{' '} {' '}
Limited time offer
SAVE % on your upgrade.

Page 1

Stoughton

Thursday, January 23, 2020 • Vol. 138, No. 27 • Stoughton, WI • ConnectStoughton.com • $1.25

REGISTRATION NOW OPEN

Registration is open for the 2020 Stoughton Youth Lacrosse season! We are currently accepting players for the following age groups: U10, U12 and U14

LASCROSSE

WANT TO LEARN MORE? OPEN HOUSE When: Monday, February 17th Time: 6:30 p.m. Where: Fox Prairie Gym

Rental Gear Available Register at www.stoughtonlacrosse.com

Budget deficits loom for SASD

Stoughton Area School District

Financial forecast predicts mounting expenses and less revenue coming in SCOTT DE LARUELLE Unified Newspaper Group

Photo by Mackenzie Krumme

Students record the weekly Bluegill News podcast to emphasize students voice and give parents an extra layer of communication. From left to right the podcasters are Norah Kluck, Maddie Oftsie, Rhianna Starr, Kristin Rosenberg, Mikayla Simpson-Verriden, Maggie Mechler, and Lia Tiede. Maddy Thoren, who is not pictured, is also a podcaster.

Bluegills hit the air

Kegonsa Elementary podcasters record weekly news update

STOUGHTON

adno=136764

Courier Hub The

On the Web

two years, gives students a voice outside of the classroom, librarian Kristin Rosenberg said. Students often To listen to the latest episode of the Bluegills talk about personal themes that relate News visit: to students and adults, in addition to rosenbergreads.podbean.com upcoming events. MACKENZIE KRUMME Rosenberg said she thought the Unified Newspaper Group and family the recent events and idea of a podcast would be a good announcements that are happening at way to reach families who get Every week, seven fifth graders use Kegonsa Elementary School. bogged down with other forms of a silver mic, audio editing software The Bluegill News, a podcast that communication from the school. and a radio voice to tell their peers has been airing weekly for the past Turn to Podcast/Page 12

While predicting budgets years down the road is difficult, no crystal ball is needed to see the Stoughton Area School District will be facing tough choices in the near future without more revenues. Monday night, school board members heard the district’s latest five-year financial forecast, and while next year’s budget is considered manageable, district director of business services Erica Pickett said beyond that, “it gets a little bit uglier.” First, the good news. Pickett said based on information from district financial advisor Baird Financial Services Company, the 2020-21 school year has a projected deficit of around $300,000; a number she termed as “very manageable,” given the district’s $45 million budget. “That’s definitely something we can manage through some minor reduction, or just some shifts in

what we might see in any given year,” she said. Then things start to get scary. Based on the Baird models, Pickett and the finance committee ran through three scenarios for the next five years: one with no increase in state aid, one with a $150 increase in revenue limit for 2021-22 and 2022-23 and one with a $150 per pupil increase in 2021-22 and another $150 in 2022-23. In a worst-case scenario, the district would be facing deficits of around $1.9 million in 2021-22, and more than $7 million by 2024-25. In the best-case scenario, there would still be deficits of around $1.4 million and $6.3 million during those years, respectively. Pickett said the financial forecast, updated every year, is a “very comprehensive tool” the district has used successfully to predict how their budgets will be a few years into the future. S h e s a i d t h e d i s t r i c t ’s enrollment decline since 2002 has been “fairly predictable” at around 50 students lost a year and is used as a starting point when estimating future budgets. One factor that could

Turn to SASD/Page 9

City of Stoughton

Feedback sought on whitewater plan Info booths, presentation, Q&A on Jan. 29 at SHS RENEE HICKMAN Unified Newspaper Group

The City of Stoughton will present a plan next week to the public to redevelop its downtown riverfront into a regional tourist destination with the addition of a whitewater park.

Over the past year, city officials have been working on a plan that would modify the Fourth Street dam, where the Yahara River runs through the city, and create a series of drops and a surfing wave for paddlers to enjoy. The city is looking for feedback to consider as the city’s parks and recreation department comes up with a final design for the park, which parks and rec director Dan Glynn said he

Courier Hub

expects to be constructed starting in 2021. Glynn said the surfing wave will be the only one of its kind in the region and could bring up to $30 million annually to Stoughton’s economy. The amount was determined by a 2018 economic study co-authored by Glynn and University of Wisconsin-Madison students and faculty. The meeting will take place on Jan. 29 at the Stoughton High School

Performing Arts Center, 600 Lincoln Ave. Glynn and Gary Lacy of Recreation Engineering and Planning will present the plan to members of the public, including information on what the city believes it could do for Stoughton’s economy as well as the land and water along the Yahara. Lacey and Glynn will discuss the vision for the

Inside Vikings remain undefeated in duals Page 7

Turn to Whitewater/Page 9

1.10% APY

*

Money Market Account

Start Saving Conveniently These smart accounts allow up to six withdrawals per statement cycle. Open with as little as $2,500.* Contact us today.

608.282.6000 home-savings.com 400 W. Main St. Stoughton

The annual percentage yield (APY) is effective as of the publication date. Funds used to open accounts must be new money. New money is defined as money not currently held at Home Savings Bank. Minimum amount of new money required to open account and obtain the disclosed APY (interest rate 1.09% and APY 1.10%) is $2,500. APY is reduced to 0.03% (interest rate 0.03% and APY 0.03%) on balances less than $2,500. An $8.00 maintenance fee will be imposed every month if the daily balance in the account falls below $2,000. Rates subject to change at the bank’s discretion. Fees could reduce earnings. *

adno=133924


2

January 23, 2020

Stoughton Courier Hub

ConnectStoughton.com

Stoughton’s first K-5 intern starts at the library Beth Rubel wants to create excitement, passion for learning

Did You Know? Teen library interns helped increased program attendance by 36%.

MACKENZIE KRUMME Unified Newspaper Group

When Beth Rubel was a child, she would listen to fantasy author Tamar Pierce on cassette tapes read sci-fi read aloud. Today, she still reads Pierce’s books so she can recommend them to different age groups. Rubel is the Stoughton Public Library’s first K-5 intern, the result of a $5,000 anonymous donation to increase library awareness and excitement for elementary age children. Amanda Bosky, the children’s librarian, said the two teen interns the library has had were so successful staff wanted to see that same inertia for the younger age group. The role of the interns is to create programs that encourage a fun learning environment. Over the course of eight months in 2013 and 2014, the library held 22 programs for teens with a total attendance of 154. In 2017, with the two teen interns and help from adult services assistant Cynthia Schlegel, the library hosted 33 programs with 421 attendance. In addition to holding three times as many programs, that’s a 36% increase in attendance at each program. Rubel is hoping to bring similar increases for the K-5 program. Rubel, a Pittsburgh native, has been in the Madison area since September and started Jan. 7, at the library. She had always thought she wanted to be a teacher or a writer. But after

Rubel’s top 5 reading list for youth Lily’s Purple Plastic Purse Elephant and Piggie Books The Magic Tree House Series Judy Moody series The Lightning Thief

Photo by Mackenzie Krumme

Beth Rubel is the Stoughton Public Library’s first K-5 intern.

If You Go What: Slime Science When: 3:30-4:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 7 Where: Stoughton Public Library, 304 S. Fourth St Info: 873-6281 a couple stints in those careers, she realized books and learning is what she l o v e d , a n d n ow s h e ’s

“It’s a really nice balance of a lot of different pieces that are all important and all need to happen,” Rubel What: Dinosaur Day What: Reading Buddies said. When: 2-4 p.m. Friday, When: 3:30-4:15 p.m. She will typically be at Feb. 23 Wednesdays Feb. 5 — the library two days per June. 3 Where: Stoughton Public week until August, working Library, 304 S. Fourth St Where: Stoughton Public with Bosky on elementary Library, 304 S. Fourth St age programing. Info: 873-6281 She has scheduled two Info: 873-6281 programs which will debut in February: a Slime Sciwo r k i n g o n a m a s t e r ’s degree in library and infor- provides behind-the-scenes ence activity and a Dinosaur mation science. work but also interaction Day. Rubel is also orchestrating the new “Reading S h e s a i d t h e l i b r a r y with children.

If You Go

If You Go

Buddies” program where children in grades K-5 are paired with older volunteers in grades 6-9 to practice reading. Rubel said she hopes to provide programs that get children excited about l e a r n i n g a n d m a ke t h e library a familiar place. She also plans to gain experience that will allow her to better serve patrons and be an asset to the library, which she considers an invaluable public good. Bosky said part of the reason staff chose Rubel for the position is because of her enthusiasm around programming and early education. “Day one I was like, ‘Do you have any ideas?’ Bosky remembers asking. And she’s like, ‘Here’s my list of all the things I’d like to do.’” Contact Mackenzie Krumme at mackenzie. krumme@wcinet.com.

Photo by Kimberly Wethal

Local bee enthusiast John Thompson takes care of the hives at Fort Littlegreen Gardens in 2018.

Beekeeping course set for Jan. 25 EVAN HALPOP Hub correspondent

Learn how to raise bees in a free fourhour basic beekeeping course from 1-5 p.m. Jan. 25 in the Stoughton EMS building at 516 S. Fourth St. John Thompson, who has been beekeeping for four years, will lead the course. He told the Hub he just wants to get people interested and said 15 had signed up as of Monday. The course description says attendees will learn where they can get bees to start a hive, how to install and inspect a hive and what to look for during the inspection. City of Stoughton beekeeping ordinances will be discussed during the course, as well as bee life cycles and honey.

If You Go What: Beekeeping 101 When: 1-5 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 25 Where: Stoughton EMS building, 516 S. Fourth St. Info: Email stoughtonbeekeeper@gmail. com or call 205-8657 It will be a combination of PowerPoint slides and hands-on learning, Thompson told the Hub. Registration is encouraged. For information, email stoughtonbeekeeper@gmail. com or call 205-8657.

Providing the Cress Circle of Care for Generations

206 6 W. Pro ospect Street • Stoughtton, WI

(608) 873-9 9244 4

crressfu uneraalservvice.ccom adno=135779


ConnectStoughton.com

January 23, 2020

3

Stoughton Courier Hub

SPD promotes O’Neil Bruno trial rescheduled Move to night shift will help department’s coverage

Trial rescheduled after changed plea

SCOTT DE LARUELLE Unified Newspaper Group

KIMBERLY WETHAL

Chad O’Neil is back at the night shift – but now, he’s wearing a sergeant’s chevron. O’Neil, who joined the Stoughton Police Department in 2003, was promoted Jan. 5 and is now responsible for the 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. late shift. He has a familiar companion helping him – Ole, his K-9 partner. The promotion provides an extra benefit to the department, which converted a vacant lieutenant position into a fourth sergeant position to better extend supervision of department staff, police chief Greg Leck wrote the Hub in an email last week. O’Neil, who has more than 20 years of law enforcement experience, said his duties will change slightly, as the sergeant position has “more of a supervisor role,” he wrote to the Hub in an email. “Ole is still with me and we are available for K9 calls just as we were prior to the promotion,” he wrote. “I have worked every shift, so going back to the night shift hasn’t been too difficult.” Email Unified Newspaper Photo submitted Group reporter Scott De Laruelle at scott.delaruel- Newly promoted to sergeant in the Stoughton Police Department, Chad O’Neil and his K-9 le@wcinet.com. partner, Ole, are responsible for supervising the department’s night shift.

Unified Newspaper Group

A jury trial for a Stoughton man accused of the November 2017 homicide of his roommate has been rescheduled to May. The trial for Ted Bruno had been set for January until he changed his plea last October. This month, the trial was set to start at 11 a.m. Monday, May 11. On Oct. 24, 2019, Bruno added “By Reason of Mental Disease of Defect” to his not guilty plea to first-degree intentional homicide charges in the stabbing death of Kim Gaida at their Felland Street home. Earlier that month, Bruno had been deemed competent to stand trial after receiving court-ordered medication at Mendota Mental Health Institute for just shy of a year to treat delusions and disorganized thinking. The trial is scheduled to last through Friday, May 15. On Nov. 27, 2017, Bruno told police he subdued Gaida by stabbing him during an argument that night at their home on Felland Street, then left the

Snowmobile season is here

SCOTT DE LARUELLE Unified Newspaper Group

Kids love transformers, but usually they’re the robot toy/movie kind. Kegonsa Elementary School students got to

learn first-hand all about real transformers when the electrical system blew out around 7 a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 14, leaving the building without electricity just as staff and students were set to arrive.

Get Connected

For area snowmobile enthusiasts, it’s a bit like Christmas in January. Almost one month into winter, all five snowmobile trails regions in Dane County parks have opened, with the southwest, northwest and north central opening Sunday, Jan. 19. For snowmobile trails to be open, there must be at least 6 inches of snow with steady below-freezing temperatures, the Dane County Parks

students were transported back to Kegonsa around 1 p.m. and classes resumed until the regular dismissal time, district spokesperson Derek Spellman wrote the Hub in an email. Email Unified Newspaper Group reporter Scott De Laruelle at scott.delaruelle@wcinet.com.

Receive

by calling or log on

$50 Amazon gift card with in-home estimate!

4

PAL STEEL New • Used • Surplus

MULTI-METAL DISTRIBUTION CENTER

Pipe - Plate - Channel - Angle - Tube - Rebar - Bar Grating, Expanded Metal Sheet - Lintels - B-Decking - Pipe Bollards - Decorative Iron Parts I & H Beams $3 & up per foot

STAINLESS STEEL & ALUMINUM ROUGH SAWN LUMBER & BUILDING SUPPLIES STEEL ROOFING & SIDING FABRICATION • CRANE SERVICE • STEEL PROCESSING 414 3rd Street, Palmyra • 262-495-4453 • www.PalSteel.com

adno=136570

Storage Available Sizes 8x10 8x18 10x16 10x20 Low Rates

Call 873-8486

Department website states. The county has more than 500 miles of snowmobile trails that link to a state-wide trail network. For more information, call the 24/7 Trails Information Line at 242-4576. Email Unified Newspaper Group reporter Scott De Laruelle at scott.delaruelle@wcinet.com.

50% OFF Installation!

1

Interest Financing!

Senior & Previous Customer Discounts!

2

BONUS!

First 100 homeowners to invest in a new bath or shower will receive a 7-Day Cruise or Resort Voucher for Two!

MINI WAREHOUSES

3

CALL TODAY!

(608)-338-1170 www.madcitybaths.com New orders only. Minimum purchase required. Does not include material costs 2 Financing available with minimum purchase and approved credit. Mad City Windows & Baths, Inc. is neither a broker nor a lender. Financing is provided by third-party lenders unaffiliated with Mad City Windows & Baths, Inc., under terms and conditions arranged directly between the customer and such lender, all subject to credit requirements and satisfactory completion of finance documents. Any finance terms advertised are estimate only. Ask for details. New orders only. Not valid with any other offer, or previous job.3 Offer good while supplies last. Minimum purchases apply. Payment in full required. Offer valid at original initial consultation only. Rules subject to change. Taxes, port charges and process fees not included. Must provide own transportation to and from departure ports or resort.4 With in-home estimate and product demonstration to homeowner(s). Limit one per household. Gift card given upon completion of demonstration to be mailed in by homeowner(s). Salespersons do not carry gift cards for security reasons. Allow 2-3 weeks after demonstration to receive gift card. Gift card valued at $50. 1

adno=134302

FREE

parks-lwrd.countyofdane.com

2.99%

1-800-355-1892 connectstoughton.com

Stock Book

For information on area snowmobile trails, visit

Winter Savings Event

Subscribe to

Find updates and links right away. Search for us on Facebook as “Stoughton Courier Hub” and then LIKE us.

On the Web

County trails all open as of Jan. 19

Blown transformer forces school switch Once it was clear the transformer would need significant repairs, students in grades K-2 were transported to Fox Prairie for classes and students in grades 3-5 were taken to Sandhill while Stoughton Utilities made repairs. After repairs were completed in the afternoon,

house and returned to make sure he was dead, according to a criminal complaint produced by the district attorney. Police said Gaida was stabbed 11 times with a knife, which was broken off in his throat. In the more than two years since, Bruno has had three attorneys. He asked to have a pair of county public defenders removed from his representation team in April 2018 after they attempted to have him use an insanity defense, which caused Bruno to feel he wasn’t being properly represented. The request to have the attorneys removed from his case six months before Bruno went to MMHI for court-ordered treatment. Amber Levenhagen’s reporting contributed to this story.

Dane County

Stoughton Area School District

Kegonsa students spend part of Jan. 14 school day at other elementaries

Bruno

adno=136566


4

January 23, 2020

Opinion

Stoughton Courier Hub

ConnectStoughton.com

Letters to the editor

U.S. contributes to world ‘terrorism’ This has been on my mind today, so I might as well get it off my chest. The last few days, there has been a lot of chatter almost all from Republicans, and their new mantra seems to be that “Democrats love terrorists.” You know, they might actually be right, but for very wrong reasons. Terrorism comes in many forms; military, economic, environmental, and within those forms both covert and overt. The U.S. is arguably the largest terrorist organization in the world. There are numerous instances of all of these terrorist acts in the past as well as currently.

You don’t have to look much further than what we have done to most countries in Central and South America, the Middle East and any number of countries in between. For all its faults, I still like, and in many instances, love the U.S. I just wish we would actually live up to the ideals that this country was founded on before it’s too late. I fear we don’t have a lot of time left before we will have lost, if we haven’t already, the respect and admiration that most of the rest of the world had for us. Bob Postel Town of Rutland

Correction Due to a significant internet outage at our layout team’s Dubuque, Iowa, office on Tuesday, Jan. 14, there is the potential for mistakes that were made throughout the paper that were not fixed. Normally, Unified Newspaper Group reporters review the layout team’s work to catch any last-minute mistakes before sending the paper to the printer, but the internet outage prevented that process. The Hub regrets any errors not resolved.

Thursday, Jan. 23, 2020 • Vol. 138, No. 27 USPS No. 614-600 Periodical Postage Paid, Stoughton, WI and additional offices. Published weekly on Thursday by the Unified Newspaper Group, A Division of Woodward Communications, Inc. POSTMASTER: Send Address Corrections to The Stoughton Courier Hub, 133 Enterprise Dr. Verona, WI 53593.

Office Hours: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday-Friday Phone: 608-873-6671 • FAX: 608-873-3473 e-mail: stoughtoneditor@wcinet.com Circulation customer service: (800) 355-1892

ConnectStoughton.com This newspaper is printed on recycled paper.

General Manager Lee Borkowski lborkowski@wcinet.com Sales Manager Kathy Neumeister kathy.neumeister@wcinet.com Advertising Catherine Stang stoughtonsales@wcinet.com Inside Sales Suzy Schleeper insidesales@wcinet.com Circulation ungcirculation@wcinet.com

Classifieds ungclassified@wcinet.com News Jim Ferolie stoughtoneditor@wcinet.com Sports Adam Feiner ungsportseditor@wcinet.com Community/Business Emilie Heidemann ungbusiness@wcinet.com Reporters Kimberly Wethal, Mark Nesbitt, Mackenzie Krumme, Neal Patten, Scott De Laruelle, Renee Hickman

In memory UNG Reporter Amber Levenhagen (1994-2019)

Unified Newspaper Group, a division of Woodward Communications,Inc. A Diversified, Employee-Owned Media Company Good People. Real Solutions. Shared Results. Printed by Capital Newspapers - Madison

NATIONAL NEWSPAPER ASSOCIATION

SUBSCRIPTION RATES One Year in Dane Co. & Rock Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $45 One Year Elsewhere . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $55 Stoughton Courier Hub Oregon Observer • Verona Press

Community Voices

Libraries all over considering fines being a thing of the past

O

verdue fines. Any regular library user is familiar with them, whether they like to admit it or not. Perhaps that bestseller got buried under a pile of other books on your nightstand. Or maybe you have a young reader in your house who likes to stash library books on her bookshelf, under the bed or in a dresser drawer. Maybe life just got in the way and you were too busy to stop by the library that day. Anyone who has ever felt nickeled and dimed by their otherwise friendly neighborhood librarian will no doubt welcome a trend in public libraries that has been gaining momentum in recent months: From coast to coast and in communities big and small, public libraries are eliminating overdue fines. Since 2017, dozens of public library systems in large cities have nixed late fees, and in October, the Chicago Public Library became the largest system to do so. The list grows with each passing month, including systems in St. Paul, Nashville, Denver, Salt Lake City and Palm Beach County, Florida. In Dane County, many libraries have already taken the plunge, with Verona, Sun Prairie, Fitchburg, Middleton and Monona all fine-free. The Madison Public Library Board is strongly considering eliminating all overdue fines, according to a story in the Wisconsin State Journal, and late last year, McFarland Public Library, Stoughton’s closest library neighbor, announced it will do away with overdue fines sometime in 2020. For proponents of the fine free movement, the issue comes down to equity and access. In recent years, many within our profession have begun to ask whether overdue fines might

be hindering the public library’s core mission of providing free access to information and promoting literacy. Studies Ramsey commissioned by large library systems have shown that library fines disproportionately impact those who are living on low or fixed incomes. For some, an extra $5 or $10 dollars a month in fines is a luxury they simply can’t afford, and as a result they never return to the library after accumulating fines. Even worse, some never use the library in the first place. For this reason, fine-free advocates argue that fines run counter to the library’s mission and end up driving away the very people who need the it the most. Since the creation of the modern public library, our institutions have used the threat of overdue fines as an incentive to induce patrons to return books on time. But so far, the evidence shows people are returning books on time without the threat of fines. After eliminating overdue fines in 2017, the Salt Lake City Public Library found no change in the average hold wait time, which is the number of days a borrower had to wait after requesting a book. Other fine-free libraries report the vast majority of their books and other materials are still being returned within a few days of their due dates. Most library users intuitively understand that library materials are held in the public trust, and that everyone shares responsibility for returning them on time. It’s important to note that fine-free does not mean never having to return your library

books. Borrowers are be responsible for replacing lost or damaged items, and those who keep their books too long past the due date will have their accounts blocked, preventing them from checking out additional items. Another concern is revenue from fines, which has become a staple of some library budgets. But I talked to some directors at smaller public libraries who reported that since fines made up such a small portion of their revenue – less than 1% in many cases – eliminating them had little impact on their bottom lines. Others have been able to make up the difference through increases in other forms of revenue, both public and private. For the Stoughton Public Library, fines represent about 1.75% of our annual operating revenue, which works out to about $15,000. This isn’t an insurmountable obstacle, but as anyone who has ever had to balance the books will tell you, any loss of revenue presents a challenge, especially when budgets are already tight and additional cuts would likely mean fewer services. The Stoughton Public Library Board of Trustees has been following the fine-free trend as it gains momentum across the country and in Dane County. Ultimately, the final decision rests with the nine voting members of the board. The challenge before both myself and the board is to eliminate barriers to access while preserving the long-term financial health of our institution. Whatever course of action we take, Stoughton residents can rest assured that their public library will continue to serve as the heart of their community, a place for literacy, learning and engagement that is truly open to everyone. Jim Ramsey is the director of Stoughton Public Library


ConnectStoughton.com

January 23, 2020

Stoughton Courier Hub

5

Dance on display JUSTIN LOEWEN Hub correspondent

The Stoughton High School dance team performed a variety of genres while hosting the Badger Conferences dance showcase on Saturday, Jan. 18. The showcase also featured teams from Oregon and Waunakee. Four members of the Stoughton youth dance team also made an appearance in a pom routine.

Photos by Justin Loewen

From left, Makenzie Devore, Annie Balthazor, Jillian Newman, Jaden Day, Grace Gilbert, Ingrid Gibson march forward in a jazz routine during the Badger Conference dance showcase in the high school gym on Saturday, Jan. 18.

Annie Balthazor had the floor to herself for a solo routine during the Badger Conference dance showcase in the high school gym on Saturday, Jan. 18.

Hannah Olson spins in dizzying circles during a jazz routine at the Badger Conference dance showcase in the high school gym on Saturday, Jan. 18.

16th

Friday, January 31

Raffle tickets available at the event

St. Ann School Gym 324 N. Harrison Street Stoughton, WI 53589

The Stoughton High Dance team executes a hip-hop routine during the Badger Conference dance showcase in the high school gym on Saturday, Jan. 18.

Proceeds to support student enrichment activities at St. Ann Catholic School, Stoughton

Pre-Sale Tickets: $10.00 Adults $7.00 Kids & Seniors 4 & under free

Tickets sold at Sunday Mass, St. Ann School Office

At the Door: $12.00 Adults $9.00 Kids & Seniors 4 & under free

Meal includes Spaghetti, Meatballs, Bread, Salad, Dessert and Refreshments

adno=133887

Cash Raffle and Get-A-Way Raffles


6

January 23, 2020

Stoughton Courier Hub

ConnectStoughton.com

Coming up

Community calendar

Energy assistance program

If you are having trouble paying your energy bills, sign up for an appointment during the Wisconsin Home Energy Assistance Program between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 23, at the Stoughton Area Senior Center. An energy services representative will meet with participants to see if they qualify for assistance. This service is by appointment only. For information, and to make an appointment, call 333-0333.

Coffee with a Reporter

Courier Hub reporters Renee Hickman and Mackenzie Krumme will hold the next Coffee with a Reporter from 9:30-10:30 a.m. Friday, Jan. 24, at the Stoughton Public Library. Hub reporters spend some time at various establishments and put up a sign asking for community members to come chat about anything pertaining to Stoughton. If you have suggestions for times and locations, please email mackenzie. krumme@wcinet.com.

Community meal

Visit First Lutheran Church, 310 E. Washington St., for the free monthly “Our Daily Bread” meal from 4-6 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 26. The meal will be served at 4:30 p.m. and includes chicken pot pie stew, fresh homemade biscuits, assorted salads, bars, cookies and ice cream,

coffee and milk. No carry-out meals are available; for transportation to the dinner, call 2342110 by noon Jan. 26. Rides are provided free of charge within the Stoughton Area School District boundaries. This month’s meal is sponsored by St. Ann’s Catholic Church. For information, call 873-7761.

Spaghetti fundraiser

their diabetes. This workshop complements existing treatments a participant receives. For information, contact Sonja at 873-2356.

Norse Afternoon of Fun

The annual Norse Afternoon of Fun is set for 1:30 p.m. Sunday Feb. 9, at Stoughton High School, 600 Lincoln Ave. The Stoughton High School Norwegian Dancers are set to perform and Syttende Mai 2020 King and Queen, Prince and Princess will be announced. There will also be a bake sale supporting the Norwegian Dancers. For information, contact the Stoughton Chamber of Commerce at stoughtonwi.com.

St. Ann Catholic School is holding its 16th annual Spaghetti Dinner fundraiser at 5 p.m. Friday, Jan. 31, at 324 N. Harrison St. Advance tickets are $10 for general admission and $7 for children and seniors. Children ages 4 years and younger are free. Attendees will pay $2 more at the door. Tickets can be purchased in advance at Sunday Mass or Friends of the library annual the St. Ann School office. The meal includes meatballs, spa- meeting ghetti, bread, salad, dessert and The Friends of the Stoughton Public refreshments. There will also be raf- Library will be holding their annual fles. meeting at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 11, in For information, contact 873-3343. the Carnegie Room. A check will be presented to the Living with diabetes library director generated from fundA 6-week course on “Healthy Living with Diabetes” starts 2-4:30 p.m. Tues- raisers held during the previous year. The Friends Volunteer of the Year days from Feb. 4 to March. 17. The course is at Stoughton Hospital, award will also be presented. Opportunities to meet the Friends 900 Ridge St. Registration is required. This workshop is designed to help group and become involved will be adults with Type 2 Diabetes, or pre-dia- available. For information visit stoughtonlibetes, learn self-management skills and increase their confidence in managing brary.org/friends or call 873-4050.

Thursday, Jan. 23

• 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Home Energy Assistance (appointment only), senior center, 333-0333

Friday, Jan. 24

• 9:30-10:30 a.m., Coffee with a Reporter, library, mackenzie.krumme@wcinet.com • 9 a.m., Memory screenings, library, 240-7400 • 6 p.m., Winter Showcase, The Otis Sampson American Legion Post, 803 N. Page St., 205.9090

Saturday, Jan. 25

• 9 a.m., Wacky Garb Ball: Heroes and Villains, Stoughton VFW, 200 Veteran Road, (715) 760-0603 • 1-3 p.m., Kon-Tiki film event, Livsreise Norwegian Heritage Center, 277 W. Main Street, livsreise.org • 1-5 p.m., Beekeeping 101, Stoughton EMS building, 516 S. Fourth St., stoughtonbeekeeper@gmail.com or 205-8657

Sunday, Jan. 26

• 12:30-3 p.m., Scrabble Tournament ($25), Stoughton Hospital, 900 Ridge St., 873-2334 or sebert@stohosp. com

Tuesday, Jan. 28

• 1 p.m., Creative writing (last Tuesday of every month), senior center, 873-8585 • 7 p.m., Stoughton City Council, Council Chambers/ Public Safety Building, 321 S. Fourth St. (second and fourth Tuesday of the month)

Wednesday, Jan. 29

• 1 p.m., Page Turners Book Discussion Group (“Salt to the Sea”), senior center, 873-6281 • 3:30- 4:15 p.m., Reading Buddies volunteer orientation, library, 873-6281 • 7 p.m., Dialogue on Race, Covenant Lutheran Church, 1525 N. Van Buren St., 873-7494

Thursday, Jan. 30

Baha’i Faith

For information: Alfred Skerpan, 877-0911 or Gail and Greg Gagnon, 873-9225 us.bahai.org Stoughton study classes.

Bible Baptist Church

2095 Hwy. W, Utica 873-7077 • 423-3033 Sunday: 10 a.m. - Worship; 6 p.m. - Worship

Christ Lutheran Church

Covenant Lutheran Church

1525 N. Van Buren St., Stoughton • 873-7494 covlutheran@covluth.org • covluth.org Saturday: 5:30 p.m. Worship Sunday: 9:30 a.m. Worship, 10:30 a.m. Fellowship

Ezra Church

St. Ann Catholic Church

Fulton Church

1844 Williams Drive, Stoughton • 873-9106 Saturday: 6 p.m. Worship Sunday: 10 a.m. Worship

9209 Fulton St., Edgerton 884-8512 • fultonchurch.org Saturday: 8 a.m. prayer breakfast Sunday: 8 and 10:30 a.m. Worship Coffee Fellowship: 9 a.m. Sunday School for all ages: 9:30-10:30 a.m. Varsity (High Schoolers): 12-3 p.m. AWANA (age 2-middle school): 3-5 p.m.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Good Shepherd By The Lake Lutheran Church

825 S. Van Buren, Stoughton 877-0439 • Missionaries 957-3930 Sunday: 9 a.m. Sunday school and Primary

Cooksville Lutheran Church

11927 W. Church St., Evansville 882-4408 Pastor Karla Brekke Sunday: 10 a.m. Worship and Sunday School

Stoughton Baptist Church

• 10 a.m., Groundhog Day sampling, Yahara Chocolate, 261 W. Main St., 358-4839 • 11 a.m., Yoga classes, “Open your heart,” Stoughton Hospital, 900 Ridge St., 873-2356

First Lutheran Church

Christ the King Community Church

Christian Assembly Church

• 5 p.m., Spaghetti Dinner, St. Ann School fundraiser, 324 N. Harrison St., 873-3343

Corner of Williams Dr. & Cty. B, Stoughton • 873-6517 Sunday: 10:30 a.m., 6 p.m. Worship

310 E. Washington, Stoughton 873-7761 • flcstoughton.com Sunday: 8:30 and 10 a.m. Worship

1860 Hwy. 51 at Lake Kegonsa, Stoughton 873-5924 Sunday Worship: 8 and 10:30 a.m. Education hour for all ages: 9:15 a.m. Adult Bible Study: 9:15-9:45 a.m.

LakeView Church

2200 Lincoln Ave., Stoughton 873-9838 • lakevc.org Sunday: 9:30 a.m. Worship

Friday, Jan. 31

616 Albion Rd., Edgerton 561-7450 • albionsdb@gmail.com forministry.com/USWISDBGCASD1 Worship Saturday 11- Sabbath School 10

515 E. Main St., Stoughton • 834-9050 ezrachurch.com Sunday: 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m.

700 Hwy. B, Stoughton 873-9353 • e-mail: office@clcstoughton.org Sunday: 8 and 10:30 a.m. Worship Family express with Sunday school: 9:10 a.m. 401 W. Main St., Stoughton • 877-0303 christthekingcc.org Sunday: 10 a.m. - Worship

Seventh Day Baptist Church of Albion

• 3 p.m., Computer class (third Thursday each month), senior center, 873-8585

323 N. Van Buren St., Stoughton 873-6448 • 873-7633 Weekday Mass: Nazareth House and St. Ann’s Church Weekend Mass: Saturday - 5:15 p.m.; Sunday - 8 and 10:30 a.m.

United Methodist of Stoughton 525 Lincoln Avenue, Stoughton stoughtonmethodist.org Stoughtonumc@Wisconsinumc.org Sunday: 8 a.m.; 10 a.m. - Full Worship

United Pentecostal Church of Stoughton

1501 E. Main St., Stoughton • 608-513-2600 Pastor Rich Thomas • rthomas@cgcmadison.org upcstoughton.com Sunday Worship: 10 a.m., Thursday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

West Koshkonong Lutheran Church 1911 Koshkonong, Stoughton Sunday: 9:30 a.m. - Worship

Saturday, Feb. 1

Food pantries City of Stoughton Food Pantry

The City of Stoughton Food Pantry, 520 S. Fourth St., is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Thursday. It will also be open from 4-6 p.m. Thursday evenings and the first Saturday of the month from 9-11 a.m.

SUMC Food Pantry

The Stoughton United Methodist Church Food Pantry, 525 Lincoln Ave., is open from 9-11 a.m. Tuesday and Wednesdays. It will also be open from 5-7 p.m. Tuesdays.

Personal Essentials Pantry

The Personal Essentials Pantry (PEP), 343 E. Main St., is open from 1-5 p.m. on the first and third Thursdays of each Month. The pantry will be closed on holidays and if SASD is closed due to weather.

Western Koshkonong Lutheran Church 2633 Church St., Cottage Grove Sunday: 9:30 a.m. worship 11 a.m. Bible study

Support groups Diabetic Support Group • 6 p.m., second Monday, Stoughton Hospital, 873-2356 Dementia Caregivers • 2 p.m., second Thursday, senior center, 873-8585

LIFE CELEBRATION CENTERS

Be Proactive, Not Pro-anxious

1358 Hwy 51, Stoughton

adno=132741

873-4590

Pete Gunderson Mike Smits • Dale Holzhuter Martha Paton, Administrative Manager Sara Paton Barkenhagen, Administrative Assistant Paul Selbo, Funeral Assistant Alyssa Halverson, Funeral Dir. Apprentice

221 Kings Lynn Rd. Stoughton, WI 53589 (608) 873-8888

adno=132734

www.gundersonfh.com

www.anewins.com

Being proactive entails creating or controlling a situation by causing something to happen rather than waiting for it to happen and then reacting to it. In this context,“proactive”is usually contrasted with “reactive,” and we are often open to the criticism that we should be more proactive. Knowing that your car is having problems, the proactive response would be to make the repairs ahead of time rather than waiting for your car to break down on the side of the road. When thinking about the future, it is common for us to worry about events that may or may not happen, and thus we are often “pro-anxious,”when we might be proactive. Anxiety can serve a useful purpose in our lives; it has been aptly described as an alarm which warns us of danger. When we have legitimate anxieties, it is like the smoke alarm telling us that something is burning, but when we have anxiety over nothing, that is like the false alarm when nothing is on fire. When the anxieties are real, it is best to be proactive. When there is nothing we can do about the situation, the biblical advice to “not worry about tomorrow”is appropriate. When there is something we can and should do, we should follow the advice given in Proverbs, and be like the ant who stores up its food for the winter. –Christopher Simon

Crohn’s/Colitis/IBD Support Group • 5:30 p.m., third Wednesday, Stoughton Hospital, 873-7928 Grief Support Groups • 2 p.m., third Wednesday, senior center, 873-8585 Low Vision Support • 1-2:30 p.m., third Thursday, senior center, 873-8585 Parkinson’s Group • 1:30-2:30 p.m., fourth Wednesday, senior center, 873-8585 Multiple Sclerosis Group • 10-11:30 a.m., second Tuesday, senior center, 873-8585

Submit your community calendar and coming up items online: ConnectStoughton.com ungcalendar@wcinet.com


Adam Feiner, sports editor

845-9559 x226 • ungsportseditor@wcinet.com

Mark Nesbitt, assistant sports editor 845-9559 x237 • sportsreporter@wcinet.com Fax: 845-9550

Boys basketball

Stoughton moves into tie atop Badger South Conference MARK NESBITT Assistant sports editor

The Stoughton boys basketball team won two road games last week and moved into a tie with Monroe atop the Badger South Conference at the halfway point of the season. Stoughton (11-2, 6-1 Badger South), ranked sixth in last week’s Division 2 Associated Press state poll, knocked off Monona Grove 53-42 on Thursday, Jan. 16. The Vikings then ran away with a 66-38 win over Prairie du Chien on Saturday, Jan. 18. Milton upset Monroe 97-84 last Thursday behind Jack Campion’s 38-point outburst, helping the Vikings move into a tie atop the conference with Monroe. The Cheesemakers will play Waunakee in the first-place Badger Challenge game on Saturday, Jan. 25, by virtue of a 79-76 triple-overtime win over the Vikings earlier this season. Stoughton will play fifthranked DeForest in the second-place Badger Challenge game at 5:40 p.m. Saturday at Edgewood High School. “To be in a spot where we are contending to win the conference championship is where we want to be at this point,” Stoughton coach Nolan Weber said. “We are still trying to figure some things out. We are coming together and starting to play better.”

Stoughton 66, Prairie du Chien 38

The Vikings turned up the pressure and had seven steals in the first half en route to a nonconference win over the Blackhawks. The Vikings jumped out to a 33-15 lead at halftime. Junior guard Cael McGee scored a team-high 18 points. Senior guard Nathan Hutcherson hit three 3-pointers in an 11-point effort. Sophomore Luke Fernholz chipped in nine points.

Stoughton 53, Monona Grove 42

The one-two punch of McGee and senior Adam Hobson outscored the Silver Eagles by themselves. Hobson scored a gamehigh 25 points and McGee had 23. The Vikings outscored MG 32-23 in the second half.

Sports

Thursday, January 23, 2020

7

Courier Hub For more sports coverage, visit: ConnectStoughton.com

Wrestling

Vikings blast Blue Devils, blank Panthers to hit 16-0 ADAM FEINER Sports editor

Six pins, four forfeit victories, three decisions and a technical fall added up to a first this season for the Stoughton wrestling team. The Vikings shut out rival Oregon 74-0 at home Tuesday, Jan. 14. Stoughton went on the road two days later and defeated Lodi 57-12. The Vikings are now 16-0 in dual competition.

Stoughton 57, Lodi 12

The Vikings won five matches by pin and four by decision in a win over the Blue Devils. Trenton Dow (138 pounds) pinned Ashton McDonald in 1:07, Brooks Empey (220) pinned Bryce James in 1:34 and Ethan Peterson (120) pinned TJ Mickelson in 1:55. Nicolar Rivera (126) pinned Chandler Curtis in 3:03, and Photos by Adam Feiner heavyweight Griffin Empey pinned Stoughton’s Luke Mechler (top) controls Oregon’s Cooper King during their 160-pound match Tuesday, Jan. 14, in Brock Beyer in 3:27. Stoughton. Mechler won by pin in 1:43. Luke Mechler (160) finished off a 19-3 technical fall of Jack Hansen at the 3:06 mark. Alex Wicks (132) won a 14-4 major decision over Dean Finney. Brandt Spilde (182) defeated Ben Simplot 7-1, and Luke Pugh (195) won a wild match 16-13 over Noah Johnson. Chance Suddeth (106) edged Parker Heintz 3-1, and Braeden Whitehead (152) held on for a 4-3 win over Colton Nicolay. Gavin Model (145) received a forfeit victory. Ramsey Winton (113) and John Harman (170) lost by pin.

Stoughton 74, Oregon 0

The Vikings improved to 5-0 in Stoughton’s Braeden Whitehead (right) takes down Oregon’s Seth Niday during their 152-pound match Tuesday,

Turn to Wrestling/Page 8 Jan. 14, in Stoughton. Whitehead won by 3-1 decision.

Boys swimming

Schmidt, Clark lead Vikings past rival Panthers ADAM FEINER Sports editor

Several of Stoughton’s eight wins against Badger South Conference rival Oregon came in dominant fashion. Yet the dual came down to the wire. The Vikings edged the Panthers 87-83 at home Tuesday, Jan. 14. Both teams are now 2-3 in conference duals. Stoughton also won a nonconference road dual against Jefferson/Cambridge on Thursday, Jan. 16, at Cambridge Elementary School. Results were not available from the dual.

Photo by Adam Feiner

Stoughton’s Conner Clark swims the 100-yard butterfly in a Badger South Conference dual against Oregon on Tuesday, Jan. 14. He won the event with a time of 54.96 seconds.

part of two first-place relay teams for the Vikings. Schmidt dusted the field in the 100- and 200-yard freestyle. His time in the 100 free (53.04) was 2.75 Stoughton 87, seconds better than that of Oregon 83 Oregon’s Blake Pankratz, Evan Schmidt and Con- and his time in the 200 free ner Clark each won two (1:54.07) was more than 11 individual events and were seconds better than that of

Pankratz. Clark blew away the field in the 50 free (23.51) and 100 butterfly (54.96). His time in the 50 free was 1.42 seconds better than that of Oregon’s Mason Konopacki, and his time in the fly was more than three seconds better than that of the Panthers’ Blake Anderson.

Schmidt and Clark teamed with Isaiah Rowley and Matt Eppler to win the 200 free relay with a time of 1:40.98, more than two seconds ahead of an Oregon quartet. Schmidt, Clark, Rowley and Jordan Barthuly won the 400 free relay with a time of 3:35.31, almost five

seconds ahead of the runner-up from Oregon. Barthuly won the 500 free with a time of 5:39.93, 14.05 seconds ahead of Oregon’s Riley Fahey. Eppler won the 100 backstroke (1:01.82), .37 seconds ahead of Anderson. Barthuly also finished second in the 200 individual medley (2:19.49), .67 seconds behind Oregon’s Connor Braatz. The Vikings’ 200 medley relay of Barthuly, Owen Lehman, Thomas Unitan and Jack Ebner placed second with a time of 2:03.81. Anthony Teche took second in the 100 breaststroke (1:18.09). “Those guys have been swimming 24 miles per week the past four weeks, and swam for the team,” Stoughton coach Jeff Bridwell said.


8

January 23, 2020

Stoughton Courier Hub

ConnectStoughton.com

Girls basketball

Marggi shoots Stoughton past Portage MARK NESBITT Assistant sports editor

Senior guard Megan M a r g g i k n o c k e d d ow n four 3-pointers and s c o r e d a ga m e - h i g h 2 0 points to lead Stoughton to a 68-35 win over Portage in the seventh-place Badger Challenge game o n F r i d a y, J a n . 1 7 , i n Beaver Dam. Marggi also grabbed five rebounds and swiped three steals for the Vikings (4-8, 1-5 Badger South), who raced out to a 39-16 lead at the half. Senior Delaney Seidel and sophomore Ava Loftus each added 10 points. Senior Riley Royston pitched in nine points and six rebounds. Sophomore Mya Davidson helped with seven points and a team-high eight rebounds. The Vikings had 14 steals and only committed 12 Photo submitted turnovers. Stoughton shot 42.8% from 3-point range Stoughton seniors Megan Marggi and Delaney Seidel were named the “Players of the Game” and interviewed by W7 Productions after the Vikings’ 68-35 win over Portage in the Badger Challenge on Friday, Jan. 17, in Beaver Dam. (6-for-14).

Boys hockey

Vikings jump ahead early, but can’t hold off Red Hawks MARK NESBITT Assistant sports editor

Milton scored three goals in the third period to hand Stoughton a 4-2 Badger South Conference loss on Friday, Jan. 17, at Mandt Community Center. The Vikings were coming off a 9-2 road loss against conference foe McFarland on Tuesday, Jan. 14.

Milton 4, Stoughton 2 The Vikings (2-10, 1-6 Badger

South) dropped their fifth straight game in a meeting between teams that play home games at Mandt Community Center. Stoughton junior forward Dustin Woelke put the Vikings on the board 2:22 into the game off an assist from senior forward Brody Hlavacek. Tyler Ellis scored his first goal with 2:05 left in the second period to tie the game at 1. Mitchell Masters scored on the power play 55 seconds into

the third period to give the Red Hawks a 2-1 lead. Stoughton freshman Will Rotar tied it at 2 a little less than two minutes later off a pass from Jared Bauer. Ellis scored on the power play with 8:27 left in the third, and Leo Studier added an insurance goal with 3:50 left. Milton finished with a 32-27 advantage in shots and was 2-for-7 on the power play. Stoughton was 0-for-2 with a man advantage, while

Wrestling: Continues roll in dual competition

Girls hockey

Icebergs tie with Lightning, can’t keep up with Cougars ADAM FEINER Sports editor

The Icebergs girls hockey co-op scored two first-period goals against the Lakeshore Lightning on Saturday, Jan. 18, but couldn’t hold on and settled for a 2-2 tie. The Cap City Cougars, leaders of the Badger Conference, beat the Icebergs 7-1 on Tuesday, Jan. 14. The Icebergs (3-11-2, 2-5 Badger) host the Rock County Fury on Friday, Jan. 24, at Mandt Community Center in Stoughton.

Icebergs 2, Lakeshore Lightning 2, OT

The Icebergs were two seconds away from a win in regulation, but Anna Gontarski scored with two seconds left to force overtime in a nonconference game at Ozaukee Ice

Center in Mequon. McFarland’s Kylie Babcock scored 6:10 into the game off a pass from Stoughton senior Taylor Nisius. Oregon junior Izzy Newton scored a little more than four minutes later off assists from Stoughton junior Sydney Schipper and McFarland senior Aeryn Olson to give the Icebergs a 2-0 lead. Gontarski scored on the power play with 4:12 left in the second period to chip away at Lakeshore’s deficit. The Lightning went 1-for-4 on the power play, while the Icebergs were 0-for-4. Lakeshore outshot the Icebergs 22-14 for the game and had the overtime’s lone shot. Stoughton freshman goaltender Aven Gruner finished with 20 saves.

sophomore goaltender Will Nih- eight unanswered goals. Stoughton finished 2-for-5 on les made 28 saves. the power play, while McFarland McFarland 9, Stoughton 2 was a perfect 3-for-3. The SparJack Sanford scored a pair of tans outshot the Vikings 36-17, as power-play goals for the Vikings Nihles made 27 saves. at McFarland Community Ice Grant Newcomer recorded a hat Arena. trick and three assists for McFarSanford scored 4:18 into the land. Jack Bartzen picked up five game off assists from Hlavacek points (goal and four assists) and and Deven Johnson to give the Max Binger added two goals and Stoughton a 1-0 lead. Sanford two assists. Simon Pommereniscored again 3:10 into the third ng chipped in two goals and an period after McFarland scored assist.

Cap City Cougars 7, Icebergs 1

Gruner made 35 saves in the Icebergs’ home loss at Mandt Community Center. The Cougars finished with a 42-8 advantage in shots. Waunakee junior Amanda Bauer scored three straight goals in the second period and another in the fourth to cap the scoring. Waunakee junior Lauren Bliefernicht opened the scoring with 8:08 left in the first period. Madison East senior Aubrey Wood scored with 4:37 left in the first to make it 2-0. Schipper got the Icebergs on the board with 3:13 left in the second period off assists from Newton and Olson to cut it to 5-1. Bliefernicht scored her second goal a little more than a minute later.

Continued from page 7 Badger South Conference duals with a dominant performance against the Panthers. “It was a great environment with youth night, and the guys were excited to wrestle,” Stoughton coach Bob Empey said. “It’s nice to see our energy back and watch us come together as a unit. Everybody wanted to score points.” Coltin Suddeth started the dual with a pin of Dakota Brown at the 1:01 mark of their 120-pound match. Rivera bumped up to 132 and scored eight takedowns before pinning Alex Vieaux in 1:37. Dow (138) earned a hardfought 2-0 decision over Michael Schliem. Dow took down Schliem a minute into the match and remained in control for the remaining five minutes. Model (145) won by 19-3 tech fall over Owen Heiser. Model scored 19 of the final 20 points to end the match at the 5:10 mark. Whitehead (152) held on for a 3-1 win over Seth

Photo by Adam Feiner

Stoughton’s Nicolar Rivera (top) takes down Oregon’s Alex Vieaux during their 132-pound match Tuesday, Jan. 14, in Stoughton. Rivera won by pin in 1:37. Niday. It was Whitehead’s second match of the season and the first to go the full six minutes. After a scoreless first period, Whitehead scored an escape and a takedown in the second. Niday also had an escape in the second, and nearly scored a takedown in the final seconds of the bout. Mechler (160) controlled the head of Cooper King en route to a pin in 1:43. Luke Spilde (170) beat Karl Brooks 7-1. Spilde scored two takedowns in the first period to lead 4-1,

then added another takedown and an escape in the third. Brandt Spilde (182) p i n n e d Ty l e r Wa l d i n 42 seconds, and Chance Suddeth (106) pinned R y a n Pa y n e i n 4 1 s e c onds. Rose Ann Marshall (113) recorded four takedowns of Ramiro Ramos before a pin at the 3:28 mark to finish off the dual. Wicks (126), Pugh (195), Brooks Empey (220) and Griffin Empey (285) received forfeit victories for the Vikings.


ConnectStoughton.com

January 23, 2020

9

Stoughton Courier Hub

Dance Phase 2 gets important approval Dimensions Council OKs plat, still working on TIF agreement winter showcase to be held Jan. 24 Kettle Park West

RENEE HICKMAN AND JIM FEROLIE Unified Newspaper Group

Plans to build single-family homes at Kettle Park West took a major step forward Tuesday, Jan. 14, with the Common Council unanimously approving a preliminary plat for the project. A plat is a legal document that divides a lot into many smaller parcels, typically used for housing subdivisions, and the preliminary plat essentially provides assurances for developers that a project can be built. Some crucial approvals remain, however, including an agreement with Forward Development Group that would provide $3 million in taxpayer financing. At the same meeting, the council directed the Planning Commission to prepare an amendment to the tax-increment financing project plan that covers the area (TID 7), which would enable the use of TIF. “This allows them to get started,” Ald. Sid Boersma (Dist. 1) said. How much of the 80 acres of KPW Phase 2 the company can build on before constructing an access to Hwy. 138 at Oak Opening Drive has been the subject of nearly four years of negotiations. Over that time, FDG has

dropped its TIF request from $5 million to $3 million, reduced the scope of that part of the plan from 460 housing units to 195 and decided to wait for the state Department of Transportation to build a new intersection at Roby Road and U.S. Hwy. 151 next year. The use of TIF for Kettle Park West – which includes a Walmart Supercenter that opened in 2017 – has been a political hot button for several years and led to a pair of citywide advisory referendums in 2014. TIF is a public financing method that is considered the primary tool for municipalities to encourage development. It involves pooling taxes from multiple jurisdictions on future development. During the Jan. 14 meeting, alders discussed what Ald. Regina Hirsch (Dist. 3) called a compromise to restrict the construction of any homes south of what will be called Alpine Street – a main road through the middle of the development – until the 138 connection is completed. The 138 connection would require a purchase of property FDG does not own and a waiver from the state Department of Transportation to have an access point to the highway closer to the Wal-Mart entrance than it would normally allow. The amendment to the TID 7 project plan allows for the addition of future elements that are expected to be contained in the Phase 2.

These include the completion of the intersection of Oak Opening and Deer Point drives, park and trail improvements and the extension of a water and sewer lines. The plat alders approved contains 19 conditions, including such standard items as requiring a development agreement, a stormwater plan and rezoning changes and more specific requirements, such as prohibiting access to certain streets and ensuring others are sufficiently wide for snow plows. It also requires there to be an agreement with the Town of Rutland to provide street access to U.S. Hwy. 51 and that the developer provide collateral equal to 120% of the estimated cost of any public improvements. City staff began working at the end of 2019 on a developer’s agreement with FDG, the Verona firm that handled the construction of Phase I and will also be responsible for Phase II. Though the 2014 referendums on the use of TIF at KPW showed the public was against both the use of TIF for Walmart and at the development in general, a series of public meetings organized by Ald. Jean Ligocki in November drew little response. After discussing the results of those meetings, alders then voted to begin evaluating FDG’s TIF proposal for the purpose of building a developer agreement.

NEAL PATTEN

If You Go

Unified Newspaper Group

Dance Dimensions, a Stoughton-based dance studio, will present its Winter Showcase from 6 - 7  p . m . , F r i d a y, J a n . 24. The showcase, which will show off s t u d e n t c h o r e o g r a p h y, will be held at American Legion Post 59, 8 0 3 N . Pa g e S t . While the showcase is free, there will be a bake sale held during the performances to raise money for the dance students. Dance Dimensions was founded in 2002 and provides both recreational and pre-professional classes for dancers ages 3 and up.

What: Winter Dance Showcase When: 6-7 p.m., Friday, Jan. 24 Where: American Legion Post 59, 803 N. Page St. Info: Call 620-5299

The studio provides lessons in ballet, tap, jazz, funk, hiphop and other forms of both classical and modern dance to students ages 3 and olde r. For information, call 608-620-5299. Neal Patten, Stoughton Community Reporter, can be contacted at neal.patten@wcinet.com.

Get wacky with Middle Ages-themed games, dance ball NEAL PATTEN Unified Newspaper Group

The U.S. never had real “kingdoms,” but during an event on Saturday, Jan. 25, at the VFW, you wouldn’t know it. The Society for Creative Anachronism’s Kingdom of Northshield will host a heroes-and-villains themed “Wacky Garb Ball,” as well as other activities, from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., Saturday,

Jan. 25, at the VFW, 200 Veteran Road. Admission to the Wacky Garb Ball is $15 for adults, $5 for children ages 5-17 and is free for children under 5. Before the start of the ball at 7 p.m., there will be dance classes held throughout the day and a judged “wacky garb” fashion show. There will be a room hosting period-appropriate games and an arts and

sciences display. Bardic activities will also be held along with a “dessert revel” potluck. The SCA is an international organization of history enthusiasts who research and re-create pre-seventeenth century skills, arts and culture. Members dress in clothing representative of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance while hosting events such as feasts, dances, educational classes and

workshops. There are over 30,000 SCA members worldwide, divided up into 20 regions k n ow n a s “ k i n g d o m s .” The Kingdom of Northshield includes members from North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin, the Upper Peninsula of Michigan in addition to Manitoba and Northwestern Ontario. Kingdoms are further broken down into smaller

regional territories. Stoughton belongs to the Barony of Jararvellir, which also includes Verona, Madison, Sun Prairie, Mount Horeb, Cross Plains, Oregon and over 85 other Wisconsin communities. For information, call (715)-760-0603 or visit northshield.org. Neal Patten, Stoughton Community Reporter, can be contacted at neal.patten@wcinet.com.

If You Go What: “Wacky Garb Ball” When: 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., Saturday, Jan. 25 Where: Stoughton VFW, 200 Veteran Road Price: $5 to $15 Info: Call (715) 7600603 or visit northshield.org

SASD: School board says budget deficits are projected to reach millions by 2022 Continued from page 1 change, though, is state funding, which has been in general decline for nearly a decade. P i c ke t t s a i d t h e d i s trict used a $150 per pupil increase as a baseline for a potential state aid increase, though that’s far from a certainty. “ ( T h a t ’s ) l e s s t h a n what have probably

gotten in the late ‘90s or early 2000s, but it’s a lot more than what we had (since),” she said. “Even if we were to make that $ 2 0 0 , i t ’s n o t g o i n g t o have a significant impact on that deficit line. “I want to be optimistic but I want to be realistic,” Pickett added. Board member Joe Freye said the projections highlight some “difficult

conversations” the board and administrators will need to have in the near future. “ We h a v e t o w o r k through it, and we will,” he said.

Communications director search

The district is looking for someone to coordinate their communication e ff o r t s , a s c o m m u n i t y

information and resource coordinator Derek Spellman has left the district to take a job with the State of Wisconsin. A former Unified Newspaper Group reporter who covered SASD, Spellman was hired by the district in May 2013. His last day was Jan. 20. A t M o n d a y n i g h t ’s school board meeting, district superintendent Tim

Onsager said the job has find that candidate who will been posted and will be for be a fit for us.” another week. Email Unified Newspaper “Then we’ll filter through Group reporter Scott De applicants to determine Laruelle at scott.delaruelwhich ones we want to le@wcinet.com. interview and see if we can

Winter Savings Event Receive

$50 Amazon gift card with in-home estimate!4

Whitewater: Public input taken into consideration for final plan Continued from page 1 whitewater park’s design as well as plans for surrounding trails and a pedestrian bridge. Information booths will be set up for attendees to learn more about plans for the park and ask questions. The booths will be staffed by members of the city’s Parks and Recreation department, Dane County

Land and Water Resources department and the City of Madison School and Community Recreation department. They’ll provide information on topics such as flood mitigation, sediment sampling and events that can be held once the park is developed. Glynn said he hopes after attendees hear about the plan they’ll communicate “what they like and don’t like about it.”

In addition to the opportunity to ask questions directly, comment boxes will be available with postcards the department will record. For information on the plan, call Glynn at 8736746 or email DGlynn@ ci.stoughton.wi.us Renee Hickman can be contacted at renee.hickman@ wcinet.com or follow her on Twitter at @ReneeNHickman

If You Go What: Yahara River Park Public Meeting When: 7-8:30 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 29 Where: Stoughton High School Performing Arts Center, 600 Lincoln Ave. Info: http://stoughtonrec. com/

50% OFF Installation!

1

2.99%

Interest Financing!

Senior & Previous Customer Discounts!

2

BONUS!

First 100 homeowners to invest in a new bath or shower will receive a 7-Day Cruise or Resort Voucher for Two! 3

CALL TODAY!

(608)-338-1170 www.madcitybaths.com 1 New orders only. Minimum purchase required. Does not include material costs 2 Financing available with minimum purchase and approved credit. Mad City Windows & Baths, Inc. is neither a broker nor a lender. Financing is provided by third-party lenders unaffiliated with Mad City Windows & Baths, Inc., under terms and conditions arranged directly between the customer and such lender, all subject to credit requirements and satisfactory completion of finance documents. Any finance terms advertised are estimate only. Ask for details. New orders only. Not valid with any other offer, or previous job.3 Offer good while supplies last. Minimum purchases apply. Payment in full required. Offer valid at original initial consultation only. Rules subject to change. Taxes, port charges and process fees not included. Must provide own transportation to and from departure ports or resort.4 With in-home estimate and product demonstration to homeowner(s). Limit one per household. Gift card given upon completion of demonstration to be mailed in by homeowner(s). Salespersons do not carry gift cards for security reasons. Allow 2-3 weeks after demonstration to receive gift card. Gift card valued at $50.

adno=136567


10

January 23, 2020

Stoughton Courier Hub

Doris Jean Nelson Doris Jean Nelson, age 92, of Stoughton, passed away on Monday, Jan. 13, 2020, at Stoughton Hospital. She was born on June 5, 1927, in Madison, Wisconsin, the daughter of Bill and Sadie (Mael) Westby. Doris graduated from Madison East High School in 1945. She earned a Marquette University Diploma in Dental Hygiene in 1948. Doris spent 54 years with the dental office of Dr. M.C. Neely and Dr. K.R. Sachtjen. Doris enjoyed spending time with her family

Doris Jean Nelson

and making quilts for all of her grandchildren. She loved her two dogs, Boomer and Kasey. Her favorite pastimes were reading detective novels, doing the daily crossword puzzle, working on jigsaw

Obituaries

puzzles and sitting in her living room to look out the window at Lake Kegonsa. She was never short on Ole & Lena jokes and was always able to make people smile and laugh. She was one of the most giving people on earth and never asked for anything in return. D o r i s i s s u r v ive d b y her step-daughters, Nancy (Peter) Knupfer and Donna (David Feuling) Nelson; grandchildren, Jason (Chrissy) Cartwright, Rebecca, Kelly, Sarah, Maria, and Leta Knupfer; great-grandchildren, Keira and Segan Cartwright; niece s , S u s a n We s t b y a n d

Cheryl Westby; nephew, B i l l We s t b y ; a n d d e a r friend, Nell Stace. She was preceded in death by her first husband, Myron Wondrash; second husband, Alvie Nelson; parents; twin brother, Jim Westby; sister, Nancy Lou Westby; and sister-in-law, Betty Westby. A private burial was held at Roselawn Memorial Park. Online condolences may be made at gundersonfh.com. Gunderson East Funeral & Cremation Care 5203 Monona Drive 221-5420

ConnectStoughton.com James H. Leslie James H. Leslie of Kalispell, Montana. passed away peacefully with his son at his bedside on Sunday, Dec. 22, 2019, at the age of 85. He was born Dec. 24, 1933 to Harold and Helen (Johnson) Leslie in Stoughton. Jim graduated from Stoughton High School in 1951. He enlisted in the army and served in the Korean War. After returning home he moved out west, eventually settling in Kalispell Montana. Jim is survived by his son Patrick (Pam) Leslie of Reno Nevada, his sister, Donna L Olson of Stoughton, and nieces and

James H. Leslie

nephews. He was preceded in death by his wife, Betty (Bozarth) Leslie, his sister Barbara Weinberg and brother-inlaws Warren Weinberg and Roger N. Olson. Per Jim’s request, there will be no funeral service.

Legals

*** ADVERTISEMENT FOR BID The City of Stoughton is seeking proposals to provide playground equipment and installation at Lowell Park. If you are a qualified playground vendor, and would like the full Request for Proposal packet, please contact Pat Groom at 608-873-6303 or pgroom@ci.stoughton.wi.us All proposals will be due on Friday, February 14th at Noon. Published: January 23 and 30, 2020 WNAXLP *** VOTING BY ABSENTEE BALLOT Any qualified elector who is unable or unwilling to appear at the polling place on Election Day may submit a request to vote an absentee ballot to their municipal clerk. A qualified elector is any U.S. citizen, who will be 18 years of age or older on Election Day, who has resided in the ward or municipality where he or she wishes to vote for at least 10 consecutive days before the election. The elector must also be registered in order to receive an absentee ballot. Proof of identification must be provided before an absentee ballot may be issued. You must make a request for an absentee ballot in writing or online at MyVote. wi.gov. Contact your municipal clerk and request that an application for an absentee ballot be sent to you for the primary or election or both. You may also submit a written request in the form of a letter or you may apply for an absentee ballot online at MyVote.wi.gov. Your written request must list your voting address within the municipality where you wish to vote, the address where the absentee ballot should be sent, if different, and your signature. You may make application to your municipal clerk for an absentee ballot in person, by mail, by fax, by email or at MyVote.wi.gov. Making application to receive an absentee ballot by mail The deadline for making application to receive an absentee ballot by mail is: 5 pm on the fifth day before the election, February 13, 2020 Note: Special absentee voting application provisions apply to electors who are indefinitely confined to home or a care facility, in the military, hospitalized, or serving as a sequestered juror. If this applies to you, contact the municipal clerk regarding deadlines for requesting and submitting an

absentee ballot. Voting an absentee ballot in person You may also request and vote an absentee ballot in the clerk’s office or other specified location during the days and hours specified for casting an absentee ballot in person. Holly Licht, City Clerk, 608-873-6677 207 S. Forrest St., Stoughton, WI 53589 Wednesday, January 29, 2020-Friday February 7, 2020, 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. (M-F) Monday February 10, 2020-Thursday, February 13, 2020, 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Friday, February 14, 2020, 7:30 a.m.5:00 p.m. The first day to vote an absentee ballot in the clerk’s office is: January 29, 2020 The last day to vote an absentee ballot in the clerk’s office: February 14, 2020 at 5:00 p.m. No in-person absentee voting may occur on the day before the election. The municipal clerk will deliver voted ballots returned on or before Election Day to the proper polling place or counting location before the polls close on (insert date of primary or election). Any ballots received after the polls close will not be counted. Published: January 23, 2020 WNAXLP *** BOARD OF EDUCATION STOUGHTON AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT BOARD — REGULAR MEETING (MONDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2019) 1. Regular Board Meeting Opening-A regular meeting of the Stoughton Area School District was called to order on Monday, December 2, 2019 at 7:00 pm in the Board Room by Board President Francis Sullivan. A. Roll Call-Present: Bubon, Coughlin, Freye, FitzGibbon, Hoppe, Jackson, Patterson, Sorg, and Sullivan. B. Public Comment-None. President Sullivan requested that the agenda order be changed and asked that the Madrigal Singers perform before the Legislative Update agenda item. C. Legislative Update-Hoppe presented a legislative update following the Madrigal singers performance. Information was shared about Senate Bill 414 and Assembly Bill 45 regarding cursive writing requirements. Hoppe offered to provide a list of bill sponsors upon board member request. Regular agenda order resumed. 2. Spotlight on Learning-Ryan Casey, SHS Music Teacher, introduced the SHS Madrigal Singers and explained more about their upcoming performances. Two songs were performed for the board members which was well-received. The Legislative update followed their performance. 3. District Administrator Report-Dr. Onsager’s report included commendations for Mr. Casey and the Madrigal Singers for their dedication and talent; expressed kind thoughts to students and staff of the Waukesha School District following the student incident; board meeting retreat “find a date” survey form should be completed; asked board members to confirm attendance for the next Dane County Equity Consortium meeting, January 15, 2020 for registration. 4. Consent Agenda-A motion was made by FitzGibbon, seconded by Sorg and carried unanimously to approve the November 4, 2019 Regular Board Meeting Minutes & November 18, 2019 Regular Board Meeting Minutes as presented; approval of the November 14 — December 17, 2019 check register as presented; We would like to say thank you to the following individuals and groups and move approval of their donations to the district: $8,000.000 from the Kegonsa Working for Kids for Library Books, $1,000.00 from Lexi Argall for the William Argall Memorial Scholarship, $25.00 from Kent & Helen Karberg for the Margaret Larson Memorial Scholarship (in memory of Doug Stolen), Clothes for students at Sandhill from Susan & John Johnson (Erica Weber Family) valued at $250.00, Clean clothes to distribute to students who need a change of clothes while at school from Covenant Lutheran Church valued at $227.00, cold weather wear for students from LakeView Church valued at $30.00, Snacks for students/families from Covenant Lutheran Church valued at $60.00, student supplies from April Knight valued at $15.00 and related cash donation budget adjustments totaling $9,025.00. 5. Discussion A. Committee Reports-Policy: Bubon reported that the committee has finished the 2000 section with good discussion; next meeting January 6, 2020. Ad Hoc: Hoppe reported on the completion of the Young Families survey by Amanda Hoffman; explanation of data presentation in February 2020 was discussed by Hoppe, Onsager and board members. B. Linkages-President Sullivan encourages everyone to participate in city council meetings. Jackson reported on the Band Booster’s meetings moving to Tuesdays and the newly formed Orchestra Boosters group. Hoppe reported on SHS performances that she attended. Patterson reported on the Fox WFK’s Fun Run event. Freye reported on meeting with Mayor Swadley and their KPW discussion; more meetings with the mayor will continue. C. 2018-2019 Audit Update — Brian Mechenich (Reilly, Penner, and Benton) presented the results of the annual audit. A question and answer session followed. The District received an unqualified opinion which is the best rating to receive.

D. Annual Safety Report — Luke Butz, Buildings & Grounds Supervisor, presented the annual safety report which included information about our safety programs, ALICE implementation and training, and future secure entrance plans for next year. A question and answer session followed. E. Transportation Update-Karen Johnson, SASD Transportation Coordinator, presented the annual transportation update which included information about upcoming department initiatives and routing/ planning software. A question and answer session followed. 6. Meeting Closing A. Recap of Action Items-None. B. Future Meetings/Events: Regular Board Meeting — December 16, 2019; Policy Committee Meeting — December 2, 2019; Employee Relations Committee — December 16, 2019; Board Retreat — Date to be announced; Finance — January 20, 2020 C. Adjournment-A motion made by Freye, seconded by Jackson, and carried unanimously to adjourn at 8:45 pm. _____________________ Yolibeth FitzGibbon, Clerk Published: January 23, 2020 WNAXLP *** BOARD OF EDUCATION STOUGHTON AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT BOARD-REGULAR MEETING (MONDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2019) 1. Regular Board Meeting Opening-A regular meeting of the Stoughton Area School District Board of Education was called to order on Monday, December 16, 2019 at 7:00 pm in the Board Room by Board President Francis Sullivan. A. Roll Call-Present: Bubon, Coughlin, Freye, FitzGibbon, Jackson, Patterson, Sorg and Sullivan. Excused: Hoppe. B. Public Comment-None. C. Legislative Update-Hoppe was excused from the meeting. No oral legislative report was given; a written report was provided for the board from Hoppe. 2. District Administrator Report-Dr. Onsager’s report included information regarding possible fund-raising ventures and the need for proper procedures. 3. Spotlight on Learning- A communication video from River Bluff administrators was presented which included middle school students sharing what they like most about their school. 4. Consent Agenda-A motion was made by FitzGibbon, seconded by Sorg, and carried unanimously to approve the December 2, 2019 Regular Board Meeting Minutes as presented; approval of the November 27, 2019-January 7, 2020 check register and December 11, 2019 Pcard statement as presented; We would like to say thank you to the following individuals and groups and move approval of their donations to the district: $4,079.73 from Fox Prairie Working for Kids for Schoolwide trip to the Overture Center in Madison on 1/27/2020; $1,500.00 from Fox Prairie Working for Kids for books to give away to Fox Prairie Elementary students for RIF; $1,500.00 from Deanne Eccles Rotar for Scholar Athlete Shirts/Strength & Conditioning Shirts; $500.00 from Rotary Club of Stoughton for the Kegonsa Little Food Pantry; $150.00 from Kegonsa Working for Kids for student participation fess for AllState Choir; $50.00 from Gary & Nancy Holloway for Chip in meals program; $35.00 from Kegonsa Working for Kids for Instrument-Recorders, Safe School Ambassador training cost from the Stoughton Wellness Coalition, c/o Teressa Pellett valued at $6,800.00, Healthy Snacks for Students from Covenant Lutheran Church valued at $50.00 and related cash donation budget adjustments totaling $7,815.23. 5. Discussion A. Committee Reports-Freye reported that the Employee Relations Committee met; meet and confer with SEA may be scheduled. B. Linkages-Several board members reported on their linkages with school buildings/school events, committees/ groups and the community. Highlights included the SHS Madrigals dinner and the River Bluff Band concert. Dr. Onsager has planned a Post Grad meeting on 1/7/2020 to talk with recent SHS grads about their education prepared them for the next step or phase in life. The board took a five-minute break at 8:10 pm and the meeting resumed at 8:15 pm. C. Advanced Learner Program Presentation-Sara Kolff, Laura Borsecnik and Chris Wiemer provided the Board with an overview of the Advanced Learning program in the District. They discussed their role in the program, what’s going well and the importance of equity. A question and answer session followed the presentation and Sullivan thanked the group for tying in the strategic plan and equity. D. BOE Post Meeting Evaluation/Survey-Board discussion ensued about the possibility of members completing a post meeting survey following each meeting. Members agreed on the survey concept including possible questions. Survey will be created and reviewed. 6. Meeting Closing A. Recap of Action Items-None. B. Future Meetings/Events: Holiday Gathering 12/18/2019; Regular Board Meeting-1/6/2020 & 1/20/2020; Board Retreat-1/11/2020; Policy Committee Meeting-1/6/2020; Finance Committee-1/20/20; State Education Convention 1/221/24/2020. C. Adjournment-A motion was made

by Freye, seconded by Jackson, and carried unanimously to adjourn at 8:42 pm. _____________________ Yolibeth FitzGibbon, Clerk Published: January 23, 2020 WNAXLP *** NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The City of Stoughton Landmarks Commission will hold a Public Hearing on Thursday, February 13, 2020 at 6:30 o’clock p.m., or as soon after as the matter may be heard, at the Opera House, Lower Level, 381 E. Main Street, Stoughton, Wisconsin, 53589, to consider a proposed ordinance amendment to the City of Stoughton Municipal Code of Ordinances, Historic Preservation Ordinance sections 38-32 and 38-36(a). This proposed amendments are to clarify that the Landmark definition includes all improvements to a landmarked parcel that have special character, historic interest, heritage or cultural character in the City of Stoughton, Dane County, Wisconsin. For questions regarding this notice, please contact Michael Stacey, Zoning Administrator at 608-646-0421 Published January 23 and 30, 2020 WNAXLP *** PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE The City of Stoughton Plan Commission will hold a Public Hearing on Monday, February 10, 2020 at 6:00 p.m., or as soon after as the matter may be heard, in the Council Chambers, Public Safety Building, 321 South Fourth Street, Second Floor, Stoughton, Wisconsin, 53589, to consider a proposed Conditional Use Permit Application by Ron Grosso, for multiple principal buildings on a lot at 441 Glacier Moraine Drive, Stoughton, Wisconsin. The property at 441 Glacier Moraine Drive is currently owned by the City of Stoughton. For questions regarding this notice, please contact Michael Stacey, Zoning Administrator at 608-646-0421 Additional information including a location map can be viewed at: http://stoughtoncitydocs.com/planning-commission Published January 23 and 30, 2020 WNAXLP *** PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE The City of Stoughton Plan Commission will hold a Public Hearing on Monday February 10, 2020 at 6:00 o’clock p.m., or as soon after as the matter may be heard, in the Council Chambers, Public Safety Building, 321 S. Fourth Street, Second Floor, Stoughton, Wisconsin, 53589, to consider a proposed rezoning of the following parcel of land located at 1640 E. Main Street, Stoughton, WI, owned by Natter Marital Property Trust. The property is proposed to be rezoned from RH Rural Holding to PB Planned Business and is described as follows: Parcel Number: 281/0511-043-9871-5 Description for tax purposes: SEC 4-5-11 PRT SE1/4SW1/4 E 298.8 FT OF S 285 FT THF EXC 0.07 A TO DOT IN DOC 2235498 (R15097/9) SEE PLAT OF SURVEY 2001-00479 For questions regarding this notice, please contact Michael Stacey, Zoning Administrator at 608-646-0421 Additional information including a location map can be viewed at: http://stoughtoncitydocs.com/planning-commission/ Published January 23 and 30, 2020 WNAXLP *** PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE The City of Stoughton Plan Commission will hold a Public Hearing on Monday, February 10, 2020 at 6:00 o’clock p.m., or as soon after as the matter may be heard, in the Council Chambers, Public Safety Building, 321 South Fourth Street, Second Floor, Stoughton, Wisconsin, 53589, to consider a proposed Conditional Use Permit Application by Maggie Gasner. The applicant is requesting conditional use approval for a Group Daycare (Weebleworld Child Care Center) at 1640 E. Main Street, Stoughton, WI. 53589. The property description is as follows: Parcel Number: 281/0511-043-9871-5 Description for tax purposes: SEC 4-5-11 PRT SE1/4SW1/4 E 298.8 FT OF S 285 FT THF EXC 0.07 A TO DOT IN DOC 2235498 (R15097/9) SEE PLAT OF SURVEY 2001-00479 For questions regarding this notice, please contact Michael Stacey, Zoning Administrator at 608-646-0421. Additional information including a location map can be found at: http://stoughtoncitydocs.com/planning-commission/ Published January 23 and 30, 2020 WNAXLP *** ORDIANCE OF THE COMMON COUNCIL CITY OF STOUGHTON, 207 S. FORREST STREET, STOUGHTON Notice is hereby given that at a regular Common Council meeting on January 14, 2020, the City of Stoughton Common Council approved O-27-2019: Repealing and recreating Section 58-6 and 58-8 and creating Sections 58-12 and 58-13 of the City of Stoughton Municipal Code relating to Public Nuisances. The full ordinance is on file for examination at the City Clerk’s Office. Published: January 23, 2020 WNAXLP

*** MEETING OF: COMMON COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF STOUGHTON Date//Time: Tuesday, December 10, 2019 @ 7:00 p.m. Location: Council Chambers (2nd Floor of Public Safety Building) 321 South Fourth Street, Stoughton, Wisconsin Members: Mayor Tim Swadley, Matt Bartlett, Sid Boersma, Phil Caravello, Ozzie Doom, Ben Heili, Regina Hirsch, Greg Jenson, Jean Ligocki, Tom Majewski, Lisa Reeves, Timothy Riley, and Brett Schumacher CALL TO ORDER Roll Call, Communications, and Presentations: Mayor Swadley called the meeting to order at 7:02 p.m. Majewski left the meeting at 7:37 p.m. Clerk Licht called the roll and noted there were 12 alders present. December 24, 2019 Council meeting is canceled. Senior Center Director Cindy McGlynn presented the Senior Center Accreditation. Minutes and Reports: the following minutes were entered into the record. Finance (11/12/19); CACP (11/5/2019) Public Comment Period: there were no comments from the public. Taxi Service Expanded Hours CONSENT AGENDA A. November 26, 2019 Council Minutes B. R-189-2019- Resolution Appointing Election Inspectors for the 2020-2021 term Motion by Jenson, second by Hirsch to approve. Ligocki noted that under old business it should state 18 constituents expressed their thoughts on Phase II TIF request. Motion carried 12-0. OLD BUSINESS O-25-2019- Amending Chapter 50-6 Subsection (b) of the City of Stoughton Municipal Code; by adding Nordic Ridge Park to the list of City Parks where alcohol is allowed by permit Motion by Jenson, second by Hirsch. to approve O-25-2019. Motion carried 11-1 with Boersma voting no. O-26-2019- Ordinance Providing for the Direct Annexation of a Portion of the Town of Dunn to the City of Stoughton, Dane County, Wisconsin Motion by Caravello, second by Heili to approve O-26-2019. Motion carried on a roll call vote 9-3 with Caravello, Hirsch, and Majewski voting no. NEW BUSINESS R- 190-2019- Authorizing and directing the proper City official(s) to enter into an agreement to continue participation in the Madison Area Municipal Storm Water Partnership (MAMSWaP) Motion by Schumacher, second by Reeves to approve R-190-2019. Motion carried 11-0. R-191-2019- Approving a financial agreement between the State of Wisconsin and the City of Stoughton for costs for the construction of roundabouts on US Highway 51 at Hoel/Silverado, STH 138 and Roby Road scheduled to be constructed in 2021. Motion by Schumacher, second by Jenson to approve R-191-2019. Motion carried 11-0. R-192-2019- To authorize an increase in operating hours for Stoughton Transit and to authorize the Addendum to the 2018 Shared Ride Taxi Contract with Running Inc. Motion by Schumacher, second by Reeves to approve R192-2019. Motion carried 11-0. R-193-2019- Authorizing and directing the proper City official (s) to engage Baker Tilly for Utilities audit services for the years ending 2019, 2020 and 2021 Motion by Schumacher, second by Jenson to approve R-193-2019. Motion carried 11-0. R-194-2019- Authorizing and directing the proper city official(s) to utilize excess

funds in the 2019 Capital Outlay Budget not to exceed $2,500 to cover deficiencies in the 2019 Body Camera Replacement budget. Motion by Schumacher, second by Jenson to approve R-194-2019. Motion carried 11-0. R- 195-2019- Authorizing and directing the proper City official (s) to terminate the existing Medical Director Agreement and enter into a new agreement with Southern Wisconsin Emergency Associates, S.C. (SWEA) regarding the provision of Medical Director Services Motion by Schumacher, second by Reeves to approve R-195-2019. Motion carried 11-0. R-196-2019- Authorizing and Directing the proper city official (s) to amend the 2019 City of Stoughton Operating Budget Motion by Schumacher, second by Heili to approve R-196-2019. Motion carried 11-0. O-27-2019- Repealing and recreating Section 58-6 and 58-8 and creating Sections 58-12 and 58-13 of the City of Stoughton Municipal Code relating to Public Nuisances Bartlett read O-27-2019 as a first reading. It will be back before the council on January 14th. ADJOURNMENT Motion by Jenson, second by Riley to adjourn at 8:13 p.m. Motion carried 11-0. Respectfully Submitted, Holly Licht, Clerk Published: January 23, 2020 WNAXLP *** PUBLIC INFORMATION AND INPUT MEETING NOTICE YAHARA RIVER PARK PROJECT The City of Stoughton Parks & Recreation cordially invites you to attend a Public Information and Input Meeting concerning the Yahara River Park Project. Wednesday, January 29, 2020 7:00 pm Stoughton High School – Performing Arts Center, 600 Lincoln Avenue The purpose of this project is to improve the Yahara River for recreational use. The project includes multi-use pedestrian trails, pedestrian bridge connecting to Mandt Park, and in-stream improvements for paddling. The intent of the meeting is to present the preliminary design of the project and take questions. The meeting will begin at 7:00 pm to present the history of the project and the updated design. Following the presentation, attendees will have the opportunity to ask one-on-one questions. Representatives from the City of Stoughton Parks and project consultant from Recreation Engineering and Planning will be present to discuss the project and answer questions. An opportunity to offer comments during the meeting or in writing after the meeting will be provided. Written comments will be accepted until February 15, 2020, at the City of Stoughton City Hall, or via email (dglynn@ci.stoughton.wi.us). If you have any questions or comments regarding the plan and proposed improvements, or are unable to attend the public meeting and would like to discuss the proposed project in person with a project representative, please contact Dan Glynn, at (608) 873-6746 (email dglynn@ ci.stoughton.wi.us). In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act and other applicable Federal and State laws, the meeting will be accessible to individuals with disabilities. Persons requiring a reasonable accommodation should call the City at 873-6677 preferably no later than five days before the meeting. Dan Glynn City of Stoughton, Parks and Recreation Director Published: January 23, 2020 WNAXLP ***

Pete Gunderson • Mike Smits • Dale Holzhuter Sara Paton Barkenhagen • Martha Paton Alyssa Halverson • Skyler Gunderson • • • •

Personalized Life Celebration Services Cremation Services & Options Traditional Burial Services Green Burials

Family Owned, Family Operated, Celebrating 97 Years Of Service Stoughton - 1358 Hwy. 51 N • 608.873.4590 OREGON - 1150 Park St. • 608-835-3515

www.gundersonfh.com

adno=131298

TOWN OF PLEASANT SPRINGS VOTING BY ABSENTEE BALLOT Any qualified elector who is unable or unwilling to appear at the polling place on Election Day may submit a request to vote an absentee ballot to their municipal clerk. A qualified elector is any U.S. citizen, who will be 18 years of age or older on Election Day, who has resided in the ward or municipality where he or she wishes to vote for at least 10 consecutive days before the election. The elector must also be registered in order to receive an absentee ballot. Proof of identification must be provided before an absentee ballot may be issued. You must make a request for an absentee ballot in writing or online at MyVote. wi.gov. Contact your municipal clerk and request that an application for an absentee ballot be sent to you for the primary or election or both. You may also submit a written request in the form of a letter or you may apply for an absentee ballot online at MyVote.wi.gov. Your written request must list your voting address within the municipality where you wish to vote, the address where the absentee ballot should be sent, if different, and your signature. You may make application to your municipal clerk for an absentee ballot in person, by mail, by fax, by email or at MyVote.wi.gov. Making application to receive an absentee ballot by mail The deadline for making application to receive an absentee ballot by mail is: 5 pm on the fifth day before the election, February 13, 2020 Note: Special absentee voting application provisions apply to electors who are indefinitely confined to home or a care facility, in the military, hospitalized, or serving as a sequestered juror. If this applies to you, contact the municipal clerk regarding deadlines for requesting and submitting an absentee ballot. Voting an absentee ballot in person You may also request and vote an absentee ballot in the clerk’s office or other specified location during the days and hours specified for casting an absentee ballot in person. Maria Hougan – Town of Pleasant Springs (608) 873- 3063, 2354 County Rd. N Office Hours: Monday – Tuesday, 8:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m., Thursdays, 9:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. The first day to vote an absentee ballot in the clerk’s office is/was: Monday, February 3, 2020 8:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. The last day to vote an absentee ballot in the clerk’s office: Friday, February 14, 2020 12:00 noon to 5:00 p.m. No in-person absentee voting may occur on the day before the election. The municipal clerk will deliver voted ballots returned on or before Election Day to the proper polling place or counting location before the polls close on (insert date of primary or election). Any ballots received after the polls close will not be counted. Published: January 23, 2020 WNAXLP


Dec. 13 Officers arrested an 18 year old man for disorderly conduct, criminal damage to property, and bail jumping following a domestic disturbance. Officers arrested a 20 year old man and a 17 year old girl for possession with intent to deliver a Schedule V drug, possession with intent to deliver THC, carrying a concealed weapon, and possession of a Schedule I Drug following an investigation into a disturbance at an apartment complex.

Dec. 14 Officers arrested a 42 year old woman on an outstanding warrant following a disturbance at an apartment complex. Officers arrested a 26 year old man for felony bail jumping and disorderly Dec. 1 conduct while armed folOfficers arrested a 48 lowing a domestic disturyear old woman for disor- bance where the subject derly conduct following a banished a pistol during domestic disturbance. the argument. Dec. 3 Officers arrested a 24 year old woman for disorderly conduct following a domestic disturbance. Officers arrested a 21 year old man for armed robbery and physical abuse of a child following an incident where a victim was struck with a broom handle and robbed of a cell phone. Officers reported that the incident occurred as part of a drug incident between the parties. Minor injuries resulted to the victim.

Dec. 15 Officers arrested a 23 year old man for felony bail jumping and disorderly conduct following a domestic disturbance. Officers arrested a 49 year old female for disorderly conduct and bail jumping following a domestic disturbance.

Dec. 5 Officers arrested a 27 year old man on an outstanding warrant after a traffic stop. Officers arrested a 48 year old male on a probation hold and several traffic violations following an investigation into a hit and run crash on E. Main Street at Chalet Drive. The subject was also charged with hit and run to an occupied vehicle and operating after suspension. Subject was identified when the incident was captured by one of our traffic cameras.

Dec. 19 Officers arrested a 60 year old woman on an outstanding warrant following an investigation into a suspicious vehicle and the driver had a warrant.

Dec. 7 Officers arrested a 28 year old woman for possession of a Schedule I Drug and retail theft following a shoplifting incident at a retail store. Subject was also found to be in possession of the controlled substance. Dec. 12 Officers arrested an 18 year old man for disorderly conduct and possession of THC following a domestic disturbance.

Dec. 17 Officers arrested a 49 year old male on a parole violation following a drug overdose incident.

Dec. 22 Officers arrested a 23 year old man on for OWI second offense and bail jumping following a traffic stop. Dec. 25 Officers arrested a 59 year old man for a felony 11th Offense OWI following a hit and run crash. A witness followed the subject to a local establishment where he was taken into custody. The suspect was also currently on probation for previous offenses. The suspect was also charged with several other traffic violations. Dec. 31 Officers are searching for a subject from a domestic disturbance. The suspect fled the scene prior officers arriving. Charges are pending.

STOUGHTON 2-BEDROOM 2 unit building. Parking for 1 car per unit in back lot. No Pets. Rent $760. Available. 608-332-6013.

DESIGNER BAG bingo at Village Lanes 208 Owen Road, Monona Tuesday, Feb. 4th, 6:45pm $25=8 games wdrawings WIN Coach, Kate Spade+More Valued at $2500 LIMITED SEATING Advance Tickets at Village Lanes or email designerbagbingo2@gmail.com

Storage Spaces For Rent ALL SEASONS SELF STORAGE 10x10 10x15 10x20 10x25 10x30 Security Lights-24/7 access OREGON/BROOKLYN CALL 608-444-2900

Automotive 2011 JEEP Wrangler, only 51,000 miles, exterior and interior in excellent condition! 4 WD, 2 Door, White, with remote start! Custom wheels-rims w 3.5" lift & 2.5" spacers. Custom grill and new running boards. $17,250. Call or text 563-258-1335.

Help Wanted EXCLUSIVELY ROSES is seeking drivers for Valentine's Day deliveries February 11th, 12th and 13th. Routes go to Chicagoland. $200-Route+Gas. Drivers must use their own vehicle. STRICTLY LIMITED to minivans and cargo vans. Apply at www.erifloral. com. To call us, dial 608-877-8879. IN-HOME CAREGIVER. 3-times a week, 2 hours-per-day. Help with housework, laundry, showering. Flexible hours. 608-845-9199. JOIN EXCLUSIVELY ROSES in Valentine's Day bouquet production February 1st-10th in a bright, energetic working environment! We offer flexible shifts, days, evenings and weekends. Up to $16-Hour. Apply at www. erifloral.com. To call us, dial 608-8778879. Owner operator to lease on, pulling hopper bottom. Local and or OTR. Must have own truck and trailer. 608723-7197.

Services OFFICE CLEANING in Stoughton Mon-Fri 5pm. Visit our website: www. capitalcityclean.com or call our office 608-831-8850.

connectstoughton.com

FRENCHTOWNSELF-STORAGE Only 6 miles South of Verona on Hwy PB. Variety of sizes available now. 10x10=$65-month 10x15=$75-month 10x20=$85-month 10x25=$95-month 12x30=$120-month Call 608-424-6530 or 1-888-878-4244

RECOVER PAINTING currently offering winter discounts on painting, drywall and carpeting. Recover urges you to join in the fight against cancer, as a portion of every job is donated to cancer research. Free estimates, fully insured, over 20 years of experience. Call 608-270-0440. SNOW PLOWING Residential & Commercial Fully Insured. 608-873-7038 or 608-669-0025

RASCHEIN PROPERTY STORAGE 6x10 thru 10x25 Market Stree/tBurr Oak Street in Oregon Call 608-520-0240 UNION ROAD STORAGE 10x10 - 10x15 - 10x20 - 12x30 24-7 Access Security Lights & Cameras Credit Cards Accepted 608-835-0082 1128 Union Road, Oregon, WI Located on the corner of Union Road and Lincoln Road

REDFEST RED ANGUS SALE, registered bulls, heifers and cows, commercial heifers and cows. Bloomington Livestock Exchange, Sunday, April 5. redfestredangus.com. 608-778-6736.

Feed & Seed

Antiques BUYING US Gold & Silver Coins and Collectibles. Call 608-988-6406 Rick Miles Coin.

Swifthaven Community 30 bed Assisted Living in Edgerton Wisconsin is looking to fill the following Positions. • Full-time 1st shift caregiver 7a-3p available immediately.

Miscellaenous SEASONED SPLIT OAK, Hardwood. Volume discount. Will deliver. 608609-1181.

• Full-time 3rd shift caregiver 11p-7a available immediately. • Part-time substitute caregiver positions hours would vary.

WE BUY Junk Cars and Trucks. We sell used parts. Monday thru Friday 8am-5:30pm. Newville Auto Salvage 279 Hwy 59 Edgerton 608-884-3114

If you enjoy working with people this is the job for you!! Application are available on www.swifthaven.com or at

Rentals GREENWOOD APARTMENTS. Apartments for Seniors 55+,currently has 1 & 2 bedroom units available starting at $810 per month,includes heat, water, and sewer. 608-835-6717 Located at:139 Wolf St., Oregon, WI 53575 ROSEWOOD APARTMENTS for Seniors 55+. 1 & 2 bedroom units available starting at $810 per month. Includes heat, water and sewer. Professionally managed. Located at 300 Silverado Drive, Stoughton, WI 53589. 608-877-9388

OFFICE/RETAIL Space for rent in Downtown Oregon. Available now. 1274 sqft, $1062 per month or 480 sqft, $400 per month. Heat included in rent. Contact 608-333-4420 or 715891-4784 for showing and further information.

NEW FACTORY built homes 3 BR, 2 BA put on your foundation. $59,980 HORKHEIMER HOMES Hazelton, IA. 800-632-5985.

OFFICE SPACES FOR RENT In Oregon facing 15th hole on golf course Free Wi-Fi, Parking and Security System Conference rooms available Kitchenette-Breakroom Autumn Woods Prof. Centre Marty 608-835-3628

Machinery

Farm RENT SKIDLOADERS MINI-EXCAVATORS TELE-HANDLER and these attachments. Concrete breaker, posthole auger, landscape rake, concrete bucket, pallet forks, trencher, rock hound, broom, teleboom, stump grinder. By the day, week, or month. Carter & Gruenewald Co. 4417 Hwy 92, Brooklyn, WI 608-455-2411

NEW HOLLAND 195 manure spreader, 3 years old. $12,000. 608-7260095.

AWARDED FOR SAFETY THANK YOU DRIVERS!

3 GREAT GREAT CDL CDL A DRIVERS D CALL CA TO QUALIFY Apply by January 24, 2020 Ap

» Steady Income » 100% PAID Benefits » Non-hazmat Tanker » Company Training » 2 years experience

JENSEN TRANSPORT, INC. EOE 1-800-772-1734 • WWW.JENSENTRANSPORT.COM

Universal Banker

Home Savings Bank is looking for an energetic Universal Banker to join our Stoughton Team. Position Summary: This position provides existing customers with a full range of banking services, including opening and processing a full range of consumer and business deposit accounts. Meets with customers face to face to discuss personal financial goals, and recommends bank services to meet those goals. Assists customers and provides solutions that meet their needs. Effectively maintains a solid base of business by developing relationships with existing and potential customers. This position also assists with marketing efforts in the growth of the branch office. Minimum Qualifications (education and experience): High school diploma or equivalent; minimum 2 years of retail banking experience; in depth knowledge of our consumer products and services; working knowledge of business deposit products and services; availability to work Saturdays on a rotating schedule. Interested candidates should email resumés to HR@home-savings.com or mail to Home Savings Bank, Attn: Human Resources, 3762 E Washington Ave, Madison, WI 53704

VILLAGE OF BROOKLYN POLICE DEPARTMENT

• Full-time 2nd shift caregiver 3p-11p available immediately.

Wanted

Real Estate

QUALITY WESTERN hay, grassy small squares. Check it out. Possible delivery. Wholesale-retail. The Hay Farm, 3696 Hwy 18, Fennimore, WI 53809.

Pets SPECIALIZING IN non-shed & hypo-allergenic, Mini DOUBLEDOODLES!!! AND MINI & PETITE Goldendoodles, Cockapoo, Poochons, Teddy Bears, Cavapoos, Morkies, Yorkie $695 to $1,495 or more #484991 We help train! www. SpringGreenPups.com 608-5747931.

Office Space For Rent

NORTH PARK STORAGE 10x10 through 10x40, plus 14x40 with 14' door for RV & Boats. Come & go as you please. 608-873-5088

Livestock

A&B ENTERPRISES Light Construction Remodeling No job too small 608-835-7791

124 Henry Street Edgerton WI. 608-884-2828 ext. 1006 EOE adno=134008

PART-TIME POLICE OFFICER The Brooklyn Police Department is currently accepting applications for a part-time police officer. $20-22/hour. Uniforms will be supplied. Must be at least 21, US citizen, DL with good driving record, WI LESB Law Enforcement Academy completion; at least 1-3 years experience as a State Certified Police Officer in Wisconsin, ability to possess a firearm, good communication skills, ability to multitask, knowledgeable with computers, among other qualifications. Ability to work days, evenings, weekends and holidays. APPLY: DJ-LE-330 and resume due Monday, February 17, 2020 by 5:00 PM to the Brooklyn Police Department, 102 N. Rutland Ave., Brooklyn, WI, 53521 or email Chief Wade Engelhart at engelhart@brooklynwi.gov. Extensive background investigation will be conducted AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

adno=136466

Increase your sales opportunities…reach over 1.2 million households! Advrtise in our Wisconsin Advertising Network System. For information call 835-6677. Agricultural/Farming Services Vacation & Travel SEED TREATMENT for soybean White Mold and SDS! Ask Fishermen: Perch, Walleye, Northern fishing. Kidder County your seed dealer for Heads Up Seed Treatment. Cost effective, ND has 30+ lakes with safe ice. Hotel room, fishing map, cleanproven results: www.headsupST.com or 866/368 9306 ing station. 833-635-5195. Cobblestone Inn, Steele, ND. GOT LAND? Our Hunters will Pay Top $$$ To hunt your land. Call for a FREE info packet & Quote. 1-866-309-1507 adno=136565

EARN EXTRA $ WORKING ONLY A FEW HOURS A DAY!

SELL IT NOW…

The Wisconsin State Journal is looking for a carriers in the following areas. Must be available early A.M.s, 7 days a week and have a dependable vehicle.

Evansville Routes: adno=136569

in the Classifieds! 873-6671 or

DEER POINT STORAGE Convenient location behind Stoughton Lumber. Clean-Dry Units 24-HOUR LIGHTED ACCESS 5x10 thru 12x25 608-335-3337

11

adno=136568

The Stoughton Police Department logged 2,162 incidents for December. Cases of interest for the month were: one armed robbery, four OWI’s, two drug incidents, 18 thefts, 15 domestic disturbances, three threats, 21 disturbances, 28 disorderly conducts, 21 traffic crashes, 66 EMS assists, nine alarms, eight juvenile incidents, 47 911 calls, two warrant arrests, 13 animal complaints, and officers responded to 38 suspicious activity calls. Officers also logged 46 check persons, 29 check properties, 70 assist cases, 30 criminal charges, 18 ordinance violations and 24 traffic arrests from 73 traffic stops. The following were identified as significant cases by the Stoughton Police Department:

Bingo

Stoughton Courier Hub

EVN101, Approx $450/Mo EVN102, Approx $600/Mo

Cambridge Routes: CAM103 Approx $500/Mo

Stoughton Routes: STO102, Approx $825/Mo STO104, Approx $500/Mo STO103, Approx $525/Mo STO105, Approx $495/Mo STO108, Approx $465/Mo

For more information, call or email Kevin at 608-225-3693 or KHenry@madison.com

adno=130608

POLICE

January 23, 2020

adno=136595

ConnectStoughton.com


12

January 23, 2020

Stoughton Courier Hub

ConnectStoughton.com

Photos by Mackenzie Krumme

From left to right, Kristin Rosenberg, Mikayla Simpson Verriden and Maggie Mechler pause from recording to wait for the audio software to process on Friday, Jan. 17. The weekly podcast, the Bluegill News is recorded on Fridays at Kegonsa Elementary School.

Podcast: Bluegill News provides student voice, extra layer of communication for families Continued from page 1 “I’m a mom, and if you send me a newsletter, my eyes will probably touch the page, but I might not necessarily intake that important information,” Rosenberg said. “Whereas, as I am a commuter, I listen to podcasts all the time … you know, you can only send home so many papers.” The Bluegill News is recorded and released on Friday. After writing the script and recording, the team edits the audio and adds music. They use a streaming website called podbean to air the podcast. It starts with announcements and always ends with a joke. The podcasts center around a theme, varying the discussion topic every week. T h i s y e a r, t h e g r o u p has centered its conversations on mindfulness and gratitude which is to help the “listener take care of themselves physically and

mentally,” one podcast explained. On an episode that aired Nov. 8, students discussed positive self talk and took turns reminding peers about their inner monologues. “When using realistic self talk – ‘This is hard’ – try to follow it up with positive self talk, ‘This is hard and I can do it,’” one of the podcasters said in the episode. That episode continued with examples of positive self talk: “This is difficult but I can figure it out. I can’t do this right now, but I will ask for help and we will get it done together. Remind yourself that you are capable, you can do it, and you are doing a good job.” “Because you are,” the group said in unison. Other topics have included how to react to someone who is upsetting you, and how being grateful can improve your mental

Be interviewed by Bluegill News The Bluegill News would like to invite community members to be interviewed on their weekly podcast. Please contact Kristin Rosenberg at kristin.rosenberg@ stoughton.k12.wi.us if you are interested.

Rhianna Starr and Kristin Rosenberg practice the script for the weekly Bluegill News podcast, which airs Fridays at Kegonsa Elementary School. The podcast includes announcements, upcoming events discussion centered around a theme, a joke and bloopers. well-being. In that episode, students cited sources from the Huffington Post and Harvard Medical School. Rosenburg said the

students are learning essential technology skills while recording. They are learning to speak clearly and not talk over each other,

because when the recording picks up multiple voices, the audio becomes jumbled. One of the most important lessons, Rosenberg said, is that the students learn it is OK to fumble and make a mistake. “Sometimes, it doesn’t always work out,” one podcaster told the Hub. “Like sometimes, it might not process or you might start when (Rosenberg) didn’t have the mic on or or you mess up, and then, you just have to keep trying.” The podcasters told the Hub that to record the best audio, they have to

remember the mic picks up every sound. So when they have to laugh, they run to the other side of the library while giggling. The students’ favorite part, they said, is often the bloopers. The group replays those highlights and laughs together about them. At the end of every episode, podcasters encourage listeners to tune in again, in unison. “That is all for this week. Catch us again next time on the Bluegill News.” Contact Mackenzie Krumme at mackenzie. krumme@wcinet.com.

Ask The Stoughton

MORTGAGE BANKING

Kathleen C. Aiken

SENIOR CARE

Q. What’s the difference between being prequalified and preapproved? A. A quick conversation with your lender about your income, assets and down payment is all it takes to get prequalified. But if you want to get preapproved, your lender will need to verify your financial information and submit your loan for preliminary underwriting. A preapproval takes a little more time and documentation, but it also carries a lot more weight. Which is better? Think of prequalification as an initial step and preapproval as the green light signaling that you’re ready to start your home search. When sellers review your offer, a preapproval means you’re a serious buyer whose lender has already started the loan process.

To apply online, go to: associatedbank.com/kaiken 117 King St. • Stoughton, WI 53589 608-873-6755 kathy.aiken@associatedbank.com

Q. Can Comfort Keepers Home Care Offer a Safe Alternative for Elders at Home? A. Home care has been proven to be an effective, safe alternative for elders who wish to live at home.

Stephen Rudolph FACHE, CSA

Instead of receiving care in a nursing home, assisted living or other care facility, seniors receive help with the activities of daily living (ADLs) in the familiar surroundings of their own home, near loved ones. Home care, is commonly provided by family members, often in partnership with professional agencies like Comfort Keepers who come into the home to give family members a respite. Comfort Keepers provide family caregivers the peace of mind that their loved one is in good hands when they cannot be with them. Home care agencies provide services, such as personal care, light housekeeping and help with the ADLs. ADLs include bathing, dressing, eating, incontinence care, using the toilet and moving in and out of a bed or chair. Comfort Keepers partner with families for the optimal amount of care to meet a senior’s specific needs, from just a few hours of care a week to full-time, 24-hour care, assuring the senior’s safety and wellbeing. The amount of service can vary depending on the senior’s need for assistance and the availability of family members to provide care that impact an elder’s ability to continue living independently. In addition, some home care providers also offer technology solutions that supplement home care, providing security for seniors at times when family or professional caregivers are not present. For more information, call Comfort Keepers at 442-1898.

579 D’onofrio Dr. #10, Madison, WI 53719 adno=131290

(608) 218-4861 • www.comfortkeepers.com

If you would like to join our Ask the Professional Section, contact Catherine Stang at (608) 873-6671 to find out how!

adno=131258 adno=49283 adno=127890

Profile for Woodward Community Media

1/23/2020 Stoughton Courier Hub  

1/23/20 Stoughton Courier Hub

1/23/2020 Stoughton Courier Hub  

1/23/20 Stoughton Courier Hub