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Sales • Lease • Management Your Richmond Specialist www.interlinkrealty.ca email: info@interlinkrealty.ca 604.271.3888

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‘Death sentence’ denounced ed

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The family of two Rottweilers ers protest the city’s order to have ve the dogs euthanized after onee of them bit a construction worker. ,

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Richmond marks first homicide of the year

Police find seriously injured man outside home on Steveston Highway; incident not believed to be random called to the scene. IHIT has remained tight-lipped about the nature of the victim’s injuries, as well as a motive and whether or not there are suspects. “The injuries observed were consistent with the male having been the victim of a homicide,” stated an IHIT press release. IHIT spokesperson Cpl. Dominic Duchesneau said Tuesday that police don’t believe the incident was unprovoked or a random attack but noted it’s too early to confirm. “We don’t think it’s a random attack. Could it change tomorrow? Potentially,” said Duchesneau. The name of the victim has not been released and police are still trying to make a connection to the house. The incident caused the closure of Steveston Highway for most of

BY GRAEME WOOD Special to the News

Early into the new year, Richmond is facing its first homicide investigation. Police have not said it was a targeted attack, but did say they believe the incident was not unprovoked or random. Police were called to a home at 8431 Steveston Highway — between No. 3 Road and Roseland Gate — at around 4:30 p.m. on Monday where they discovered a seriously injured man on the property. Paramedics were called in and tried to revive the man to no avail, according to Richmond RCMP spokesperson Cpl. Stephanie Ashton. Immediately thereafter, the RCMP’s Integrated Homicide Investigation Team (IHIT) was

the night and westbound rush hour traffic was rerouted along Rosehill Drive. Cheryl Kuchta, who lives directly behind the home under investigation, said she didn’t see or hear anything on Monday, but the news of a suspected homicide in her neighbourhood is unsettling. “It could be a scary thing if it was a gang murder or random,” said Kuchta. On Tuesday, police kept two lanes of Steveston Highway closed as white IHIT vans parked curb side. Prior to a tent being erected on the driveway, a CTV news helicopter captured video of tarps laid out on the ground. IHIT is asking anyone with information to call the IHIT tipline at 1-877-551-4448 or, to remain anonymous, Crimestoppers at 1800-222-8477.

GRAEME WOOD/RICHMOND NEWS

Police vans are stationed in front of a home on Steveston Highway east of No. 3 road, where a man died Monday afternoon.

Python slithers its way into cellphone store Lansdowne Centre officials puzzled by reptile’s appearance around microwave oven BY PHILIP RAPHAEL

praphael@richmond-news.com

Staff found python wrapped around a microwave oven.

A cellphone store at Lansdowne Centre shut its doors a little early Monday evening as a local reptile rescue shelter member retrieved a snake from the premises. According to Jason Roberts, the mall’s general manager, the four-foot-long long, two-inch diameter critter — a young ball

python — was located and safely make its way into the shopping tucked into a box centre by itself, then taken away to a was a pet of one local reptile shelter of the adjacent around closing time. store owners that “It’s really escaped, or was weird,” Roberts said. dropped off at the “Nothing like this — Jason Roberts Wind Mobile store has ever happened as a practical joke. in the mall before.” When the News Mall staff were busy Tuesday called the store, staff declined to morning trying to figure out if comment on the matter. the snake somehow managed to There are no pet stores at the

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A2 January 15, 2014 The Richmond News

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The Richmond News January 15, 2014 A3

Owner protests ‘death sentence’ for dogs City hall gathering pleads for leniency and common sense to prevail INTERACTIVE PRINT

PHILIP RAPHAEL/ RICHMOND NEWS

BY PHILIP RAPHAEL

praphael@richmond-news.com

Prabjot Nijjer, the owner of two Rottweilers, talks to assembled media, while her pets remain in ‘custody’ at the city’s animal welfare centre.

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Job losses reflect move to digital Distribution centre closes, 183 workers laid off BY BRIAN MORTON Vancouver Sun

Save Axle and Paris from being executed. The message was plain and simple Monday morning outside Richmond City Hall as a small gathering of animal rights activists, dog owners and dog lovers protested for the repeal of an order to euthanize a pair of eight-year-old Rotweilers involved in a biting incident of a construction worker last October. While supporters held up placards saying Do Not Kill Our Pets, Rehab Works, and Save Axle and Paris, owners Prabjot and Raj Nijjer expressed their grief in the death sentence hanging over their dogs. “I am here to support my two lovely dogs,” Prabjot told a group of news media, her voice quivering. “I want them free and to come home very quickly.” Since the incident the dogs, Paris and Axle, have been in the care of the Richmond Animal Protection Society, but their owners have not been allowed to see them despite having to pay for their $25 a day care at the shelter. Last October, the pair managed to get out of the Nijjer’s yard and ended up approaching a construction worker employed at a nearby development. According to Prabjot, Axle’s encounter with the worker did not result in any

serious injury. But the city is viewing the incident differently and considers the two to be a threat to public safety, said spokesman Ted Townsend. “It’s not something we take lightly,” Townsend said. “But if we believe public safety is at risk, then this is an action (euthanasia) that is open to us. Ultimately, the judge will decide if that’s the appropriate action.” A court date has been set for April, one the Nijjer’s lawyer, Joe Peschisolido,

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Axle and Paris are waiting on a judge to decide their fate after Axle bit a member of the public.

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“I don’t believe that is fair,” Peschilsolido said, adding the Nijjer’s are understandably upset at being separated from their pets they have cared for since they were young puppies and consider them to be like their children. Ordering both dogs to be killed when only one, Axle, was directly involved in the incident is unusual, Peschisolido added. “We don’t know why they are asking to kill both dogs or any of them,” Peschisolido said. Protest organizer Carolyn Quirt said she feels the city is taking a “bullying stance” on the issue and believes the matter should be resolved before it goes to court. “It seems really unfair and I don’t like the way the city is dealing with the situation,” Quirt said, adding when she learned about the story felt outraged and thought something should be done to save the animals.

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hopes can be moved up and the city’s order to put them down overturned. In the meantime, Peschisolido, a former local politician, wants the dogs returned to their owners who have installed a sixfoot fence on their property to ensure the dogs do not escape again. They have also vowed to have them euthanized should another incident occur. Peschilsolido added the city’s current order to euthanize is unwarranted.

Nearly 200 employees at periodical and book supplier TNG’s Richmond plant, which is owned by Vancouver billionaire Jim Pattison, will lose their jobs April 1 when the facility shuts down. And new technology is being blamed for the pending closure. “It’s technology and seeing everything move to a digital venue,” said Teamsters Local 213 official Anita Dawson, the business representative and union bargaining agent with TNG. The shutdown, said Dawson, will throw 183 workers out of work in the Lower Mainland and also at a couple of small distribution centres on Vancouver Island. TNG was previously known as The News Group. TNG Canada president Peter Olson said in an email to The Vancouver Sun that the closure of the Vauxhall Place plant in north Richmond will, ultimately, result in the loss of 66 full-time and 117 part-time jobs. For more stories, go to www.vancouversun. com.

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A4 January 15, 2014 The Richmond News

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Patrick Rault, shown at the Lansdowne Canada Line station, was a beta tester of the Compass Card program and discovered some serious user problems with the new transit pass.

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Compass glitches uncovered Testing in Richmond reveals flaws that need fixing BY ELAINE O’CONNOR The Province

When Compass Card beta tester Patrick Rault was issued the new TransLink fare card last fall, he dutifully tried to use it to tap in and tap out of each bus he took. But on more than one occasion, he simply couldn’t: The driver shut off the engine before he could exit and the card readers shut down. “It has some flaws,” Rault said frankly. And, he added, card reader “reaction time is pretty slow. When you unload a full bus, it will take longer for people to unload, especially in rush hour.” Those are just two of the glitches revealed by Compass Card testing. Others include hard-to-see card reader screens, poor operation of reader sensors in low light, and fare gate beeping noises that are either too loud or too quiet. Now, the clock is ticking to eliminate flaws with — Mike just a few months to go before public adoption of the system this summer. Chief among other concerns, Rault said, was that infrequent riders without a Compass Card will have to pay cash to ride a bus (where there is no card vending), then pay again for a card at a SkyTrain station, as they can’t pass fare gates with a bus transfer. “Occasional users will pay more,” said Rault, vice-president of the transit advocacy group Transport Action B.C. “They will be charged twice; that is not really fair. That will not encourage people to take transit for spontaneous trips.” Rick Jelfs, a Vancouver bus rider and member of Transport Action B.C., pointed out that consumers will also lose discounts. FareSaver booklets will be scrapped this summer, so a one-zone trip will rise from $2.10 with a FareSaver to $2.35 with Compass Card’s “stored value” discount. “It’s kind of a de-facto fare increase,” Jelfs said. The Compass system works by debiting the maximum fare upon tap-in and crediting for the correct number of zones upon tap-out. There are concerns that riders could cheat by tapping out at one zone, then staying aboard a bus for two zones on the estimated 50 routes that cross boundaries. And if passengers forget to tap out when they get off in one zone and the route con-

tinues into a second zone, they would be charged for both zones. A fifth of the 10,000 beta testers made that error. Adequate public education is also at issue: There are concerns that the AskCompass.ca website may not reach seniors. Despite these challenges, Trans-Link is forging ahead. By the end of January, about 80,000 people - including TransLink staff, B.C. Bus Pass holders and CNIB pass holders - should be using the new cards. TransLink hopes to convert another 800,000 passengers by summer. The $194-million system is expected to capture $7 million in additional revenue by limiting fare evasion. Last November, TransLink announced the wider rollout, which was to have begun with West Coast Express riders, had been pushed back because beta testing revealed technology glitches. It was also revealed that the budget exceeded its $171-million estimate. TransLink’s Madill Mike Madill said the transit authority chose the phase-in model to “pinpoint issues and work to remedy them.” He explained in an email that TransLink would “make additional hardware and software changes to the system over the next few months, to incorporate feedback from both daily customer usage and ongoing testing.” “We’re taking the time to get the system right and we’re confident that when Compass rolls out to the majority of our customers later this year, it’s an easy transition for everyone,” said Madill, vice-president of enterprise initiatives. Madill countered earlier media reports that seniors who often prefer to use the closer front exit were being required to exit buses from the back to tap out, as a matter of policy. On the contrary, he said, all passengers can tap out or exit the bus “through the most convenient (rear or front) doors.” How the new Compass Card system will affect you: • The reloadable electronic fare cards will work on all TransLink buses, SkyTrain, SeaBus, West Coast Express, but not B.C. Transit. • Cards for seniors and children are orange, adults’ are blue. • Cardholders must make a $6 deposit for the cards. Customers can preload cards with cash to create stored value.

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The Richmond News January 15, 2014 A5

News

Blacklist reunites teen with stolen iPhone BY ALAN CAMPBELL

acampbell@richmond-news.com

Few people who have their phones stolen expect to ever see them again — especially if you’re using the iPhone 5. But that’s exactly what happened to a Richmond youth, who had his cellphone stolen during gym class late last year. And the unexpected return of his iPhone is all due to a website called the “Blacklist” and the good nature of the person who bought it from the thief on Craigslist. After buying the phone for $300 from a seller on Craigslist, the new owner — a 17-year-old Surrey university student — discovered the device wouldn’t work. He then contacted his network provider, who then informed him the iPhone was on the Canadian Wireless Telecommunications Association’s National Stolen Device Blacklist. And, after reporting it to the police, the university student voluntarily drove into Richmond and hand-delivered the phone to the school principal of the Richmond student.

FILE PHOTO

An iPhone like this one was stolen from a teenager at school. A Good Samaritan delivered the phone back to the student after realizing it was listed as stolen on a new website.

“Thanks to the conscientiousness and kindness of the Surrey university student, who has asked not to be identified, we were able to return the phone to its rightful owner,” said Const. Greg Reimer, of Richmond RCMP. “But better yet; we were also able to identify a suspect in the theft of the phone. “We are now taking steps to hold that person accountable for their

actions.” The public can blacklist their lost or stolen phones via the blacklist, which several Canadian wireless carriers have signed up with in order to render the devices inoperable. To check “It’s really a matter of out the buyer beware, when buyBlacklist ing items from strangers over the Internet,” added Reimer. “The blacklist can be a valuable tool in helping the consumer protect themselves from being victimized.” Last fall, several Canadian cellular phone providers began utilizing the blacklist. “We are extremely pleased that the stolen phone blacklist is making a difference,” said Ashlee Smith, of the Canadian Wireless Telecommunications Association. “We encourage all cell phone users to visit www.protectyourdata.ca to find out more about keeping your wireless device safe and tips for personal safety.”

Snake rescuer: Staff looked terrified Continued from page 1 Val Lofvendahl, who has run the Richmond-based Reptile Rescue, Adoption & Education Society (reptilerescuerichmond.org) for the past 11 years and was the one who retrieved the snake, figures it was dropped off at the mall. “I doubt he’d have been able to make it there by himself. The nearby residences are just too far away, and the weather is too cold. He would not have survived a long journey,” she said. When Lofvendahl arrived at the cellphone store, staff were anxiously waiting on a bench outside. “They looked terrified,” she said, adding she was told the python was in the back storage PHILIP RAPHAEL/RICHMOND NEWS room. Val Lofvendahl, who runs the “They said he was discovered Richmond-based Reptile Rescue, Adoption wrapped around the microwave, & Education Society, handles the ball probably seeking some warmth,” python she retrieved from the Wind Lofvendahl Mobile store at Lansdowne Centre on said. “When I Monday evening. got to him, he

was sitting on top of a box.” The species can grow up to about five feet long and live up to 25 years. Judging by his size it’s estimated the snake is about two years old. “He looks pretty well fed, but a bit dehydrated. He has a bit of scale rot, which means he likely wasn’t kept in an appropriate cage. But overall, he’s in pretty good shape,” she said. Lofvendahl has since named the python Wind, after the store, and will keep him at the shelter for the next month or so to ensure he is eating well and is healthy enough to be put up for adoption. “He is a really nice snake, very docile,” said Lofvendahl, estimating she performs about half a dozen snake rescues a year locally, each adding to the 50 or so reptiles she has on hand at the shelter.

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A6 January 15, 2014 The Richmond News

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The Richmond News January 15, 2014 A7

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AWARDS

City commends Lulu’s best Firehall, River Green creators grab design accolades

Join the Job Options BC Program! Job Options BC is an employment and skills training program that helps unemployed Richmond and South Delta residents gain the skills, confidence, and experience they need to find employment!

What does this program offer? •

BY GRAEME WOOD

The 2013 Richmond Lulu Awards were handed out Monday evening at Richmond City Hall as three developments took home honours for their superior urban designs within the city. In the public and institutional building category, Steveston Fire Hall, designed by Hughes Condon Marler Architects and Space2space Design Inc., took home the honours for its LEED gold standard project. Among its special features are a green roof, visual openness and a diagonal footprint to accommodate easier access for fire trucks from both sides. “It’s wonderful to be recognized for this project. The city had high expectations, so it’s very gratifying to be recognized,” said architect Darryl Condon, who noted the use of wood and floor to ceiling windows were his favourite components of the fire hall.

• • •

Special to the News

Up to 10 weeks of group and individual programming, short-term training and work experience that prepares participants for new employment Four weeks of group activities including self and vocational assessments, job search skills training, life skills training, employment counseling, basic skills upgrading, computer training, short-term certificate training, sector specific career corners and more Customized job search coaching and ongoing follow up support Direct marketing and placement assistance as needed Wage subsidy support to facilitate on-the-job training and to increase participants’ opportunities for suitable employment Up to six months of follow up support.

Who is eligible?

John Ryan (from left), vice-president of Aspac Developments Inc., Dana Westermark, president of Oris Consulting Ltd. and Darryl Condon, managing principal of Hughes Condon Marler Architects, received 2013 Lulu Awards at Richmond City Hall on Monday. Developer Oris Consulting Ltd. and architectural firms Van Der Zalm and Associates Inc. and Hearth Architectural Inc. won the award in the residential townhouse category for the Currents at London Landing development, which was lauded for its design and seamless incorporation into the neighbourhood. River Green, the glass and concrete marvel that welcomes people at the south end of the No.2 Road

Bridge, took the award in the residential and mixed-use highrise category. The multi-building complex, developed by Aspac Developments Inc., features terraced residential apartments and was praised for its public art installation and openness to the public. With its location next to the oval, overlooking the mouth of the Fraser River’s middle arm, River Green is some of Richmond’s priciest property.

Eligible participants for this program are 18+ years of age, unemployed, and are looking for work in British Columbia. In addition participants must: • Legally entitled to work in Canada • Non- EI client (not eligible for EI, have not established a regular EI claim in the last three years and have not established a maternity or parental claim in the past five years) • Living in South Delta or Richmond • Not a student; and • Not participating in another Labour Market Agreement (LMA) funded program

Next Start Dates: January 27th, 2014 How to register? • • •

All eligible applicants are required to attend an information session and undergo an intake interview in order to be considered for the training sessions. Due to the high number of applicants there may be a waitlist. To register for an upcoming information session please call 604-271-7600 ext 684 or email at joboptionsbc@rysa.bc.ca .

Working together to help keep BC strong

Funding provided through the Canada-British Columbia Labour Market Agreement

CRIME

Mounties hope sketch leads to arrest who deployed some type of pepper Richmond Mounties are hoping this spray chemical in his face before fleesketch of a break-in suspect — who pepper-sprayed the homeowner — will ing the scene. strike a chord with a member of the The suspect is described as a public. Caucasian male, five foot, six inches The incident happened last May tall, with short blonde hair. and the RCMP, having exhausted all Anyone with information can avenues of investigation, are hoping contact Richmond RCMP by email at Suspect someone recognizes the man. richmond_tips.richmond.ediv_lmd@ On the day in question, around 4 p.m., the rcmp-grc.gc.ca or if you wish to remain owner returned home at around to find the anonymous, call Crimestoppers at 1-800-222front door of his residence kicked in. 8477. He then came face to face with a suspect, — Alan Campbell/Richmond News

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A8 January 15, 2014 The Richmond News

Opinion T H E

Published every Wednesday & Friday by the Richmond News, a member of the Glacier Media Group. 5731 No. 3 Road, Richmond, B.C. V6X 2C9 Phone: 604-270-8031 Fax: 604-270-2248 www.richmond-news.com

EDITORIAL OPINION

Publisher: Tom Siba tsiba@ richmond-news.com

Editor: Eve Edmonds editor@richmond-news.com Sports: Mark Booth mbooth@ richmond-news.com Reporters: Alan Campbell acampbell@ richmond-news.com Philip Raphael praphael@ richmond-news.com

Director of Advertising: Rob Akimow rakimow@ richmond-news.com Sales Representatives: Angela Nottingham anottingham@ richmond-news.com Lori Kininmont lkininmont@ richmond-news.com Lee Fruhstorfer lfruhstorfer@ richmond-news.com Danny Cheng dcheng@ richmond-news.com Austin Nguyen anguyen@ richmmond-news.com

Digital Sales: Olivia Hui ohui@ glaciermedia.ca Sales Support:

Joyce Ang jang@richmond-news.com

Delivery: 604-942-3081 distribution@richmond-news. com Classified: 604-630-3300 Fax: 604-630-4500 classified@van.net The Richmond News is a member of the Glacier Media Group. The News respects your privacy. We collect, use and disclose your personal information in accordance with our Privacy Statement which is available at www.richmond-news.com. The Richmond News is also a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulartory body. The council considers complaints from the public about conduct of member newspapers. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint, contact the council. Your written concern with documentation should be sent to 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. www.bcpresscouncil.org.

R I C H M O N D

N E W S

Risky business Bad credit? No credit? No problem! At least, no problem for Toronto Dominion and other major banks which have recently been driving full speed into the dubious practice of high-interest subprime car loans. According to recent reports, the practice targets people who often can’t get regular credit yet still need a car to get around. The marks blunder in to car dealerships and — lacking alternatives — agree to car financing provided by the banks at interest rates that would make a loanshark blush. Victims are promised they can renegotiate the loan in a year. Only many people have found out they can’t. People who bought cars through the subprime schemes have been left with sky high interest rates. When a CBC story garnered national attention, the reaction was instructive. Many blasted the borrowers, noting the idiocy that eroded their credit was also evident in the decisions to sign those deals. Others rightly attacked the banks for exploiting the most financially vulnerable in such a predatory manner. Both sides have a point. But if the buyers were stupid, they were stupid to trust a bank, whose practices are regulated by Ottawa. The VSA is currently investigating complaints. We hope their review is thorough. In the meantime, car buyers without much to spend would be well advised to do their homework before signing on the dotted line.

CHOICE WORDS

We’re being taxed out of town The Editor, Re: “Toll every bridge, tunnel,” Letters, Jan. 10. It appears that this person is out of touch with the regular working folks. I cannot afford to live in Richmond, so I commute into work. With the high cost of living and housing, tolling already struggling families is, to say the least, short sighted. We pay high income taxes, and a fair amount on property taxes. The whole idea of taxes originally was to pay for things like bridges and roads. So I ask you, where is this money? The government (no matter who is in charge) should have accountability for where tax money ends up. That is not the case now. So I say “HELL NO” to any toll. A restructuring of tax dollars should go back to the original plan for paying for roads, transportation and the common good in general. It is a true disgrace to the government to have its citizens pay such high tolls to use a bridge that our tax dollars should have taken care of. Mary Hayfield Surrey

Letters policy The editor reserves the right to edit letters for brevity, clarity, legality and good taste. Letters must include the author’s telephone number for verification. We do not publish anonymous letters.

Send letters to The Editor, Richmond News, 5731 No. 3 Road Richmond, B.C. V6X 2C9 Fax: 604-270-2248 or e-mail: editor@richmond-news.com

Is it a bird? A plane? No, it’s the PM

Prime Minister Stephen Harper was in Langley last week, being his usual communicative self. We got the call a few hours before his 4 p.m. appearance that we would be allowed to send a photographer — no reporters allowed — to capture images of the great man. No questions to be asked, at all. No communication with the PM. At the appointed time, I dutifully went down with my photographer hat on and was pointed to a railing, behind which I could stand and photograph the PM from the safe distance of about 20 feet. Apparently this is close enough to bask in the presence of the PM, but not so close that he actually has to acknowledge your existence. Harper’s attempts to manage his public image have become farcical over the last few years. It’s not that we begrudge him his lack of charisma — far from it! Please, let us have more boring leaders, as it forces us to think about their policies, rather than their hairstyles and broad white grins. Let’s have Justin Trudeau wear only dull, rumpled grey suits and a bag on his head from now on. The NDP’s Thomas Mulcair is only marginally more approachable than Harper, and often seems as prickly as a hedgehog. The problem with Harper isn’t that he’s boring, it’s that he thinks we’re all boring. Too boring to speak to, at any rate.

Matthew Claxton PAINFUL TRUTH

Ever since he was first elected, Harper has steadily reduced his exposure to anyone who might want to ask him a question, in public, in front of a hot mic. Instead, we get heavily stage-managed events like this one. The theme is Canada’s upcoming 150th birthday (just three years away!) so let’s have him in Fort Langley, with some HBC trade goods and blankets in the background. When he does answer questions, they’re often softball queries tossed by reliable allies. It was at an event like that in Vancouver that a couple of protestors managed to get close to Harper. Of course, in the grand Canadian tradition, all they did was hold up signs to bring attention to global warming. They didn’t even try to pie him. Most of these appearances could be simulated from Ottawa with a greenscreen and a copy of Photoshop. This would also save on the travel costs for the federal government, and who would mind that? Harper can expect a lot more attempts to disrupt his schedule if he maintains his present course. There’s simply no better way to get some attention

for your cause than by getting it in front of the PM. And if the PM won’t talk or engage with Canadians outside of scripted and controlled moments, you disrupt the script, you make the moment a little less controlled. I know there are a lot of areas where I don’t agree with Harper, but I’d respect him more if he’d explain himself honestly and take tough questions now and again. Heck, “I don’t know” and “That’s a tough one” are legitimate answers, and ones we should hear more often from our politicians (of all parties) rather than pat answers that dodge the questions. There are reasons for Harper to change his ways of dealing with the press and public beyond the fact that it’s the right thing to do. He’s on the campaign trail for 2015 in a low-key way already. He’ll be trying to either defend his first majority government, or shore it up for his successor. And he’ll be trying to do that under the looming shadow of the Senate expenses scandal. What he needs right now is practise at talking to actual Canadians, and debating people who hold different values and ideas. Because come the real campaign, he’s going to have to do a bit of that. And if he’s rusty, things won’t go well for him. Matthew Claxton is a reporter at the Langley Advance.


The Richmond News January 15, 2014 A9

Letters

Great smiles that last a lifetime

STATISTICS

Our city is one big contradiction The Editor, Re: Most Richmondites work in home city,” Letters, Jan. 10. Here we receive yet another National Household Survey that gives us more conflicting statistical information, this time about the commuting habits of Richmondites. The National Household Survey states that 55 per cent of Richmond residents do not leave the city boundaries to go to work and yet on another survey, Richmond has the highest

rate of office vacancy in the Lower Mainland. The same survey group claimed Richmond is the poorest city in the Lower Mainland, based on household income levels, with a few areas of town being comparable to the Downtown Eastside. Oddly enough, the city has some of the most expensive real estate in the country and leads North America in having the most luxury car sales per capita.

Richmond is also known for leading the country with high rates of child poverty, and yet our students are often ranked among the best and brightest in the province. Perhaps we should just concede that statistical information is completely irrelevant when it comes to Richmond because there is too much missing data to take any tangible information from. Ken Moffatt Richmond.

Dog owners think they’re above the law

Letters policy The editor reserves the right to edit letters for brevity, clarity, legality and good taste. Letters must include the author’s telephone number for verification. We do not publish anonymous letters.

However, in the last few months, it seems many dog owners are treating the park as an off leash area. Many of the animals are well behaved and there are many more that are totally out of control. Send letters to The Editor, Richmond News, 5731 No. 3 Road Richmond, B.C. V6X 2C9 Fax: 604-270-2248 or e-mail: editor@richmond-news.com

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Got some news to share or an event you’d like us to cover?

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A10 January 15, 2014 The Richmond News

FOOD AND WINE

Community

B.C. wine has bright future T

he very first Europeans to plant grapes for the purpose of making wine in British Columbia were missionaries who settled in the Kelowna area around 1860, but really, not much happened until after the First World War. By 1930, there were a few areas around B.C. producing wines from both grapes and fruit. The Okanagan region was in its infancy and fruit wine production had begun on the Saanich Peninsula on Vancouver Island. From there, the industry continued to grow quite slowly and, frankly, had a pretty poor track record from a perspective of quality and consistency. In fact, until 1988 when the B.C. government started paying growers to replant vineyards with the international grape varieties like the Chardonnay, Riesling, Merlot and the Cabernets we see today, nothing of the current thriving industry really even existed. Today, there are 254 wineries in five major wine producing regions with dozens of emerging subregions. The Okanagan has long been the darling of the industry and produces 90 per cent percent of B.C. wine. But in the last decade, the Similkameen Valley, Fraser Valley, Gulf Islands and Vancouver Island have all displayed their potential, producing wines of high quality with distinct regional identities. As consistency and quality continues to improve in

Ryan Lewis RAISE A GLASS

these regions increases, I see a bright future, as there are now dynamic young producers who are eager to share their wares setting up shop all over southern B.C. I spoke with Patrick Murphy, proprietor and winemaker at Vista D’oro in Langely, about the emergence of what he and some of the other industry leaders here in southwest B.C. are calling “Coastal Wine.” For the pioneers in any new wine region, there is always going to be a period of trial, and possibly error as winemakers unearth the potential of both their individual vineyard sites and the surrounding region. Understanding what grows best in their vineyards and why, will, in turn, help to determine what wines will be of the highest quality. Some grapes like Foch for example, that proved to be disappointing in the Okanagan are performing well down here on the coast and islands. Those, along with some of the more familiar grapes like Pinot Noir, Riesling, Pinot Gris have begun to make a name for themselves. Most of us have had the opportunity to sample the terrific wines coming out of the Okanagan Valley, which

is definitely the heart of B.C.’s wine production. But what about some of those aforementioned up and coming areas, what’s happening there? For this edition I have sourced wines from some of those other regions and provided some recommendations as well. The majority of the wines were sourced from the VQA store, Sip Wines at Ironwood Plaza. For those of you who might be unfamiliar with the VQA store model, it is a special retail licence for the sale of B.C. wines. And because they specialize in our local wines they can often provide expert advice! So the next time you head out to the Fraser Valley or take holiday on Vancouver or the Gulf Islands, stop in and see what’s happening in coastal vineyards. And for further reading, try John Schreiner’s BC Coastal Wine Tour Guide. Vancouver Island: Averill Creek Vineyards (Duncan) — Pinot Noir 2009, $26 Cellar Door at Sutton Place Wine Merchants or Edible Canada Restaurant. Gulf Islands: Saturna Island Family Estate Winery (Saturna Island) — Riesling Wild Ferment 2009, $18 at Sip Wines. Fraser Valley: Vista D’ Oro Farms & Winery (Langley) — Douro 2007, port style wine, $36 at Sip Wines. Similkameen Valley: Orofino (Cawston) — Red Bridge Merlot 2011, $24 at Sip Wines.

AROUND TOWN

Monday

Are you gay, bisexual, or just not sure? Need a safe place to talk? HOMINUM is an informal discussion and support group to help gay, bisexual and questioning men with the challenges of being married, separated or single. We meet every Monday evening in locations around the Metro Vancouver area. For more information and meeting location, call Don at 604-329-9760 or Art at 604-462-9813.

Tuesday

Richmond Hospice Association Library is open Tuesdays from 2 to 5 p.m. at The Caring Place, Suite 310, 7000 Minoru Blvd. Come and meet the librarian and see the resources for bereavement support. Call Janice at 604279-7140.

Wednesday

A support group for the visually impaired meets on the second Wednesday of every month at the Japanese Cultural Centre from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. The group meets with others who have similar sight problems — it could include those who have overcome and are able to give some simple assistance. Periodically,

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ABSOLUTE FINAL Deadline midnight Jan. 15

The enRICHed Speakers Toastmaster’s Club meets on Wednesdays from 1 to 2 p.m. in Meeting Room M.1.003 at City Hall. This year the club is celebrating its 20th anniversary. Guests are welcome to attend. The Richmond Garden Club meets on the fourth Wednesday of the month at 7:30 p.m. at the Minoru Sports Pavilion, 7191 Granville Ave. All novice and experienced gardeners are welcome as our guests. For more information, call Gary at 604-278-8159.

Upcoming

Richmond Public Library is offering a free and unique family literacy program called Learning Together. The program will take place at the Brighouse (Main) Branch, 7700 Minoru Gate on Wednesday mornings starting Jan. 15, and at Cambie Branch, Cambie Shopping Plaza at No. 5 and Cambie roads on Fridays starting Jan. 17. To register, visit any branch of Richmond Public Library or call 604-231-6412. $

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The Richmond News January 15, 2014 A11

COMMUNITY MATTERS

For the good of our community

Community is families and “Family is the first community we belong to.” - Michael McCoy Executive Director

F

amily is first and foremost an experience in human relations that teaches all of its members how to be at home and at home in the world at large. It is an experience and environment created around daily rituals, significant life events, and life spent together. Every family experiences joy and faces challenges, some easily overcome, and some that require support and guidance. We strongly believe that every family should have access to that support and guidance at times and that they are provided in the areas of education and health.

Pancake Breakfast FREE PANCAKE BREAKFAST COOKED BY RICHMOND FIREFIGHTERS SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16TH 2014 DEBECK ELEMENTARY: 8600 Ash street, Richmond, 10 am – 11:30 am Fire trucks and firefighters will be on hand to show kids the trucks and arts and crafts, face painting, story time are just a few of the activities happening next door at Richmond Family Place.

For more information please contact:

Touchstone Family Association is a non-profit society, providing services to children and their families in Richmond since 1983 and continues to try and meet the needs of families here in Richmond. Our primary focus is on preserving and enhancing family relationships. Over 400 children and their families benefit from our services on an annual basis. Our intent is to offer innovative ways to

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Please come out and join us for this fun filled morning full of good food and fun for the whole family.

Janice Kostiuk at 604 279 5599

Our goal is to enrich and support family life, encourage healthy neighbourhoods and, that, in turn will create stronger, caring and responsive communities.

bring neighbours and community together by providing accessible services, counsel and information to families, youth and children. If you would be interested in helping us to support a family we would be delighted to hear from you. Information is available on our website www.touchfam.ca or call 604-279-5599.

What can you do to promote your healthy family?

One of the most important things, which has also been clinically proven to be a major contributor in achieving a positive family environment, is for families to commit to Eating Together. We celebrate Family Day in February so we suggest that you encourage your family to eat together during the month of February and at least once a week throughout the whole year !!!!! BROUGHT TO YOU BY:


A12 January 15, 2014 The Richmond News

Arts&Culture ART

Overcoming obstacles; one fairy tale at a time Teenage girls’ insecurities leads to artist’s series of fantasy illustrations

BY Y VONNE ROBERTSON Special to the News

I

t started with the idea of positive reinforcement. As a counsellor and mother of two daughters, Gabrielle Lightfoot listened to stories of teenage insecurities and struggles from the young girls who visited her. “I found it was always girls who said they can’t do something,” she said. “I’ve worked with a diversity of cultures and it’s the same across the board. It’s hard to hear their stories sometimes.” It sparked a creative fuse that led Lightfoot to do a series of illustrations about female empowerment called Fantasy Fairy Tales. Always drawn to the visual arts, Lightfoot used her counselling experience in her artistic practice. Her small and simple drawings use colour and movement to depict optimism as the series follows fantastical fairy adventures. Character expression also plays an important role in conveying the mood of the piece. “The figures always look positive and content, as if they’ve overcome something,” said the Richmond resident. “Oftentimes, there’s movement depicted in the imagery to show that the fairy is going forward in life. They tell the story about how people move forward from their past story.” Lightfoot’s love of fairy tales began as a young child. She would eagerly devour any story from the Brothers Grimm to

GRAEME WOOD/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS

Gabrielle Lightfoot’s small and simple drawings use colour and movement to depict optimism as the series follows fantastical fairy adventures. Cinderella or Sleeping Beauty. But within the fantasy, reality intertwines. Not only are some of the landscapes derived from real experiences, such as a swamp she visited during a trip

to Oregon, so are some of the emotional challenges faced by the characters. Lightfoot was born with a hip dislocation that caused her to be in and out of hospitals since the age of one and a half.

“I remember being pulled out of school a lot and feeling singled out,” she said. “My health has caused a lot of setbacks. But we all have issues, so my work is about overcoming obstacles, no matter what they are. I used my own experience as a vehicle to look at how we overcome these issues.” Lightfoot has spoken at local schools in the past and now wants to revisit them with her new series. “I can draw and I can talk, so I thought, how can I encourage a positive attitude?” she said. “I don’t want to be preachy. I want to use the illustrations as a jumping off point.” In the meantime, she’s been visiting Seafair Montessori Rainbow House with a similar series about empowerment for pre-school aged children. Rather than drawings, she hand-makes soft dolls and uses them to tell stories to the classes. In one story, her main character, Junior, has a physical disability, but doesn’t realize it. “The characters are very funny and also challenged in different ways, but they have a fantastic attitude,” she said. “Kids love the stories and love hugging the dolls afterwards. It provides an emotional connection for them.”

CALENDAR South/West corner of No.1 Road and Moncton Street. Featuring contemporary paintings, by artists Therese Lydia Joseph and Marilynn Tebbit.

January 19

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Throwbacks to the days of the railroad in Steveston are all part of the transportation exhibition at Richmond Museum. January 2014 Arts Events Prepared by the Richmond Arts Coalition

On now until January 26

On the Move: Richmond’s Transportation Legacy At the Richmond Museum 7700 Minoru Gate, Richmond This exhibit explores, through photographs and artefacts from the museum’s collection and on loan from the community, how changing modes

of transportation have shaped this city. Themes include transportation related to sea, land and air, and contemporary issues such as city planning. For more information call 604.247.8300 or visit www.richmond.ca/museum

January 1 to February 24

Dancing in the New Year: Art Show Location: Rocanini Coffee, Roasters Steveston Cafe’, open daily 8 a.m. - 6 p.m., 115-3900 Moncton Street,

FIRST-CLASS HONOURS RECITAL WITH MEDAL PRESENTATION Place: St. Alban’s Anglican Church, 7260 St. Albans Road, Richmond. Tickets are $2/person or $5/family at the door. The Richmond branch of the BC Registered Music Teachers Association will hold a special recital on Sunday Jan. 19, 2014 at 1:30 pm at St. Alban’s Anglican Church. Students achieving high marks in the Aug. 2013 RCM exams will perform and medals will be presented. For more information please call 604.268.9559, visit www.bcrmta.com or email info@bcrmta.com.

What’s on at the Gateway Theatre:

Ongoing: Gateway Academy for the Performing Arts Drama, voice and musical theatre Programs taught by Theatre Professionals. Call 604.247.4975 for inquiries about

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Uniforms from days gone by are on display in the transportation exhibition at the Richmond Museum. on–going enrolment. Gateway Theatre, 6500 Gilbert Road. Box office, phone 604-270-1812 for tickets and information. Box office hours Monday to Friday, noon to 6 p.m., Saturday 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. www. gatewaytheatre.com

January 26

Family Sunday Richmond Art Gallery 7700 Minoru Gate. Family Sunday is a free drop-in art program that offers families the occasion to explore the

gallery exhibitions together through various art activities. Family Sunday is on the fourth Sunday of every month from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, phone 604-247-8313 or email gallery@richmond.ca. Presented with support of

More at richmond.ca/events. To register for arts programs for all ages, visit richmond.ca/guide.


The Richmond News January 15, 2014 A13

Community

Are you ready to achieve your goals in 2014? A Danielle Aldcorn

hectic schedule to do all the things that you have established as important? If you were taught that busy is the opposite of lazy and having a lot to do is a sign of success, can you shift your values so that being busy watching a butterfly land on a blade of grass, listening to your child tell a story, or doing nothing other than listening to your inner voice is as important as signing 20 contracts at work? Whether you like to make resolutions as a way to light a fire under the seat of your pants or you think resolutions are empty promises that lead to ultimate failure and self loathing, the bottom line is that we could all stand to grow and improve over the upcoming year. The key is to know exactly what we want to change, what we need in order to make that change, and to give ourselves the time and

space necessary to do it. We will all have different goals and different things will motivate us to work toward those goals. Are you ready and prepared to take action?

Happy New Year. Danielle Aldcorn BSW, MA is a registered clinical counsellor at the Satori Integrative Health Centre.

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ones. Do you relationship? know what Do you know they need and how hard you want, or do have to work? you assume Are you it’s the same prepared to as what you learn how FAMILY FUNCTION need and to become a want? better comDid anybody resolve to municator? Can you shift be a better parent? Being away from competitiveness a parent is a very difficult with your spouse into cooperation? How willing are you career and the job description is constantly changing. to become less selfish? Are you willing to give How about resolutions yourself a break since the to spend more quality time hours are grueling, it’s with your friends and fammessy, there is no compenily? Sweet, but intending to sation other than a job well spend more time with them done, you can’t quit, there doesn’t do any good if you are no promotions, and all never get around to it. of the training is on the job Are you ready to listen more, care more, give uncon- without a supervisor? Can you accept that you ditionally more, compliment genuinely more, and criticize are human and sometimes you can’t do it perfectly and less? Hosting more dinners and that’s okay? Let’s say you are ready attending more parties is not for the resolutions you made, all there is to spending more do you have time in your quality time with your loved

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N A I L C A R E • W A X I N G • FA C I A L S • N A I L C A R E • W A X I N G

We say stinking rich (or filthy rich), meaning extremely rich – the German expression is “stinkreich.” In German-speaking countries, the luck-bringing pig (“Glücksschwein”) is a star performer around New Year’s Eve. It’s especially popular on greeting cards and as confectionery. When I was a child, I’d see the old year out in the company of a pink marzipan pig. A version of the “Glücksschwein” made it to America — the famous pink peppermint pig, born in Saratoga Springs, N.Y., in the 1880s and still going strong. Winston Churchill, who loved animals, once said, “I like pigs. Dogs look up to us. Cats look down on us. Pigs treat us as equals.” Now ask yourself, why would that be? Something to muse over as the new year begins. Sabine Eiche is a writer and art historian (http:// members.shaw.ca/seiche/)

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N A I L C A R E • W A X I N G • FA C I A L S • N A I L C A R E • W A X I N G

I

male, sow the Calpurnius female. Piso. The word At some hog (perhaps point, the of Celtic oriGerman gin) signifies “Schwein” a castrated acquired a figIN OTHER WORDS male swine. urative meanPork, the term ing that is at we generally use for the the other end of the spectrum meat, comes from the Latin from gluttony and filth. “porcus,” swine. By the 17th It meant, and still means, century, porker was the word luck, as in the phrase for a pig raised for food. “Schwein haben” – to be In various languages, pig, lucky. swine, sow and hog can also The proper German be employed figuratively to word for luck is “Glück” refer to people in a deroga(the English and German tory sense, alluding to their both derive from the Middle gluttony, greed, coarseness or High German “gelücke”). dirtiness. Sometimes “Schwein” is As a matter of fact, such used in German as an intenan application of the words sifier. “Schweineglück,” for was known already to the instance, means great luck. ancient Romans. For the poet Likewise, the word Horace, “porcus” became a “Schweinegeld” (“Geld” is term of reproach against a money in German) means glutton. “Majalis,” castrated a lot of money. When boar in Latin (and root of the you say something costs Italian “maiale,” the word “Schweinegeld,” you’re sayfor pork meat), was used in a ing it’s very expensive. Stink disparaging sense by Cicero plays a similar figurative role in his oration against Lucius in both German and English.

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n times of yore, when people told stories, they often gave the leading roles to animals, transforming them into the embodiment of certain human traits – the bee is busy, the fox cunning, the hare fast, the tortoise slow, and so on. The pig is one of the few animals associated with qualities ranging from the worst to the best. Right now, around New Year’s, some countries hail the pig as a celebrity, considering it a bringer of luck (more on that below). Look in a thesaurus under pig and you will find a series of words, each of which has a specific meaning. Pig (from the Middle English “pigge”) refers, strictly speaking, to the young animal. The name for the adult animal is swine, deriving from the Old English “swin.” It’s close to the German “Schwein” and also related to the Latin adjective “suinus.” Boar is the adult

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• N A I L C A R E • WA X I N G • FA C I A L S •


A14 January 15, 2014 The Richmond News T H E

R I C H M O N D

N E W S

Sports

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Fabulous freshman class lead soaring Sockeyes With four rookies among their top six scorers, defending PIJHL champions have reeled off 13 straight wins BY MARK BOOTH

mbooth@richmond-news.com

What the Richmond Sockeyes are accomplishing this season has to be of great concern to every team in the Pacific International Junior Hockey League. After a dream 2012-13 campaign that culminated with the junior “B” hockey trifecta — league, provincial and Western Canadian championships — the Sockeyes seemed destined to take a step back. Their roster was decimated by players graduating or moving onto the next level. Head coach Judd Lambert, who was returning behind the bench after a one year hiatus, had little to work with. At least so it seemed. Instead, the team has reloaded with one of the best crop of firstyear players to come along in recent memory and is poised to take another deep playoff run, starting next month. The Sockeyes will be riding a 13-game win streak into tomorrow night’s 7 p.m. home tilt against the Delta Ice Hawks and have a league best 24-2-3 record. Four of their top six scorers are rookies, including 16-year-old John Wesley leading the way with 41 points in 33 games. What’s even more impressive is nobody in the freshman class

was actually recruited by the club. Instead, it’s the result of standout graduating minor hockey players wanted to be part of a winning franchise. “We just picked these guys right out of training camp (in August),” said Lambert. “(General manager) Richard (Petrowsky) did a really good job of collecting names for the camp but no one was signed before it. The last time I coached, virtually half our rookies were signed in May.” Besides Wesley, scouts have taken notice of 17-year-old Ayden McDonald. The 6-foot-4, 195pound winger has gone from a long shot just to make the team to scoring 20 goals, the best among all rookies in the league. Ontario native Mac Colasimone, who arrived on the Sockeyes doorstep, through the advice of a parent from last year’s team, is also a major contributor with 31 points. Homegrown product Jacob Wozney is enjoying a productive campaign, while Cole Plotnikoff, the club’s other 16-year-old, is among a whopping 11 players with 17 points or more. “They are going to be one and done players,” continued Lambert. “I think kids want to play junior and they love to have the opportunity to play. We were fortunate

MARK BOOTH/RICHMOND NEWS

Richmond Sockeyes Ayden McDonald is among an impressive group of rookies with the club. enough to get some pretty good players at our camp who have turned out to be effective players in the league too. It’s encouraging to see so many of young guys up there (in league scoring).” The Sockeyes are getting exceptional goaltending from veteran goaltender Kootenay Alder who was at his best in a recent showdown with the Aldergrove

Kodiaks that resulted in a 2-1 win. Other returnees such as captain Adam Nishi, fellow blueliner Dominic Centis and forward Liam Lawson are not only key contributors but also remind the youngsters what this franchise is all about. “We expect to win games regardless of who is in the lineup,” added Lambert. “That’s the

attitude we have and that’s the way it has always been. “I hate the phrase winning culture but that’s our attitude. We are here to be the best. If you don’t have that goal then there’s no point in coaching, no point in playing or having a franchise. I think you can do both. You can develop players and win hockey games.”

Atom A2 Islanders overcome slow start to win Hollyburn tourney

Seafair Atom A2 Islanders

Seafair Atom A2 Islanders hockey team captured its second tournament of the season, this time taking the Hollyburn New Year’s Classic. The Merv Taylor coached squad got off to a tough start but got stronger with every game en route to the title. After opening round-robin play with a loss and a tie, Seafair was in a must-win situation against Vancouver Minor A1 just to be part of the playoff equation. The team came through with a 5-1 win then received help from North Vancouver A2 to advance to the

playoff round based on a better goals against average. In the semi-finals, the Islanders defeated division rival Hollyburn A1 5-2 which then setup a rematch with Vancouver Minor A1 for the championship. The final game was tense and Vancouver had Seafair on its heels in the earlier going and managed to open the scoring. It didn’t take long for the coaches to regroup the team, settle down the nerves, and the Islanders to find their skating legs. The comeback was on and then some

HOCKEY NIGHT IN RICHMOND! MISSION ICEICEBREAKERS HAWKS SOCKEYES VS DELTA Richmond's Premier Sports Team Since 1972

as the locals rolled off five unanswered goals to win in convincing fashion. The team includes: Garret McLeod, Dylan Tsang, Ethan Riesterer, Travis Lin, Henry Smith, Grace Wallace, Tate Taylor, Josh Hikida, Thomas Tien, Kage Palla, Kyle Hepburn, Dominic PassalacquaMain, Tova Henderson, Eithan Grishin, Davis Sato, Cailey Wong and Jacob Rausch. Rounding out the coaching staff are Dan Wallace and Dennis Sato. The team manager is Ed Tien.

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The Richmond News January 15, 2014 A15

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A20 January 15, 2014 The Richmond News

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Richmond News January 15 2014  

Richmond News January 15 2014