be the first fully inclusive and destination playground in Santa Barbara, enriching public spaces to truly serve our whole community, and elevating play to be more for everyone. “ This is the most exciting park in our City’s history.” —Planning Commissioner Barrett Reed

Inclusion is so much more than wheelchair accessibility.


Total Raised To Date: $2 MILLION Total Needed to Build Gwendolyn’s Playground: $6 MILLION

INCLUSIVE + FUN Thoughtful equipment, color, and design invite people of all abilities to play together INNOVATIVE + SENSORY RICH Multi-level imaginative play structures break the mold of traditional playgrounds to engage diverse learning styles and ignite all five senses

It is a belief that we all belong.

SAFE + ACCESSIBLE Secure fencing offers fully accessible entrances and play spaces are free of prohibitive bark or steps EDUCATIONAL + CONNECTING A thriving gathering space for community that provides opportunities for inclusive programs and educational outreach events


LEAVE A LASTING LEGACY We are pleased to offer opportunities for Founding Partners. The Founder’s Wall is a statement art pieces in the heart of the park. Colorful tiles will permanently display the names of playground and field donors, alongside positive messages. Sponsorship tiles and field naming opportunites are limited.

PLAYGROUND FEATURES Mindfully designed to be more for everyone, some of the features of Gwendolyn’s Playground include the following. Sponsorship of these features include recognition on the Founder’s Wall as well as artfully designed installations elsewhere in the space.

DONATION INFO: Gwendolyn Strong Foundation is a registered 501(c)(3) nonprofit public charity. Our tax identification number is 26-4734446. You can donate securely on our website or by sending a check to: Gwendolyn Strong Foundation, 27 W. Anapamu Street, Suite 177, Santa Barbara, California 93101

VICTORIA @ NEVERGIVEUP.ORG • 805-203-0334 WEBSITE: NEVERGIVEUP.ORG • SOCIAL MEDIA: NEVERGIVEUPORG


I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

NOV. DEC.

24 1

T HE

by

TERRY ORTEGA

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. Submit virtual and in-person events at independent.com/eventsubmit.

COVID-19 VENUE POLICY

11/24: Storytime Under the Tree Join under the big sycamore

FRIDAY 11/26 11/26: The Comedy of Monique Marvez Take in a night of hilarious insight into family, friendship, and relationships with this comedian, author, and star of specials and appearances on Showtime, HBO, Comedy Central, and more. A welcome wine reception will feature live music from fine arts guitarist Xander Sack. 8-10pm. S.B. Wine Collective, 131 Anacapa St., Ste. C. GA: $50; VIP: $70. Call (805) 869-6510 or email hello@tasteandseesb.com.

tinyurl.com/MoniqueMarvez

SATURDAY 11/27 11/27: Small Business Saturday The community is invited the first day of “Shop Small” to celebrate the spirit of the season and support area stores. Various hours and locations. Downtown S.B. Free. Email amy@downtownsb.org.

tinyurl.com/DowntownSmallBiz

11/25:

Thanksgiving Day at the Zoo Get family and

friends out of the house and visit your animal friends at the zoo! Make reservations online. 9:30am-3:30pm. S.B. Zoo, 500 Niños Dr. Free-$19.95. Call (805) 962-5339. sbzoo.org Thanksgiving meal. Noon-2pm. Veterans’ Memorial Bldg., 1121 W. Cabrillo Blvd. Free. Call (805) 708-3876 or email adamsangels sb@gmail.com.

tinyurl.com/2021ThanksgivingMeal

11/25: Community Thanksgiving Dinner S.B. Agriculture and Farm Educa-

11/25: Groove with Gratitude: A Thanksgiving Donation Class Let Amelia Neal guide you to

MONDAY 11/29

11/29:

tinyurl.com/StorytimeTree

See Thanksgiving Things to Do.

runsantabarbara.com/ thanksgiving-4-miler

tion invite the community to share in a

tree for stories, songs, and more. Make your reservation online and don’t forget a blanket! 10:30am. Goleta Valley Library, 500 N. Fairview Ave., Goleta. Free.

THURSDAY 11/25

begins by going down Hollister Avenue to Turnpike and then along treed bike paths and finally through a local neighborhood, finishing in Thunderbird Park just off Walnut Lane. Registration: 7-8:45am; race: 9:05am. Parking: Magnolia Shopping Ctr., 5124 Hollister Ave. Registration and starting line: Thunderbird Park, 182-184 Walnut Ln. $40. COURTESY

WEDNESDAY 11/24

11/25: Annual Thanksgiving 4 Miler 2021 This flat and fast course

11/27:

Carpinteria Holiday Museum

Marketplace This market will offer one-

of-a-kind deals on antiques, handcrafted gifts, and vintage goods from more than 60 vendors. Also, see a collection of beautiful and unique nativity sets from around the world on display and available for purchase. 8am-3pm. Carpinteria Valley Museum of History, 956 Maple Ave., Carpinteria. Free. Call (805) 684-3112 or email info@carpinteriahistoricalmuseum.org.

carpinteriahistoricalmuseum.org/ events

SUNDAY 11/28 11/28: Plant Talk Stop by the native plant nursery to learn quick tips and tricks for gardening with native plants. This short and informal chat will also have the have time for a Q&A. Noon. Courtyard & Garden Nursery, S.B. Botanic Garden, 1212 Mission Canyon Rd. Free-$16. Call (805) 682-4726.

sbbg.org/classes-events

UCSB Chamber Orchestra The UCSB Chamber

connect with community and ground into gratitude in this dance-inspired yoga flow. Choose to take the class in-person or join via Zoom. Half of all proceeds will go to the Tribal Trust Foundation. 9-10:15am. Sol Seek Yoga Studio, 25 E. De la Guerra St. Donation-based: minimum $25. Call (805) 2599070.

tinyurl.com/Thanksgiving Class2021

WEDNESDAY 12/1 12/1: Parkinson & Movement Disorder Alliance (PMD Alliance): Refresh! Anyone impacted by a movement disorder is welcome to empower your body and mind in outdoor, interactive movement and learning sessions designed specifically for people with Parkinson’s disease. There will be speakers, movement breaks, and exhibits. Arrival and exhibits: 9:30-10am; program: 10am-1pm. Brass Bear Brewing & Bistro, 28 Anacapa St., Unit E. Free. tinyurl.com/Refresh-SB

Orchestra will present an all-Beethoven program of orchestral masterpieces. 7:30-9pm. Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall, UCSB. Free$10. Call (805) 893-2064 or email ticketoffice@as.ucsb. edu.

music.ucsb.edu/news/ event/2297

TUESDAY 11/30 11/30: UCSB Jazz Ensemble Presents The Majesty of Marty Paich and Oliver Nelson This evening of exquisitely crafted music for medium-sized jazz ensembles will draw from the outputs of Marty Paich and Oliver Nelson and present music from Wynton Marsalis’s Democracy Suite and small-band music by Gordon Goodwin, Pepper Adams, and the Dave Pell Octet. 7:30-9pm. Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall, UCSB. Free-$10. Call (805) 893-2064 or email ticketoffice@ as.ucsb.edu.

music.ucsb.edu/news/event/2301

Events may have been canceled or postponed. Please contact the venue to confirm the event.

COURTESY WIKIMEDIA FOUNDATION

Join current cast members of the Emmy-nominated TV show Whose Line Is It Anyway? — Ryan Stiles, Greg Proops, Jeff B. Davis, and Joel Murray — in 90 minutes of hilarious improvised comedy and songs all based on audience suggestions. 7:30pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. $59-$79. Call (805) 963-0761. lobero.org/events

COURTESY

Whose Live Anyway?

to help the families and individuals in our community struggling to make ends meet. Today is the last day to drop off fresh or frozen turkeys and chickens or financial donations. 7am-3pm. Foodbank Warehouse, 4554 Hollister Ave. Free. Call (805) 967-5741. tinyurl.com/TurkeyDrive2021

COURTESY

11/24:

11/24: Foodbank Turkey Drive 2021 The Foodbank of S.B. County wants

COURTESY S.B. ZOO

Thanksgiving Things to Do

Patrons of all ages must show proof of being fully vaccinated or supply a negative COVID-19 medical test result from within 72 hours, along with an official photo ID, before entering the Lobero, Granada, Center Stage, and New Vic theaters and the S.B. Bowl. Masks are currently required indoors, regardless of vaccination status. The venues request that patrons consult their individual websites for the most up-to-date protocols before attending an event.

12/1:

Indy Book Club: November Book Discussion Join the S.B.

Independent and the S.B. Public Library for a discussion about the book of poems An American Sunrise by Joy Harjo that explores Indigenous pasts, presents, and potential futures in the U.S. and the impact of America’s colonial history. 6-7pm. Municipal Winemakers, 22 Anacapa St. Free.

tinyurl.com/Indy BookClubNov

Volunteer Opportunity INDEPENDENT.COM

Fundraiser

NOVEMBER 24, 2021

Continued > THE INDEPENDENT

37


Shows on Tap eoslounge.com

11/24, 11/26-11/30: SOhO Restaurant & Music Club Wed.: The Hansen Family Songfest!, 7pm. Free. Fri.: Leslie Lembo & Raw Silk, 8pm. $12. Ages 21+. Sat.: Me Sabor Presents: Maynor Vargas y Su Orquesta Bonko, 10pm. $18-$25. Ages 21+. Sun.: Sandy Cummings & Jazz du Jour; 12:303:30pm; $10. Dreamland: Celebration of Joni Mitchell Featuring Kimberly Ford; 7:30pm; $15. Mon.: SBCC Jazz Combos Concert, 7pm. $15. Tue.: Motown Monday on Tuesday, 6-9pm. $10. 1221 State St. Call (805) 962-7776.

About Time, 1-4pm; Brian Kinsella, 5-8pm; Flannel 101, 9pm-midnight. Sun.: Sam Mitchell, noon-4pm. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Free-$5. Ages 21+. Call (805) 686-4785.

mavericksaloon.com/eventcalendar/

11/27: Arrowsmith’s Wine Bar Tony Ybarra. 5:30-8:30pm. 1539 Mission Dr., Solvang. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 686-9126.

tinyurl.com/TonyYbarra COURTESY

11/24: Eos Lounge King Zero, 9pm2am. $10. 500 Anacapa St. Ages 21+.

sohosb.com/events

11/25, 11/27: Cold Spring Tavern Thu.: Jeffrey Pine. Sat.: Oddly Straight. 1:30-4:30pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free. Call (805) 967-0066.

coldspringtavern.com

11/26-11/27: M.Special Brewing Co. (Goleta) Fri.: Berry McGuire, 6-8pm. Sat.: Chill Point, 8-10pm. 6860 Cortona Dr., Ste. C, Goleta. Free. Call (805) 968-6500.

11/27: Island Brewing Co. Will

11/26: Pali Wine Co. Live music. 6-8pm. 116 E. Yanonali St., Ste. A-1. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 560-7254.

islandbrewingcompany.com/ calendar

Bremen, 6-9pm. 5049 6th St., Carpinteria. Free. (805) 745-8272.

mspecialbrewco.com

urbanwinetrailsb.com/events

11/28: S.B. Wine Collective Noah

11/26-11/28: Maverick Saloon Fri.: The Regulars, 5-8pm; The Molly Ringwald Project, 9pm-midnight. Sat.:

tinyurl.com/noah-gibbings

Gibbings and Band, 2:30-5:30pm. 131 Anacapa St., Ste. C. Free. Call (805) 456-2700.

FARMERS MARKET SCHEDULE THURSDAY

SUNDAY

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm

Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6pm

TUESDAY

FRIDAY

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am

Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 3-6pm

SATURDAY

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6pm

WEDNESDAY

Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8am-1pm

(805) 962-5354 sbfarmersmarket.org •

FISHERMAN’S MARKET SATURDAY

Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call (805) 259-7476. cfsb.info/sat

38

THE INDEPENDENT

NOVEMBER 24, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


COURTESY

T HE

Holiday Head Start

UCSB Chamber Orchestra

11/26-12/1:

Department of Music

Nightly Snowfall Don’t miss the opportunity to experience nightly snowfall twice each evening for 10 minutes through December 31. Snow is non-toxic, gluten-free, and made from a pH balanced vegetable base. No snow on Christmas Day. 5:30 and 6:30pm. Center Ct., Paseo Nuevo, 651 Paseo Nuevo. Free.

Fall Concert Series UCSB Chamber Orchestra November 29 | 7:30 pm | Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall

paseonuevoshopping.com/holiday 11/24, 11/26-12/1: Miracle at the Funk Zone If you are a nostalgic Christmas fan, Pearl Social will transform into international smash “Miracle” pop-up Christmas bar through December 31. There will be over-thetop holiday decor, displays, and festive cocktails like Bad Santa, On Dasher, and more in collectable ceramic vessels (a portion of some of the mug sales will go to the James Beard Foundation’s recom Open for Good. Reservations are recommended. See website for hours and to make a reservation. Pearl Social, 131 Anacapa St., Ste. B. Free. Call (805) 284-0380 or email info@pearlsocialsb .com .com. pearlsocialsb.com

11/24, 11/26-12/1: Letters to Santa Creation Station Every day through December 24, you can write or draw a wish list (with a complimen complimentary box of crayons) and then drop it in Santa’s mailbox with your return address to receive a postcard from Santa! 11am-7pm. Center Ct., Paseo Nuevo, 651 Paseo Nuevo. Free.

paseonuevoshopping.com/ holiday

11/24-12/1: A Crimson Holiday S.B.’s uptown artisan gift gallery will offer items from 40+ of the area’s most talented artists and designers through January 7, 2022. Wed.-Sat.: 10am7pm; Sun.: 11am-6pm; Mon.:-Tue.: 10am-6pm. La Cumbre Plaza (former Tiffany & Company), 121 S. Hope Ave. Free. Call (805) 570-1987 or email mardanne@silcom.com mardanne@silcom.com.

acrimsonholiday.com 11/24, 11/26-12/1: 54th Annual Yes Store This S.B. tradition since 1968 will offer shopping for arts, crafts, custom fine jewelry, clothing, and so much more from past and new area artists. Open through December 24. Wed., Sun.-Tue.: 10am-7pm; Fri.: 9am-8pm; Sat.: 10am-8pm. Paseo Nuevo, 651 Paseo Nuevo, #101 (by the Nordstrom Bldg.) Free. Call (805) 966-

9777 or email YesStoreSantaBarbara@ yahoo.com. theyesstore.com

11/26-12/1: Anthony’s Christmas Trees Find the perfect tree through December 24. Wed.-Thu., Mon.-Tue.: 9am-8pm; Fri.-Sat.: 9am-9pm; Sun: 10am-7pm. Earl Warren Showgrounds, 3400 Calle Real.

Free. Call (805) 966-6668 or email

elves@anthonyschristmastrees.com.

anthonyschristmastrees.com 11/26-12/1: Big Wave Dave’s Christmas Trees Choose from a variety of trees from the Pacific Northwest through December 23. 10am-9pm. 3805 State St. (La Cumbre Plaza, Macy’s parking lot). Free. Call (805) 218-0282.

bigwavedaveschristmastrees .com/locations

11/26-11/28: Live Holiday Music and Roaming Carolers Take in the sounds of costumed carolers, holiday horns, choirs, and an occasional squeezebox as performers roam throughout the center through December 24. Fri., Sun.: Jazzy Bells; Sat.: Ragtime Brothers. 2:30-4:30pm. Free. Call (805) 966-6634. Paseo Nuevo, 651 Paseo Nuevo. Free.

paseonuevoshopping.com/ holiday

11/26-12/1: Photos with Santa at Paseo Nuevo Santa will be in his cottage next to the Christmas tree through December 24 to take a photo with you or your pet. No appointments are necessary: first-come, first-served. Visit the website for daily hours. Center Ct., Paseo Nuevo, 651 Paseo Nuevo. Free. Call (805) 966-6634.

paseonuevoshopping.com/ holiday

11/26-11/28: Sounds of the Holidays Celebrate the season with performances through December 24.

Fri.: Ragtime Brothers; Sat.: Django Bell; Sun.: Holiday Garden. 2:30-

4:30pm. La Cumbre Plaza, 121 S. Hope Ave. Free.

shoplacumbre.com/events

11/27: Solvang Julefest Santa’s Village Meet Mr. and Mrs. Claus, do some shopping, and have your gifts wrapped every Saturday through December 18. And don’t forget about the citywide search for the mysterious Solvang Nisse throughout Julefest to win a prize. Noon-4pm. Solvang Park, 1630 Mission Dr., Solvang. Free. Call (877) 327-2656 or email info@solvang usa.com.

solvangjulefest.org solvangusa.com/events/ nisse-adventure

UCSB Jazz Ensemble November 30 | 7:30 pm | Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall UCSB Choirs by Candlelight: Clarity December 1 | 7:30 pm | Trinity Episcopal Church UCSB Ensemble for Contemporary Music December 2 | 7:30 pm | Karl Geiringer Hall UCSB Gospel Choir December 3 | 7:30 pm | Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall

Purchase Tickets $10 general admission | $7 seniors, military, non-UCSB students FREE UCSB students and children under 12 Purchase tickets via the new AXS Tickets app, online, or call (805) 893-2064. Scan the QR code or visit music.ucsb.edu/news/purchase-tickets for more information. We recommend that patrons purchase tickets in advance of all events.

11/28: Hanukkah Celebration Commemorate the Festival of Lights with storytelling, traditional songs, and prayer led by Daniel Brenner (associate rabbi at Congregation B’nai B’rith), the lighting of the menorah, an assortment of savory and sweet latkes, and samples of handcrafted vodka cocktail pairings. 5-6:30pm. Belmond El Encanto Hotel & Spa, 800 Alvarado Pl. $65. Ages 21+. Call (805) 845-5800 or email concierge .ele@belmond.com.

tinyurl.com/HanukkahElBelmond 11/28: Christmas Sign Workshop! Join this DIY, step-by-step workshop and create your own unique Christmas holiday wood sign. Select a wood project from the gallery and choose your paint and wood stain colors. Preregistration is required. 2-5pm. Board & Brush Studio, 1404 Bath St. $68. Call (805) 792-9603 or email santabarbara@boardandbruch.com.

tinyurl.com/ChristmasSignDIY

12/1: 26th Annual La Arcada Plaza Christmas Walk Get into

Masks and proof of vaccination or negative COVID test required. See music.ucsb.edu/news/covid-19-information for more details.

Santa Run SAT U R DAY, D E C E M B E R 1 1

Santa Claus is coming to town – at La Cumbre Plaza. Join the fun & festivities at the Santa Claus Run Santa Barbara. There will be plenty of holiday cheer for both the 5K and 1-Mile Fun Run. Santa hats for all. Medals for all finishers. Prize for best Santa costume. 5K starts at 8:30am at La Cumbre Plaza in front of Lure Fish House with 1-Mile Fun Run starting around 9am. Packet Pickup and Late Registration starts Saturday, December 11 at 7:15 a.m. next to Lure Fish House (next to Macy’s) at La Cumbre Plaza.

REGISTRATION FEES:

the holiday spirit with strolling carolers, area music groups, popcorn, snow flurries, and lots of holiday goodies. 5-8pm. La Arcada Plaza, 1114 State St. Free.

tinyurl.com/LaArcada

Regis

activete.cr at om (search

under “S anta in Sant a Barbar Run” a)

INDEPENDENT.COM

5K: through Dec. 1, $20 - after Dec. 1, $25. Youth 5K: $15 until race day, 1-Mile Fun Run: $15 until race day. Add $5 race day registration for all races.

NOVEMBER 24, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

39


GIVE THE

GIFT OF GIVING! independent.com/givingtuesday

The Santa Barbara Alliance for Community Transformation The Santa Barbara Alliance for Community Transformation (SB ACT) exists to equip the community to lovingly engage the marginalized while actively working for the betterment of their physical, spiritual, emotional, and mental needs.

Direct Relief Direct Relief is a humanitarian aid organization, active in all 50 states and more than 80 countries, with a mission to improve the health and lives of people affected by poverty or emergencies — without regard to politics, religion, or ability to pay.

sbact.org

directrelief.org

Planned Parenthood California Central Coast To improve our communities’ sexual and reproductive health outcomes through health care, education, and advocacy.

Santa Barbara Historical Museum Our mission is to inspire meaningful connections to Santa Barbara history.

sbhistorical.org

plannedparenthood.org/plannedparenthood-california-central-coast

Community Environmental Council CEC advances rapid and equitable solutions to the climate crisis. We build on-the-ground momentum to reverse the threat of climate change. We transform the systems that fuel it. We safeguard the community from its impacts. And every day, we move people to create a more resilient Central Coast.

cecsb.org

SBHS Computer Science Academy The CS Academy’s mission is to introduce as many SBHS students as possible to computer science and demonstrate its relevance to their academic and career interests. Through innovative courses, extracurricular activities, and industry partnerships, this Career Technical Education (CTE) program prepares students to pursue a career in this dynamic field.

sbhscs.org

TV Santa Barbara The Mission of TV Santa Barbara, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, is to empower people to make media that matters.

tvsb.tv

sbnewhouse.org

Los Padres ForestWatch Los Padres ForestWatch protects wildlife, wilderness, water, and sustainable access throughout the Los Padres National Forest and the Carrizo Plain National Monument. We achieve this through education, advocacy, and, when necessary, legal action for the benefit of our communities, climate, and future generations.

forestwatch.org

New House Santa Barbara New House dedicates itself to providing a clean, sober, and healthy environment that allows men with alcohol and other drug problems to begin their journey of recovery and to reclaim their dignity, self-esteem, and sense of purpose.

Wood Glen Hall It is the mission of Wood Glen to operate a nonprofit retirement residence that provides affordable quality care and support services to ensure that California’s central coast seniors may live their later years with security and dignity and as independently as they are able.

Cancer Foundation of Santa Barbara The mission of the Cancer Foundation of Santa Barbara is to ensure superior cancer care for all citizens of Santa Barbara County regardless of means. The Cancer Foundation is the leading fundraising and grant-making institution in Santa Barbara County dedicated to cancer care and the largest contributor to Sansum Clinic and Ridley-Tree Cancer Center, the leading provider of outpatient cancer care on the central coast.

cfsb.org

Sanctuary Centers We provide mental health care that transforms lives.

sanctuarycenters.org

woodglenhall.org

PA I D A DV E R T I S E M E N T 40

THE INDEPENDENT

NOVEMBER 24, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

CommUnify CommUnify provides education and supportive services for low-income Santa Barbara County residents. We are committed to alleviating poverty in our county. Our 17 programs empower our clients to attain financial stability and enable them to become healthy, educated, self-sufficient members of our community so they may retain their dignity.

communifysb.org

Worldhealer, Inc. Worldhealer believes community based practices promote sustainable systemic and behavioral change. Every individual in this world can improve their quality of life, realize their dreams, and pave the way for future generations.

worldhealer.org

Explore Ecology Explore Ecology educates and empowers the next generation of environmental stewards. We connect children to the natural world by bringing outdoor experiences to local schools. 30,000 students learn and grow with us in school gardens and on field trips to the Watershed Resource Center and Art From Scrap each year.

exploreecology.org

Domestic Violence Solutions for Santa Barbara County We provide safety, shelter, and support for individuals and families affected by domestic violence and collaborate with community partners to raise awareness regarding the cause, prevalence, and impact.

dvsolutions.org


This Giving Tuesday, the Santa Barbara Independent encourages our readers to make a donation to one of Santa Barbara’s many nonprofits doing great work in the community. Here are just a few of those organizations.

Immigrant Hope Santa Barbara Our mission is to empower our community by educating adults, providing support in finding a possible pathway to legal residency, and sharing the hope of the gospel.

immigranthopesb.org

Legal Aid Foundation Legal Aid Foundation of S.B. County provides free legal assistance to Santa Barbara County residents. Our mission is to provide high-quality civil legal services to low-income and other vulnerable residents in order to ensure equal access to justice. We change lives through direct representation, legal advice and information, and community education.

lafsbc.org

Unite to Light Unite to Light believes that access to clean and affordable light and energy are critical to improving health, education, and prosperity. They focus on projects that help children study at night, equip midwives with tools to save lives, and offer relief to those suffering from disasters and experiencing homelessness.

unitetolight.org

Jodi House Jodi House empowers brain injury survivors to not merely survive but thrive. By providing survivors and caregivers with the resources and support they need, Jodi House ensures that no one in our community has to face brain injury alone, regardless of the ability to pay for services.

ShelterBox USA To provide families with life-saving shelter and the essential tools and supplies that will enable them to rebuild their homes and transform their lives after disaster.

shelterboxusa.org

jodihouse.org

Rancho Palomino

Santa Barbara

Wildling Museum of Art and Nature The Wildling’s mission is to inspire our community and visitors to enjoy, value, and conserve wildlife and natural areas through art. We provide artistic, educational, and field experiences of nature for that purpose.

Gateway Educational Services We believe in creating equity through education. Our goal is to improve academic success for students falling below their grade level. We focus on reading and math intervention with a 1 to 1 service model. Gateway has served students since 2009 in Santa Barbara County.

cadasb.org

wildlingmuseum.org

gatewayeducationalservices.org

Alzheimer’s Association, California Central Coast Chapter The Alzheimer’s Association leads the way to end Alzheimer’s and all other dementia — by accelerating global research, driving risk reduction and early detection, and maximizing quality care and support. The California Central Coast Chapter serves San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, and Ventura Counties.

Apples to Zucchini Cooking School On school campuses, in parks, and in our own teaching kitchen and garden, our Chef Educators teach students of all ages and backgrounds how to prepare delicious, nutritious, and affordable plant-forward meals with the goal of building a healthier, more resilient community. Please join us!

League of Women Voters of Santa Barbara “We envision a democracy where every person has the desire, the right, the knowledge, and the confidence to participate.” Always nonpartisan, we educate and advocate on the climate emergency, voting rights, housing, homelessness, redistricting, criminal justice reform, and more. Our all-volunteer nonprofit league is dedicated to “making democracy work.”

Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Since 1949, the Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse has provided compassionate care to youth, adults, and families in recovery from substance abuse, and helped prevent this disease by providing behavioral health counseling, education, mentoring, and youth development activities.

alz.org/cacentralcoast

atozcookingschool.org

Rancho Palomino Santa Barbara Provide educational experiences led by Indigenous cultural artists. Activities for all ages preserving community access to farming, through ranching trades including horsemanship, native culture, and archery.

ranchopalominosb.com

New Beginnings Our mission is to provide quality, affordable counseling, shelter, case management, and education that strengthen our community and provide our clients with the ability to lead healthy and productive lives.

sbnbcc.org

lwvsantabarbara.org

MICKEY FLACKS JOURNALISM FUND

Santa Barbara International Orchid Show SBIOS has presented 75 years of Orchid Shows, promoting beauty, art, culture and conservation of the world’s most exotic flower in three-day extravaganzas each March with regional, national and international exhibitors and vendors. The survival of S.B. County’s beloved icon — the U.S.’s largest orchid show — depends on your donation today!

sborchidshow.com

Grassini Gives Back Each year, the Grassini family selects a local non-profit partner for the Grassini Gives Back holiday charity event. In addition to producing award-winning wine, giving back to the community is incredibly important to the Grassini family, making this annual fundraiser a true highlight of the year for the whole community.

grassinifamilyvineyards.com

Santa Barbara Meals on Wheels, Inc. Santa Barbara Meals on Wheels is dedicated to delivering affordable, freshly prepared meals 365 days a year to elderly and home-bound residents of our community, providing both nutrition and personal interaction in support of their effort to live independently, with dignity, as long as they are able.

Mickey Flacks Journalism Fund To promote social justice and protect the environment, SBCAN — in partnership with the Santa Barbara Independent — support research and reporting on environmental and social justice issues. Your tax-deductible donations to the SBCAN Mickey Flacks Journalism Fund will help ensure that these issues will continue to be researched and reported on in the Santa Barbara region.

mealsonwheelssb.org

sbcan.org/journalism_fund

INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 24, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

41


SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT AND DOWNTOWN SANTA BARBARA PRESENT

Downtown Business

Spotlight a virtual interview series 11/25: No Show - Happy Thanksgiving! Join Gareth Kelly in conversation with t Nexek! e W

INGRID ESTRELLA Game Seeker

HOLLAND HAWTHORNE Renaissance Fine Consignment

Holiday Shopping Thursday, December 2 | 3pm Live on Zoom Register at independent.com/spotlight

Offer ends Dec. 31

40 off BUY ONE, GET ONE

%

WINDOWS AND PATIO DOORS 1 MINIMUM PURCHASE OF 4

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MINIMUM PURCHASE OF 4 – INTEREST ACCRUES FROM THE PURCHASE DATE BUT IS WAIVED IF PAID IN FULL WITHIN 12 MONTHS

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DETAILS OF OFFER: Offer expires 12/31/2021. Not valid with other offers or prior purchases. Buy one (1) window or entry/patio door, get one (1) window or entry/patio door 40% off when you purchase four (4) or more windows or patio doors between 3/1/2021 and 12/31/2021. 40% off windows and entry/patio doors are less than or equal to lowest cost window or entry/patio door in the order. Subject to credit approval. Interest is billed during the promotional period, but all interest is waived if the purchase amount is paid before the expiration of the promotional period. Financing for GreenSky® consumer loan programs is provided by federally insured, federal and state chartered financial institutions without regard to age, race, color, religion, national origin, gender, or familial status. Savings comparison based on purchase of a single unit at list price. Available at participating locations and offer applies throughout the service area. See your local Renewal by Andersen location for details. License number available upon request. Some Renewal by Andersen locations are independently owned and operated. “Renewal by Andersen” and all other marks where denoted are trademarks of Andersen Corporation. © 2021 Andersen Corporation. All rights reserved. rba12589 *Using U.S. and imported parts.

1

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THE INDEPENDENT

All Booked

NOVEMBER 24, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

A bi-monthly newsletter from the Santa Barbara Independent exclusively for book lovers.

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living TAKE OUT Dine Out

COURTESY ARAMAK

Travel

Yosemite in the ‘Off Season’? T

Rock On

here was nothing “off ” about our “off-season” visit to Yosemite National Park. In fact, I’d argue our two-day autumn stay rivaled any spring or summer itinerary. Instead of hot weather, we got cool, crisp air. Evergreen ponderosa pines stood against oaks and dogwoods turning intense yellow and deep red. Smatterings of small groups replaced the peak-season throngs. And the waterfalls roared with life thanks to a recent rainstorm. The timing of it all felt like a stillundiscovered secret. We stayed at the newly renovated Wawona Hotel,

In Many Ways, Fall Visit Beats Spring or Summer Trip by Tyler Hayden which was built in 1856 as one of California’s original mountain lodges. It breathes with history. Situated near the south fork of the Merced River and just a couple of miles down the road from Mariposa Grove of giant sequoias, the Wawona features 104 rooms outfitted with Victorian-era furnishings and decor, and the lobby holds a double-sided fireplace circled by deep-seated couches perfect for reading or conversation. Wi-Fi is available, but we did ourselves the favor of putting our phones away. On our first morning, we drove the 27 miles to the valley (which takes about 45 minutes), stopping at the Tunnel View overlook to take in El Capitan, Half Dome, and all the beauty in between. We made our way to the Lower Yosemite Falls Trailhead and toward the base of the iconic drop-off, and as we craned our necks upward to watch the spray make a rainbow in the early light, we heard a mild exclamation behind us. Another couple had spotted a black bear meandering 50 yards away down the creek. We were a lot more interested in him than he was in us, and he kept his focus on the fish before turning a bend out of sight. Lunch was at the Ahwahnee Hotel, where we put down half-pound burgers at tables visited by queens

and presidents. Outside, a squirrel the size of a small cat scurried to and fro, gathering leaves to make a nest. The Ahwahnee, considered Yosemite’s “premier” accommodations, is another time machine back to a bygone era of elegance in the wild. High ceilings hold intricately carved beams and hand-made stained glass, while massive stone hearths radiate warm light across antlered chandeliers and plush seating areas. Native art and basketry line the walls. The afternoon took us to the Ansel Adams Gallery, where I was happy to find and buy a few prints by the celebrated photographer I hadn’t seen a million times already. The gift shop was ideal for a few early Christmas presents, and there was even a small but smartly curated book collection to search through. It being Halloween weekend, we checked out the nearby historic cemetery, aptly populated that day with a small band of ravens. After a deep, entirely undisturbed sleep in our king-sized bed—wall-length heaters made the room a cozy refuge from the 36-degree night outside—we decided the next day to hike the Mirror Lake Trail at the east end of the valley. Challenging but not difficult, the five-mile loop took us right under Yosemite’s most dramatic formations and along the route’s namesake body of water that reflected the sheer granite walls in picture-perfect detail. That night, we took a “star-gazing” tour of constellations across a brilliantly bright Milky Way splashed across ink-black sky. Closer to “home” at the Wawona, nearby attractions include an impressive covered bridge (one of only 12 in the state); a cluster of historic buildings, including an old Wells Fargo office, bakery, blacksmith, powder house, and jail; and the scenic Wawona Meadow Loop Trail that weaves through lush forest surrounding a wide meadow. The hotel serves a buffet breakfast and dinner and has a full bar for unwinding at the end of the day. If you do decide to travel in the October-November window that worked out so well for us, be sure to keep tabs on weather-related closures of roads and seasonal amenities, like bike rentals and access to Glacier Point. But the trade-off is well worth it. Go see for yourself. For more information and to book your trip, visit travelyosemite.com. n

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Mizuba Tea’s

MATCHA MASTERY

Lauren Danson Imports Directly from Japanese Farmers to Highlight Heritage BY MATT KETTMANN

growing up in Santa Barbara’s Bel Air Knolls neighborhood, that Lauren Danson founded Mizuba Tea Company feels like destiny. But the fact that she’s focused on matcha—the powdered green tea from Japan that’s wrapped up in history, ceremony, and reverence — came a bit more by chance. In March 2013, while visiting a friend in Kyoto during her senior year of college at Westmont, Danson decided to hop off the train in Uji. The prime tea-growing region is home to the matcha ceremony, which uses a bamboo whisk and small bowl to infuse the stone-milled tea powder into hot water. She was wowed by the town’s tea-soaked scene, enjoying matcha soft-serve ice cream, buying as much tea powder as she could cram in her bag, and sipping an eye-opening cup of tea with a matcha farmer. “I could have met an oolong farmer,” she explains today, laughing about what a different train stop may have meant. A few months later, after finishing a summer graduate program in publishing at the University of Denver — Danson thought she’d be a journalist or go work for Chronicle Books—she reconnected with the farmer, who wondered if she could sell his tea in the United States. She received her first order in September 2013, and Mizuba Tea was born, becoming one of the earliest matcha-focused companies in North America. “When I started, I could count on one hand the amount of matcha companies in America, and one was in Canada,” she recalled. Then NPR labeled matcha the top food of the year in 2015, and the market exploded. “It was wild to watch,” said Danson. “I just started seeing matcha companies pop up everywhere. It was intimidating, but I didn’t worry about it too much. I just did what I did and supported my farms.” Those direct-to-farm connections and Danson’s focus on educating about the rich heritage of the beverage are what set Mizuba apart from the ocean of competitors hopping on the matcha-as-wellness bandwagon. “Yes, matcha is good for you,” said Danson. “But the number-one health benefit that I will promise you about matcha is that it will be a beautiful life experience.” She quickly found that Japanese tea farmers were hungry for export opportunities. “Tea in Japan is exceptionally on the decline,” she said. “People my age there are not interested in tea.”

That goes for consumers, who are increasingly opting for coffee, but also the next generation of tea farmers. “Farming is hard, especially in Japan, where you have a culture that really takes up the mantle to do things and do them excellently,” she said. “You commit your life to making the perfect rice or the perfect tea.” Over the past two decades, four out of five tea farms in Japan are no longer growing tea, said Danson, even though exports are on the rise. “All the farmers that do exist are looking at exporting,” she said. “That’s why I was asked in the first place.” Today, Danson works with about eight farms, most of which are organic. She uses her website and packaging to explain what sets each farmer apart, though many are quite shy about having their family showcased. “I do my best to tell their stories based on what they want me to tell everyone,” said Danson. Others, like fifth-generation farmer Kiyoharu Tsuji, internationally known as Tsuji-san, are happy to be “rock stars.” Though matcha remains the core, Mizuba’s line is expanding deeper into loose-leaf teas, even featuring specific cultivars, which is like merlot versus malbec in the wine world. “It’s a huge iceberg,” she explained of exploring the endless tentacles of tea types. “We’re reaching the bottom of the iceberg now.” Those cultivars were included in the batch of samples she sent me a few months ago, each with a very specific preparation regimen. The Saemidori gyokuro, which is grown in the shade on volcanic soils in Kagoshima, called for five grams to be steeped in 50 mL of 105-degree water for one to two minutes. Her notes suggested a rounded body with baked peach and sweet pea flavors. My tea palate is not quite so refined, but I did note a sweetness and barley-like richness, with hints of dried fruit. The sencha Yabukita, meanwhile, called for six grams in 180 mL of 160-to175-degree water for one minute to reveal guava, apple, and umami flavors, which are classic for this ancient cultivar.

My package also included Kyô-bancha, which is a large-leaf, low-caffeine tea that I found to be full of kelpy, seaweed-cracker flavors; a pan-roasted Kamairicha, loaded with toasty elements; and more basic tea, such as genmaicha, which is brewed with roasted mochi rice, and tencha, the root of powdered matcha. There were flavored teas, too, such as the sencha with yuzu and the chamomile with houjicha. And, of course, there was also some of Mizuba’s classic matcha in a little tin, which requires a whipping to blend into hot water — a milk frother works just fine if you don’t have the bamboo whisk. But as detailed as Danson can go, she more often has to pull back the focus to explain the basics, namely that all tea—green, black, oolong, Earl Grey, pu-erh, you name it — comes from the same plant species, Camellia sinensis. “It does still surprise me that most people don’t know that yet,” said Danson, who joked that she sometimes loses her voice while doing customer education. “It’s exciting for me to see the realization that tea is one plant.” She also has to cut down those trying to ride the matcha wave without actually selling true matcha, as the style is not well regulated. “Matcha will always be powdered green tea,” she explained, “but not all powdered green tea is matcha.” The business—which now sells to more than 600 wholesale accounts, more than half of which are coffee shops — is a family affair: Her mom helps with packaging and distribution; her Portland-based in-laws help with placements up there, including into the five cafés they own; and her husband, whom she met while ordering inside The French Press the same year she started Mizuba, has even started his own company, Herald Tea, which sources from China and Taiwan. Despite the growth, popularizing those familyowned Japanese farms remains Danson’s motivation and mission. “I’m just a conduit for their knowledge,” she said. “I love providing a tool for people if they want to go deeper and understand the flavors of Japanese tea.” See mizubatea.com. n

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NOVEMBER 24, 2021

FOOD & DRINK

A

s someone who’s been fascinated with tea since

JAPAN TO US: Mizuba Tea’s founder, Lauren Danson, works with Japanese farmers such as Mr. M (below) in Uji, which is a prime tea-growing region and the ancestral home of the matcha ceremony. She now also works with loose-leaf teas, such as the genmaicha, which includes roasted grains of rice, being poured above.

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JOHN DICKSON

Make It a Holi-date!

Ring in the season with live music and cheer

She & Him

HISTORY FOR SALE: The Palms in Carpinteria is on the market for nearly $10 million.

Restaurants Serving

A Very She & Him Christmas Party

Thanksgiving

Thu, Dec 2 / 8 PM Arlington Theatre

H

Usher in the holiday season with the “old-school studio-pop sensibility” (NPR) of M. Ward and Zooey Deschanel as they celebrate the tenth anniversary of their album A Very She & Him Christmas.

My Bluegrass Heart Béla Fleck, Sam Bush, Jerry Douglas, Stuart Duncan, Edgar Meyer and Bryan Sutton Wed, Dec 15 / 8 PM Arlington Theatre This unparalleled evening in support of Béla Fleck’s new album My Bluegrass Heart is a veritable Who’s Who of some of the greatest instrumentalists in bluegrass history.

ere are restaurants serving Thanksgiving meals this year, not including the already sold-out spots or those requiring advance ordering: Ca’ Dario (Goleta/Montecito/Santa Barbara: $80; 2-9 p.m.); Carp Kitchen & Grocery (everything but turkey); Chumash Casino’s Grains & Grounds ($150 takeout, feeds 4-6); Chumash Casino’s Willows ($65; 3-9 p.m.); Cold Spring Tavern (turkey, prime rib, or salmon; 11:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m.); Convivo Restaurant ($75 three-course, $90 four-course adults, $35 ages 12 and below; noon-8 p.m.); Costa Kitchen & Bar ($89 adults, $39 ages 12 and below; 1-7 p.m.) Crocodile Restaurant & Bar ($35; noon-9:30 p.m.); Dargan’s Irish Pub & Restaurant ($29.95; 11:30 a.m.-9 p.m.); Finch & Fork ($95 adults, $35 ages 3-10; 3-8 p.m.); Frog Bar and Grill (turkey or prime rib; $59 adults, $24 children ages 12 and below; 11 a.m.-3 p.m.); Harbor Restaurant ($24.99; noon-9 p.m.); Harry’s Plaza Café ($26.95; 11 a.m.-9 p.m.); Holdren’s Steaks & Seafood ($39 turkey, $49 prime rib; noon-9:30 p.m.); Joe’s Café ($31.95 ham, $32.95 turkey, $37.95 prime rib adults, $16.95 turkey ages 12 and below; noon-9 p.m.); Little Dom’s Seafood (takeout only, deepfried turkey $87, sides/desserts extra); Live Oak Café (brunch with turkey sandwiches and pot pies); Louie’s California Bistro (turkey or salmon); Mulligan’s Café & Bar ($35.99 all-you-can-eat buffet with turkey, ham, prime rib; noon-5 p.m.); The Outpost, Goodland Hotel ($65; 3:30-7:30 p.m.); Pea Soup Andersen’s (Buellton, 11 a.m.-7 p.m.); Rosewood Miramar’s Chandelier Ballroom (brunch buffet; $145 adults, $65 ages 4-12; 1-7 p.m.); Roy (turkey, prime rib, or salmon stuffed with crab and lobster; $65; 3:30-8:30 p.m.); Santa Barbara Sunshine Café ($22.95; 9:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.); Shoals Restaurant, Cliff House Inn ($75; 1:30-6:30 p.m.); Stella Mare’s ($65 adults, $29 ages 12 and below; noon-6 p.m.); and the Tee-Off Restaurant & Lounge ($28.95; 3-9 p.m.).

THE PALMS FOR SALE: The Coastal View News reports that The Palms Restaurant is for sale for $9.85 million. The two-story, mixed-use building at 701 Linden Avenue includes the landmark restaurant on the first floor and five apartments and an office on the second. “A piece of admired Carpinteria history, this iconic restaurant was established in 1912 as a steakhouse with a twist, you cook your own steak,” the article said. The business, which closed during the pandemic and never reopened, comes with licenses for liquor, live music, and dancing. Thanks to reader Richard for the tip. HANDLEBAR AND MOKUTAN: Handlebar Coffee, which opened at 128

(805) 893-3535 | www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu Arlington event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 963-4408 46

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East Canon Perdido Street in November 2011 then expanded to 2720 De La Vina Street in September 2017, will be opening a third location at 836 East Anapamu Street across from the Santa Barbara Bowl in 2022. Readers LGB and Laura saw a liquor license application in the current home of Choppa Poke at 716 State Street for a business named Mokutan. John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@SantaBarbara.com.


r

Topa Topa x Carhartt This p i S = Harvest Swoon

T

PROUDLY SERVING SANTA BARBARA FOR OVER 40 YEARS

he wine-beer hybrid is now

firmly established in American craft brewing, but the freedom to push flavor themes remains boundless. Case in point: a sangriastyle kettle sour called Harvest Swoon, which balances the tartness of sauvignon blanc grapes with key lime, passion fruit, and peach. This is the second year that Topa Topa Brewing Company — which is headquartered in Ventura but an established presence in Santa Barbara thanks to their Funk Zone taproom—teamed up with Carhartt Family Wines in Los Olivos on such a hybrid, and this one also relies on sour yeast cultures from The Rare Barrel in Berkeley to bring the tang. There’s not even a lick of hops in the batch, leaving the fruit to shine, but it does pack a medium punch at 6.9 percent ABV. The overall effect is much smoother than many kettle sours, perfect for sunny days or, let’s be honest, breakfast. This batch, which was feted during an end-of-harvest pig roast at Peasants Feast in

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Solvang last week, is probably gone by now, but watch for a rosé in February. See topatopa.beer. —Matt Kettmann

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SOMM TV’s Sparklers

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ooking competition shows are a dime a

dozen these days, but there aren’t many — or any? — that make wine a central part of the equation. Sparklers, a new series from the streaming service SOMM TV, does just that, challenging five wine professionals to develop dishes based on a limited range of ingredients in sparkling-wine-producing regions of Oregon, Italy, and France. Set over 13 half-hour episodes, the format and judging for each battle changes a bit, sometimes pitting the individuals against each other and other times creating team experiences, such as episode two, when one must go forage for ingredients while the other preps. The mostly Napa-based cast — Maryam Ahmed, formerly with the Culinary Institute of America; George Walker III, of Wade Cellars; and

Meghan Zobeck, of Burgess Cellars—does feature two SoCal stars: Claire Coppi of Sushi Note in Los Angeles and Matthew Kaner, the renowned sommelier behind Bar Covell and Augustine who grew up in Santa Barbara. Unlike the contestants on other, more cutthroat cooking shows, where the banter borders on angst and anger, the Sparklers stars are extremely collegial and supportive of each other, while still striving to win each challenge. That pleasant tone makes learning about each region, character, and ingredient all the more enjoyable, easy to pair with your own glass of wine at home. See sommtv.com, which also features free podcasts, including my recent chat with the Somm franchise founder Jason Wise about the Ocean Fathoms underwater wine project off of the Santa —MK Barbara coast.

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BRINGING THE MERRY, MERRY BACK

I

where they left off with this popular seasonal project. While Ward was in Portland and Deschanel was in Los Angeles during the pandemic, the pair traded files digitally to produce the songs that round out the 10th-anniversary deluxe edition. Although this method required a departure from Ward’s preferred analog-exclusive studio technique, Deschanel praised the process, saying that “it was like giving and getting little presents” to send and receive the recordings that came together to create the final mixes. While “It’s Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christmas” follows the nostalgic pop blueprint established at the outset of She & Him’s holiday odyssey, “Last Christmas” by George Michael and “Holiday” by Madonna revive the sounds of the 1980s. “Holiday” in particular did not necessarily present as a Christmas song on first impression. Still, in Ward’s twangy, guitar-and-drums-oriented arrangement, it fits right in alongside the more familiar Christmas standards. Part of the proceeds

from the reissued album will support 826 National, a network of youth writing and publishing centers in which Deschanel has volunteered as an instructor. The artists acknowledged that playing music helped them get through the pandemic quarantine and emphasized their gratitude for the return of live events. Deschanel said she grew up caroling in the holiday season and expressed her willingness to “harmonize on just about every holiday song.” Ward said that he hopes people will dress up for the concert in Santa Barbara and come out wearing their “best Christmas masks.” The show begins at 8 p.m. with a comedian to warm up the crowd. She & Him is partnering with UCSB Arts & Lectures to invite audience members to bring a new, unwrapped toy or gift card to donate to United Way of Santa Barbara County. For more information and tickets, visit artsandlectures.ucsb.edu or call the box office at (805) 893-3535.

LUM ART PING PONG PAELLA PARTY If you grew up loving contemporary art, you likely experienced it through the glossy magazines that once dominated the discourse. Artforum, ARTnews, Art in America — these publications allowed us to learn what was happening in the museums and galleries around the world and acquire the ideas and vocabulary that made it all so exciting. Thanks to the husband-and-wife team of Debra Olin Herrick and Arturo Heredia Soto, along with a colorful roster of writers, the Central Coast now has its own version of one of these classic glossies. Begun in 2020 as a humble yet beautifully designed and illustrated 16 pages, Lum Art Magazine has grown throughout four issues to a robust 48, with articles by Madeleine Eve Ignon, Bay Hallowell, and Santa Barbara Museum of Art curator James Glisson. Some of the stories feature artists like Claudia Borfiga and Elisa Ortega Montilla, who will be familiar to readers of the Independent. In contrast, others

48

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NOVEMBER 24, 2021

focus on radical provocateurs, such as Dakota Noot, whom you may not yet know. The whole thing is edited with great skill by Herrick and designed with panache by Heredia Soto. On Saturday, December 4, the Lum Art gang will celebrate the impending publication of issue number five with a benefit pingpong tournament and paella party at a private home on the Mesa in Santa Barbara. The ticketed event aims to raise funds to underwrite the issue and support two new initiatives to help underrepresented artists and arts writers. It’s also intended as an opportunity for likeminded arts people to gather in person and enjoy food, wine from Municipal Winemakers, beer from Topa Topa, and some friendly table tennis competition. For tickets and information about the event and to examine previous issues of the magazine, visit lumartzine.com. —CD

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FUNDRAISER FOR ARTIST

CHRIS POTTER

Chris Potter has charmed thousands of people here in Santa Barbara and all over the world with his plein air landscape paintings, generous attitude, and dedication to his young family and his community. Earlier this month, Potter went to the doctor with a host of symptoms and found out that he is suffering from stage-three lung cancer. Since hearing this terrible news, his many friends have come together to create a GoFundMe to help Potter defray his anticipated medical expenses and make up for the loss in income while he is unable to paint. To help out one of the Santa Barbara art scene’s guiding lights at this dark moment, go to gofund.me/46aa5334. —CD

—Charles Donelan INGRID BOSTROM

take that.t

SHE & HIM AT T H E A R L I N G T O N t’s been two long years without one, and even the most confirmed Scrooges and Grinches have gotten impatient. Now, thanks to UCSB Arts & Lectures, one of Santa Barbara’s most cherished holiday gatherings returns. On Thursday, December 2, She & Him (that’s Zoey Deschanel and M. Ward, plus backup singers and a band) will perform a splendid and comforting set of retro seasonal classics for a festive crowd at The Arlington Theatre. The concert kicks off a national tour for the duo She & Him, who made a significant impact on the crowded Christmas music market with their 2011 album A Very She & Him Christmas, and a follow-up LP, Christmas Party, in 2016. In addition, on November 12, 2021, Merge Records released an expanded Deluxe edition of A Very She & Him Christmas featuring three new numbers — “Holiday,” “Last Christmas,” and “It’s Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christmas.” In a recent phone conversation, the stars sounded relaxed and relieved to pick up

PAUL WELLMAN FILE PHOTO

PAGE 48

COURTESY UCSB ARTS & LECTURES

UCSB ARTS & LECTURES tk: “tko.... THROWS HOLIDAY BASH WITH

L I F E


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny WEEK OF NOVEMBER 24

ARIES

LIBRA

TAURUS

SCORPIO

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): Aries author Chris Brogan says, “Don’t settle. Don’t finish crappy books. If you don’t like the menu, leave the restaurant. If you’re not on the right path, get off it.” That’s the best possible counsel for you to hear, in my astrological opinion. As an Aries, you’re already inclined to live by that philosophy. But now and then, like now, you need a forceful nudge in that direction. So please, Aries, go in pursuit of what you want, not what you partially want. Associate with the very best, most invigorating influences, not the mediocre kind. (Apr. 20-May 20): Author Kurt Vonnegut wrote wistfully, “I still catch myself feeling sad about things that don’t matter anymore.” If similar things are running wild in your head, dear Taurus, the coming weeks will be a favorable time to banish them. You will have extra power to purge outdated emotions and reclaim at least some of the wild innocence that is your birthright. P.S.: There’s nothing wrong with feeling sad. In fact, feeling sad can be healthy. But it’s important to feel sad for the right reasons. Getting clear about that is your second assignment.

GEMINI

(May 21-June 20): “I’ll walk forever with stories inside me that the people I love the most can never hear.” So says the main character in Gemini author Michelle Hodkin’s novel The Evolution of Mara Dyer. If that heart-rending statement has resonance with your own personal experience, I have good news: The coming weeks will be a favorable time to transform the situation. I believe you can figure out how to share key stories and feelings that have been hard to reveal before now. Be alert for unexpected opportunities and notat-all-obvious breakthroughs.

CANCER

(June 21-July 22): A study of people in 24 countries concluded that during the pandemic, more than 80 percent of the population have taken action to improve their health. Are you in that group? Whether or not you are, the coming weeks will be a favorable time to go further in establishing robust self-care. The astrological omens suggest you’ll find it easier than usual to commit to good new habits. Rather than trying to do too much, I suggest you take no more than three steps. Even starting with just one might be wise. Top three: eating excellent food, having fun while exercising right, and getting all the deep sleep you need.

LEO

(July 23-Aug. 22): Leo-born scholar Edith Hamilton loved to study ancient Greek civilization. She wrote, “To rejoice in life, to find the world beautiful and delightful to live in, was a mark of the Greek spirit which distinguished it from all that had gone before.” One sign of Greece’s devotion to joie de vivre was its love of play. “The Greeks were the first people in the world to play,” Hamilton exulted, “and they played on a great scale. All over Greece, there were games” — for athletes, dancers, musicians, and other performers. Spirited competition was an essential element of their celebration of play, as was the pursuit of fun for its own sake. In resonance with your astrological omens, Leo, I propose you regard ancient Greece as your spiritual home for the next five weeks.

VIRGO

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Virgo singer/songwriter Florence Welch of the band Florence and the Machine told an interviewer why she wrote “Hunger.” She said, “I looked for love in things that were not love.” What were those things? According to her song, they included taking drugs and performing onstage. Earlier in Florence’s life, as a teenager, “love was a kind of emptiness” she experienced through her eating disorder. What about you, Virgo? Have you looked for love in things that weren’t love? Are you doing that right now? The coming weeks will be a good time to get straight with yourself about this issue. I suggest you ask for help from your higher self. Formulate a strong intention that in the future, you will look for love in things that can genuinely offer you love.

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): There’s a Grateful Dead song, with lyrics written by John Perry Barlow, that says, “You ain’t gonna learn what you don’t want to know.” I propose you make that your featured advice for the next two weeks. I hope you will be inspired by it to figure out what truths you might be trying hard not to know. In so doing, you will make yourself available to learn those truths. As a result, you’ll be led on a healing journey you didn’t know you needed to take. The process might sound uncomfortable, but I suspect it will ultimately be pleasurable. (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Scorpio author and philosopher Albert Camus was a good thinker. At age 44, he won the Nobel Prize for Literature — the second-youngest recipient ever. And yet he made this curious statement: “Thoughts are never honest. Emotions are.” He regarded thoughts as “refined and muddy” — the result of people continually tinkering with their inner dialogue so as to come up with partially true statements designed to serve their self-image rather than reflect authentic ideas. Emotions, on the other hand, emerge spontaneously and are hard to hide, according to Camus. They come straight from the depths. In accordance with astrological potentials, Scorpio, I urge you to keep these meditations at the forefront of your awareness in the coming weeks. See if you can be more skeptical about your thoughts and more trusting in your emotions.

SAGITTARIUS

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Poet Renée Ashley describes what she’s attracted to: “I’m drawn to what flutters nebulously at the edges, at the corner of my eye — just outside my certain sight. I want to share in what I am routinely denied or only suspect exists. I long for a glimpse of what is beginning to occur.” Although I don’t think that’s a suitable perspective for you to cultivate all the time, Sagittarius, I suspect it might be appealing and useful for you in the coming weeks. Fresh possibilities will be coalescing. New storylines will be incubating. Be alert for the oncoming delights of the unknown.

Join us in reading November’s book of the month! NOVEMBER’S THEME: BOOKS WRITTEN BY INDIGENOUS AUTHORS

D I SCUSS ION :

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CAPRICORN

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): What could you do to diminish your suffering? Your next assignment is to take two specific steps to begin that process. You’re in a phase of your astrological cycle when you’re more likely than usual to see what’s necessary to salve your wounds and fix what’s broken. Take maximum advantage of this opportunity! I proclaim this next chapter of your life to be titled “In Quest of the Maximum Cure.” Have fun with this project, dear Capricorn. Treat it as a mandate to be imaginative and explore interesting possibilities.

AQUARIUS

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “It is a fault to wish to be understood before we have made ourselves clear to ourselves,” wrote my favorite Aquarian philosopher, Simone Weil. I agree. It’s advice I regularly use myself. If you want to be seen and appreciated for who you really are, you should make it your priority to see and appreciate yourself for who you really are. The coming weeks will be a favorable time to make progress in this noble project. Start this way: Write a list of the five qualities about yourself that you love best.

PISCES

(Feb. 19-Mar. 20): Nigerian author Ben Okri, born under the sign of Pisces, praises our heroic instinct to rise above the forces of chaos. He writes, “The most authentic thing about us is our capacity to create, to overcome, to endure, to transform, to love, and to be greater than our suffering.” You’ve been doing a lot of that excellent work throughout 2021, dear Pisces. And I expect that you’ll be climaxing this chapter of your life story sometime soon. Thanks for being such a resourceful and resilient champion. You have bravely faced but also risen above the sometimes-messy challenges of plain old everyday life. You have inspired many of us to stay devoted to our heart’s desires.

HOMEWORK: Gratitude is the featured emotion. See how amazing you can make yourself feel by stretching it to its limits. Newsletter.FreeWillAstrology.com Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. INDEPENDENT.COM

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COMPUTER/TECH DECKERS OUTDOOR Corporation seeks an Enterprise Project Manager at our Goleta, CA facility to pro‑ vide hands‑on project management over key enterprise/IT projects. Req. BS+2 or no degree+5. For fur‑ ther reqs. and to apply visit: www. deckers.com/careers Ref#11939. INTERESTED CANDIDATES send resume to: 3423@google.com Attn: V. Cheng. Please reference job # below: Research Scientist (Goleta, CA) Research & develop Quantum Error Correction (QEC) schemes from concept to experiment to produc‑ tion, using domain expertise in QEC research & software engineer‑ ing to improve Google technol‑ ogy. 1615.9627 Exp Inc: C, C++ & Python; Quantum Algorithms, Complexity Theory, & Quantum Circuits; contribution to research communities & efforts; working on a multidisciplinary team for engineering quantum systems; & Quantum Error Correction. Position reports to the Google Goleta office & may allow partial telecommuting.

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to provide high quality customer service in terms of appearance, demeanor and interactions with patients and their families. This candidate will work directly with patients, members of our health‑ care team and physicians. Duties will also include data entry, sched‑ uling, providing instructions/direc‑ tions and completing necessary paperwork. Qualified candidates will have a 1 year of customer service and cleri‑ cal support experience. Preferred candidates will have medical office experience as well as knowledge of medical terminology. Benefits include medical, dental, vision, life and disability insurance, as well as 403b retirement plan. Interested candidates can apply online at https://www.sansumclinic. org/employment to position #2995.

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PROFESSIONAL

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, GOV RELATIONS

GOVERNMENTAL RELATIONS Assist with establishing and main‑ taining collegial and productive relationships with federal, state, and local officials and their staffs on behalf of the campus. Provide infor‑ mation and work with campus staff, faculty, student groups and alumni on federal and state legislative issues and UC advocacy campaigns. In collaboration with the Director, develop and implement strategies consistent with campus priorities to educate officials, staff and commu‑ nity groups about the campus and the University of California. Attend government, community, campus, and other meetings and represent

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the Director as necessary. Provide high level analytical, research and administrative support to the Director on ongoing and special governmental relations projects and initiatives. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and/or equivalent experience/training. 3‑5 years of experience working in communi‑ ty engagement; public relations; public policy or legislative agenda setting; and/or working at a fed‑ eral, state, or municipal govern‑ ment level on funding and legisla‑ tive processes OR an equivalent combination of education and/or experience. Demonstrated experi‑ ence working with local, state and federal elected officials or related policy or political considerations. Solid analytical skills and ability to develop recommendations for positions on matters facing cam‑ pus. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. Able to travel and work occasional evenings and weekends. $61,200 – $70,000/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual ori‑ entation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protect‑ ed veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/29/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb. edu Job # 26236

Collaborates in the successful devel‑ opment, planning, budgeting, and administration of Transfer Services. Evaluate programs and services to make relevant improvements in design, policies, procedures, and implementation, for current and future years. Reqs: Experience in providing in‑depth, wide‑ranging and complex academic advising and holistic services to undergraduates. Working knowledge of MS Office products and Google Connect/ Drive applications. Ability to coor‑ dinate and present educational programs and and present edu‑ cational, academic, social, cultural events/programs and workshops. Ability to work in a highly col‑ laborative manner with a diverse group and a variety of cultural backgrounds.Experience with social media management on multiple platforms, updating department website, and Emma application. Ability to work occasional evenings and weekends. Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $57,000 ‑ $63,975/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment with‑ out regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 1/3/22. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job #25905

COUNSELOR/ TRANSFER STUDENTS

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM Utilizes advanced counseling skills gained at the Master’s degree level in counseling or related fields; exhibits culturally inclusive active listening skills and provides coun‑ seling services for personal, social and academic issues, including but not limited to cultural identity, educational, relationship, family, sexuality and sexual identity issues.

FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES COORDINATOR

EDUCATION ABROAD PROGRAM Supports the management, long‑range planning, organization, coordination, oversight and/or per‑ formance of multiple operational

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WEB CONTENT MANAGER The Santa Barbara Independent has an opportunity in our Digital Department. This full-time position will publish all editorial content on independent.com as part of a team of two web content managers. Looking for motivated individuals, who have great attention to detail and are ready to collaborate. Web content managers handle all digital formats including website, newsletters, and social media. HTML/CSS knowledge a plus. Will train the right candidate. Full-time positions include health, dental, and vision insurance; Section 125 cafeteria plan; 401(k); and vacation program. This position is currently authorized to work from home, but weekly inperson meetings in Downtown Santa Barbara are required. EOE F/M/D/V. No phone calls, please.

Please send résumé along with cover letter to Patient Services Representative Sansum Clinic is the leader in healthcare in Santa Barbara, with 100 years of excellence. As one of the first points of contact for our patients you be expected

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activities and services for one or more buildings, including space planning, general maintenance, specialized facility systems and operations, call center triage and tracking of repair services, move planning and coordination, devel‑ opment of procedures, policies and communications related to infra‑ structure and safety. Assists with special projects and office manage‑ ment for achieving the objectives of the organization. In the absence of the Assistant Director, is responsible for the day‑to‑day operations of the office and supporting the needs of all units at the System‑wide office. Develops an understanding of pro‑ gram goals, functions, and process‑ es to complete ongoing tasks and projects successfully. Understands and maintains the confidentiality of protected or sensitive information. Make sure all queries are followed up in a timely manner. May develop and oversee the system for schedul‑ ing conference calls and confer‑ ence room reservations. Manages the administration of off‑site file storage. Provides back‑up front entrance coverage as needed. Assists with office safety and secu‑ rity. Serves as an active member of the Emergency Response team and is trained in first aid and CPR; serves as Injury and Illness Prevention Program committee member. Work location is the UCEAP Systemwide Office in Goleta, CA (near UCSB). Reqs: BA or AA degree in related area and/or equivalent experience/ training. Working knowledge of practices and procedures relating to facility maintenance. Written communication skills to prepare a variety of correspondence, reports, policies and procedures, and train‑ ing documents. Skills to work under pressure to successfully meet dead‑ lines, when required. Working orga‑ nizational skills to work on multiple projects with competing deadlines, to establish goals and workload

priorities with strong organization and attention to detail, and to meet project deadlines within budget and time constraints. Working knowl‑ edge of practices and procedures of safety and emergency prepared‑ ness. Notes: Satisfactory convic‑ tion history background check. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. This is an essential posi‑ tion with 100% of the work per‑ formed onsite. Requires occasional on‑call work, outside of business hours, for emergencies and/or criti‑ cal site‑related projects or issues. $24.62‑$28.73/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment with‑ out regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 12/1/21. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 26941

FRONT HOUSE PERSONNEL SUPERVISOR

CAMPUS DINING The Front House Personnel Supervisor is responsible for aid‑ ing the Personnel Manager in all aspects of hiring, training, schedul‑ ing, and supervision of all student employees. Responsible for over‑ seeing a catering program during the summer season. Reqs: Ability to work effectively in a fast paced, high volume operation with a large team of managers, full‑time and student staff. Minimum two years

of supervisory experience. Ability to work with a diverse staff. Ability to effectively and clearly com‑ municate directions to employees and customers. Excellent custom‑ er service skills. Ability to work independently and exercise initia‑ tive while also acting as a team member. Ability to communicate, analyze and troubleshoot situations as they occur. Experience with Excel and Word. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license. Satisfactory criminal history background check. $42,900‑$48,900.28/yr. Friday – Tuesday 1:30 pm – 10 pm. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified appli‑ cants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orienta‑ tion, gender identity, national ori‑ gin, disability status, protected vet‑ eran status, or any other character‑ istic protected by law. Application review begins 12/07/21, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job# 27439

LICENSED CLINICAL SOCIAL WORKER

STUDENT HEALTH Provides a full range of social work services, with emphasis on iden‑ tifying treatment resources and providing psychosocial interven‑ tions (individual, group, crisis) not offered by other campus resources, to assure that students receive opti‑ mal benefit from medical and/or psychiatric care. The primary client population to be served is stu‑ dents with significant psychosocial stress, acute and chronic mental


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High

Low

High

Low 8:25 pm 0.3

Sunrise 6:43 Sunset 4:49

High

Thu 25

4:05 am 3.4

5:23 am 3.4

12:15 pm 4.5

Fri 26

4:41 am 3.6

8:03 am 3.4

1:30 pm 4.2

9:21 pm 0.4

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5:04 am 3.9

10:02 am 3.0

2:58 pm 3.9

10:11 pm 0.5

Sun 28

5:27 am 4.3

11:12 am 2.4

4:23 pm 3.9

10:56 pm 0.6

Mon 29

5:50 am 4.8

12:03 pm 1.6

5:36 pm 3.9

11:36 pm 0.8

Tue 30

6:16 am 5.3

12:48 pm 0.7

6:42 pm 3.9

Wed 1

12:15 am 1.0

6:45 am 5.8

1:33 am -0.1

7:44 pm 3.9

Thu 2

12:53 am 1.3

7:18 am 6.3

2:18 pm -0.8

8:43 pm 3.9

3D

27

10 H

18 D source: tides.net

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STUDENT HEALTH Provides medical and administrative support to the physicians, physi‑ cian assistants, nurse practitioners, and clinical nurses. Assists with exams and procedures, taking vitals, checking in/out patients, fill‑ ing out necessary paperwork, tak‑ ing phone messages and follow‑ ing directives from the clinicians. Acts as a resource for non‑licensed staff. Utilizes nursing knowledge in these tasks as well as but not limited to providing patient educa‑ tion, administering immunizations, and functioning within the scope of practice. Reqs: Licensed by the CA State Board of Nursing. Must be CPR certified/Basic Life Support (BLS) certified or dually certified in both AHA Advanced Cardiac Life Support and AHA Pediatric Advanced Life Support at all times during employment. Must be orga‑ nized, detailed oriented, confiden‑ tial and dependable. Strong oral/

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written communication, organiza‑ tional and customer service skills. Proficient in Microsoft and Google suite. Notes: Credentials verification for clinical practitioner. Mandated reporting requirements of Child Abuse and Dependent Adult Abuse. Satisfactory criminal history back‑ ground check. To comply with Santa Barbara County Public Health Department Health Officer Order, this position must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while work‑ ing in patient care areas during the influenza season. Must be licensed by the CA State Board of Nursing. Must have current license at all times during employment. Must be CPR certified/Basic Life Support (BLS) certified or dually certified in both AHA Advanced Cardiac Life Support and AHA Pediatric Advanced Life Support at all times during employment. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disci‑ plinary action. This is an 11month position, M‑F 7:30am – 4:30pm. 4 weeks of furlough is taken during quarter beaks and summer months. May include Thurs. evenings from 10am‑7pm. $30.42‑ $37.83/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified appli‑ cants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual ori‑ entation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other char‑ acteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 21751

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illnesses and in need of short and long‑term social services, includ‑ ing long‑term counseling and case management support. Reqs: Must be currently registered as a Licensed Clinical Social Worker in the state of California. Master’s degree in Social Work. Notes: Credentials ver‑ ification for the clinical practitioner. Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. Satisfactory conviction history back‑ ground check. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. This is an 11‑month position with 4 weeks of furlough taken during quarter breaks and sum‑ mer months. Salary commensurate with experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive con‑ sideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job #25943

(CONT.)

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Across

1 Printer cartridge color 5 Sports reporter Andrews 9 Bee-related 14 Emmett Kelly persona 15 Dynamic prefix 16 “Death Be Not Proud” poet John 17 “Jane ___” 18 Greek island and titular home of the Louvre’s “Winged Victory” statue 20 Extinct beast with a trunk 22 Thurman of “The War with Grandpa” 23 Dubai’s country, briefly 24 “Who is, um, ___-Doo?” (response from Burt Reynolds, er, Turd Ferguson) 27 Petco Park player 29 Field figure 32 Leaves in the cup 33 Fourth word in the “Star Wars” opening crawl 35 “Lord of the Rings” actress Tyler 37 Sunlight unit 38 Whence aliens originate, in some sci-fi works 43 Not just mine 44 Barge puller 45 Pronoun option 46 Place to play the ponies, briefly 47 Rockefeller Center setting, for short 49 Attorney-___ 53 “Town Called Malice” band 57 Regatta requirement INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

59 “As Is” singer DiFranco 60 “The Living Daylights” star 64 It’s celebrated in May 66 4, on some old clock faces 67 Words often paired with “Come on!” 68 Pot throw-in 69 Saint ___ Bay, Jamaica 70 Braces (for) 71 Yearn for 72 Insect found in the theme entries (and the subject of a famous joke told by Norm Macdonald)

Down

1 Ruin, like a pet owner’s favorite pillow 2 His cello is nicknamed “Petunia” 3 On a gap year, maybe 4 63-Down’s brother and former bandmate 5 Class with little struggle 6 Tool for enlarging holes 7 “Garfield” waitress 8 Weight-loss app whose subscription fees got flak from the BBB in 2020 9 Committee type 10 ___-Novo (Benin’s capital) 11 Where travelers can be put up 12 Anti-apartheid org. 13 “Born,” in some notices 19 Many commercial logos (abbr.) 21 “Hasta ___” (“See you later”) 25 Necklace unit 26 Orange side dish 28 Joe Namath’s last pro team

30 Poetic lament 31 Cone producer 34 Baseball Hall-of-Famer Mel 36 Beetles, e.g. 37 Novelist ___ Easton Ellis 38 Pedal pusher 39 The “R” of “Notorious RBG” 40 Jacks ___ (video poker variety) 41 Attila, for one 42 Catherine of “Schitt’s Creek” 48 Road Runner’s foe 50 “Hispanic, ___, or Spanish origin” (U.S. census category) 51 Apply holy oil 52 Sorta alcoholic and aromatic, maybe 54 It means “struggle” in Arabic 55 Answers from a flock 56 Fez’s country (abbr.) 58 Tossed in 61 More ___ enough 62 Sharpen, as skills 63 4-Down’s brother and former bandmate 64 “Top Gun” aircraft 65 “Cheerleader” singer ©2021 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #1059

LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION:

NOVEMBER 24, 2021 THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT NOVEMBER 24, 2021

51 51


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EMPLOYMENT ous department documents, forms and other paperwork, providing information by telephone and in person, and assisting other man‑ agement staff with project related tasks. Reqs: High School Diploma or equivalent. Excellent written and oral communication skills, effective interpersonal skills and the ability to exercise indepen‑ dent judgment. Must be orga‑ nized, accurate and dependable. Demonstrated attention to detail with frequent interruptions. Must successfully complete and pass a background check before employ‑ ment and date of hire. Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. Satisfactory conviction his‑ tory background check. To comply with Santa Barbara County Public Health Department Health Officer Order, this position must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Any HIPAA or FERPA vio‑ lation is subject to disciplinary action. Salary commensurate with experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 26735

PLUMBER

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT Plumber/Sprinkler Fitter: Maintains and repairs fire sprinkler systems and fire hydrants in on‑campus and off‑campus UCSB facilities. Designs, redesigns and assembles from working drawings and blue‑ prints various systems including water, steam, sanitary and storm drains, irrigation and sprinkler sys‑ tems and compressed air lines. These installations require a thor‑ ough knowledge of all building and safety codes, the ability to work from blueprints and make working drawings, and the ability to use appropriate formulas and computations for pipe sizing and fitting related to pressure and flow; performs welding, soldering and brazing as required; installs and repairs plumbing fixtures, air compressors, pumps, steam and hot water boilers.Reqs: Must pos‑ sess the skills, knowledge and abilities essential to the success‑ ful performance of Journey Level Plumber duties as evidenced by a journeyman plumber certificate or an equivalent combination of edu‑ cation and experience. Substantial journey level experience in institu‑ tional, industrial and commercial plumbing installation and mainte‑ nance. Thorough knowledge of all building and safety codes. Ability to work from blueprints and make working drawings. Ability to use appropriate formulas and computations for pipe sizing and fitting related to pressure and flow. Excellent interpersonal and customer service skills. Preferred Qualifications: C16 license or 3 years experience installing, repair‑ ing or maintaining commercial fire sprinkler systems. Note: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $37.56/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all quali‑ fied applicants will receive consid‑ eration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender iden‑ tity, national origin, disability sta‑ tus, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 26306

52

PHONE 805-965-5205

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MARKET PLACE

(CONT.)

SR. CONTRACTS ANALYST

BUSINESS & FINANCIAL SERVICES Analyzes complex contract struc‑ tures, policies, procedures, and practices. Develops, drafts, reviews, negotiates all types of business agreements and con‑ tracts for the University. Delegated authority and autonomy to act on behalf of the Regents of the University of California in negotia‑ tions between UCSB and private/ industrial/governmental agencies and companies. Requires expert knowledge of University poli‑ cies regarding materiel and risk management, as well as Public Contract Codes, Federal procure‑ ment regulations, and the Uniform Commercial Code. Requires self‑motivation with the ability to work proactively and positively in an organization experiencing significant change while main‑ taining a high level of service. Demonstrates exceptional inter‑ personal and communication skills to provide customer service in a fast‑paced, high‑volume dynam‑ ic, and intellectually challenging work environment. Performs with prioritizing diverse projects and exceptional time management. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equiv‑ alent combination of education and experience. Significant expe‑ rience negotiating and drafting contracts. Excellent communica‑ tion, interpersonal, and analytical skills, strong organizational and training skills, and the ability to handle multiple tasks under pres‑ sure of deadlines and frequent interruptions. Must be detail‑ori‑ ented with a high degree of accuracy, and demonstrate good judgment, assertiveness balanced with diplomacy, and discretion regarding confidential matters. Excellent written skills including the ability to construct grammati‑ cally correct, concise, and accu‑ rate legal documents. Must have excellent customer service skills, ability to work in a team envi‑ ronment, and foster cooperation. Juris Doctorate degree preferred. Note: Satisfactory conviction his‑ tory background check. $86,215 ‑ $94,248/yr The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteris‑ tic protected by law. Application review date begins 12/8/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 26800

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for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sex‑ ual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/29/21. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 26880

STUDENT HEALTH PHYSICIAN

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THE MANY FACES OF BRAIN INJURY IN THE SANTA BARBARA COMMUNITY

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A Holiday Tradition

A Triple Bill featuring State Street Ballet and Santa Barbara Choral Society & orchestra Jo Anne Wasserman, Conductor Choreography by William Soleau

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Bernstein + Copland + Lauridsen

Sat l Oct 12 l 7:30 pm

NOVEMBER 24, 2021

Continue reading for details

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Saturday, March 14, 7:30 pm at The GranadaTheatre

Saturday, March 14, 7:30 pm at The GranadaTheatre

THE INDEPENDENT

On May 19th, DUCKS are coming to Santa B

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SLEEPING BEAUTY

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UCEN ADMINISTRATION Responsible for the follow‑ APARTMENTS & ing functions inSLEEPING the University BEAUTY CONDOS FOR RENT Center and other department buildings as required: Custodial $1320 1BD Corner of Hope & Care of the University Center San Remo‑N State St‑Barbara Apts Department Buildings, Following Quiet NP 687‑0610 th Anniversary Season 2019 /2020 and Enforcing Policies, Procedures 519MASTERS THE NUTCRACKER SLEEPING BEAUTY and Directions, Safety, Security, 1BD NEAR Cottage Hospital.AMERICAN State Street Ballet 25th Anniversary l a sterling year of performances & events W Alamar. Set among beautiful Customer Service, and Employee oak trees across the street from JoinReqs: us for a gala evening Development.honoring Responsible Sara Miller McCune and benefiting State Street Ballet for all aspects of custodial work Oak Park. NP. $1320. Call Cristina Sunday, September 22, 2019 at the Four Seasons Biltmore The GranadaTheatre such as cleaning floors, walls, 687‑0915 windows, furniture, restrooms, statestreetballet.com stairs, ceilings, garbage cans, entryways, and walkways; empty‑ ing garbage cans, changing lights, moving equipment, and supplies, and arranging furniture. Notes: Satisfactory criminal history back‑ ground check. Must be able to work NIGHTS and/or weekends as this position is for an evening shift position. $20.14‑$21.38/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified appli‑ cants will receive consideration

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SBCASA.ORG

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At the New Vic Fri l May 8 l 7:30 pm Sat l May 9 l 7:30 pm

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NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: LARRY J. WINTER (aka LARRY WINTER) NO: 21PR00509 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con‑ tingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of LARRY J. WINTER, (aka LARRY WINTER) A PETITION FOR PROBATE: has been filed by: CHARLIZE WINTER in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that (name): CHARLIZE WINTER be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests author‑ ity to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approv‑ al. Before taking certain very impor‑ tant actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: on 12/23/2021 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before Story the hearing. Your appearance may be in G person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE Barbara County! A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to ! e consult with an attorney knowledge‑ r e H able in California law. HundredsYOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by of orphaned and injured babiesthe court. If you are a person inter‑ e brought to Santa dlife Care Networkested in the estate, you may file with ation, and a secondthe court a Request for Special Notice at life in the wild. (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inven‑ tory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Rosaleen Wynne, Esq, 222 East Carrillo Street, Suite 207, Santa Barbara, CA 93120‑0146; (805) 966‑1204. Published Nov 11, 18, 24 2021.

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NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: ELLEN SERRA NO: 21P00524 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con‑ tingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of ELLEN SERRA A PETITION FOR PROBATE: has been filed by: KEVIN ROBERT SERRA in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that (name): KEVIN ROBERT SERRA be appointed as personal representa‑ tive to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests author‑ ity to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approv‑ al. Before taking certain very impor‑ tant actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to

the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: on 01/06/2022 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledge‑ able in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person inter‑ ested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inven‑ tory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: James F. Cote, Esq, Law Offices of James F. Cote 222 East Carrillo Street, Suite 207, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 966‑1204. Published Nov 18, 24. Dec 2 2021.

FBN ABANDONMENT STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: #1 CAR WASH, #1 GASOLINE at 1901 South Broadway Santa Maria, CA 93454; Crest Trading Company 1601 Skyway Drive 114 Bakersfield, CA 93308 The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 06/13/2017 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original file no. 2017‑0001736. The person (s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: Vickey Rockberg (same address) This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 3, 2021. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30, Published: Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SBBIKE, BICI CENTRO, SBBIKE+COAST, COAST+SBBIKE at 506 E. Haley St. Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Santa Barbara Bicycle Coalition (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Greg Janee, Secretary Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 18, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002921. Published: Nov 4, 11, 18, 24 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CHAINED SB at 1204 Diana Road Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Stefanie J. Bayles (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Stefanie Bayles Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 18, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002920. Published: Nov 4, 11, 18, 24 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: QUEEN MARY

SEAFOODS at 2405 Calle Linares Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Henry D. Hepp (same address) This business is con‑ ducted by a Individual Signed: Henry Hepp Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland,

County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2021‑0002996. Published: Nov 4, 11, 18, 24 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GILL FORD MAZDA at 440 Hitchcock Way Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Gill Motors SB,

Inc. 1100 S. Madera Ave. Madera, CA 93637 This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Gagandeep Chahal, CFO Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by

E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0003005. Published: Nov 4, 11, 18, 24 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PHILASOPHIE at 474 Cinderella Ln Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Philasophie LLC 2108 N. Street Ste N Sacremento, CA 95816 This busi‑

ness is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Melissa Mininni, Manager Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 15, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E31. FBN Number: 2021‑0002905. Published:

NOTICE OF CITY COUNCIL PUBLIC HEARING (Held Electronically and Telephonically) Tuesday December 7, 2021, at 5:30 P.M. NOTICE OF CITY COUNCIL PUBLIC HEARING AMENDMENTS TO TITLES 2, 12, AND 17 TO ESTABLISH THE HISTORIC PRESERVATION AND ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND TRIBAL CULTURAL RESOURCES ORDINANCE AND GENERAL PLAN AMENDMENT TO THE VISUAL AND HISTORIC RESOURCES ELEMENT Case Nos. 16-092-OA and 20-0004-GPA (Held Electronically and Telephonically) ATTENTION: The Virtual Meeting is held pursuant to Assembly Bill (AB) 361. The meeting will be Virtual because meeting in person would present imminent risks to the health or safety of attendees. The public may only view the meeting on Goleta Channel 19 and/or online at https://www.cityofgoleta.org/goletameetings and not in Council Chambers. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Goleta City Council will conduct a public hearing to consider adoption of Titles 2, 12, and 17 (Zoning) of the Goleta Municipal Code (GMC) Amendments (Case Nos 16-092-ORD as described below. The date, time, and location of the City Council hearing is as follows: HEARING DATE AND TIME: PLACE:

Tuesday December 7, 2021, at 5:30 P.M. Given the local, state, and national state of emergency, this meeting will be a teleconferenced meeting with detailed instructions for participation included on the posted agenda.

The City Council agenda for the public hearing will be posted on the City website (https://www.cityofgoleta.org/i-want-to/news-andupdates/government-meeting-agendas-and-videos) at least 72 hours prior to the City Council meeting. The agenda will have instructions regarding how to participate in the public hearing. PROJECT DESCRIPTION: On December 7, 2021, the Goleta City Council will review and will be asked to decide regarding the following proposed additions and amendments to Titles 2, 12, and 17 of the Goleta Municipal Code: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Chapter 2.16 to add duties, responsibilities, and member makeup of the Historic Preservation Commission Chapter 12.13 to add Section 12.13.030Q to include failure to maintain a historic resource as a nuisance. Chapter 17.33 establishing Historic Preservation regulations, process, and Historic Resources Inventory, etc. Chapter 17.43 establishing Archaeological and Tribal Cultural Resources regulations and review process, etc. Chapter 17.29 regarding Demolitions and Relocations to be reflective of the requirements of Chapter 17.33 Chapter 17.50 to update the responsibilities of the City Council, the Design Review Board, the Planning and Environmental Review Director, and to add a Historic Preservation Commission with responsibilities to the list of Review Authorities 7. Chapter 17.73 to add additional terms and definitions to conform with the above new regulations In addition, the City Council will review and act regarding the associated amendments to four Visual and Historic Resources Element policies in the Goleta General Plan/Coastal Land Use Plan (General Plan). This General Plan Amendment (GPA) is proposed in conjunction with the proposed Ordinance as described above. The policies proposed to be amended are: 1. VH 5.1 (landmark designation) 2. VH 5.2 (eligibility criteria) 3. VH 5.5 (alterations) and 4. VH 5.6 (demolitions) On June 14, 2021, the Planning Commission recommended adoption of the GPA. Further, on November 8, 2021, the Planning Commission recommended adoption of the Title 17 changes. The City Council will be the final decisionmaker for above stated amendments to Title 2, Title 12, and Title 17. PROJECT LOCATION AND DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY: The Historic Preservation and Archaeological and Tribal Cultural Resources regulations and the GPA would apply citywide, including all areas of the City within the Coastal Zone. As indicated previously, a copy of the draft provisions will be available with the City Council agenda at the web address noted above and at https://www.cityofgoleta.org/ projects-programs/historic-preservation/historic-preservation-ordinance at least 72 hours in advance of the meeting. Environmental Review: Pursuant to Public Resources Code Section 21083.3 and California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) Guidelines Section 15183, projects that are consistent with the development density of existing zoning, community plan, or General Plan policies for which an Environmental Impact Report (EIR) was certified shall be exempt from additional CEQA analysis except as may be necessary to determine whether there are project-specific significant effects that are peculiar to the project or site that would otherwise require additional CEQA review. There is no new substantial information indicating that the impacts of the project will be more severe than described in the General Plan EIR when the Visual and Historic Resources Element was adopted and there are no cumulative or off-site impacts from the proposed project that were not addressed in the General Plan EIR. As such, the Ordinance is exempt from further CEQA review. In addition, pursuant to CEQA Guidelines §15061(b)(3) and §15378(b)(5), the proposed Ordinance does not qualify as a “project” for the purposes of CEQA because the Ordinance does not result in direct or indirect physical changes in the environment. The amendments proposed do not, by themselves, have the potential to cause a significant effect on the environment. Any subsequent development project will be separately examined in accordance with CEQA. As such, the proposed Ordinance is exempt from CEQA review. PUBLIC COMMENT: All interested persons are encouraged to view the meeting and to provide written and/or oral comments. All letters/ comments should be sent to cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org. Letters must be received on or before the date of the hearing or can be submitted at the hearing prior to the conclusion of the public comment portion of the Public Hearing. IN LIGHT OF THE CITY’S NEED TO HOLD PUBLIC MEETINGS ELECTRONICALLY AND TELEPHONICALLY PURSUANT TO AB 361, written comments may be submitted as instructed above or via email to: cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org or by electronic means during the Public Hearing (date and time noted above), provided they are received prior to the conclusion of the public comment portion of the Public Hearing. Instructions on how to submit written comments during the hearing will be available on the City’s website:https://www. cityofgoleta.org/i-want-to/news-and-updates/government-meeting-agendas-and-videos FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Additional information is on file at the City Planning and Environmental Review Department, Monday, and Wednesday from 8:00am – 12:00pm at 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, CA 93117 or can be obtained by calling Current Planning Manager Lisa Prasse at (805) 961-7542 or lprasse@cityofgoleta.org. For inquiries in Spanish, please contact City staff at 805-562-5500 or espanol@cityofgoleta.org. NOTE: If you challenge the nature of the above action in court, you may be limited to only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice or in written correspondence delivered to the City on or before the date of the hearing (Government Code Section 69009[b][2]). Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need assistance to participate in this hearing, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (805) 961-7505. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the hearing will enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements. Publish: Santa Barbara Independent, November 24, 2021 INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

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IN THE SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON In re the Conduct of:) Case Nos. 21-38 & 21-59 MICAH D. FARGEY, Bar No. 096814 Respondent. PUBLISHED NOTICE TO ANSWER TO: Micah D. Fargey Last known address: 7307 SW Beveland Road, Ste. 200, Portland, OR 97223 You are hereby notified that the Oregon State Bar (Bar) has filed a BR 3.1 petition for suspension during pendency of disciplinary proceedings (BR 3.1 Petition) against you based on the allegations as set forth in the Bar’s amended formal complaint. A true copy of the BR 3.1 Petition can be obtained from the Oregon State Bar Disciplinary Board Clerk (Disciplinary Board Clerk) at 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road, Post Office Box 231935, Tigard, OR 97281-1935, United States. The Bar seeks your immediate suspension from the practice of law pending the disposition of disciplinary charges filed against you as set forth in the Bar’s amended formal complaint. You are further notified that you may file with the Disciplinary Board Clerk, with a service copy to the Bar’s Disciplinary Counsel, your verified answer within fourteen (14) days from the date of service of this notice upon you. Upon the filing of your answer with the Bar or in case of your default in so answering, the BR 3.1 Petition shall be heard, and such further proceedings as the law and the facts shall warrant. You are further notified that an attorney accused of misconduct may, in lieu of filing an answer, elect to file with the Bar’s Disciplinary Counsel, a written resignation from membership in the Bar. Such a resignation must comply with BR 9.1 and be in the form set forth in BR 13.7. You should consult an attorney of your choice for further information about resignation. The address of the Oregon State Bar is 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road, Post Office Box 231935, Tigard, OR 97281-1935, United States. EXECUTED this 5th day of November 2021. OREGON STATE BAR By: /s/ Veronica R. Rodriguez Veronica R. Rodriguez, Bar No. 181818 Assistant Disciplinary Counsel Published Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2 2021. IN THE SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON In re the Conduct of:) Case Nos. 21-38 & 21-59 MICAH D. FARGEY, Bar No. 096814 Respondent. PUBLISHED NOTICE TO ANSWER TO: Micah D. Fargey Last known address: 7307 SW Beveland Road, Ste. 200, Portland, OR 97223 You are hereby notified that the Oregon State Bar (Bar) has filed a formal complaint and an amended formal complaint against you, alleging your violations of RPC 1.3, RPC 1.15-1(a), RPC 1.15-1(c), RPC 1.15-1(d), RPC 1.16(d), RPC 8.1(a)(2), RPC 8.4(a)(2), RPC 8.4(a)(3), and RPC 8.4(a)(4) in five causes of complaint. A true copy of the formal complaint and amended formal complaint can be obtained from the Oregon State Bar Disciplinary Board Clerk (Disciplinary Board Clerk) at 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road, Post Office Box 231935, Tigard, OR 97281-1935, United States. The Bar seeks to impose formal discipline upon you for these alleged violations. You are further notified that you may file with the Disciplinary Board Clerk, with a service copy to the Bar’s Disciplinary Counsel, your verified answer within fourteen (14) days from the date of service of this notice upon you. Upon the filing of your answer with the Bar or in case of your default in so answering, the amended formal complaint shall be heard, and such further proceedings as the law and the facts shall warrant. You are further notified that an attorney accused of misconduct may, in lieu of filing an answer, elect to file with the Bar’s Disciplinary Counsel, a written resignation from membership in the Bar. Such a resignation must comply with BR 9.1 and be in the form set forth in BR 13.7. You should consult an attorney of your choice for further information about resignation. The address of the Oregon State Bar is 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road, Post Office Box 231935, Tigard, OR 97281-1935, United States. EXECUTED this 5th day of November 2021. OREGON STATE BAR By: /s/ Veronica R. Rodriguez Veronica R. Rodriguez, Bar No. 181818 Assistant Disciplinary Counsel Published Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2 2021. 54

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Nov 4, 11, 18, 24 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: MITSUYE YAMADA & MICHAEL YASUTAKE JUSTICE FUND at 522 University Rd. 5034 HSSB Santa Barbara, CA 93106; Diane Fujino 456 Cool Brook Lane Goleta, CA 93117; Matef Harmachis 456 Cool Brook Lane Goleta, CA 93117 This business is conducted by a Unincorporate Assoc. Other Than a Partnership Signed: Matef Harmachis, Treasurer Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 25, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021­0002990. Published: Nov 4, 11, 18, 24 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: THE UNCOMMON BALANCE at 2021 Chino Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Courtney R. Salviolo (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Courtney Salviolo, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021­0002998. Published: Nov 4, 11, 18, 24 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: KEG N BOTTLE MARKET #4 at 915 Embarcadero Del Mar Goleta, CA 93117; NBK, Inc. 6060 El Cajon Blvd. San Diego, CA 92115 This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Randy Konja, Vice President Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 04, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0002805. Published: Nov 4, 11, 18, 24 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: JAK PHOTOGRAPHS at 767 Cypress Walk Apt C Goleta, CA 93117;Juliana A Kunz (same address) This business is con­ ducted by a Individual Signed: Juliana A Kunz Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 21, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E20. FBN Number: 2021­0002958. Published: Nov 4, 11, 18, 24 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ICAREHEALTHCARE at 150 Via Lee Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Catherine A Callahan (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Catherine Callahan Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 02, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0003061. Published: Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GOODLAND POOL SERVICES at 770 La Roda Ave. Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Jimmy Jerry Russell (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Jimmy J Russell, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 25, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0002987. Published: Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THE POPE’S NEW at 140 Industrial Way Buellton, CA 93427; Industrial Way LLC 2060 Huntington Dr. Ste 1 San Marino, CA 91108 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Robert Tweed, Managing Member Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 04, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland,

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County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0003089. Published: Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: LOCALE GROUP, LOCALE PARTNERS, LOCALE REAL ESTATE, THINK LOCALE at 1290 Coast Village Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93108; Jonathan R Perkins 1628 La Vista Del Oceano Santa Barbara, CA 93109 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Jonathan Perkins Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 15, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E28. FBN Number: 2021­0002913. Published: Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: YWAM‑SANTA BARBARA, YOUTH WITH A MISSION‑SANTA BARBARA, YWAM SB at 4978 La Gama Way Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Interntional Reconciliation Coalition (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: David Mitchell, Treasurer Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 02, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0003056. Published: Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ORGULLO WINES, AREA 5.1 at 140 Industrial Way Buellton, CA 93427; Orgullo Wine Group, LLC 567 West Channel Islands Boulevard 238 Port Hueneme, CA 93041 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Guillermo Gomez, Member Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 05, 2021. This state­ ment expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0003094. Published: Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: KIN BAKESHOP at 199 S. Turnpike Road, Suite 103 Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Mor, Inc. 5109 San Simeon Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93111 This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: William Chen, Chief Financial Officer Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 08, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0003105. Published: Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: SAVOR MATCHA at 133 East De La Guerra, #239 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Aiko Strasser, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 08, 2021. This state­ ment expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0003116. Published: Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: LOKI VENDING at 1426 Burton Mesa Blvd. Lompoc, CA 93436; Kevin Maxwell Telfer 740 N H Street #161 Lompoc, CA 93436 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Individual Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 21, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021­0002961. Published: Nov 18, 24. Dec 2, 9 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THE POPE’S NEW at 140 Industrial Way Buellton, CA 93427; Industrial Way LLC 2060 Huntington Dr Ste 1 San Marino, CA 91108 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Robert Tweed, Managing Member

Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 04, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0003089. Published: Nov 18, 24. Dec 2, 9 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: MINDFUL EATING INSTITUTE at 610 Maple Avenue, #B Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Petra Beumer (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Petra Beumer, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 09, 2021. This state­ ment expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0003121. Published: Nov 18, 24. Dec 2, 9 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: OLIVE HOUSE INC., FEELEY WINES, LOS OLIVOS OLIVE OIL COMPANY, TWENTY MILE WINERY at 1603 Copenhagen Dr. Solvang, CA 93463; Olive House Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Jeff Feeley, President Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 03, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E17. FBN Number: 2021­0003068. Published: Nov 18, 24. Dec 2, 9 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: THE GOODLAND COALITION at 6155 Verdura Avenue Goleta, CA 93117; Robert E Wignot (same address) George A Relles 484 Valdez Avenue Goleta, CA 93117 This business is conducted by a Unincorporated Assoc. Other Than a Partnership Signed: Robert E. Wignot, Treasurer Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 08, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021­0003103. Published: Nov 18, 24. Dec 2, 9 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BEE WILD COLLECTIVE at 875 Cieneguitas Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Evan R Froewiss (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Evan Froewiss Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 11, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0003134. Published: Nov 18, 24. Dec 2, 9 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: PACIFIC CARPET CLEANING at 5142 Matorral Way, Unit B Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Jose Antonio Rodriguez (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Jose Antonio Rodriguez Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 10, 2021. This state­ ment expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E28. FBN Number: 2021­0003139. Published: Nov 24. Dec 2, 9, 16 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: GIFFIN EQUIPMENT at 285 Rutherford St. Santa Barbara, CA 93117; Mel Giffin, Inc (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Amanda Twining, President Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 16, 2021. This state­ ment expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0003179. Published: Nov 24. Dec 2, 9, 16 2021.

NAME CHANGE AMENDED IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF TYLER JOSEPH SCHMIDT TO SHOW CAUSE FOR

CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV03264 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: TYLER JOSEPH SCHMIDT TO: TYLER NORTH THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indi­ cated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person object­ ing to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec­ tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Dec 14, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four succes­ sive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Oct 15, 2021. by Thomas P. Anderle. of the Superior Court. Published. Nov 4, 11, 18, 24 2021. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF KRISTINE CASULLO TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV03385 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: KRISTINE CASULLO TO: KRISTINE CHRISTENSEN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indi­ cated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person object­ ing to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec­ tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Dec 20, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four succes­ sive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Nov 03, 2021. by Colleen K. Sterne. of the Superior Court. Published. Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2 2021. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF KIRSTEN BLICHER HINRICHS TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV03996 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: KIRSTEN BLICHER HINRICHS TO: DAY WITHERSPOON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indi­ cated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person object­ ing to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec­ tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Dec 20, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa


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Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four succes‑ sive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Nov 03, 2021. by Colleen K. Sterne. of the Superior Court. Published. Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2 2021.

PUBLIC NOTICES RFP ‑ Isla Vista Parking Study The Isla Vista Community Services District is seeking proposals for an Isla Vista Parking Study. Submittal Due Date/Time: Tuesday, November 30, 2021, at 10:00 AM (PDT) Submittal Location: Electronic submit‑ tals via email to generalmanager@islav‑ istacsd.ca.gov https://islavistacsd.ca.gov/rfp‑isla‑vis‑ ta‑parking‑study ISLA VISTA PLANNING REPORT & EDUCATIONAL WORKSHOP REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS The Isla Vista Community Services District is seeking proposals for an Isla Vista Planning Report and Educational Workshop. Requests & Clarifications Deadline: Monday, November 16, 2021, at 10:00 AM (PDT) Submittal Due Date/Time: Monday, November 30, 2021, at 10:00 AM (PDT) Submittal Location: Electronic submit‑ tals via email to generalmanager@islav‑ istacsd.ca.gov https://islavistacsd.ca.gov/isla‑vis‑ ta‑planning‑report‑educational‑work‑ shop‑request‑for‑proposals DISH WIRELESS LLC is proposing to install new wireless telecommunications antennas on an existing building rooftop located at 820 Bond Avenue, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara County, CA 93103. The new facility will consist of the collocation of antennas within stealth radome and monopole structures at 48ft 3in above ground level (measured to the top of the antennas) on the 37ft 4 in building. Any interested party wishing to sub‑ mit comments regarding the potential effects the proposed facility may have on any historic property may do so by sending such comments to: Project 6121009759 ‑ KC EBI Consulting, 6876 Susquehanna Trail South, York, PA 17403, or via telephone at (512) 663‑0478. WORKERS’ COMPENSATION APPEALS BOARD; SPECIAL NOTICE OF LAWSUIT (Pursuant to Labor Code section 3716 and Code of Civil Procedure section 412.20 and 412.30) WCAB No. ADJ9761982 To: DEFENDANT, ILLEGALLY UNINSURED EMPLOYER: APPLICANT, RAUL ADAME DEEFENDANTS, JOSHUA RICHARD BRAUN NOTICES 1) A lawsuit, the Application for Adjudication of Claim, has been filed with the Workers’ Compensation Appeals Board against you as the named defendant by the above‑named applicant (s). You may seek the advice of an attorney in any matter connected with this law‑ suit and such attorney should be consulted promptly so that your response may be filed and entered in a timely fashion. If you do not know an attorney, you may call an attorney reference service or a legal aid office. (See telephone directory.) 2) An Answer to the Application must be filed and served within six days of the service of the Application pursu‑ ant to Appeals Board rules; therefore, your written response must be filed with the Appeals Board promptly; a letter or phone call will not protect your interests. 3) You will be served with a Notice(s) of Hearing and must appear at all hearings or conferences. After such hearing, even absent your appearance, a decision may be made and an award

of compensation benefits may issue against you. The award could result in the garnishment of your wages, taking of your money or property or other relief. If the Appeals Board makes an award against you, your house or other dwell‑ ing or other property may be taken to satisfy that award in a non‑judicial state, with no exemptions from execution. A lien may also be imposed upon your property without further hearing and before the issuance of an award. 4) You must notify the Appeals Board of the proper address for the service of official notices and papers and notify the Appeals Board of any changes in that address. TAKE ACTION NOW TO PROTECT YOUR INTERESTS! Issued by: WORKERS’ COMPENSATION APPEALS BOARD Name and address of Appeals Board: WCAB 130 E. Ortega Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Name and address of Applicant’s Attorney: Ghitterman, Ghitterman & Feld, 418 E. Canon Perdido St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; FORM COMPLETED BY: Ellia Limon, Telephone No.: (805) 965‑4540. NOTICE TO THE PERSON SERVED: You are served: as an individual defen‑ dant Published: Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2, 2021. WORKERS’ COMPENSATION APPEALS BOARD; SPECIAL NOTICE OF LAWSUIT (Pursuant to Labor Code section 3716 and Code of Civil Procedure section 412.20 and 412.30) WCAB No. ADJ3476488 To: DEFENDANT, ILLEGALLY UNINSURED EMPLOYER: APPLICANT, MARIA CABELLOS DEEFENDANTS, CARRIE AGUILAR INDIVIDUAL DBA CASA BLANCA NOTICES 1) A lawsuit, the Application for Adjudication of Claim, has been filed with the Workers’ Compensation Appeals Board against you as the named defendant by the above‑named applicant (s). You may seek the advice of an attorney in any matter connected with this law‑ suit and such attorney should be consulted promptly so that your response may be filed and entered in a timely fashion. If you do not know an attorney, you may call an attorney reference service or a legal aid office. (See telephone directory.) 2) An Answer to the Application must be filed and served within six days of the service of the Application pursu‑ ant to Appeals Board rules; therefore, your written response must be filed with the Appeals Board promptly; a letter or phone call will not protect your interests. 3) You will be served with a Notice(s) of Hearing and must appear at all hearings or conferences. After such hearing, even absent your appearance, a decision may be made and an award of compensation benefits may issue against you. The award could result in the garnishment of your wages, taking of your money or property or other relief. If the Appeals Board makes an award against you, your house or other dwell‑ ing or other property may be taken to satisfy that award in a non‑judicial state, with no exemptions from execution. A lien may also be imposed upon your property without further hearing and before the issuance of an award. 4) You must notify the Appeals Board of the proper address for the service of official notices and papers and notify the Appeals Board of any changes in that address. TAKE ACTION NOW TO PROTECT YOUR INTERESTS! Issued by: WORKERS’ COMPENSATION APPEALS BOARD Name and address of Appeals Board: WCAB 130 E. Ortega Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Name and address of Applicant’s Attorney: Ghitterman, Ghitterman & Feld, 418 E. Canon Perdido St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; FORM COMPLETED BY: Ellia Limon, Telephone No.: (805) 965‑4540. NOTICE TO THE PERSON SERVED: You are served: as an individual defen‑ dant Published: Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2, 2021.

NOTIFICACIÓN DE AUDIENCIA PÚBLICA DEL CONSEJO DE LA CIUDAD (a realizarse electrónicamente y por teléfono) Martes, 7 de diciembre, 2021, a las 5:30 P.M. NOTIFICACIÓN DE AUDIENCIA PÚBLICA DEL CONSEJO DE LA CIUDAD ENMIENDAS A LOS TÍTULOS 2, 12 Y 17 PARA ESTABLECER LA ORDENANZA PARA LA PRESERVACIÓN HISTÓRICA, RECURSOS ARQUEOLÓGICOS Y TRIBALES CULTURALES Y LA ENMIENDA AL PLAN GENERAL PARA EL ELEMENTO DE RECURSOS VISUALES E HISTÓRICOS Casos No. 16-092-OA y 20-0004-GPA (a realizarse electrónicamente y por teléfono) ATENCIÓN: la reunión virtual se realiza conforme con el Proyecto de Ley (AB) 361. La reunión será virtual porque reunirse en persona presentaría riesgos inminentes para la salud y seguridad de los asistentes. El público solamente puede ver la reunión en el Canal 19 de Goleta y/o en línea en https://www.cityofgoleta.org/goletameetings y no en las Cámaras del Consejo. POR LA PRESENTE SE NOTIFICA que el Consejo de la Ciudad de Goleta realizará una audiencia pública para considerar la adopción de las Enmiendas a los Títulos 2, 12 y 17 (Zonificación) del Código Municipal de Goleta (GMC por sus siglas en inglés) (Caso Nos 16-092-ORD) como se describe a continuación. La fecha, hora y ubicación de la audiencia del Consejo de la Ciudad son las siguientes: FECHA Y HORA DE LA AUDIENCIA: martes, 7 de diciembre, 2021, a las 5:30 P.M. LUGAR:

dado el estado de emergencia local, estatal y nacional, esta reunión será una reunión de teleconferencia con instrucciones detalladas para la participación incluidas en el orden del día publicado

El orden del día para la audiencia pública del Consejo de la Ciudad se publicará en la página web de la Ciudad (https://www.cityofgoleta. org/i-want-to/news-and-updates/government-meeting-agendas-and-videos) por lo menos 72 horas antes de la reunión del Consejo de la Ciudad. El orden del día tendrá instrucciones sobre cómo participar en la audiencia pública. DESCRIPCIÓN DEL PROYECTO: el 7 de diciembre, 2021, el Consejo de la Ciudad de Goleta revisará y se le pedirá que haga una decisión sobre las siguientes adiciones y enmiendas a los Títulos 2, 12 y 17 del Código Municipal de Goleta: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Capítulo 2.16 para añadir funciones, responsabilidades y composición de los miembros de la Comisión de Preservación Histórica Capítulo 12.13 para agregar la Sección 12.13.030Q para incluir la falla de mantener un recurso histórico como una molestia. Capítulo 17.33 que establece las regulaciones y proceso de Preservación Histórica y el Inventario de Recursos Históricos, etc. Capítulo 17.43 que establece regulaciones para Recursos Arqueológicos y Tribales Culturales y el proceso de revisión, etc. Capítulo 17.29 sobre Demoliciones y Traslados para que reflejen los requisitos del Capítulo 17.33 Capítulo 17.50 para actualizar las responsabilidades del Consejo de la Ciudad, de la Junta de Revisión de Diseño, del/a Director/a de Planeamiento y Revisión Ambiental y añadir una Comisión de Preservación Histórica y sus responsabilidades a la lista de Autoridades de Revisión 7. Capítulo 17.73 para añadir términos y definiciones adicionales para ajustarse a las nuevas regulaciones mencionadas arriba. Además, el Consejo de la Ciudad revisará y actuará sobre las enmiendas asociadas con cuatro normas del Elemento de Recursos Visuales e Históricos en el Plan General de Goleta/Plan del Uso de la Tierra Costera (Plan General). Esta Enmienda al Plan General (GPA por sus siglas en inglés) se propone junto con la Ordenanza propuesta según se describe arriba. Las normas propuestas para ser enmendadas son: 1. VH 5.1 (designación como monumento histórico) 2. VH 5.2 (criterios de elegibilidad) 3. VH 5.5 (alteraciones) y 4. VH 5.6 (demoliciones) El 14 de junio, 2021, la Comisión de Planeamiento recomendó la adopción del GPA. Además, el 8 de noviembre, 2021, la Comisión de Planeamiento recomendó la adopción de los cambios al Título 17. El Consejo de la Ciudad será el responsable final de las enmiendas al Título 2, Titulo 12 y Título 17 mencionadas arriba. UBICACIÓN DEL PROYECTO Y DISPONIBILIDAD DE DOCUMENTOS: las regulaciones sobre la Preservación Histórica y los Recursos Arqueológicos y Tribales Culturales y el GPA se aplicarán en toda la ciudad, incluyendo las áreas de la Ciudad dentro de la Zona Costera. Como se indicó previamente, una copia del borrador de las provisiones estará disponible con el orden del día del Consejo de la Ciudad en la dirección de página web notada arriba y en https://www.cityofgoleta.org/projects-programs/historic-preservation/historic-preservation-ordinance por lo menos 72 horas antes de la reunión. REVISIÓN AMBIENTAL: conforme con la sección 21083.3 del Código sobre Recursos Públicos y la Sección 15183 de las Guías de la Ley de Calidad Medioambiental de California (CEQA por sus siglas en inglés), los proyectos consistentes con la densidad de desarrollo de reglamentos existentes de zonificación, el plan de la comunidad o el Plan General por los cuales un Informe del Impacto al Medio Ambiente (EIR por sus siglas en inglés) fue certificado, deben estar exentos de un análisis adicional de CEQA excepto cuando pueda ser necesario para determinar si hay efectos significativos específicos del proyecto que son peculiares al proyecto o al lugar, que de otra manera requerirían una revisión adicional de CEQA. No hay información sustancial nueva que indique que los impactos del proyecto serán más severos que lo descrito en el Plan General del EIR cuando se adoptó el Elemento de Recursos Visuales e Históricos y no hay impactos acumulativos o fuera del área del proyecto propuesto que no se abordaran en el Plan General del EIR. Por definición, la Ordenanza está exenta de una revisión adicional de CEQA. Además, conforme con las Guías §15061(b)(3) y §15378(b)(5) de CEQA, la Ordenanza propuesta no califica como un “proyecto” para los propósitos de CEQA porque la Ordenanza no resulta en cambios físicos directos o indirectos en el medio ambiente. Las enmiendas propuestas no tienen el potencial en sí mismas de causar un efecto significativo en el medio ambiente. Cualquier proyecto de desarrollo subsiguiente será examinado de forma separada según CEQA. Por definición, la Ordenanza propuesta está exenta de una revisión de CEQA. COMENTARIO PÚBLICO: se anima a todas las personas interesadas a que vean la reunión y provean comentarios escritos y/u orales. Todas las cartas/comentarios deben enviarse a cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org. Las cartas deben recibirse en o antes de la fecha de la audiencia o pueden entregarse durante la audiencia antes de la finalización de la porción del comentario del público de la Audiencia Pública. CONSIDERANDO LA NECESIDAD DE LA CIUDAD DE REALIZAR LAS REUNIONES PÚBLICAS EN INTERNET O POR TELÉFONO CONFORME CON AB 361, los comentarios escritos pueden ser presentados como se indica arriba o por correo electrónico a: cityclerkgroup@ cityofgoleta.org o por medios electrónicos durante la Audiencia Pública (fecha y hora indicados arriba) siempre y cuando se reciban antes de la finalización de la porción del comentario del público de la Audiencia Pública. Habrá instrucciones disponibles sobre cómo entregar comentarios escritos durante la audiencia en la página web de la Ciudad: https://www.cityofgoleta.org/i-want-to/news-and-updates/ government-meeting-agendas-and-videos PARA MÁS INFORMACIÓN: hay información adicional archivada en el Departamento de Planeamiento y Revisión Ambiental de la Ciudad, lunes y miércoles de 8:00am – 12:00pm en 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, CA 93117 o puede obtenerse llamando a la Gerente Actual de Planeamiento Lisa Prasse, (805) 961-7542 o por correo electrónico en lprasse@cityofgoleta.org. Para preguntas en español, por favor comuníquese con el personal de la Ciudad llamando al 805-562-5500 e escribiendo a espanol@cityofgoleta.org. Nota: si usted denuncia la naturaleza de la acción descrita arriba en los tribunales, usted podría estar limitado solamente a aquellos asuntos que usted o alguna otra persona mencionaran en la audiencia pública descrita en esta notificación o en la correspondencia escrita entregada a la Ciudad en la fecha de o con anterioridad a la audiencia pública (Sección del Código de Gobierno 69009[b][2]). Nota: conforme con la Ley de Americanos con Discapacidades, si usted necesita asistencia para participar en esta audiencia, por favor llame a la Oficina de la Secretaria Municipal al (805) 961-7505. Una notificación por lo menos 72 horas antes de la audiencia permitirá al personal de la Ciudad hacer arreglos razonables. Publicación: Santa Barbara Independent, 24 de noviembre, 2021 INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 24, 2021 THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT NOVEMBER 24, 2021

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