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Trust The Best Scott Stewart & Kathy Bartels KBartels@StarkHomes.com SStewart@StarkHomes.com (608) 512-8487 • (608) 235-2927 adno=94057

It’s your paper! Friday, August 9, 2019 • Vol. 6, No. 6 • Fitchburg, WI • ConnectFitchburg.com • $1

Getting aroundabout

Inside Comprehensive Plan rewrite timeline approved Page 3 District 3 alder appointment expected Aug. 13

Fitchrona-Nesbitt closure difficult for neighboring businesses

Page 5

Business

SCOTT GIRARD Unified Newspaper Group

Photos of ongoing projects Page 15

Photos by Kimberly Wethal

Fitchburg resident Tom Thayer stands in his backyard, which has been encroached by flooding from Lake Barney and exacerbated by a high water table in the area. He’s put up 800 feet of blue flood barriers around the southern and western parts of his yard, at a cost of $40,000. Behind him, two pine trees have been drowned by the high water table.

Under pressure

Sports

Lake Barney flooding damaging homes, fields; changing ecology KIMBERLY WETHAL Unified Newspaper Group

Record-setting All-City Swim and Dive meet Page B1

Schools

Find out what’s in the plans for the new OSD school Page B7

At first glance, you might think Fitchburg resident Tom Thayer has a lakefront property. He never intended for that to be. When he purchased his home in 1985, Lake Barney was a couple hundred yards away, and there was a sprinkling of small ponds south of his home. “We had two ponds on our property, and this at one point was all wooded,” he said, pointing past a flood barrier in his backyard to a handful of dead trees enveloped by water. Now, Lake Barney, a glacial kettle that at the time spanned 30 acres, has expanded to 800 acres and encroaches on Thayer’s home to the south and west. Its growth has encapsulated smaller lakes all the way to County Hwy. D, more than a mile to the west. Thayer’s predicament is part of a larger, multifaceted problem. Heavy rain patterns late last summer and a large snow melt this spring, combined with a bike path owned by the Village of Oregon that reduced ground water’s natural flow, have put the underground PRSRT STANDARD ECRWSS US POSTAGE

PAID

John Brown, Town of Oregon resident, filled in his basement to accommodate a rising water table that filled his basement full of water. As a result, the door to the basement from the outside had to be cut in half, and the space is around 4 feet tall, about half of what it was prior to the flooding. water table under pressure and caused Lake Barney to swell. Now, homes, wildlife and farm fields all are in jeopardy. And there’s no easy fix. For one thing, seven governmental entities would be directly affected by any solution to the problem. Water flows from the City of Fitchburg to the town and

village of Oregon, and any solutions might require use of state and federal land. And the water has to go somewhere. Simply fixing the problem around Lake Barney could cause flooding elsewhere, including in the Badfish Creek, which has had its share of flooding issues over

Turn to Flooding/Page 12

Betsy Jenkins walked up to the car with Illinois license plates in the It’s Your Party parking lot, almost as dismayed as the driver, who couldn’t get to Bavaria Sausage just 100 feet away. His choices were to walk through a construction area or get back on Nesbitt Road, drive southwest to Maple Grove Drive, north to County Hwy. PD and around to the other side of Nesbitt Road – a 10-minute trip, according to Google Maps. “Every day, we have some,” Jenkins, the owner of the party supply store said as she watched the driver instead turn onto Allegheny Drive. That detour – rather than the one the city prescribes – has been since July 10 the fastest way around from one side of the Nesbitt and Fitchrona roads intersection to the other. It will remain so until October, when the new roundabout is expected to be complete. Business owners near the intersection told the Star they understand a change was needed. The four-way stop has led to backups during rush hour every weekday. But they’re disappointed in some of the city’s communication, including signage now that work is underway. “Better signage would help a lot,” said Bavaria Sausage president Judy Cottrell. Jenkins said she’s had drivers come through as fast as 50 mph, and they have sometimes directed their anger at not being able to get through the intersection at her and her employees. “I just know that this has been really challenging,” she said. The timing adds to the difficulty. Not only is the summer a busy time for It’s Your Party deliveries, Bavaria’s summer brat cookouts and Felly’s Flowers, but the Verona Road reconstruction project is still going, leaving drivers trying to get to Verona or into Fitchburg with limited options. “It’s a double whammy,” Cottrell said.

Turn to Roundabout/Page 15

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August 9, 2019

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Fitchburg Star

Biking for BGC The public joined in on the 17th annual Bike for Boys & Girls Clubs event Saturday, July 20 at McKee Farms Park, 2930 Chapel Valley Road. Hundreds of bikers pedaled their way across the finish line and into the post-ride party of cold drinks and even colder custard, as it was a hot and sunny summer day. – Emilie Heidemann Angela Bohnsack and her son, Avery Dotson, 4, both of Verona, shoot some hoops together.

Photos by Emilie Heidemann

Bike for Boys & Girls Clubs participants make their way through the finish line.

Circling around a second time The second annual Fitchburg Festival of Speed was held on Saturday, July 13, at Agora. The event involved criterium races for cyclists, a 5K run, a fun run for kids, children’s entertainment and two live music performances as the day carried on. – Kimberly Wethal Cyclists make a loop around the Agora Pavillion during the Fitchburg Festival of Speed on Saturday, July 13. Photo by Kimberly Wethal

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August 9, 2019

Fitchburg Star

3

City of Fitchburg

Alders propose 6 CIP amendments SCOTT GIRARD Unified Newspaper Group

Two of the six proposed amendments from alders on the city’s 10-year plan for capital expenses would affect projects that cost more than $5 million each. One would delay expanding the police station and move it into a single $14 million project. The other would accelerate the reconstruction of a well-traveled intersection that is expected to experience significant development in the next few years. The proposals to the city’s capital improvement plan were published on it’s website July 31. A public hearing on the amendments is planned for the Aug. 13 Common Council meeting, followed by discussion and votes on each amendment and the overall plan. The CIP outlines potential upcoming major capital projects to give staff and elected officials a chance to prepare for large expenditures. It does not lock in any spending, but helps set the baseline for the upcoming year’s budget discussion, which is in the fall. Mayor Aaron Richardson proposed a drop of more than $2 million in spending from 2019 to 2020 in his CIP proposal published in May, with $23.2 million on 2020 projects. It recommends an annual drop in spending through 2023. Among its proposed expenditures are $1.6 million in planning for an addition to the Fitchburg Police Department station in 2020 and $6.4 million for construction of a new facility in 2024, with an anticipated additional investment in 2030. Last year, Mayor Jason Gonzalez had proposed a $25 million facility to be completed in 2022. For the 2019 CIP, Ald. Dan Bahr (Dist. 2) proposed an amendment to delay the planning and return it to a

single-phase project with no investment necessary in 2030. It would save the $1.6 million this year and add $1.5 million for planning in 2022, with $9.25 million in 2023 and $2.85 million in 2024 for construction costs. Ald. Tom Clauder (D-4) proposed the other major amendment, which would move up construction on the Lacy Road-Seminole Highway intersection to 2021-22. Richardson had planned it for 2023-24, but Clauder’s amendment description cited “the anticipated increase in traffic,” as a reason to accelerate it. It would not change the budget allocated for the project, with $920,385 in 2021 and $5.22 million in 2022. The initial project description does not prescribe whether the four-way stop would become a roundabout or a stoplight; state law requires roundabouts be considered when major intersections are rebuilt. It would also reconstruct Lacy Road from a rural to an urban section west of the intersection to Savanna Oaks Middle School and Seminole Highway south of the intersection to Schumann Street. According to a staff memo, moving up the Lacy-Seminole reconstruction would push back a reconstruction project on Fitchrona Road beyond 2023, as “Seminole and Fitchrona cannot be closed down at the same time.” Other proposed amendments include adding a drone program for multiple departments back into the plan in 2021 and beyond, additional funding in 2020 for resurfacing streets in the Briarwood neighborhood, funding to complete the Dunn’s Marsh recreational circuit sometime in 2025-29 and removing $25,000 of funding for the Verona Road Business Coalition in 2021.

Updated comprehensive plan expected by spring election Council votes 4-3 for timeline despite requests on potential projects SCOTT GIRARD Unified Newspaper Group

The City of Fitchburg expects to complete its Comprehensive Plan update by the spring election. The plan, which outlines future development plans throughout the city, must receive an update every 10 years, according to state statutes. The Common Council approved the timeline for that update July 23 on a 4 to 3 vote, with the council at seven members until it appoints someone to the open seat in District 3. The last approval came in 2009 following more than six years of work. That plan outlined development expectations for the next 50 years, something the four alders who supported the March deadline July 23 pointed to as a reason to keep a tighter timeline. A draft of the plan is expected by January 2020 for discussion at Plan Commission, with a draft going to the Common Council later that month. A formal public hearing at the commission would be scheduled in February 2020 under the timeline, with another public hearing in front of the council in March or April. Other anticipated public input opportunities include a survey, focus groups and a potential open house. Members of the public who spoke during public comment periods on the plan timeline asked for a longer horizon and more opportunities for input. While the timeline would make the plan complete by the April election, it could complicate a pair of projects that have been brought up over the past two weeks: an Edgewood College athletic and outdoor learning complex along Lacy Road and an Oregon School District middle school planned for just north of the Village of Oregon limits. Neither of the pieces of land for those is in the comprehensive plan for development, meaning it would require an amendment, either now

or during the yearly amendment process, if that allowed for such substantial changes. Alds. Dorothy Krause (D-1), Anne Scott (D-1) and Julia Arata-Fratta (D-2) were the three votes against the timeline. Krause had proposed an amendment to extend the deadline to the end of July, which only received support from the same three alders. Arata-Fratta said she was concerned about the timeline before hearing about the Edgewood project, and did not want the city to “miss a lot of opportunity.” “We don’t even know because we are not discussing in depth about what is the vision we want for the city,” she said. “We are doing a refresh if we approve tonight this short time frame. It’s not close to revision.” Krause, who said “there’s been a lot of change” since the last plan was approved, said she saw the timeline as too political. “(Dan Bahr) and others want to get it done before there might be other people sitting in the seats,” she said. “Because they want to do it the way they want to do it. I hate that this has become a political discussion.” Bahr agreed he wanted it done before the election, and said that was something he believes his constituents want. “They want efficient government .. .they do not want a circus, they want things done orderly and properly and effectively,” he said.

Projects uncertain Edgewood College vice president for business and finance Michael Guns told alders July 23 that city staff had told them a change on the land they’re looking at could only be done during the 10-year rewrite, as it would be considered a “major” change – not covered by the annual amendment process. “What we’re concerned about is, if we’re not in this cycle, that we’ll be forced out 10 years,” Guns said, adding that they could be shovel-ready as soon as spring 2021. That timeline was unrealistic to city staff and some alders, given the other requirements before the plan could be amended, including a neighborhood plan and approval to extend sewer and water service to the property by a

regional planning body. Planner Sonja Kruessel told the council that they could consider adding the properties, which are across the street from land already in the urban service area, but it would seemingly go against “the best way to plan.” “It’s also worth noting that typically planning in a future Urban Development Area is not for a specific project,” she said. “If you want to add new areas, what’s changed (from the last plan)? How is this objective methodology any different?” The OSD project includes land purchased through a successful referendum last fall, and the district has indicated it will need to build the new middle school within a decade. A representative for the district, attorney Matthew Fleming, told the Plan Commission July 16 during its discussion of the timeline that it would need to be approved for the sewer and water service before it could go to a referendum for the actual building. “All of these things create kind of a long time horizon regardless,” Fleming said. “We need to get everything going now in order to get ready for accommodating that population.” The Edgewood complex could also help solve a water problem in the area, as it would maintain a wetland on the property for study by its students, Guns said. The four alders who voted in favor of the March deadline all said they were interested in the project, but weren’t sure how long the delay would be and did not want to wait for a single project. “It’s a long term conversation that’s gonna have to go on,” Ald. Dan Bahr (Dist. 2) said. “I don’t think we can just change or extend or revamp our timeline every time something comes forward.” “I think we can accommodate Edgewood,” he added. That accommodation could come in a language change in the plan to allow for more significant amendments between the 10 year updates, which Kruessel said they could “discuss the pros and cons of” over the next few months. Contact Scott Girard at ungreporter@wcinet.com and follow him on Twitter @sgirard9.

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August 9, 2019

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Fitchburg Star

Letter to the Editor

Legislative Opinions

City missing Edgewood opportunity Comprehensive plan timeframe misses opportunities, potential Last year, our families and Edgewood College were excited to enter into a partnership on turning 40 acres on our land into athletic fields and a wetland preserve. This was an opportunity we explored with our Fitchburg alders and city leadership. It would have been a winwin-win for Edgewood College, city residents, and us. It would have turned current farmland into wonderful open space and an ecologically diverse area for wildlife and study. Lastly, it would have contributed to solving water retention issues, which did not exist 10 years ago prior to nearby industrial, commercial and residential development. Unfortunately, elected officials over the past two weeks voted to accelerate the comprehensive plan, which effectively eliminates this land from being included in the urban services area. Urban services required for the Edgewood College project will already be extended to within twenty feet of our property. City residents will be deprived of a park-like atmosphere at Lacy and Seminole, where they could otherwise take a bike ride to sight-see cranes

and other wildlife that took advantage of the wetlands. It will deprive our family of the ability to utilize our land for what we believe to be its best intended purpose. It deprives Edgewood College of a great resource for its student- athletes and Environmental Sciences students. For a city that missed out on the opportunity to have Epic headquartered in Fitchburg and has a slogan of “City in Motion,” you would think the Common Council would be more flexible and open to responsible growth opportunities. Additionally, it may require us to consider alternative uses of our facilities and farmland less desirable to Fitchburg residents. Our first choice is to partner with city planners and Edgewood College to build the beautiful, value-added facility that will exist in perpetuity as seen in the rendering attached. Please reach out to your elected officials if any of the above concerns you. Make your voices heard. Tom & Lyn O’Brien Pat & Jean O’Brien City of Fitchburg

Friday, August 9, 2019 • Vol. 6, No. 6 Periodical Postage Paid, Verona, WI and additional offices. Published monthly on Friday by the Unified Newspaper Group, A Division of Woodward Communications, Inc. POSTMASTER: Send Address Corrections to The Fitchburg Star, 133 Enterprise Drive, Verona, WI 53593.

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General Manager Lee Borkowski lborkowski@wcinet.com Sales Manager Kathy Neumeister kathy.neumeister@wcinet.com Display Advertising Donna Larson veronasales@wcinet.com Daniel Duquette oregonsales@wcinet.com Catherine Stang stoughtonsales@wcinet.com Classifieds ungclassified@wcinet.com Circulation ungcirculation@wcinet.com News Jim Ferolie fitchburgstar@wcinet.com Sports Adam Feiner ungsportseditor@wcinet.com Assistant Editor Scott Girard ungreporter@wcinet.com Reporters Kimberly Wethal, Mark Nesbitt, Amber Levenhagen, Scott De Laruelle, Emilie Heidemann, Mackenzie Krumme

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My family moved to Fitchburg 16 years ago. We choose Fitchburg because of the opportunities of a newer growing city, its diversity, closeness to UW-Madison and the quality of Madison schools. In the last decade, Fitchburg has grown at a very fast pace, becoming one of the fastest growing communities in Wisconsin. This growth has been effectively managed because it created and implemented a city comprehensive plan in 2009. A comprehensive plan determines and regulates public policies on transportation, utilities, land use, zoning, recre- Arata-Fratta ation and housing. The comprehensive plan has to be reviewed every 10 years to stay in accordance with state statues, which may require the city to do revisions to the existing plan that passed in 2009. During last month’s city council meeting, it decided (on a 4-3 vote) on a short time frame of only nine months to reauthorize the current plan. One reason the mayor and some members of the council chose the shorter timeframe – which

normally could take up to one to two years – is to have it completed before the next election in April 2020. With that election only eight months away, the city must conduct a thorough analysis of the current plan, hold neighborhood meetings to obtain input from community residents and provide enough time for staff to compile information to prepare city leaders with enough information to consider it all. I voted against the short timeframe because I believe the council and staff will not have enough time to do a revision in a more inclusive way with a lot of opportunities for residents to be part of the process. The revision of the comprehensive plan is our opportunity, as residents, to discuss and regulate how the city will grow over the next decade. We shortchanged ourselves with a revision that will be done in eight months. I know that the plan created 10 years ago was robust and is still valid, but approaching and new topics have arisen within the last 10 years and must be discussed. Those include the annexation of Town of Madison and how to incorporate it the city’s land use, climate change, redevelopment, new future land

development areas and new opportunities like Edgewood College and Verona and Oregon school district future schools. We should remember that the comprehensive plan, also known as the landuse plan, is a guide intended to lead the future actions and determine the longterm legacy of a community. It establishes a vision for the future of our city, and it should not be subjected to an abbreviated timeline based on when the next election is. By voting for a short timeframe, the Council and all the City’s residents missed a great opportunity to take the required time needed to revise our comprehensive plan and not simply refresh what we did 10 years ago. If done correctly, our comprehensive plan will build on what we have already done while further promoting our community’s diversity by preparing us for the future by not missing legacy building opportunities because of a short timeframe Fitchburg residents deserve better. Julia Arata-Fratta is an alder for the City of Fitchburg representing District 2.

To Your Health

Change digital habits for increased well-being Summer for me means time up north at family cabins just south of Minocqua. There’s no internet there, and cellular data is not great, either. Even phone reception is spotty. If I need to make a call, I go out to this certain spot in the middle of the driveway, and if I’m lucky, the call doesn’t get dropped. My digital habits are different up there, by default. I can’t take internet-based work up there, Facebook will make me wait if it even loads, and a flood of texts comes in on my way down U.S. Hwy. 51 after the weekend. But it’s harder for most of us to change those habits when we’re back at home in our same old life and not Konopacki being forced to. There is a growing conversation around smarter technology use and the benefits of changing our digital habits. It can be done, and we can track the benefits of doing so. Most of us can relate to picking up our phone to check a quick email and then 45 minutes later realizing we have gone down the rabbit hole of unrelated, unimportant browsing. The products and pages we consume have been designed to hold our attention for as many minutes as possible by stimulating our brains in a way that leaves us wanting more. Tristan Harris brought attention to this back in 2013. While working at Google, he created a manifesto calling for the company to respect users’ attention, stating that we “have certain vulnerabilities that are being exploited by tech companies, leading us to act impulsively and against our own better interests.” He theorized this made it incredibly difficult to use our digital devices in a healthy, sane manner. In short, he wrote, we are using our devices as if we are addicted.

There are mental, emotional and physical tradeoffs to giving more minutes to our devices. This year, the World Health Organization included “Gaming Disorder” for the first time in its list of diseases. Researchers have also noticed a spike in young adult anxiety and depression, corresponding with a spike in smart phone use. Overusing our devices also trains our brains to demand constant stimulation. If we never get to be alone with our thoughts, we lose the ability to regulate the emotions, thoughts and signals from our bodies that tell us when our stress systems are being activated and ultimately overloaded. Ideas to improve our digital habits are starting to gain traction. Google has a site (wellbeing.google) that gives individuals and families tools for digital well-being, stating that “great technology should improve life, not distract from it.” Apps that track your daily digital use, evening winddown features, and do-not-disturb mode are all options to help people take back their power in relation to how they use technology. One way to start is to seek out times you don’t automatically check your phone. When you find yourself waiting in line at the store, delay checking your notifications. Notice that discomfort: It’s your brain’s slight addiction talking to you. Set a goal for 10 times per day that you keep your phone in your purse even when your brain tells you to check something. For a deeper dive into this process of change, I can recommend a book I just finished: “Digital Minimalism,” by Cal Newport. The author suggests starting with a full-on 30-day technology fast, apart from the basics that you need to continue functioning at work and home (i.e. email, etc.). And then after 30 days, come up with a plan for how technology will truly serve what is important to

you, rather than just slowly eat up more of your time. Cal also says we should address the void we fill with unconscious social media use before we attempt to make change. He says to add in more “intentional leisure.” That means discovering and doing things that bring you joy, just for the sake of doing them. We might think we crave time to disconnect and do nothing, but if those minutes are given to mindless browsing, we feel more depleted after and less ready to return to the demands of our lives. The book also recommends true social stimulation, ideally through in-person connections, rather than a collection of tiny social “pings” such as likes or comments on social media. A lot of time spent on social media can make us think we’ve spent an hour being social, but it won’t activate the social centers of our brains that give us feelings of well-being. That requires situations where you observe and interact with others using voice, tone, and posture, helping you have a whole-body experience. To assess how changing digital habits is helping you, monitor your internal well-being, along with other health indicators such as sleep, energy and mood improvements. Look at number and quality of real-life, in person friendships and connections and the simple ability to be present with those in front of you. Ideally, you’ll also being to see kids around you making smarter choices based on your example. In a perfect world, we’ll blend technology and wisdom and benefit much more from these amazing tools we have at our fingertips. Dr. Laura Konopacki is the owner of Body Wave Chiropractic in Fitchburg, and she has additional training in pediatrics and functional neurology.

Assembly speaker defies civil rights law over phone call access State Representative Jimmy Anderson made a reasonable request. Anderson requested to phone in to some committee meetings – just some committee meetings, not every committee meeting. Wisconsin Assembly Speaker Robin Vos refused this straightforward request, violating the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The ADA is federal civil rights law.

The ADA guarantees the constitutional right of every citizen to participate in the civic life of our democracy. The people Anderson was elected to serve, are entitled to his participation in the work of the Wisconsin State Assembly. Vos’ refusal makes second-class citizens of the people Rep. Anderson represents. Representatives Anderson and Vos both took the same oath of office: “to

uphold the constitution of the United States and the constitution of the state of Wisconsin”. The US Constitution guarantees the right of every citizen to participate in the work of government, a foundation of our democracy. By violating the ADA, federal civil rights law, Speaker Vos violates the rights of every person in Wisconsin. Dorothy Dean CEO, Disability Justice


ConnectFitchburg.com

August 9, 2019

City of Fitchburg

5

Fitchburg Star

Verona Road

3 candidates Construction limits access at McKee interview for open alder seat Highway traffic flow expected to be in place by end of year SCOTT GIRARD

The three applicants seeking to fill an open aldermanic seat tried to sell themselves to their voters Wednesday – the seven alders on the Fitchburg Common Council. The council is expected to vote for Sam Voorhees, Patrick Cheney or Shannon Strassman at its Aug. 13 meeting. Whomever is selected will fill Dan Carpenter’s Seat 6, which he vacated when he moved out of District 3 this year. It will require four votes to appoint any of the candidates, Mayor Aaron Richardson explained to the group at Wednesday’s Committee of the Whole meeting. If no one reaches that threshold on the first vote, the person with the fewest votes would be cut and there would be a second vote, he said. Candidates answered predetermined alder questions, which covered how they would interact with residents, working for a majority-minority population in the district and housing density. All three praised Carpenter and said they wanted to continue his responsiveness to citizens. “I was only interested in this seat after Dan resigned because I liked what Dan Carpenter was doing,” said Cheney, the East Fitchburg Neighborhood Association president. “I think he responded well to citizens who brought problems to him, and that’s what I’m interested in.” Strassman, a nurse for UW Health, echoed a similar tone. “I do believe in a lot of the things that Dan stands for,” she said. “We need to be

Contact Scott Girard at ungreporter@wcinet.com and follow him on Twitter @sgirard9.

Photo by Scott Girard

Crews continue to work on the future Verona Road lanes that will go under the Williamsburg Way bridge and over traffic on County Hwy. PD.

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By this year’s end, Verona Road traffic will travel underneath Williamsburg Wa y a n d ove r M c Ke e Road. That will allow nonstop traffic all the way to the light at Raymond Road. To get to that point, though, some headaches have been required. This week, the intersection of Verona and McKee roads – also known as County Hwy. PD – was closed nightly as crews installed the bridge girders that will allow traffic to flow as eventually intended. Only right turns were allowed at the intersection beginning at 7 p.m. Monday-Thursday nights, with Friday as a potential makeup date if weather delayed work earlier in the week. Last month, the Williamsburg Way bridge opened after weeks of no left turns at the intersection with Verona Road. Crews are continuing to work on the Verona

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transparent and listen to the people that we represent and really take in account what they want instead of what we think is best for them.” Voorhees praised Carpenter at times but added that there was “some room for engaging people that haven’t historically been engaged in Fitchburg.” “I think that means renters, I think that means people of color, I think that means people who have recently moved here to the city,” said the west-side ad agency employee. Voorhees has worked with political candidates, he said, and has seen their “ability to fundamentally change and improve peoples’ lives.” His fiancée, Ann DeGarmo, was recently elected to a Dane County Board seat representing parts of Fitchburg. “We have a lot of big opportunities and challenges coming up,” he said. “We need to make sure that we have as many perspectives on the table as possible.” For Strassman, being on the council would be a learning opportunity, as well as a chance to serve her community, she said. “Hopefully I will be able to learn a lot from you if I get the opportunity,” Strassman told alders. Cheney, who regularly attends city meetings and worked closely with the city during the Lacy Road reconstruction project, said he was ready to step up and represent a larger group beyond his own neighborhood. Voorhees and Cheney both said there’s a need for more “collegiality” on the council, as well, with Voorhees encouraging “working together on the issues that are affecting Fitchburg.”

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6 Fitchburg Star Fitchburg Technology Campus Back to School Block Party Aug. 22

ConnectFitchburg.com

August 9, 2019

Annual event includes music, food, games

If You Go

Soon, students will once again fill up school hallways and classrooms. Before they do, students and their families will have the chance to fill up the streets around the Fitchburg Technology Campus for the annual Back to School Block Party on Thursday, Aug. 22. The annual event, which begins at 5 p.m., is expected to include live music from Soggy Prairie, a screening of Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax at 8 p.m. and a performance from James the Magician. Past years have also included games like Giant Jenga, crafts, face paint, visits from Bucky Badger and a chance to see emergency equipment up close, like a Fitchburg fire truck up. The event will close the 2600 block of Research Park Drive.

What: FTC Back to School Block Party When: 5 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 22 Where: 2600 block of Research Park Drive Info: Search “FTC Back to School Block Party” on Facebook One of Fitchburg’s three school districts will begin school the next morning, as the Verona Area School District is starting its year early to allow time for construction renovations next summer. Both the Oregon and Madison Metropolitan school districts will begin class on Sept. 3. – Scott Girard

Senior center hosts 40th anniversary celebration KIMBERLY WETHAL

If You Go

Unified Newspaper Group

The Fitchburg Senior Center hasn’t formally celebrated an anniversary in almost 20 years. Director Jill McHone said with the center turning 40 this year, it’s time for one. “It just felt like the right time to celebrate,” she said. The event is planned to coincide with National Senior Center Month, McHone said, taking place on Thursday, Sept. 19. F r o m 4 - 7  p . m . , t h e Fitchburg Senior Center will host the anniversary celebration, complete with food truck options, live music from the Red Hot Horn Dawgs at 5 p.m. on the drive-up patio and beer

What: Fitchburg Senior Center 40th anniversary celebration When: 4-7 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 19 Where: Senior Center, 5510 Lacy Road Info: Call 270-4290 available for purchase. Two of the food cart vendors have been confirmed with Toast, which will serve paninis and sandwiches, and Jakarta, a cart that has food of an Indonesian flair. They’re working on securing one more cart, McHone said. The Chocolate Shoppe

van will sell ice cream during the event, too, she added. At 4:30 p.m., Mayor Aaron Richardson will give a speech, as will former senior center directors and mayors who were instrumental in growing the senior center, McHone said. Inside the senior center, McHone said a slideshow on the senior center’s history will play, as well as materials on what services the senior center provides. “We really want it to be a community event,” she said. Email reporter Kimberly Wethal at kimberly. wethal@wcinet.com and follow her on Twitter @ kimberly_wethal.​

Calendar of events Monday, Aug. 12

• 10-11 a.m., Preschool art at the library (ages 2-5), 729-1762

Wednesday, Aug. 14

• 8:30 a.m., Chat with Mayor Aaron Richardson, senior center, 270-4290

Thursday, Aug. 15

• 10 a.m. to noon, Wellness checks with the nurse, senior center, 270-4290 • 1-145 p.m. Bouncing babies, library, 729-1762 • 3-6 p.m., Fitchburg Farmers Market, Agora Pavilion, 5500 E. Cheryl Parkway, 277-2592

Friday, Aug. 16

• 11-11:45 a.m., Book Boogie (ages 2-5), library, 729-1762

Saturday, Aug. 17

• 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Agora Art Fair, agoraartfair.com • 10:30-11:30 a.m., Indoor Camping Adventure (ages 5-12), library, 729-1762

Monday, Aug. 19

• 6-9 p.m., Concerts at McKee: Orquesta SalSoul, McKee Farms Park, 2930 Chapel Valley Road, fitchburgchamber. com

Wednesday, Aug. 21

• 10-11 a.m., Toddler build (ages 1-3), library, 729-1762 • 6-6:30 p.m., Family pajama story time (ages 2-5), library, 729-1762

Thursday, Aug. 22

• 10 a.m. to noon, Wellness

checks with the nurse, senior center, 270-4290 • 1:30 p.m., I Love a Mystery Book Club: “The Passenger” by Lisa Lutz, senior center, 2704290 • 3-6 p.m., Fitchburg Farmers Market, Agora Pavilion, 5500 E. Cheryl Parkway, 277-2592

Monday, Aug. 26

• 10:30 a.m., Chat with Mayor Aaron Richardson, senior center, 270-4290 • 5:30-7:30 p.m., County supervisor Ann DeGarmo office hours, McKee Farms Park, 2930 Chapel Valley Road • 6-7 p.m., DIY phone cases (ages 13-17, registration required), library, 729-1762

Tuesday, Aug. 27

• 9:30 a.m., Photo and video with iPhones/iPads with FACTV (registration required), senior center, 270-4290

Wednesday, Aug. 28

• 10-11 a.m., Toddler time (ages 1-3), library, 729-1762

Thursday, Aug. 29

• 10 a.m. to noon, Wellness checks with the nurse, senior center, 270-4290 • 1-1:45 p.m., Bouncing babies (birth to prewalkers), library, 729-1762 • 3-6 p.m., Fitchburg Farmers Market, Agora Pavilion, 5500 E. Cheryl Parkway, 277-2592

Saturday, Aug. 31

• 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Fitchburg Senior Center Friends ice cream social (donations encouraged), Eplegaarden,

2227 Fitchburg Road, fitchburgwi.gov

Sunday, Sept. 1

• 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Fitchburg Senior Center Friends ice cream social (donations encouraged), Eplegaarden, 2227 Fitchburg Road, fitchburgwi.gov

Monday, Sept. 2

• 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Fitchburg Senior Center Friends ice cream social (donations encouraged), Eplegaarden, 2227 Fitchburg Road, fitchburgwi.gov

Wednesday, Sept. 4

• 6-6:30 p.m., We are in a book club! (ages 5-8), library, 7291762 • 7-8 p.m., Microsoft Word Basics (registration required), library, 729-1763

Thursday, Sept. 5

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• 6-7 p.m., Breakout challenge (ages 13-17, registration required), library, 729-1762 • 6:30-8 p.m., Japanese tea ceremony and demonstration, library, 729-1763

Wednesday, Sept. 11

• 10-11 a.m. Toddler art (ages 1-3), library, 729-1762

Thursday, Sept. 12

• 10 a.m. to noon, Wellness checks with the nurse, senior center, 270-4290 • 1-1:45 p.m., Bouncing babies (birth to prewalkers), library, 729-1762 • 1:30 p.m., REACH book club: “The Eighty-Dollar Champion: Snowman, The Horse That Inspired a Nation,” senior center, 270-4290 • 3-6 p.m., Fitchburg Farmers Market, Agora Pavilion, 5500 E. Cheryl Parkway, 277-2592

Sunday, Sept. 15 • 11 a.m. to noon, Grandparents • 8:30-11 a.m., Make-A-Wish Day crafts (ages 2-5), library, Wisconsin: Walk for Wishes, 729-1762 McKee Farms Park, 2930 Saturday, Sept. 7 Chapel Valley Road, jpekol@

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Monday, Sept. 16

• 9:30 a.m., Preschool storytime (ages 2-5), library, 729-1762 • 3:30-4:30 p.m., Cover letter and LinkedIn 101 presentation, Monday, Sept. 9 library, 729-1763 • 9:30 a.m., Preschool storytime • 6-7 p.m., Make a Pinata (reg(ages 2-5), library, 729-1762 istration required), library, 7291762 Tuesday, Sept. 10

• 10 a.m. to noon, Wellness checks with the nurse, senior center, 270-4290 • 11:30 to 12:30 p.m., A Good Yarn book club: “The Chillbury Ladies’ Choir” by Jennifer Ryan, library, 729-1763 • 3-6 p.m., Fitchburg Farmers Market, Agora Pavilion, 5500 E. Cheryl Parkway, 277-2592 • 6:30-8:30 p.m., First Thursday Friday, Sept. 13 Films: “Fighting With My Family” • 11-11:45 a.m., Book boogie (PG-13, 110 minutes), library, story time (ages 2-5), library, 729-1763 729-1762

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• 10-11 a.m., In the News discussion: Immigration, library, 729-1763 • 11 a.m. to noon, Smoothie sampling (ages 13-17 registration required), library, 729-1762

Wednesday, Sept. 18

• 9:30-11 a.m., Play-Doh Palooza (ages 2-5), library, 729-1762 • 10-11 a.m., Wednesday morning book discussion: “Circe” by Madeline Miller, library, 7291763 • 7-8 p.m., Microsoft Word Intermediate class (registration required), library, 729-1763

Thursday, Sept. 19

• 10 a.m. to noon, Wellness checks with the nurse, senior center, 270-4290 • 3-6 p.m., Fitchburg Farmers Market, Agora Pavilion, 5500 E. Cheryl Parkway, 277-2592 • 6-6:35 p.m., Unbookclub! (ages 9-12), library, 729-1762

Saturday, Sept. 21

• 10:30-11:15 a.m., Do Re Read Mi a Story (ages 2-5), library, 729-1762 • 1-3 p.m., Adult drop-in coloring, library, 729-1763

Sunday, Sept. 22

• 2-3:30 p.m., Movie: “Good Night and Good Luck” (rated PG, 93 minutes), library, 7291763

Monday, Sept. 23

• 9:30 a.m., Preschool storytime (ages 2-5), library, 729-1762

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Friday, Aug. 9

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ConnectFitchburg.com

August 9, 2019

Fitchburg Star

7

Third annual Race for Agrace Sept. 15 Funds end-of-life care program

If You Go

MACKENZIE KRUMME Unified Newspaper Group

Last year, more than 600 people raised $46,000 during the Race for Agrace event. This year, they hope to raise even more. The event starts at 8:30 a.m. Sunday, Sept. 15, at Agrace Hospice Care, 5395 E. Cheryl Pkwy. All proceeds benefit the Care for all Program, which ensures that anyone regardless of socioeconomic status can receive end-oflife care. “Patients get to end-of-life where there is not a cure, and they

Coming up Pack ‘n the Park Pack McKee Farms Park will be packed from 6-9 p.m. Friday, Aug. 9. There will be games, inflatables, prizes, food for purchase from the Fitchburg Optimist Club, and a movie. The movie will be “Moana,” and will start at at 8:15 p.m. For information, call 2704200.

Book boogie Boogie on down to the library 11-11:45 a.m. Friday, Aug. 16 for a morning filled with books, dancing, crafts and more. If you love music and movement, this is the program for you. Recommended ages 2-5 years.

Indoor Camping Tired of mosquitos? Not interested in sleeping on the ground? Here’s your opportunity for a camping experience without all of that at the library from 10:30-11:30 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 17. Build a bird nest, make animal tracks, read in a tent and enjoy a s’more. The event is recommended for ages 5-12. For information, call

What: Race for Agrace When: 8:30 a.m. Sunday, Sept. 15 Where: Agrace Hospice Care, 5395 E. Cheryl Pkwy. Info: agrace.org need hospice but can’t afford it. So that program pitches in a pays for patients who have financial need,” said Monica Cicci, senior editor on marketing communications team at Agrace Hospice Care. The race includes a one mile walk and a timed 5K run/walk

option. Last year’s numbers were a significant increase from the first year, Cicci said. That’s important because the need has also grown. “We found through the first half of this year- our requests (for aid) are double of what they were last year,” Cicci said. Agrace Hospice Care is a non-profit organization. Cicci said raising these necessary funds is the purpose of the organization. “It is our mission to provide people with what they need, during end of life care,” Cicci said. For information, visit agrace. org. File photo by Kimberly Wethal

Contact Mackenzie Krumme at From left, Colin Kopling, 7, of Oregon, fist-bumps family friend Randy mackenzie.krumme@wcinet.com. Rueth, of Oregon, as he waits for family members to cross the finish line during the Race for Agrace 5K on Sunday, Sept. 16, 2018.

from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. On Sunday, Sept. 1, they’ll be serving ice cream from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. A ny d o n a t i o n s g ive n during the ice cream social will be used to support the senior center’s Patient Advocate Program. For information, visit fitchburgwi.gov.

729-1763.

DIY phone cases

Create a new phone case that reflects your personality from 6-7 p.m. Monday, Aug. 26, at the library. Attendees should bring a clear or white case to customize, or they can make over their current one. The crafting session is recommended for teenagers Microsoft Word basics ages 13-17. Learn the basic skills Registration is required. required for MicroFor information, call 729- soft Word from 7-8 p.m. 1762. Wednesday, Sept. 4, at the library. iPhone video class During the class, you’ll Learn how you can turn learn how to make bolded your iPhone or iPad into text, edit line spacing and a powerful tool for pho- change page alignment settos and videos at 9:30 a.m. tings. Registration is required. Tuesday, Aug. 27, at the For information, call 729library. J e r e m y a n d A n d r e w 1763. from FACTV will teach the First Thursday movies course. Registration is required. Join the library for a For information, call 270- recently released movie on 4290. the first Thursday night of the month. Ice cream social From 6:30-8:30 p.m., the Fitchburg Senior Center library will show “FightFriends will serve free ice ing With My Family,” a cream at Eplegaarden, 2227 biographical movie about Fitchburg Road, during English WWE Champion Raya Knight. The movie is Labor Day weekend. On Saturday, Aug. 31, rated PG-13 and runs for and Monday, Sept. 2, volun- 110 minutes. For information, call teers will be at Eplegaarden

729-1763.

Grandparents Day crafts Get a jump on making the perfect gift for the best grandparent in your life with a crafting session at the library from 11 a.m. to noon on Friday, Sept. 6. The event is recommended for children ages 2-5. For information, call 7291762.

In the News Interested in discussing current events over a cup of coffee? The library will host an hour-long “In the News” discussion from 10-11 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 7. The topic of the discussion will be immigration. Selected readings will be suggested, but attendees are encouraged to bring their own news stories to discuss as well. For information, call 7291763.

specialty flavor smoothies like orangesicle, mocha and “green machine” from 11 a.m. to noon Saturday, Sept. 7, at the library. The event is recommended for teenagers ages 13-17. It is advised that some of the recipes contain foods that are common allergens. Registration is required. For information, call 7291762.

Breakout challenge Do you have the mental chops to escape from the library? From 6-7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 10, do a simulated escape room game at the library. The event is recommended for teenagers ages 13-17. Registration is required. For information, call 7291762.

Tea ceremony

Discover the history and significance of the Japanese tea ceremony with a demonstration and sampling event from 6:30-8 p.m. Tuesday, Smoothies Sept. 10, at the library. Learn to make and sample There will be a

presentation that starts the program, which will be followed by sampling of Japanese teas and sweets. For information, call 7291763.

Cover letter seminar Do you have a cover letter that’ll wow potential employers? Or do you have a LinkedIn, but don’t know how to best use it to make connections and land that next job? Nikki Ryberg will give advice to job seekers from 3:30-4:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 16, at the library. R y b e rg w i l l g o ove r effective cover letter techniques and give advice for how to use LinkedIn. For information, call 7291763.

Make a pinata Celebrate Mexican Independence Day by learning how to make a pinata from 6-7 p.m. Monday, Sept. 16, at the library. The event is recommended for children ages 5-12. For information, call 7291762.

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August 9, 2019

ConnectFitchburg.com

Fitchburg Star

Community Night Out Aug. 14 Huegel-Jamestown Park hosts from 5-8 p.m. SCOTT GIRARD Unified Newspaper Group

Fitchburg joins the national movement of an August “night out” to get to know first responders in its community this year. The Fitchburg Police Department will host the city’s first Community Night Out from 5-8 p.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 14, with community resources, businesses, first responders and emergency vehicles on hand. It will be similar to National Night Out, a nationwide event – on Aug. 6 this year – to promote community interaction. “The goal of this family friendly event is to help build a safer, healthier, and more connected community for all,” the Facebook

If You Go What: Community Night Out When: 5-8 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 14 Where: Huegel-Jamestown Park, 5902 Williamsburg Way Info: Search “Fitchburg, Wisconsin — Police Department” on Facebook

event page states. The event, at Huegel-Jamestown Park, 5902 Williamsburg Way, will include food and refreshments, as well as a MedFlight scheduled for 5:30 p.m. K9 Drago will also be on hand to meet families. Contact Scott Girard at ungreporter@wcinet.com and follow him on Twitter @sgirard9.

Graffiti artist featured at 11th annual art fair Art lovers can do more than buy art at the Agora Art Fair this year – they can watch it be made. Chicago-based graffiti artist C3PO will be creating a piece of art for attendees to view throughout the Saturday, Aug. 17, event, through a partnership with Momentum Art Tech Madison. The Agora Art Fair, in its 11th year, will feature more than 100 artists selling photography, painting, jewelry, ceramics, metals, woodworking and sculptures, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on East Cheryl Parkway in front of Agora. Four Fitchburg artists – Adam Pankratz, Kerri Shannon, Julie Snyder and Carol Widra – will be featured in the event, as well as seven from surrounding Oregon and Verona communities. T h e eve n t w i l l a l s o include live music, food carts, a wine and beer garden and crafts for children.

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From right, life-long friends Marchelle Mertens and Mary Gilmartin look at ceramic flower separators at the Agora Art Fair on Saturday, Aug. 18, 2018. Art in the Wind will return this year, with enthusiasts bringing bright kites to color the sky. In addition to pursuing art located on both the ground and in the air, attendees will also get to try their hand at graffiti art beside C3PO’s work. “This is a rare opportunity to watch an incredibly

What: 11th annual Agora Art Fair When: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 17 Where: The Agora, 5500 E. Cheryl Pkwy. Info: agoraartfair.com

talented graffiti artist at see this kind of captivating work,” said Angela Kind- art creation up close.” erman, executive director For more information, of the Fitchburg Cham- visit agoraartfair.com. ber Visitor and Business Email reporter KimberBureau, said in a news ly Wethal at kimberly. release. “Artistic expression of all kinds can help wethal@wcinet.com and bridge gaps between culfollow her on Twitter @ tures and communities, kimberly_wethal.​ and we know people will appreciate the chance to

Local reporters invite Fitchburg residents to bring their story ideas and concerns to the Star’s upcoming “Coffee With a Reporter.” Held from 2-3 p.m. Friday, Aug. 16, reporters Kimberly Wethal and Scott Girard will be available to hear from citizens at Barriques Cafe, 5957 McKee Road. Wethal is the community reporter for the Star, and

Girard covers both the City of Fitchburg and the Verona and Madison Metropolitan school districts. Reporters may pull story ideas from the session, and may ask for additional contact information, if necessary. For information, email We t h a l a t k i m b e r l y. wethal@wcinet.com. – Kimberly Wethal

If You Go What: Coffee With a Reporter When: 2-3 p.m. Friday, Aug. 16 Where: Barriques Cafe, 5957 McKee Road Info: email kimberly. wethal@wcinet.com

‘Team Hope’ event Aug. 18

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Star reporters to host ‘Coffee With a Reporter’ Aug. 16 at Barriques Cafe

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Run/walk supports people with Huntington’s disease August will kick off the statewide fundraiser for Huntington’s disease and it comes to Fitchburg on Aug. 18. At 10 a.m. Sunday, Aug. 18, McKee Farms Park opens for the Team Hope Walk for Huntington’s Disease. All proceeds support the mission of Huntington’s Disease Society of America, which is to improve the lives of everyone impacted by the disease. H u n t i n g t o n ’s d i s e a s e is a fatal genetic disorder

described as having ALS, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s simultaneously.” Registration opens at What: Team Hope Walk 9 a.m. at the event site, Madison 2930 Chapel Valley Road. Participants can run or walk When: Registration at 9 a 5K during the event. This a.m. Sunday, Aug. 18 is a family-friendly event, Where: McKee Farms where children and pets are Park, 2930 Chapel Valley encouraged to join the fun. Road The team has raised more Info: Email Shana than $16,200 so far. Vergetsen at wisconsin@ The fundraiser has taken walkforhd.org place in Neenah and Eau Claire earlier this month and is scheduled to take that causes the breakdown place in Brookfield at the of nerve cells in the brain, Fox Brook Park on Aug. 25. affecting a person’s physical and mental abilities, Contact Mackenzie according to the HDSA’s Krumme at mackenzie. website. Symptoms “are krumme@wcinet.com.

If you go


ConnectFitchburg.com

August 9, 2019

9

Fitchburg Star

OSHP presents ‘Titanic, The Musical’ Fitchburg native in cast

musical about the famous

If You Go

MACKENZIE KRUMME Unified Newspaper Group

The Oregon Straw Hat Players tackles Dane County’s inaugural amateur theater production of “TitanicThe Musical,” and 12 year old, Fitchburg-native Erica Briski plays a first-class child. Performances run at various times Saturday, Aug. 10, through Saturday, Aug. 17, at the Oregon Performing Arts Center, 456 N. Perry Pkwy. Ticket prices are $17, $15 for seniors and $12 for students. This is Briski’s eighth production with the OSHP; She has been acting since she was six years old. “It’s very, very fun,” Briski said. “I like singing and I love all the music. I love everybody and I just love everything about it.” The musical focuses largely on the human impacts of the April 15, 1912, disaster of which 1,500 people died. The play follows stories of the people aboard the ship including the owner, designer, captain, crew and passengers. Director Sami Elmer Kapusta said the play touches on gender roles, class and the progress of technology. “Theater goers should know there are no Jack and Rose, and Celine Dion’s ‘My Heart Will Go On’ is not featured in the score” the news release said. ‘What they will experience is an inspiring

What: Oregon Straw Hat Players presents ‘Titanic, The Musical” When: 2 p.m. Aug. 11, Aug 17; 7:30 p.m. Aug. 10, 15-17 Where: Oregon Performing Arts Center, 456 N. Perry Parkway Price: $17 for adults, $15 seniors, $12 students Info: oshponline.org

Photo submitted

Stephanie Drahozal, Emily Richardson, Steve Schumacher, Isabel Mancl, Rob Bolton, Emma Goecks, Eric Augustine are all cast members in OSHP’s “Titanic-The Musical.”

doomed ship.” “Titanic, The Musical” won five Tony awards in 1997, according to the news release. The production at OSHP will have a roughly 20 member orchestra to play the music, which director Sami Elmer Kapusta describes as modern, yet classical and syntagmatic. “Hands down my favorite part of the play is the music,” said Elmer Kapusta. “There are scenes with dialogue but there is almost never a time where you don’t hear music.” The majority volunteer cast, crew, staff and orchestra is comprised of nearly 100 participants of all ages from Brooklyn, Madison. McFarland, Mount Horeb, Oregon and Stoughton. For information, visit oshponline.org.

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August 9, 2019

ConnectFitchburg.com

Fitchburg Star

Fitchburg residents named Paul Harris fellows Honor considered one of the ‘highest’ at international level EMILIE HEIDEMANN Unified Newspaper Group

The Fitchburg-Verona Rotary Club presented seven of its 18 members one of the “highest (award) a Rotarian can obtain at the international level,” last month. Two of those Rotarians, Fitchburg residents Meredith Shelton and Sue Mach, are among the pool of recipients recognized for their contributions to the club and for their services to the community. They and other members received their distinctions at the monthly Fitchburg-Verona Rotary Club meeting, held at Ten Pin Alley, 6285 Nesbitt Road in Fitchburg in July. Harris was a Chicago attorney best known for founding Rotary International in 1905, according to the Rotary International website. The Paul Harris Fellow program recognizes individuals who contribute $1,000 to the Rotary Foundation or Rotary International. The website states the honor was established in 1957 to show appreciation for the funds that help support the Rotary’s Annual Fund, PolioPlus or any approved Foundation grants. “It is extremely unusual for any club in the entire world to be able to recognize seven members at the same time, especially in a

Photos by Emilie Heidemann

Above left, Meredith Shelton, president of the Fitchburg-Verona Rotary Club, accepts a pin from Ed Futa, post international Rotary secretary, and her Paul Harris award from Tom Marshall, past district governor. Above right, Sue Mach accapts her Paul Harris award from Marshall. small club like ours,” Tom Marshall, past district governor for Rotary International, wrote to the Star in an email. Shelton, club president, told the Star she felt it was “huge” for the group to have seven Paul Harris fellows. Similarly, Mach, past president and treasurer, said “it feels good” to be apart of an organization that wants to help their neighbors in an “efficient” manner. Both Shelton and Mach said they originally got involved with the Fitchburg-Verona Rotary Club because they wanted to give back. Originally a resident of Sauk Prairie, Shelton has lived in Fitchburg for half of her life. As a business manager with the City of Fitchburg and fire department for 13 years, she’s quite acquainted

with the community. Her mother was involved in the Rotary Club of Madison West Towne – Middleton and her brother participated in a rotary youth exchange program, so involvement in her group “made sense” – with a close, convenient meeting location to boot. Shelton said she’ll have joined four years ago in November. Now as president, Shelton said one of her goals is to increase the club’s social media reach and to perhaps gain more members within the next year. She said the more members the club has, the more it can accomplish in its community – projects like helping Verona’s Badger Prairie Needs Network repackage food for a kitchen-to-table food initiative on a monthly basis.

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While Shelton found her way to the club through family, Mach did so through her occupation. Originally from Oshkosh, Mach moved to the area in 2003. She was with a company that encourages community involvement and through that, she decided to get involved in the Fitchburg-Verona Rotary Club. “I like the size of ours,” Mach said. “Everyone knows each other and we have common goals and interests. We’ve done a lot of community projects during the time I’ve been involved.” From 2007 until around 2014, Mach was the club’s treasurer. She was president during the 2016-2017 year – the Rotary year runs from July 1 through June 30 of the next year. Mach recalled carrying out

projects like donating a Wii and landscaping at the Verona Senior Center. She also remembered donating a water fountain to McKee Farms Park, planting trees and doing cleanup for the Fitchburg Dog Park. Both Shelton and Mach said the individual contributions made to the Rotary through each member allows the club to pool money for charitable efforts. “A thousand isn’t a lot, but when you put it together with all the Rotary members and see all the good it’s doing, you can feel like you’ve done your part,” Mach said. Email Emilie Heidemann at emilie.heidemann@wcinet.com or follow her on Twitter at @HeidemannEmilie.

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ConnectFitchburg.com

August 9, 2019

Paulpalooza returns for second year Aug. 25 KIMBERLY WETHAL Unified Newspaper Group

Even though last year’s inaugural Paulpalooza was meant to celebrate the life of a Fitchburg teenager who died in 2017, there was still a little bit of sadness. Kathie Natzke, mother of Paul, who was born with spina bifida and died in an unexpected accident, said it was sad because it was “definitely a party he would have loved.” “The fact that he was missing was painful,” she wrote to the Star in an email. “But happy

and sad can coexist and it was so wonderful to see so many people come out to help us raise money and honor his memory.” Kathie and her husband Jim will host the event again on Sunday, Aug. 25, at The Hop Garden, 6889 Canal St., Belleville. The event runs from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., with all proceeds going to Paul’s Party, a nonprofit started by the Natzkes to celebrate Paul’s life. The nonprofit provides money for sports equipment and camps for children with disabilities, she said. “All of these things are much more

11

Fitchburg Star

If You Go

expensive for kids with disabilities, making them cost prohibitive for many families,” she said. “We don’t want kids to miss out just because they have a disability.” The event will include live music and food – including Paul’s favorite, macaroni and cheese – as well as a raffle and yard games. In addition, event host Hop Garden will be serving a special brew of “Pop-a-Wheelie Red Lager,” in memory of the red-headed wheelchair user, Kathie said. She said her goal in hosting the event is to raise money for charity, while giving people a

What: 2nd annual Paulpalooza When: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 25 Where: The Hop Garden, 6889 Canal St., Belleville Info: paulsparty.org/paulpalooza “fair representation” of her son’s life. “I want people who knew Paul to feel him, and those who didn’t, to leave thinking, ‘Wow, he must have been a super cool kid,’ because he was,” she wrote. For more information, visit paulsparty.org.

Ask the Fitchburg

MORTGAGE BANKING

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Q. What steps should buyers take when getting ready to purchase a home? A. There are several steps that buyers should take when getting

ready to purchase a home in today’s competitive market. The first step is to know your credit score. Credit scores are an important part of your financial picture. Step two is to get your paperwork in order such as: two years of tax returns, bank and investment statements, pay stubs, etc. A third important step is to save for a down payment. This step is easy to understand. The more you save, the less you have to borrow. The Shawn Pfaff last step is to sit down with a Realtor to discuss buyer agency and learn how an agent can work tirelessly on your behalf in your upcoming purchase. As a Fitchburg Realtor, I welcome the opportunity to assist buyers find the home of their dreams. Please email pfaffs@firstweber.com to get started.

Q. When is the first payment due? A. This depends on when you close your home loan and if you

Kathleen C. Aiken

pay prepaid interest at closing. For example, if you close late in the month, chances are your first mortgage payment will be due in just over 30 days. Conversely, if you close early in the month, you might not make your first payment for nearly 60 days. That can be nice if you’ve got moving expenses and renovation costs to worry about, or if your checking account is a little light.

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Q. Does the Cremation Society of Madison and State of Wisconsin require special paperwork to authorize the cremation of my body? A. Yes! Depending on who your LEGAL next of kin is and or how many children you have if any, you would be advised to complete a Wisconsin State Authorization for disposition of remains form. We are happy to answer questions about the form and provide it if you need it. Please contact us.

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SENIOR CARE

CHIROPRACTOR

Q. How can I help my senior drink enough water each day? A. Here are some ideas to help seniors stay hydrated.

Q. With the start of school right around the corner, what recommendations

• Talk to a doctor – not only can a healthcare professional provide a recommendation about how much water someone needs, they can also provide guidance and tips on managing water intake. • Create a schedule – it can be difficult to drink a lot of water in one sitting. However, creating a schedule that accounts for daily activity, physician-recommended intake levels and the preferences of the senior can help keep hydration on track. • Eat water rich foods – Eating cucumbers, watermelon, apples and other water rich produce can help Stephen Rudolph seniors get more fluids at meal times. Broth is also a good option. FACHE, CSA • Make water more interesting – For those that don’t enjoy drinking water, adding small amounts of juice or flavoring to water can make it less boring. Popsicles are also a great option…especially on warm days! • Reduce water loss – excessive sweating can contribute to dehydration – keeping inside temperatures at a reasonable level, and be mindful of fluid loss during outside activities. • Don’t wait for thirst – often, by the time seniors feel thirsty, they may already be dehydrated.

do you have for preventing back pain from heavy backpacks?

A. Every year we see more and more kids with neck, shoulder and back pain as a result

of over weight and/or improperly worn packs. Let’s start by first getting them the correct backpack. A good pack should have function first and fashion second. Find a pack that is sturdy, or slightly rigid as well as padded on the portion that rests against the spine. Jill Unwin, Lee Unwin, This will protect the back and force the items inside to sit properly. Make sure the pack DC, CCEP BCMT, CSCS has wide padded shoulder straps in order to help distribute the weight evenly. Look for a pack that has at least one waist strap and if possible, a chest strap as well. Using these straps will keep the weight from shifting when you move. A good pack will cost between $50 and $150. Finding the right back pack is only half of the equation; how you wear it and how much you put in it determines the risk of injury. A pack should not be carried on one shoulder or below the waist. Both of these positions put undue stress on the shoulders and back. Proper position is always on both shoulders and above the beltline. The weight of the pack should be no more than 10-20% of the person’s body weight. If your child does complain of neck, shoulder or back pain a thorough chiropractic evaluation is in order to determine any damage to the nervous or musculoskeletal system

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DENTIST

Q. Why is an airway evaluation an important part of my child’s dental checkup? A. Significant growth and developmental milestones occur during the first 18 months of

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Drs. Kate & John Schacherl, D.D.S.

life. As your child grows, proper breathing is essential to their health, development, and educational success. Children who cannot breathe well through their noses tend to breathe more through their mouths. This sets up a chain of events that may severely impact your child’s health and the way their facial features develop. Early detection and correction of airway problems is critical to optimizing your child’s proper growth and development. Using precision diagnostic technologies, our doctors are able to detect and address these issues before they become more serious. This is especially important if your child (or baby) snores, mouth breathes, or grinds her teeth. For babies, we also see the inability to nurse. Treatment options depend on your child’s age and symptoms and include tongue tie releases, dental appliances to increase airway size and capacity, and airway orthodontics. Drs. John and Kate Schacherl have extensive training in airway orthodontics and breathing disorders. We’re here to help. Call to schedule your free consultation appointment.

PHYSICAL THERAPY

Q. Can Stellar Rehab’s therapists come to my home to provide therapy after my knee replacement?

A.

YES! Stellar Rehab’s Physical Therapists, Occupational Therapists and Speech Therapists can provide in-home therapy services if you qualify for homecare services. There are certain criteria that must be met that determines if you are “homebound,” meaning that you require the services to be provided in your home rather than going to an outpatient setting. If those criteria are met and Susan Armstrong, MPT your physician provides an order for homecare services, your insurance will likely Physical Therapist cover your services in-home. Stellar’s partnerships with homecare agencies also allows for RNs to provide in-home care. Stellar’s highly qualified staff can help you with this process. Contact Stellar Rehab at www.stellarrehab.com to find out if this is an option for you after your knee replacement.

Comprehensive Therapy Services 1049 N. Edge Trail • Prairie Oaks (608) 845-2100 • Verona, WI 53593 • www.stellarrehab.com

If you would like to join our Ask the Professional Section, contact Daniel Duquette at 835-6677 to find out how!

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Q: It’s gorgeous outside and I want to enjoy it with my dogs, how can I keep them safe from the heat? A: With the hot summer days in full force we need to remember our four-legged friends to ensure they aren’t accidentally overheating. A dog’s normal body temperature ranges between 99.5-102.5°F, and though they can tolerate the heat for a little while, temperatures reaching 106°F or higher require emergency veterinary assistance. Dogs cool themselves down by panting, primarily, and by sweating from hairless skin like their paw pads and noses. Though these methods usually meet a dog’s needs, it is an owner’s duty to ensure their pups have ample opportunities to cool down. On hot days access to shade, plenty of fresh water to drink, and taking walks in the early morning or late evening are easy ways to beat the heat. Give field/working dogs plenty of breaks and let brachycephalic (short-snouted) breeds enjoy a little extra time inside. And never leave a dog unattended in a hot car even for a short time! Keep alert for any indicators of heat stress like excessive panting or drooling, vomiting, lack of coordination, or an altered mental state and don’t hesitate to consult your local veterinarian.

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2985 Triverton Pike Dr., Ste. 200, Fitchburg, WI 53711 pfaffs@firstweber.com • www.shawnpfaff.firstweber.com


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August 9, 2019

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Fitchburg Star

Flooding: Fitchburg resident Thayer spent $40K last fall for 800 feet of flood barriers the past decade. Limited, sometimes temporary, fixes have had to come from affected property owners, and often at a hefty cost. Thayer spent $40,000 last October for 800 feet of large blue flood barriers that line his backyard to the south and west in an attempt to keep the water at bay. His neighbor across the street, John Freiburger, had standing water in his yard during the spring and is paying out of pocket to take down almost two dozen 300-year-old trees. A mile to the southwest, Jerry Schmelzer is constantly running sump pumps to keep water out of a basement that never experienced flooding in decades prior. John Brown battled the rising water table on his Town of Oregon property last fall and nearly lost – spending thousands of dollars to fill in half of his basement in order to save his home. In addition to out of pocket costs, property owners have lost income. In some cases, crops planted during last year’s harvest couldn’t be taken out of the field last fall because of wet conditions, and a percentage of land wasn’t usable this year because fields had standing water in them. Freiburger went to the city and had his property valuation reduced after it was determined that almost a quarter of his farm land was unable to be rented out for crops. “I’ve got land that I can’t use,” he said. The heavy rains and rising water table are also changing the landscape of the area. Claudia Guy, City of Fitchburg environmental engineer, said the Madison area hasn’t seen an annual rainfall this high since the 1950s. Coincidentally, she told the Star in an email, that’s the last time Lake Barney overflowed. The only way the lake can drain is through evaporation and infiltration, she

said, and with a water table that high, it’s difficult for water to drain away into the soil. The groundwater was rated by the U.S. Geological Survey as “high” in March of this year, and in the last five months, it has only decreased in rank to “much above normal,” meaning the water table is still sitting in the “greater than 90th percentile” range, Guy said. That’s resulted in a shift in wildlife and vegetation in the area. Thayer told the Star on Aug. 5 he used to see four pairs of cranes in what used to be farm fields, but it’s since dwindled to a sole pair. Trees are also dying, as oxygen is being cut off to the root systems and the plants are basically being drowned. An emergency solution would involve clearing out the outflow. That could drop the water level by a few feet but would still leave homeowners at risk in the case of another heavy rain, Thayer said. A more permanent solution could involve a controlled system, Fitchburg Agriculture and Rural Affairs committee chair Ed Kinney said. Water could be released through the Village of Oregon at a limited rate as a way to minimize flooding events, and the land surrounding Lake Barney could operate as a large detention area. But, Kinney added, even a n e m e rg e n cy s o l u t i o n might take years to implement because it would have the excess stormwater being sent over land owned by the state Department of Corrections and would involve the DNR. And any proposed long-term fix would need the approval of all of the governmental entities involved. “There is a possibility that’s there’s just flat-out not a solution,” Kinney said.

‘A plain disaster’ Water has caused headaches for Brown before. The federal government purchased his land near the Kickapoo River alongside 140 other farms decades earlier, he said, for construction

Photos by Kimberly Wethal

John Brown, Town of Oregon resident, sits in what’s left of his basement. A rising water table forced him to take action last fall, when he filled the basement with around four feet of concrete to prevent water from collecting. His basement, previously a height of a little more than eight feet, has been reduced to around four. of the La Farge Dam. That was done to control flooding in that river valley. After moving to Oregon 20 years ago, the now 79-yearold isn’t interested in moving again. And when the flooding got bad last October, he didn’t think his home would sell anyway, given the condition the rising water table left it in. So he sunk $20,000 into repairs to keep the house livable. “It was just a plain disaster,” Brown said. “I’ve never been through anything like it in my life.” U n t i l l a s t y e a r, h i s 1860s-era home on County Hwy. D just south of County Hwy. M had no water issues, perhaps because of precautions he took to seal the perimeter of his home when he moved in. But the water table on his property began rising from the Lake Barney overflow and a lack of drainage routes for heavy rainfalls. He had two sump pumps running constantly in his then-8 foot tall basement, Brown said, but it wasn’t helping much. “A l l y o u ’r e d o i n g i s

recirculating the water,” Brown said. “You’re pumping it out, and it goes over in the pond, and then the water table stays the same and it’s just coming right back in. All you’re doing is going in a circle.” So he and a friend laid down a foot of hydraulic cement by hand. And when water continued to seep up through the floor, Brown added 32 inches of stone, two layers of plastic water barriers and four inches of fiber concrete. He had to move most of the utilities to the first floor. That meant creating a large closet in one of the bedrooms – Brown’s wife wasn’t in favor turning the entire room into a utility space – and cramming the water heater, softener, brine tank, plumbing and a stacked washer and dryer into it. The only utilities that were spared was the electric system and the furnace, which hangs from the ceiling of the basement. “At night, I wouldn’t sleep good until I got all the utilities moved up,” Brown said. “I mean, I lost weight. I wanted to go on a diet, but

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John Brown, Town of Oregon, shows off the measuring stick he used to calculate how high the water table was on his property. that’s not the kind of diet you want to go on.” Now, the only way to move around in Brown’s basement-turned-crawl space is on red rolling work stools that sit near the bottom of the stairs, which had to be cut off when the feet of concrete were added. At the bottom of the stairs, a red notebook

hangs from a nail in a wooden post, where every day, Brown records the height of the water table. He specifically noted July 3 of this year – on that day, the water table was 28 inches high. Nearly a month later, on Friday, Aug. 2, he showed

Turn to Flooding/Page 13

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Call 608-243-8800 fo or more information!


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August 9, 2019

Fitchburg Star

13

Flooding: Solution would require cooperation by multiple municipalities, state and feds

Continued work Schmelzer, Brown’s neighbor to the north just over the City of Fitchburg border, said he, too, has spent at least an hour each day redirecting water out of his basement. Because the water table is higher than his basement floor, he’s seen as much as two feet of standing water, Schmelzer said. “We haven’t had a day with a dry basement since October,” he said. “My furnace was halfway under water, and the water heater’s gone now – I have a suspended tankless water heater on the wall now.” The cost of repairs and running sump pumps for months has added up to more than $4,000, he said. But he said the larger cost is time spent working on it. “It’s just (laborious) and time-consuming, having to deal with it all,” Schmelzer said. “It’s not like I can throw $4,000 at it and it’s OK. That’s not the way it is.” As you walk around Thayer’s backyard, the sound of pumps is constant. Some of Thayer’s pumps are on sensors and start up when high water levels are sensed. Others on Thayer’s property that are in lower spots are running constantly. “Right now, they’re doing their job keeping the water out, but we’ve got to pump the rainwater that occurs back out over the barrier,” he said. “They work well, but I’d love to get rid of them. “I don’t want to look at the electrical bill,” Thayer added.

A changing landscape Freiburger has 21 hickory trees on his County Hwy. M property that date back before the Revolutionary War. But they have died after getting their roots drowned by the rising water table. That means he’ll need to get them professionally taken down, at an estimated cost of $20,000. “The loss of the trees

No easy solution Any solution to the problem would require the cooperation of multiple municipalities and likely would involve state and federal agencies. The City of Fitchburg and Village of Oregon are both exploring solutions. A draft of Fitchburg’s 2020-29 capital improvement plan recommends spending

Photos by Jim Ferolie

On the left, the southern tip of Lake Barney, and the area to the south and west in September 2011. The lake had flooded over in 2008, but at this point had virtually returned to its natural size. On the right, Lake Barney had swelled in September 2018 to the point that much of the farmland to the south was overtaken by water, covering parts of the Rotary Bike Trail put in by the Village of Oregon in the process. $60,000 next year to study Lake Barney and determine what options could get approval from the DNR and village and town of Oregon. Because the flooding doesn’t affect city property, the CIP narrative states, the city would normally treat it as a private property concern in which individual landowners would be responsible. But overwhelming public interest to have the city involved in lowering water levels led officials to reconsider that stance. Under the CIP timeline, which is only a guideline for planning future budgets and not a commitment, any project construction for storm sewers wouldn’t be until 2024, and only after it works with the DNR to ensure downstream communities wouldn’t be harmed. The Village of Oregon is rerouting the Rotary Bike Trail to an area with higher elevation, public works director Jeff Rau said. He said the village has already had a difficult time

moving water from the business park through the Lerner Conservation Park area and to drain into the Oregon branch of the Badfish Creek. That means any type of solution for the flooding near Lake Barney would require storm sewer improvements to be made within the village, he added. The village is committed to working with Fitchburg to find a long-term solution that minimizes future impacts, Rau said. “(We want to make) sure we’re not harming anyone downstream, because you don’t want to force your problem onto someone else,” he said. The situation gets more complex with U.S. Fish and Wildlife land abutting Thayer’s property, which is managed by the DNR, and the Oregon Correctional Center owning land to the north and south of County Hwy. M. Any projects through the land would be subject to approval from state and

federal agencies. Earlier this summer, Guy organized a meeting with local, county and state governmental entities and property owners in the area, Ald. Janell Rice (Dist. 4) said. A member of Ag and Rural Affairs, Rice said both emergency and long-term solutions are being considered.

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“Somewhere along the way, some entity is going to have to make a sacrifice,” she said. “I certainly don’t want it to be the homeowner.” Email reporter Kimberly Wethal at kimberly.wethal@ wcinet.com and follow her on Twitter @kimberly_wethal.​

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it had decreased to 11 inches. “Even if you drained this dry, it could take two to 10 years to bring the water table back down,” Brown said. “I know what the cure is – you’ve got to get rid of the water. And then it’s going to take time.”

is pretty disheartening,” Freiburger said. “Especially these pre-settlement burr oaks. They’ve seen just about everything … it’s sad to see these things go.” The habitat around Thayer’s property has completely changed in the past couple of years, he said. At one time, farmland to the west of his yard housed multiple pairs of cranes, deer, turkeys and other woodland creatures. In the four years prior to it being flooded out, the field was home to a hay crop. “We’ve got a lot of geese now,” he said with a laugh. “It’s been interesting to watch the ecology of this area change because of it.” Some of the changes he’s seen have almost been comical, Thayer said. Before the flood barriers were put up last fall, he explained, there was a hatching of minnows that happened to find its way onto his property and began to clog up the pumps. “In mid-March, we had some bigger pumps out here – that took care of the fish; they all got pumped,” he said. As the water runs out of places to go on his property, Thayer said, it moves north across Hwy. M to Freiburger’s and other neighbor’s properties, filling the ditches and fields in the process. As he pulled into his driveway on Aug. 5, Thayer said, it was the first time he hadn’t seen water sitting in the ditch in eight months. And while the water table has decreased since its peak in spring, Freiburger still has some fields that have seen little to no improvement and still have standing water in them. He has around 250 acres out of 1,035 that were unplantable this year as a result. “It’s a loss of income for rural people,” Freiburger said.

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Continued from page 12


14 Fitchburg Star - August 9, 2019

City Hall - Main Line Administration Assessing Building Inspections City Clerk Economic Development

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FACTv Finance Fire Department FitchRona Human Resources Library Municipal Court

270-4225 270-4251 278-2980 275-7148 270-4211 729-1760 270-4224

Parks & Forestry Planning/Zoning Police Public Works Recreation/Community Center Senior Center Utilities

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CURBSIDE BRUSH COLLECTION

OLD FASHIONED ICE CREAM SOCIAL, LABOR DAY WEEKEND, AUGUST 31ST-SEPTEMBER 2ND

Residents are provided with fourteen brush collections and four yard waste collections between April and November. Residents must have their brush and yard waste placed at the curb by 6:30 a.m. Monday on the following brush collection weeks: August 26-30, September 9-13,

The Fitchburg Senior Center Friends & Senior Center volunteers will be serving free Schoep’s ice cream at Eplegaarden, 2227 Fitchburg Road, during Labor Day weekend. Donations appreciated to support the Senior Center’s Patient Advocate program.

September 23-27, October 7-11 and October 21-25 (yard waste also collected). Actual collection dates may depend on weather. For more information on brush and yard waste collection, visit www.fitchburgwi. gov/2568/Brush-Yard-Waste

SENIOR CENTER CELEBRATES 40 YEARS The Fitchburg Senior Center is 40 years old! Join us from 4:00 to 7:00 p.m. on Thursday, September 19 as we look back on the wonderful history of our Center. A special program kicks off at 4:30 p.m. that will include former Mayor Jeanie Sieling and former Director Sue Sheets – both were instrumental in the early stages of the current Senior Center location. At 5:00 p.m., the Red Hot Horndawgs take the stage for a fun night of live music. Food

and drink available to purchase throughout the event.

5510 Lacy Road, Fitchburg

Wednesday, Monday, August 14, 2019 August 26, 2019 8:45 to 9:45 a.m.

10:30 to 11:30 a.m.

Mayor Aaron Richardson wants to listen to your comments and concerns about our city.

Aaron Richardson, Mayor (608) 270-4215

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RECREATION DEPARTMENT Go to www.fitchburgwi.gov/recreation and click on “View Activities” to see our full list of programs!

Youth Dance Classes

Mrs. Nicole offers a variety of dance classes for kids age 2-12 years old. She offers Monday, Tuesday, and Saturday classes. All three days have an end of the year dance recital held at the Oregon High School Performing Arts Center. • Classes Offered - Creative Movement (2-3 yrs.), Pre-Ballet 1 (3-5 yrs.), Pre-Ballet 2 (4-6 yrs.), Ballet 1 (5-7 yrs.), Ballet 2 (6-8 yrs.), Ballet 3 (7-11 yrs.), Jazz 1 (4-6 yrs.), Jazz 2 (6-9 yrs.), Jazz 3 (7-11 yrs.), Tap 1 (5-7 yrs.), Tap 2 (7-10 yrs.), Hip Hop (7-12 yrs.), and Lyrical (7-12 yrs.) • Day/Time – Monday evenings and Saturday mornings, September-March (over 18 classes plus rehearsal and recital) • Location – Fitchburg Community Center • Fee – ranges from $171-$251 (recital costumes included)

Musikgarten – What Do You Hear?

Whose voice is that? Is it high or low; is it fast or slow? The ability to listen to discriminate sounds and focus attention is fundamental to learning, and music class is the perfect environment. Sing, chant, move, dance, listen, and play simple instruments! This is a multi-age music experience for families of children ages birth-4 years old. Children are fully engaged in the playful music making process right along with their parent/guardian! • Days – Thursdays, Sept. 5 – 26 • Time - 9:00-9:40 a.m. • Location – Fitchburg Community Center – Prairie View Room • Ages – Less than 5 yrs. • Fee - $48

Musikgarten – Fall Songs & Sounds!

Enjoy revisiting songs and rhymes from childhood that encourage musical exploration of the fall season! We will sing, move, dance, draw and even celebrate Halloween with a costume day! This is a multi-age music experience for families of children ages birth-4 years old. Children are fully engaged in the playful music making process right along with their parent/guardian! • Days – Thursdays, Oct. 3 – 31 (No class on Oct. 24) • Time - 9:00-9:40 a.m. • Location – Fitchburg Community Center – Prairie View Room • Ages – Less than 5 yrs. • Fee - $48

Youth Soccer - This fall we are offering various youth soccer programs. Soccer (Ages 3-5)

This coed program will introduce the basic skills of soccer including dribbling, passing, and shooting. Shin guards are recommended and do not forget a water bottle.This is an instructional program. Participants will not be placed on teams or contacted by a coach. Please plan to arrive a couple minutes early to check in on the first date of the program. Participants receive a t-shirt. • Days – Saturdays, Sept. 28 – Oct. 19 • Time - 10:00-10:45 a.m. • Location – Tower Hill Park • Ages – 3-5 • Fee - $25

Soccer (Ages 6 & 7) and (Ages 8-10)

This 6 week program is led by one of the ACE Soccer Club coaching directors with the help of parent volunteers. Parent volunteers will help by keeping players focused on practice as well as lending a hand with small-sided games (with Director instruction).The program will focus highly on training and learning fundamental soccer skills and techniques. Practice will consist of four parts (warm-up, small-sided activity, expanded small-sided activity, the game) and at the end of every practice will be a scrimmage. Players attending/completing the entire 6-week program will leave with a better understanding of the rules and techniques used in soccer, teamwork, and sportsmanship while gaining confidence in themselves. The goal for the coaching staff is that every player has FUN while instilling a “love of the beautiful game.” • Days – There is a Monday option and Wednesday option for each age group. The program begins the week of Sept. 9 and runs through the week of Oct. 14. • Time – Ages 6-7 is from 5:00-5:50 p.m. Ages 8-10 is from 6:00-6:50 p.m. • Location – Wildwood South Park • Fee - $60


ConnectFitchburg.com

August 9, 2019

Fitchburg Star

15

Photos by Scott Girard

Above, a new UW Credit Union branch is expected to open this fall on the 2800 block of North Fish Hatchery Road. At right, the 160-unit Fitchburg Senior Housing complex next to Nine Springs Golf Course is expected to open next spring for residents.

Making progress on projects It’s a busy summer for development around Fitchburg, with projects at various stages throughout the city. On North Fish Hatchery Road, a new UW Credit Union branch is expected to open this fall while a 160-unit senior apartment complex next to Nine Springs Golf Course has brought a crane to the corridor. Elsewhere, the North Stoner Prairie Neighborhood area is busy with work on new buildings for Sub-Zero and Promega, along with a headquarters for Race Day Events and a new Hop Haus Brewing location.

Roundabout: City delayed construction by two weeks to allow Williamsburg bridge to open Continued from page 1 City of Fitchburg project engineer Bill Balke pointed out that the city delayed the construction by two weeks from its initially planned June date to allow the Will i a m s bu rg Wa y b r i d g e across Verona Road to open — offering one slight relief to frustrated drivers. And contractors are “still on schedule to open Oct. 2.” The $1.6 million project needed to be done this year to use funding from the tax-increment financing district that covers the nearby Orchard Pointe development, which has increased traffic in the area, Balke explained. City officials knew that project deadline about two years ago, he said. “We worked backwards from there and worked with the (state) Department of Transportation and other regional projects that are going on,” Balke said. Verona Road Business Coalition project manager Cindy Jaggi is helping the city with its outreach to businesses, and she has dropped off maps for them to help visitors navigate the various projects. She said she’s seen “a lot of creative and innovative” initiatives, like loyalty cards at nearby Quivey’s Grove and changes to start and stop times for employees. She acknowledged it’s been especially hard for the restaurants and service industry businesses, but she said “destination businesses” like Ten Pin Alley are holding strong. “ E v e r y b o d y ’s r e a l l y working very, very diligently to communicate with their own customers and patrons,” Jaggi said. “They’re doing everything

Why a roundabout?

Photo by Scott Girard

Bavaria Sausage added its own signage for drivers who make it nearly to the closed intersection, reminding people they are open. An additional sign was placed about a half-mile earlier on Nesbitt Road where a sign states “local traffic only.” possible to keep communicating that business is open.” Bavaria put its own sign on the city’s “Local traffic only” sign that’s about a half-mile from their store, showing it’s still open. Despite that sign, and a similar one on the other side of the roundabout down the road from Felly’s and It’s Your Party, it seems many drivers expect to be able to get through the intersection. “Basically our parking lot is one big turnaround,” Cottrell said.

‘Needed to do something’ While the construction is an inconvenience, the business owners who spoke with the Star understood why the project was needed.

“Traffic in the springtime would back up past our garden center, in all directions, for a mile starting at 4 p.m.,” said Felly’s Flowers president Jim Aldrich. “I think this will alleviate most of the problem.” Cottrell said Bavaria ownership knew the city “needed to do something” because of how backed up the intersection was – she was never able to turn left out of their parking lot when leaving around 5 p.m. She’s not confident a roundabout was the right decision, preferring a mini-roundabout or traffic signal, the other two options the city considered. Balke said the roundabout was the best option of the three, and the consultants report the Common Council looked at in April 2018 showed it would be less

expensive than traffic signals despite the extra land acquisition that was necessary. Roundabouts can be more difficult for pedestrians to navigate and challenging for drivers to learn, but traffic accidents are generally much less serious because of the lower speeds. “It just made more sense in the long term to have something that had traffic that was flowing better and less chance of bigger accidents,” Balke said.

‘Everywhere’s ripped up’ The logic behind the decision and timeline doesn’t alleviate the frustration for area businesses. It’s Your Party employee Melinda McDonald has added about 15 minutes to her commute in both directions now. She has to

go through the backed-up, under construction intersection of Verona Road and County Hwy. PD and then has to travel a mile further west to Maple Grove Drive to get around the Nesbitt-Fitchrona work. She’s noticed she has company, as “everybody’s have to go the same way to get where they’re going.” J e n k i n s s a i d “ eve r y where’s ripped up,” causing them to add time to their deliveries, too. She showed off the entrance to her business’ parking lot that was graded in late July so drivers could get to the loading dock and pointed out they also have to move the construction signs themselves when they’re leaving the site. For Bavaria, Cottrell has decided to consider canceling the remainder of

The Fitchrona-Nesbitt intersection is changing from a four-way stop to a roundabout 16 months after it was approved by the Fitchburg Common Council. The city also considered a “mini-roundabout” and traffic signals but decided on a roundabout based on cost and how long it would help traffic. City project manager Bill Balke told the Star the roundabout will have the longest life and that accidents in roundabouts tend to be less severe than at traffic lights, where some people “tend to try to go through” as the light changes. The choice required the city to purchase land from the neighboring property owners. the planned brat cookouts, which normally are a twice a week feature throughout the summer. At Felly’s, Aldrich said they’re losing out on the end of their busy season, with annuals and perennials in August and garden mums and asters normally popular through September. “It’s affected us greatly,” he said. “It’s a real inconvenience.” Contact Scott Girard at ungreporter@wcinet.com and follow him on Twitter @sgirard9.


16 Fitchburg Star - August 9, 2019

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Sports

Swimming

Friday,August. 9, 2019

The

1

Fitchburg Star For more sports coverage, visit: ConnectFitchburg.com

Diving

Ridgewood finishes second at All-City ADAM FEINER Sports editor

Photo by Adam Feiner

Seminole’s Molly Hoppe, 10, competes in the backstroke at the 2019 All-City Swim Championships on Sunday, Aug. 4, at West Side Pool in Madison. Hoppe set a new pool record in the girls 9-10 50-meter backstroke with a time of 35.89 seconds.

Gold rush

VAHS swimmers, grads, help break records at All-City Championships ADAM FEINER Sports editor

The record board at Madison’s West Side Pool will need almost a complete overhaul after the 2019 All-City Swimming Championships. Wes Jekel, a 2019 Madison West graduate who will swim at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, broke three records. Jekel also broke a pair of his own pool records, cruising to gold medals in the 100 backstroke (56.75) and 100 butterfly (54.96). Competitors from 13 teams, including several Verona Area High School swimmers and recent graduates, combined to set 37 new pool records and six new meet records in 64 events Verona quarterback Adam Bekx warms up by throwing a pass from a knee Tuesday, Aug. 8 during the first official practice of the season behind Badger Ridge Middle School. Verona opens the season at home against Janesville Parker on Friday, Aug. 23. The Wildcats will scrimmage at Waunakee on Friday, Aug. 16. Photo by Mark Nesbitt

during the finals on Sunday, Aug. 4. Ridgewood won its 40th team title since 1970 with 2,698 points, as the Green Buns set nine new pool records and two meet records. Seminole finished third with 2,206 points, as each swimmer averaged 11.99 points. Nakoma averaged 13.46 points per swimmer. Host West Side placed 11th out of 13 teams with 724 points. VA H S s e n i o r s J o s i e McCartney and Sara Stewart helped set a record in the 200-meter freestyle and the 200 medley relay, and Stewart set her own record in the 100. Aidan Updegrove, a 2019 VAHS graduate, was on a record-setting 200 free relay. And Wildcats had a

handful of other top finishes.

Ridgewood Kiara Bissen, Malia Bissen, McCartney and Stewart set a pool record for the Green Buns in the 200 free with a time of 1 minute, 50.45 seconds in the 15-19 age division. The same quartet also set a pool record in the 200 medley relay with a time of 2:01.21. Stewart set a meet record in the girls 15-19 100 backstroke with a time of 1:03.48. Jillian Holler set a meet record in the girls 11-12 50 freestyle with a time of 28.02 seconds. Kiara Bissen broke her own pool record in the girls 15-19 100 breaststroke with a time of 1:14.16.

Turn to Swimming/Page 2

Three hundred divers, 13 teams and more than 100 volunteers and sponsors descended on Madison’s Ridgewood Pool on Monday, July 29 and Tuesday, July 30 for the 2019 All-City Dive Championships. High Point won the team title with 208 points, as each diver averaged 5.94 points. Host pool Ridgewood, which had won six of the last seven and three straight All-City Dive Championships, settled for second with 192 points. “I believe the All-City Dive Championships are a time to celebrate athletes who compete with one another instead of against one another,” Chairman Terry Ritter said. “Judges and officials determine where they place with their performance.” Verona’s Mikayla Ott received one of the five outstanding sportsmanship awards, given to those who display respect, listening, communication, responsibility, courage and gratitude throughout the meet. She finished third in the girls 13-14 division, just behind fellow Verona native and Hawks Landing teammate Annika Rufenacht. Rufenacht finished second in the 13-14 girls division, and three current or former Verona Area High School divers finished in the top 10 of the boys 15-18 division.

15-18 girls Monona’s Trinity McNall pulled away from the field to win her third All-City Dive title with a six-dive score of 223.90. McNall was the only competitor to crack the 190-point mark. West Side’s Gena Dockry (178.65 points), Elizabeth Andrzejewski (177.00) and Anna Sanders (176.95)

Photo by Adam Feiner

Ridgewood’s Conner Dugan begins his approach in the boys 15-19 division finals at the All-City Dive Championships on Tuesday, July 30, at Ridgewood Pool. Dugan placed seventh with a six-dive score of 190.60.

Team scores 1. High Point 209 2. Ridgewood 195 3. Monona 182 4. Parkcrest 155 5. Shorewood Hills 138 6. West Side 77 7. Seminole 77

8. Hawks Landing 73 9. Hill Farm 43 10. Middleton 36 11. Maple Bluff 34 12. Nakoma 16 13. Goodman 7

finished sixth, seventh and Dugan (190.60) and VAHS eighth, respectively. senior Alex Ritter (187.95) finished seventh and eighth, 15-18 boys respectively for Ridgewood, Verona Area High School while Isaac Roush sealed graduate Aiden Updegrove High Point’s team title by placed fourth (207.40) for winning an individual title Ridgewood in his 11th All- with a score of 255.35. City Dive Championships. Turn to Diving/Page 3 Fellow VAHS grad Conner

Futsal

International kicks Verona Soccer Club’s Aman-Lavicky excels on U.S. national team ADAM FEINER Sports editor

K a t e A m a n - L av i c k y became a member of the Verona Soccer Club when she was 10. Soon after, she started playing futsal, a fast-paced, 5-on-5 indoor soccer game on a smaller scale. And now futsal is

Did You Know? Futsal is played on a basketball court with a ball that is smaller than a normal outdoor soccer ball. The ball is harder and has less bounce than a regular soccer ball, making it easier to control and pass. taking her to places she never thought she’d be. A m a n - L a v i c k y, 1 4 , returned to the United States this month after an eight-day trip to Buenos Aires, Argentina, where

she played three matches with the 2004 U.S. Youth National Futsal Team. The date 2004 refers to the players’ birth years.

Turn to Futsal/Page 5


2

August 9, 2019

ConnectFitchburg.com

Fitchburg Star

Swimming: Green Buns race to another title Continued from page 1 Annika Slager broke her own pool record in the girls 8 and under 25 breaststroke with a time of 21.51, while teammates Emmie Goodavish (22.03) and Julianna Olajos (24.27) finished second and third, respectively. Brecken Curran set a new pool record in the boys 8 and under 25 freestyle with a time of 16.16, and also won the 100 IM (1:29.49). The Green Buns’ 200-meter freestyle relay team of Max Jones, Max Carter, Jake McKinnon and Ben Cutler-Heiderscheit set a pool record with a time of 1:59.93 in the 11-12 boys division. Isabella Gonzales set a pool record in the girls 13-14 100 backstroke (1:07.46), Isabella Bloom set a pool record in the girls 11-12 50 butterfly (30.75), and Mallory Heil set a pool record with a time of 19.58 in the girls 8 and under 25 backstroke. Stewart also placed second in the 100 butterfly with a time of 1:04.66, while teammate Josie McCartney was third (1:04.96). Kiara Bissen finished second in the 200 individual medley with a time of 2:27.14. In the girls 13-14 division, Ridgewood’s 200 medley relay team of Gonzales, Chloe Plautz, Ellen Osthelder and Rowan Schreiber finished third (2:10.81). Schreiber also placed third in the 50 butterfly (30.97). Ridgewood took home several silvers in the girls 9-10 division. The 200 medley relay team of Sara Osthelder, Reese Roswold, Caitlin Patrick-Stern and Ella McGinnis clocked in at 2:36.62. Osthelder also took second in the 50 backstroke (37.90), while Roswold was second in the

50 breaststroke (40.09) and third in the 100 IM (1:20.85). In the girls 8 and under division, Goodavish won the 25 free with a time of 16.71. Slager placed second in the 100 IM (1:32.65), and Heil was third in the 25 butterfly (18.17). Cutler-Heiderscheit (30.12) and Max Jones (30.29) finished second and third, respectively in the boys 11-12 50 freestyle. Cutler-Heiderscheit (34.90) and Max Drake (35.85) finished second and third respectively in the 50 backstroke. Ridgewood’s 200 free relay team of Sergio Cabada, Logan Urben, Jameson Bartels and Walter Billmeyer finished second with a time of 2:28.33 in the boys 9-10 division. Billmeyer also placed second in the second in the 50 backstroke (38.56) and 100 IM (1:26.86). Huck Watermolen took second in the boys 8 and under 25 breaststroke (24.54), while teammate Will Snow placed third (25.48). Anthony Patrick-Stern was second in the 25 butterfly (20.89).

Seminole

Jekel joined Noah Gonring, Updegrove and Charles Feller (Madison West) on the boys 15-19 200 free relay team to set a pool record of 1:36.00. Isabelle Enz was a part of two record-breaking relays and broke two individual marks in the girls 13-14 division. Enz teamed with Hannah Mello, Elizabeth Arnold and Maia Blas in the 200 free relay (1:52.36). Enz, Mello and Blas teamed with Samantha Vega in the 200 medley relay (2:04.49). Enz won by almost two seconds in the 100 free

(59.28), and won by more than two seconds in the 100 IM (1:07.80). Monica Schmidt, Katherine McClure, Catherine Arnold and Emily Spielman broke a pool record with a time of 1:58.50 in the girls 11-12 200 free relay. Schmidt broke her own pool record in the 100 IM (1:08.18), while Emily Spielman finished third in the event (1:12.69). Avery Blas broke his own pool record in the boys 13-14 100 breaststroke (1:10.81), and Molly Hoppe set a new pool record in the girls 9-10 50 backstroke (35.89). VAHS sophomore Kenzie Zuehl, VAHS senior Kaitlyn Zuehl, Allison Spielman and Isabella Granetzke finished second in the girls 15-19 200 free relay with a time of 1:51.00. Mello won the girls 13-14 50 butterfly (30.18), and was third in the 100 backstroke (1:08.86). Schmidt won the girls 11-12 50 breaststroke (36.11), and Catherine Arnold placed second (36.57). Arnold also took second in the 50 free with a time of 28.89. Jekel, Feller, Gonring and Updegrove also finished second in the 200 medley relay with a time of 1:47.06, edged by .02 of a second by High Point. Feller also second in the 100 breaststroke (1:06.20). Brady Lake, Cooper Blodgett, Max Garbacz and Nicholas Enz won the 200 free relay with a time of 2:21.17 in the boys 9-10 division. Blodgett, Garbacz and Enz teamed with Tristan Lorson to place second in the 200 medley relay (2:42.78). Garbacz won the 50 butterfly (37.13).

Swimming

Zuehl sisters fueled by sibling rivalry

Photos by Mark Nesbitt

Seminole Pool’s Kaitlyn Zuehl swims the butterfly during the 200-meter individual medley in a dual meet against Ridgewood earlier this summer. MARK NESBITT Assistant sports editor

When many teenagers are still in bed during the summer, Verona Area High School senior Kaitlyn Zuehl and her younger sister, sophomore Kenzie, take turns waking each other up to get to the pool by 6:30 a.m. for swim practice. The Zuehls are members of the Seminole Pool Sharks. For 11 years, Kaitlyn has used the sibling rivalry with Kenzie to continue pushing her to faster times. “She’s definitely a motivation,” Kenzie said of her older sister. “We both get each other up in the mornings, and we push each other in practice.” “We push each other all the time,” Kaitlyn added. “It’s kind of fun having a sister and best friend on the team that you swim with

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Verona sophomore Kenzie Zuehl swims the breaststroke in the 200-meter individual medley in a meet against Ridgewood earlier this summer. everyday.” Both Kaitlyn and Kenzie use the Fitchburg club team as a way to prepare for the Verona Area/Mount Horeb swim season in the fall. Kenzie Zuehl was on the 200-meter medley relay team that captured the WIAA Division 1 state title. She and her older sister were also on the Wildcats’ 200 freestyle relay team that finished second at state, and she was a state qualifier in the 50 free as a freshman last year. “I’m trying to go as fast as I can now so when I get back to high school (season) I can just exceed that,” Kenzie said. Saturday, July 13, the sisters combined on six topthree finishes. Ridegwood won the dual meet over Seminole 638-431. Avery Updegrove, a 2019 VAHS grad, also swims for the Seminole team.

Josie McCartney, Sara Stewart and Molly McCormick compete for Ridgewood in the summer and Verona Area/Mount Horeb in the fall. “It’s all like an intrasquad meet going against each other during the summer,” Kaitlyn Zuehl said. “I love knowing people from other teams and from high school and the rec league.” The younger Zuehl has been swimming the 100 free, 200 individual medley and 100 fly throughout the summer. She already knows what events she wants to focus on in the fall. “Going into the season, I definitely would like to stick with the 50 and 100 free,” she said. Kaitlyn Zuehl’s favorite event is the 100 butterfly. Her best time in the butterfly is 1 minute, and it’s 24.7 seconds in the 50 free.

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ConnectFitchburg.com

August 9, 2019

Fitchburg Star

3

Diving: Competitors save best for finals at All-City meet Dugan also wrapped up his 11th year of competition in the All-City Dive meet. S e m i n o l e ’s B e n S t i t gen finished second with 242.50 points. Te a m m a t e We s J e ke l was 14th with a score of 156.10. Aidan Muckian took 12th (169.45), and Zack Strobel was 15th (154.85) for Ridgewood.

13-14 girls Shorewood’s Rian Wells won with 225.50 points, followed by Rufenacht (205.50) and Ott (193.95). Rufenacht was an AllCity Dive champion in 2016 and 2018, while Ott was a 2017 champ. Ridgewood’s Ella Bodwin moved up seven places in the finals to finish sixth with a score of 167.30. Teammate Cami Hurley took 14th (154.70). West Side’s Sarah Weaver moved up four places

in the finals to finish 10th another top-10 finish in seventh (144.85), while with a score of 159.65. Lily Watermolen took 14th 13-14 boys (134.50) for the hosts. Katie “Squishie” Parkcrest’s Evan Prince won with a score of 191.60. M c C l u r e o f S e m i n o l e West Side’s Joey Cook moved up five spots in the stood pat after the pre- finals to finish sixth with lims and finished fourth 147.30 points. We s t S i d e ’s J u l i (166.30). Ridgewood’s Jake Stro- ana Ketarkus was 11th bel was seventh (162.30), (136.80). and Ben Hanlon was 11th 11-12 boys (140.40). Seminole’s Liam UpderSeminole’s Brennan Sulgrove was in first place livan moved up three spots after the prelims, as he in the finals to claim secracked up 124.45 points in ond with a score of 142.85 just four dives. However, points. High Point’s Bosten he slipped all the way to Bold won with a six-dive 10th (154.15) in the final score of 169.45. standings. Ridgewood had four divers make the finals. 11-12 girls Callum Mutch claimed R i d g e w o o d ’s G a b b y s eve n t h ( 1 3 2 . 3 0 ) , J a ke Drake claimed second with M c K i n n o n t o o k n i n t h a score of 160.20, right (131.45), Carter Nienajadbehind Monona’s Emelia lo was 11th (129.55), and Max Drake came in at 14th Hopper (172.85). Emily Jensen moved up (123.60). Nolan Perkins moved two spots in the finals to finish fourth (153.85) for up two spots in the finals Ridgewood. to finish 10th (130.45) for Claire Wendell added Seminole.

10 and under girls M o n o n a ’s M i k a y la McQueeney won with a score of 139.75. West Side’s Eve Nardi finished ninth (116.90), while teammate Charlotte Fleming was 13th (112.10).

10 and under boys R i d g e w o o d ’s J a c o b O ’ N e i l l m ove d u p t wo spots in the finals to finish second with 131.90 points. Parkcrest’s AJ Beard won with a score of 140.65. Ridgewood had five other divers make the finals. Connor Krohn moved up three spots in the finals to finish sixth (117.10), f o l l ow e d b y t e a m m a t e Jayden Raymond (116.40) in seventh. Jameson Bartels (95.10) and Brolan Shafer (91.20) finished 11th and 12th, r e s p e c t i v e l y. A n t h o n y Patrick-Stern was 16th (70.40). Seminole’s Brady Lake took 13th place with a score of 89.70.

Photo by Adam Feiner

Seminole’s Aiden Updegrove launches off the board in the boys 15-19 division finals at the All-City Dive Championships on Tuesday, July 30, at Ridgewood Pool. Updegrove finished fourth with a score of 207.40.

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August 9, 2019

ConnectFitchburg.com

Fitchburg Star

Madison West

Edgewood

Madison West hires three new coaches

Edgewood still fighting to host athletic events

Regents have new coaches in volleyball, girls golf, boys soccer ADAM FEINER Sports editor

Madison West has hired new coaches in girls golf, girls volleyball and boys soccer. Kayleigh McHugh takes over the Regents girls golf program. Ben Sperstad is the new girls volleyball coach, and Pat Bauch was promoted to West head coach of the boys soccer program at his alma

mater. The hirings were announced last week. McHugh is a PGA associate and assistant golf professional at Odana Hills Golf Course. She replaces Terry Everson, who is still the boys golf coach at West. Sperstad is a design verification and validation engineer at GE Healthcare in Madison, but has an extensive volleyball background. He was a former standout at Mukwonago

High School during his prep days, and also competed at national tournaments for the West Allis Lightning club team. Sperstad, who has been an assistant at the high school level, replaces Phil Friedl as the Regents head coach. Bauch was promoted to head coach of the boys soccer team after four years as an assistant. He replaces Drew Kornish, who took the head coaching job at

Sauk Prairie in May. Bauch, a 2004 West grad, is a social studies teacher at his alma mater, as well as a training associate at Exact Sciences in Madison. Alicia Pelton remains the interim athletic director at West, as Devon Peterson continues on medical leave. The school is still looking for a new wrestling coach and softball coach. No timetable was announced for those hirings.

Oregon

Badger Conference admission fees rise, OHS passes stay same ADAM FEINER Sports editor

The Badger Conference i s r a i s i n g r eg u l a r- s e a son admission to athletic events from $4 to $5, affecting Oregon High School.

The change will take place at the first athletic event of the 2019-20 school year in August. Admission rates for regular-season tournaments and WIAA postseason competition will continue to be set separately.

The OHS student athletic pass is $50 and is good for admission to any home athletic event throughout the school year, with the exception of WIAA tournament games. Students will show their student ID at the ticket booth to enter

the event. The Panther Bargain Family Pass is $60, and is good for 20 admissions for the whole family to any OHS home athletic event within a given school year, again with the exception of WIAA tournament games.

School seeks to terminate master plan with Madison ADAM FEINER Sports editor

Edgewood High School has requested the City of Madison terminate its campus master plan, which would mean the school could host athletic events on its turf field. The Madison Zoning Board of Appeals on July 1 1 d e c i d e d E d g ew o o d can not play games on its athletic field. Edgewood would lose its remaining development rights in the master plan and would need city approval for individual development proposals and other changes if its master

plan is terminated. The master plan is set to expire in 2025. The presidents of Edgewood High School, Edgewood College and the campus schools requested an early termination in a July 29 memo. The master plan, which was crafted in 2014, said the field was used for team practices and physical education, but did not name athletic competitions. Edgewood appealed notices of violations from the city after it hosted soccer, track and field and lacrosse games on the turf last spring. T h e s c h o o l ’s a p p e a l a l l eg e d t h a t t h e c i t y ’s actions are a potential violation of the Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act.

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Fitchburg Star

August 9, 2019

5

Futsal: Incoming freshman Aman-Lavicky plans to play three sports at Madison West Continued from page 1 She recorded two goals and three assists to help her team win all three matches. The 2004 U.S. squad routed San Lorenzo 11-0 on July 28 to start the international tournament, then beat Argentina’s 2004 national team 5-3 on July 30, and finished up with a 10-1 rout of Ferro Carrell Oeste on July 31. “We brought six U.S. teams, so it was fun when the others would watch your games,” Aman-Lavicky said. “The atmosphere was amazing. People went crazy when someone scored.” Aman-Lavicky and her teammates also visited local futsal and soccer clubs on days they did not play. “Going into it, I didn’t

know any of my teammates, but I made some amazing new friends,” Aman-Lavicky said. “Playing where the Argentine national team trains and plays was really cool, too.” More than 5,000 girls and boys tried out for 12 spots in six age groups, but AmanLavicky beat the odds and was selected to the AmanLavicky selected to the 2004 U.S. Youth National team. Every state has its own tryouts for the national futsal teams, but due to low numbers in Wisconsin, AmanLavicky went straight to Kansas City for the national tryout on June 30. “I was definitely not expecting to be selected,” she said. “I didn’t even hear about it until a month before my tryout.”

Verona roots

Focused on the future

Aman-Lavicky started playing club soccer in Verona and joined FC Wisconsin for two years before returning to Verona this year. She plays on the U16 team. A m a n - L a v i c k y, w h o recently moved from Fitchburg to Madison, is an incoming freshman at Madison West High School. She will not be able to continue her futsal career with the Regents but is thankful to her two club teams for giving her the opportunity to play. “A lot of club soccer teams play it in the winter since we can’t play outside,” Aman-Lavicky said. “It’s an alternative to indoor soccer. Both Verona and FC Wisconsin do it.”

Aman-Lavicky played the pivot position for the national team, which is similar to that of a forward in soccer. She plans on participating in cross country, basketball and soccer at Madison West. Aman-Lavicky is also planning on going to club soccer practices after cross country practices during the week and practice and play in tournaments with Verona on the weekends in the fall. She’s hoping to put her futsal experience to good use. “You have to be technically solid with your foot skills,” Aman-Lavicky said. “It’s a fast surface and a really fast-paced game. You have to be thinking and moving quickly, and that helps in any sport.”

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Verona Soccer Club’s Kate Aman-Lavicky helped the 2004 U.S. Youth National Futsal Team with two goals and three assists in three matches at an international tournament in Argentina.

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6

August 9, 2019

Madison/Oregon schools

Fitchburg Star

Madison Metropolitan School District

Online enrollment begins New students, high schoolers must go to enrollment day Online enrollment for the 2019-20 school year in the Madison Metropolitan School District began this week. Families of continuing students in elementary and middle school are able to complete the process online as of Aug. 6. New students and high school students are required to go to school during their assigned enrollment day. For Leopold and Chavez elementary school students, in-person

enrollment is at the school 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2-6 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 20. For middle school, new students can enroll from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and returning students from 2-6 p.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 21. High school student enrollment for new students will be 12-6 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 14, and for students returning to West either 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday, Aug. 16, and 7:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 20. To see a full list of enrollment options, visit mmsd.org/enroll. – Scott Girard

ConnectFitchburg.com

Oregon School District

Summertime smiles Sessions provide a chance for both learning and fun SCOTT DE LARUELLE Unified Newspaper Group

It’s so much fun, sometimes kids (and teachers) forget it’s still school. Both inside and outside, the Oregon School District’s Summer School has offered students dozens of educational opportunities in its session, which ran July 8 through Aug. 2. Held mainly at Oregon High School, four 60-minute courses were available

to students each day, with breakfast and lunch offered during the four-week program. A total of 120 classes are offered (some with multiple sections), including traditional courses like math, language arts and STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Math), but also some that provide lots of chances for physical activity, like “Moving and grooving” for K-2 students. Students can let their creative sides out with everything from glitter art to cup stacking. Some fun new courses this year included “Kids in the Kitchen,” “Harry Potter” and “Pancakes and Games around the World.”

There were also some new “traditional” courses, such as “Say Yes” classes to encourage K-6 students’ interest in reading, writing and math. OSD deputy superintendent Leslie Bergstrom said the district looks to provide a variety of courses during the summer to help meet the needs and interests of all students and support their mindset to be “lifelong learners.” “We want to provide summer experiences that cultivate positivity and a joyful environment,” she wrote in an email to the Star. “Summer school is another opportunity to grow the love of learning.”

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August 9, 2019

Fitchburg Star

7

‘Inviting spaces’ in new places Collaborative spaces, natural connections a focus in new elementary school SCOTT DE LARUELLE Unified Newspaper Group

The designs for the Oregon School District’s new elementary school under construction in Fitchburg put an emphasis on creating “inspiring learning spaces.” They incorporate modern elements while keeping true to existing district standards for elementary schools. In addition to several playgrounds, there are three inner courtyards, a butterfly garden and several dedicated collaboration areas designed for staff to make presentations to larger groups, or for multiple classrooms to work together on projects. Solving problems collaboratively is an important part of the district’s focus for the future, and those educational ideas are embodied in the new design of the approximately 130,000-square-foot building, with dedicated spaces for collaboration and small-group instruction. There is also a focus on the natural aspects, from the site location itself

Rendering courtesy Oregon School District

The design of the new elementary school incorporates more use of natural light, shown in this rendering of the cafeteria. A planned outdoor courtyard can be seen on the left side, one of several features designed to incorporate a natural look within and around the building. to outdoor classroom and garden areas to facilitate the district’s ongoing focus on green and healthy initiatives. The school will be the first “net-zero” school building in Wisconsin, said Nathan Schieve of Bray Architects, meaning it will create more energy than it produces. While the building will feature technologies already in use in the district like LED lighting and solar panels,

he said the “size and careful coordination of each system” in the new school will enable it to have the “net zero” designation. After the successful referenda last fall to pay for the land and school, district officials established a 19-member design team comprising of staff and administrators to work with Bray Architects. The idea was to develop design concepts that would be consistent

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with the district’s stated goals and values, said district superintendent Brian Busler. These include ensuring “safe, appropriate and inspiring learning environments for students, staff and community; equitable access to resources which provide opportunities to participate in meaningful, appropriate learning experiences; and innovative, flexible learning environments that support dynamic and evolving educational approaches.” A focus on a more natural balance is shown in everything from increased use of “green” energy conservation technology like solar panels, geothermal heating and cooling and even the location of the building itself, sited to bring in as much natural light as possible. Schieve said providing natural light to all core spaces was an “extremely high priority” for the building, with a goal to reduce reliance on artificial lighting. “We arranged our large group resource spaces directly adjacent to classroom spaces hoping to maximize their use by students and staff, and also take advantage of natural light with exterior windows facing multiple directions,” he wrote the Observer in an email. Busler said the school will have

secure entrances and is “designed with safety and security as a priority.” Other buildings in the district got upgraded security features after the 2014 referendum. But while the new building will have a more modern look and feel compared to current elementary schools now serving their second and third generations of OSD students, the idea is to keep some continuity in those buildings. An important part of the design philosophy was “providing similar high quality experiences across all our elementary schools,” said OSD communications director Erika Mundinger. “I’d say there are more similarities than differences (in the design),” she wrote in an email to the Hub. Busler said the design team guided the process based on “experience and expertise,” making sure to incorporate features to create “warm and inviting classrooms” and spaces that will help create an “inspiring learning environment.” “(This) building was designed on the sole purpose of meeting the needs of our students today and into the future,” he said. Email Unified Newspaper Group reporter Scott De Laruelle at scott.delaruelle@wcinet.com.

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August 9, 2019

Verona schools

Fitchburg Star

ConnectFitchburg.com

Next steps begin after boundaries SCOTT GIRARD Unified Newspaper Group

Determining new attendance area boundaries last month was the most time-consuming and public decision the school board has had to make for planning the opening of the district’s new high school in fall 2020. While many of the important decisions like school start times and staffing will be made behind the scenes by staff, the board still needs to tackle grandfathering, which will determine what, if any, students will remain at their current elementary school even if their attendance area changed. Superintendent Dean Gorrell

added that the district still has to prepare to get the new and shuffling buildings physically ready for students. “Sooner than later, moving six buildings is going to happen,” Gorrell said. Much of that moving will be done next summer, with school this year ending early. The new high school will open in fall 2020, with Badger Ridge Middle School moving into the current high school and Sugar Creek Elementary School moving to the current BRMS building. New Century and Verona Area International schools will move into the K-Wing while Core Knowledge Charter School – which is K-8 – will move into the main high school building with BRMS. Many of the decisions from now on will be behind the scenes. District staff and consultants will work to streamline bus routes and the costs that come with them, determine how

new building locations will affect start times and look at staffing levels with new student populations at each school. Gorrell said he would keep the board informed throughout and bring any “bigger than what you might anticipate change” to trustees for discussion. One of the likely most controversial decisions, grandfathering, remains with the board. Board vice president Meredith Stier Christensen and president Noah Roberts told the Press on Monday they had received plenty of emails on both sides, with some supporting new boundaries effective for all elementary students immediately in 2020-21 and others supporting some sort of flexibility. Both said they couldn’t support any plan before they see data from staff, which is expected at the next meeting, Monday, Aug. 19. “Our goal is always to minimize disruption for kids,” Roberts said. “It all depends on the numbers at each

school.” All three district leaders praised the process that got them to last week’s boundary decision. Roberts said he couldn’t imagine the board having to “start from scratch,” and he said the Attendance Area Advisory Committee was key in getting them to a decision. “They provided us with three very different options that prioritized different things,” Roberts said. “It was a great way to discuss and dive into the complexity of our district.” Communication on both the boundaries and any other decisions that change routines for families will be important over the next 13 months. Roberts said the district will have to “clearly and repetitively communicate to families” about the upcoming changes. Gorrell said using varied methods of communication will be important, as well. “You can get things out via email

or you can get things out via snail mail, and somebody will miss it,” Gorrell said. “Then it comes as a surprise, so you just gotta be cognizant of that and build in multiple ways and multiple times for informing people.” He hopes parents whose children are changing schools under the new boundaries will talk with staff at their new school and take advantage of yet-to-be determined plans for “welcoming new to the school families.” “We knew going into this process that this isn’t going to make everybody happy,” Gorrell said. “An encouragement would be to … reach out the new attendance area school, that administrator, take a visit, take a tour, take your child there, get familiar with it.” Read the full story and see the approved maps at ConnectFitchburg.com.

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