Page 1

THE EAGLE The ’Joitrnal of' the T

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

DECEMBER, 1949


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THE Tlle

THE

EAGLE

Regimental Journal of

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

WOLFENBUTTEL

LIST

OF

DECEMBER,

CONTENTS

flare is a gradually improving stock of vanity cases, cigarette cases, cigar boxes, pocket lighters,

EDITORIAL

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1949


THE

JOURNAL

OF

EDITORIAL

Northampton Barracks

Wolfenbattel

YET another editor produces his first “ Eagle.” As with others he is torn between the desire to make a really fat “ Eagle ” and keeping the cost down. This one is fairly fat, has plenty of photographs but is causing the editor some anxiety as to the cost.

He feels however, that if there is

to be an ” Eagle ” then it should be worth reading, even if it costs more. In June six 01d Comrades visited us and how pleased we were to have them. Their Visit is mentioned by many contributors to this edition. We hope they were the first of many who will come to see us. We are still at Wolfenbiittel and have now been here for two years. This must be a record for the post war era. An amusing letter was received from Mr. Blundell, an Old Comrade. He has trouble with

our

modern

abbreviations—G.M.T.,

W /Cp1., etc. To enlighten him and probably others, G.M.T. means General Military Training and not Greenwich Mean Time as he suggests. W/Cpl. means War Substantive Cpl. and is not necessarily connected with Workshops. Leaving us shortly are Major Starkey, Maj— or Graham and Captain Houstoun. The former is leaving the Army, Major Graham is taking up an appointment as D.A.Q.M.G. at

H.Q., B.A.O.R. and Captain Houstoun is tak-

The Barracks were built in 1935/1936 on what was pre« vimrsly tilled land and were occupied by No. 7 Flack Regt. (A.A.) which [rained here. During the war the Barracks

ing over duties as adjutant .to the Fife and Forfar Yeomanry (T.A.) from Captain Whit— worth who is leaving the Army. We wish them all the best of luck and shall miss them. Those three 01d stalwarts ; Q.M.S. (O.R.S.) Kelly, T.Q.M.S. Hill and S.S.M. Butterworth have left us during the last few weeks. More of them can be read under ” Valete.” Contributors have done well and are sin— cerely thanked for their notes, photographs, and sketches, etc. Only a few needed pressure and it is hoped that all will do as well next time. Contributions for the June, 1950 issue will be wanted by the end of April. The editor would particularly like contributions from Old Comrades.

®hifuarn

were also occupied by paratroops.

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ROYAL

DRAGOONS

3

Cambridge. Gazetted to the Royals in 1912 he joined the Regiment in South Africa. He served throughout the 1914-1918 war during which period he was wounded. He retired in 1920 succeeding his father in 1944. His death in May, 1949 is mourned by many old Royals who remember his keen sense of humour and invariable interest in the Regiment. One of his proudest moments was when his only son, who was serving as a corporal in the 11th Hussars, won an immediate

commission for gallantry in the field and was gazetted to the Royals. The tragic death of this son as the result of a fire at Barford Camp was a severe blow to the family.

Va lete Q.M.S. (O.R.S.) M. M. KELLY 0.400010 Q.M.S. (O.R.S.) M. M. Kelly, joined the Army from the Duke of York’s School. He enlisted as a Boy in the Old Cavalry Depot at Canterbury on 22nd December, 1925, and about the Ist January, 1926 was posted to The Royals at Aldershot. A year later he attended a course at Kneller Hall. In 1927 he moved with the Regiment to Egypt and remained abroad with them until their return in May, 1936, when he became

Trumpet Major. In October, 1938, when the Regiment moved out to Palestine, Mr. Kelly went out with the Commanding Ofiicer as his Trumpet— Major, and also became the Troop Sgt. of the then Administration Troop of R.H.Q. He took up the duties of S.Q.M.S. “ C " Squadron in January 1941, just as the Regi— ment was being mechanised. He became Sergeant—Major of the Squadron in July, 1943 and remained with the Squadron until early 1947. In 1946 he acted as R.S.M. for eight months and in March, 1947, he took up the job of Orderly Room and was appointed Q.M.S. (O.R.S.) which he held until he went home on 31st August, 1949. During the War he gained the Croix—de— Guerre (Belgian) and was also Mentioned in Despatches. He was awarded the LS. and G.C. Medal (and had the usual other medals). Mr. Kelly will be much missed, for his cheerfulness and sense of humour, and his

SIR \VATKIN WILLIAMS WYNN Sir Watkin Williams Wynn was born in 1891 and educated at Eton and Trinity,

loyalty to the Regiment was outstanding.He is now training for an Inspectorate 1n the N.S.P.C.C.


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DRAGOONS [THE

T.Q.M.S. c. HILL No. 401335 T.Q.M.S. C. Hill, joined the Regiment as a Boy on 20th April, 1927 and went abroad with the Band when the Regiment moved out in that year and remained with them all the time. With the rest of the Band he rejoined the Regiment in 1939 when they were absorbed by Squadrons on the outbreak of war. In July, 1940 he was promoted Sergeant, and went on the Technical Staff. He be— came a Squadron QM. Sgt. in August, 1944, and in October was made T.Q.M.S. which appointment he held until his discharge by purchase on 27th June, 1949. Mr. Hill was awarded the Commander—in— Chief’s citation in 1944, held the LS. and G.C. Medal, and, of course, all the usual war

medals. He was a very popular member of the Regiment and his unfailing good spirits were known to all. He is now undergoing civilian technical training in Denmark. S.S.M. G. BUTTERVVORTH No. 408969 S.S.M. G. Butterworth was a comparatively young soldier in that he joined the Service on Ist April, 1936, and a couple of months later came to The Royals in Shorncliffe. He moved abroad with us in October of that year and was promoted Sergeant in May, 1940. In April, 1943, he was made S.Q.M.S. and in July of that year he became S.S.M. of “ B ” Squadron. He had remained with this Regiment throughout the war, and for many years was S.S.M. of “A” Squadron. He took this Squadron twice to Berlin, in March, 1947,

(when it was known as “ X ” Squadron) and again in March, 1949. He gained a Mention in Despatches (and all usual war medals). Mr. Butterworth was always a first-class soldier and was constantly at work making his Squadron as efficient as possible. His enthusiasm greatly contributed to their success in sport as well. His intention is to open up a business in the fish trade in the North of England.

0.C.A. Notes OUR first function of the Winter Season was a Dance and Social at the Drill

Hall, Reedworth Street, Kennington, S.E.11, where “ Bunty ” Hewitt is “ Mine Host." It proved a great success. Many members were present, including two large parties who arrived in coaches from the Hounslow Area,

organised by ” Shady” Crook. We would like to see coaches with members and their ladies, arrive at our functions, from areas

JOURNAL

OF

lighted to see any Old‘Royals (or young ones) who are able to visit him. We are very grateful to the Commanding Officer for his efforts in encouraging, members leaving the Regiment to join the O.C.A. We hope to have the pleasure of welcoming these young members at our future gather— ings.

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

5

It is with the deepest regret that we have to report the death of Viscount Valentia who died on October 6th. He served with the Regiment during the first World War. Finally, we take this opportunity to send warmest greetings and best wishes for the season

to

our

members and

all serVing

Royals.

round London, the Midlands and any large towns where there are Old Royals; if any members have any ideas will they please write to the Hon. Secretary. As to future functions, the main event of

the year, The Annual Reunion and General

Meeting will be held, as in previous years, in London on Cup Final Day, 29th April, 1950. All members will be notified, in plenty of time, as to the place and time of commencing. Please make certain to keep

this date free. Bunty ” Hewitt, proved such a worthy

Squadron Notes

host at our first function that we have booked the same Drill Hall, for our next

Dance and Social which will be held on a Saturday, either at the end of December or the beginning of January. Notices will be sent to all members living in London and Home Counties. The number of letters received by the Secretary makes it certain that all members enjoyed reading the account of the visit to The Regiment, in Germany, which was made

by six Old Comrades. Many are asking if‘this visit is going to be repeated. Al— though we cannot say with certainty, you may be sure that all efforts will be made for another such visit, and, if possible, arrange-

ments will be made for members to take their wives. Notices will be sent to all members as soon as permission has been granted by the authorities. We take this opportunity of congratulating Mr. A. W. Lock, of York, one of our

oldest members, on being awarded the Meritorious Medal. It has been brought to our notice that an Old Royal is a Pensioner at the Royal Hospital, Chelsea and we give below a few

details of his service with the Regiment. No. 4856 Sergeant Richard Bishop reached the age of 84 years in July, 1949. He served with The Royals in South Africa, from 1900 until 1903. He re-enlisted in 1914, under the appeal for instructors by Lord Kitchener, and was finally discharged in March 1919. we wish Sgt. Bishop many peaceful and happy years to come. He would be de—

“A” SQUADRON SINCE we last went to press we have become well established as the Regi— ment’s

detachment

in

Berlin,

and

all

ranks are very happy to be here, although many of the senior and regular membersof the Squadron miss their friends who are With the main part of the Regiment back at Wolf— enbiittel. We sympathise with our_ Com— manding Officer in that his command is split during this very difficult transient period of getting the Regiment on a permanent peace— time footing. _ _ About six weeks after our arrival in Berlin we were subjected to what is known officially as Exercise “ Stonk,’ though we have a few alternative names for it. This exercrse is based on the assumption that the Squadron Leader is a slave—driver, the 2nd i /c. an arch— embezzler, the S.S.M. an illiterate henchman to the Squadron Leader, and the S.Q.M.S. a thief and a hoarder who would cheerfully

rob his own grandmother. For a few days after the conclusion of the exercise these four persons wandered about in a daze fully con— vinced that they fit their respective bills perfectly. The exercise starts by the Emma tion Headquarters who administer us getting in extra batteries of typists and sending out files of official documents and Army Forms to the Squadron asking for returns about anything from mousetraps to compassionate leave. A fleet of despatcli riders delivers the whole consignment at approximately 12.45 hrs. on a Wednesday, when everyone is preparing for an afternoon’s game. That evening the entire Officers’ and Sergeants Messes are asked to cocktail parties, supper, and a dance, all of which terminate well after

midnight. (All this is part of the plan). Meanwhile at about 10 pm. the Orderly Officer back in barracks receives a cryptic intimation that “ Stonk ” proper will com—


THE

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ROYAL

THE Dan/Ea wHo COWERTED R

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[91,.01 FORD

INTO Fl-

13937 mgr/n7-

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make Captain (Q.M.) Lewis give vent to his wrath; and the Gordon Highlanders, with whom 1st Troop has indulged in many water— borne operations on the Havel lake. We have been very sorry to lose many good men on release to Civvy Street, and wish them well in their various new jobs. Too many to mention by name, but we are proud to know that every one of them has joined the Old Comrades’ Association. Our greatest loss was S.S.M. Butterworth, who changed overnight from making out charge sheets to selling fish and chips in Oldham. He had served fourteen years as a Royal, the last three in this Squadron. He was ex— tremely popular with all ranks, well versed in all aspects of training and administration in the Squadron, and a walking encyclopaedia concerning every man‘s trade, home address, etc. We felt his loss for many weeks. His suc— cessor, Sgt. Major Palmer has settled in well. He specialises in accounts, ammunition, and

mence at first parade the next morning. When this fatal hour arrives a convoy of staff cars screams to a halt in the Squadron lines, and disgorges a battalion of very senior staff officers, who, armed with blue

pencils, notebooks, and very determined looks, separate and make their various ways to such nerve-centres as the Squadron Office, S.Q.M.S. Stores, Arms Stores and the cook— house. Having arrived they start ferreting in files, safes and cupboards, unearthing A.C.I.’s and correspondence, etc. and gen— erally pulling to pieces (figuratively and liter— ally) a great organisation which has been built up through the years by dint of greying hairs and loss of weight oh the part of many gallant ex—“A” Squadron members who are now enjoying the blissful pleasantries of civilian life. Six hours later they emerge from the wreck and retire to lunch in the Officers’ Club, where they spend the rest of the day writing a report on the administration of the Squadron. Well, to return to seriousness, it's not quite as bad as all that, and really we love H.Q. B.T.B. and they have been known to com— mend us for various things. Anyway our “ Stonk ” report showed that we are a very contended Unit, and if we get our whip out we do things well. Our next big event in Berlin was partici— pating in the King’s Birthday Parade on

June 9th. This was preceded by a number of rehearsals, during which we learnt a lot of new swear—words from the Squadron Sgt. Major, and our drivers found out that Daimler wheels take very kindly to Zebo, and that wireless aerials can be made to look like polished copper. On the great day all went well, turrets traversed and guns dipped in salute as we “ marched ” past, thanks to much planning and advice from Lieuts. Soltan and Price. Of course, the Squadron Leader had to have his little joke, and pre— tended that his car wouldn’t start at the crucial moment. Something has been written about sport in “A” Squadron elsewhere in this copy. Suffice it to say here that we have never had a player criticised by any neutral umpire or referee, even when we have lost a game heavily. \Ve get on very well with the three Battal— ions in Berlinithe Queen’s Royal Regiment, who have often shown us on exercises that they have lost none of the dash that they are reputed to have shown nearly three hundred years ago when in 1661 they helped us round up some renegades at Tangier. The Royal Welch, who are kindred spirits in that they, like us, have a Davies~Cooke with equally big feet as our own edition, and a Welsh Quarter— master whose C.Q.M.S.’s are afflicted with the same vices as those which are calculated to

defence of night leaguers. His pet subjects appear to revolve round the theories that bar— bers as a profession are underworked and that , it is possible to dispense with a mirror if one polishes one’s boots satisfactory. Among the other well—known personalities now lost to us are 2nd/Lieut. Brewster who plans to revolutionise the Hotel Trade, 2nd/Lieut. Roe, who learnt to play the piano in record time and appeared to satisfy Bandmaster Trythall, and 2nd/Lieut. Silberrad, who gave us a new line in Armoured Car tactics. He is now a budding Barrister, and we feel sure that if future civilian law—breakers knew what was in store for them with him as a Prosecu— tor, they would think again. Our families are quite comfortably situ— ated, and judging by the comparatively few complaints

about

rations,

furniture,

etc.

seem quite content. That will probably start something! I We hope to be able to move them into even better quarters shortly. We congratulate Sgt. and Mrs. Joyce on the birth of a daughter, and Cpl. Kimble on his marriage to Kathleen Benbow. The Sgts.‘ and Cpls.’ Messes run very well, and are quite well furnished. The walls are hung with photos of ”A” Squadron groups taken between the wars. We have been delighted to see many visitors from the Regiment up here, notably the Commanding Oflieer and Mrs. Heathcoat— Amory, the Quartermaster, and the Padre, and many others. Also the six “ old ” Old Comrades who arrived on the eve of Waterloo

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

rst Troop A Sqn., \Vinners of the Troop Competition, April — july, 1940

Standing (left 10 righ!) .' Tpr. Egan, L/Cpl. Under— wood, L/Cpl. Critcher, Tpr. Heath and Tpr. Hill. Seated: (left to right) .' Tpr. Eyre, Tpr. Croker, Cpl. White, Sgt. Phillips, Tpr. Roberts, Tpr. Legg, and L/Cpl. Bromley. From Row (left to right): Tpr. Elkington, Fletcher and Tpr. Warwick.

Tpr.

Day, and showed us what extraordinary feats the human frame is capable of in spite of no sleep. It was grand to see them, and we hope they enjoyed their short stay in Berlin. As one of them so aptly remarked, “ We’ve’ been trying to get to Berlin since 1914 ! ' We were very happy to have the Regimental Band here for a week, and look forward to

their next visit. Being on detachment gives rise to more intensive work in keeping a Squadron up to scratch administratively, and we would like to express our thanks to S.Q.M.S. Bowen; Cpl. Clarke and Tpr. Cooke in the Squadron Office ; S/Sgt. Douglas and L/Cpls. Sager and Osinski in the Fitters Shop ; and Cpl. Collins and Tpr. Hedges (Ration Stores) ; Tprs. Houghton and Leese (Squadron Stores). All these often have to put in extra hours. For the rest the fighting Troops have coped well with such extra duties as Duty Troop and ceremonial guards. We are now completely self—contained, and have our garages right on our doorstep, so to speak, and have our own petrol point, fitters shop and oil stores. We have even bought thirty chicks and have a promise of three pigs from the Rhine Army Agricultural School. The Barracks have been decorated internally, and we are nearly well set to withstand the rigours of the Berlin winter. Summer training is over, cricket bats are in store, and we can motor through the Grune—


THE

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THE

ROYAL

D RAGOONS THE

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narrowly to the Queen’s, who later won the B.A.O.R. cup. We have now gone into training for the Winter Sports ,' namely Soccer, Hockey, and Rugby. Although rather outclassed by the Battalion teams in soccer, our play is steadily improving, but we look forward to any foot— ballers in the Regiment who can escape the QHM’s watchful eyes. We promise better in hockey judging by our friendly games; we are, I feel going to be a strong force in the Senior League. Rugby enthusiasts are combining with smaller Units in the Rugby league, and we shall endeavour next April to win the seven— aside competition again. STOP PREssiHere is our first Hockey League result :—”A” Squadron Royals, 6. Combined R.E./R.A.S.C. team, 0.

with satisfaction, and turn our thoughts to Christmas trees and pantomimes. Carry on, ‘A” Squadron! ”A” SQUADRON SPORTS NOTES The Squadron has been upholding the name of the Royal Dragoons in the realm of

9

cinema, ballroom, restaurant, games floor and

beer bar offering a full evenings entertainment to even the most discriminating. The Club enjoys the patronage of a considerable number of French and American personnel, who together with the “ Jocks ” and the “ Taffies” give the beer bar an atmosphere comparable to that of Piccadilly on a Saturday night. Smaller but nevertheless popular, are the more modest canteens of the Salvation Army, Y.M.C.A., Church of Scotland and Toc H,

conveniently situated, with the exception of the Toc H, within a half-mile radius of the

N.A.A.F.I. Club. For those who tire easily of N..A..A.l7.l. tea

After Duty in Berlin

and wads, there are various attractions in the

HE city of Berlin offers a larger number and variety of amusements to Service personnel than does any other city in the B.A.O.R. Needless to say, the Royals have taken full advantage of this happy situ— ation, and the black beret and Eagle can be

other Sectors. The “ Casino ” in the French Sector, for instance, brings Champagne within reach of the O.R’s pocket, providing the OR. is willing to cough up half a weeks pay. In the American Sector “ Truman Hall " offers fried chickens (Southern style) ice cream and Coca—Cola, while “ Onkel Toms ” provides

/

THERE wees - Fuss 6v may”.-.

tached in Berlin behind us, we review it all

DRAGOONS

seen in the three Sectors most nights of the week. The chief centre of attraction of course is the N.A.A.F.l. Club, an imposing modernistic looking building of four storeys with its

IN THE GRUNEWHLD,

wald training area and give map references without having to work them out if possible (except 2nd Troop, who seem attractedso much to the Olympic Stadium as a tralning ground). Major Greaves is back from leave and x “in the chair” again. Captain Dlmond returns once more to his own office to depose Lieut. Soltan and to delve into the mysteries of “ double entry’ and ledger accounting. Rumours of winter courses and N.C.O.’s cadres are in the air. And so, our first six months of being de—

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sport in Berlin. The enthusiasm has always been up here with us whether we have been beaten or have won. Cricket has now ended and although we lost more league matches than we won we were able to finish 5th equal in the league out of nine. \Ve managed to beat two Battalion teams and Headquarters B.T.B. We fitt— ingly ended the season with our most re— sounding victory against the Queen’s, scoring 139 to their 23. We relied in strength on Major Greaves and L/Cpl. Brown (who both played regularly for combined Serv1ces B.T.B.) backed up by the rest of the team who endeavoured to stay in while the stronger members of the team scored the runs. We turned our attentions at the beginning of September to the knockout Basketball competition. We were drawn agalnst the Royal Welsh Fusiliers and after leading for all but the last two vital minutes we were beaten narrowly 23—21. The R.W.F. lost

3..

+ .

311A“ \ or-, ((1

..mo.5QuiTOES

B‘f

NIQHT'.


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Lessons in Voice Production given any evenlng by appointment. Georgius Sol— tano (Late Grenadier Guards). *

Motto

of

Berlin

*

*

R.E.M.E.

Workshops :

“ What I have I hold.” *

*

*

“A" Squadron is still perplexed to know why a certain officer came up from the Regiment with a map of Wolfenbiittel tattooed on his chest. *

Parade in Honour of H.M. The King’s Birthday. “ A ” Squadron, Berlin 1949.

Cars and Crews of “A ” Sqn. which took part. in The King’s Birlhday Parade in Berlin, june, 1949

the usual amazing concoctions common to milk bars throughout the States. During the summer months the Olympic Stadium was a popular rendezvous for Service personnel. Reputed to be the best in the world, this fine sports centre is believed to have been built by Hitler especially for British Troops. With its swimming pools, gymnasiums, and countless playing fields, the Stadium is the Mecca of all sportsmen and energetic characters in Berlin. Music lovers are catered for by the two remaining Opera Houses in the city, one in

few happy hours with “A" Squadron. One of our gallant old Warriors passed a very fitting remark, when he said they set out for Berlin in 1914 and it took them till 1949 to finally reach their objective. Having settled in they partook in a ” jildi scoff ” and set out to recce the area and see some of the interesting sights of the City. Visiting the Brandenburg Gate and Hitler’s Chancellery also the famous Reichstag which incidentally is just the same as it was after the famous fire in 1933. Not forgetting the Olympic Stadium built for the Games of 1936.

Services to find life, after duty in Berlin, dull

or boring.

C.A.R.

For Sale—One bicycle. Manufactured 1917. Should be ideal for village policeman. Apply Captain Dimond.

Back for tea and prepare for a conference in the Sgts’ Mess at 1830 hrs. The conference adjourned at 2000 hrs. for the Old Comrades and Sergeants' Mess members to take a walk along to the Officer’s Mess where Major Greaves and the Officers were waiting to get the ” griff ” on what happened a long time ago. Midnight arrived with Mr. Thomas telling us a few stories which we all enjoyed. The sentry on the gate is still trying to

5k

*

It

Overheard one night in the Squadron Volkswagen. “ Kiss me, Hardy.” The Nelson touch ? ? 1k

Do you feel more dead then alive on early morning P.T. P Do you have difficulty in sleeping at night? Try Hopper’s anti— fatigue pills. *

*

*

Time: 1355 hrs. Date: 17/6/49. Place: Berlin. " Objective reached, can only hold out until 0930 hrs. tomorrow. Then will have to withdraw to consolidate last position, i.e. Sgts‘ Mess, The Royals VVolfenbiittel." The above is text of message flashed to all four corners of the earth, when six of our Old

Comrades arrived here in Berlin to spend a.

The morning of ”VVaterloo Day” was rather marred by having to bid farewell to six real Old Royals who had to go and consolidate their last position, but as they drove westward down the autobahn we pre— pared to get on with our annual Waterloo Day festivities.

*

The Squadron Sergeants’ Mess is now on the double entry—system. Single tots are a thing of the past. *

*

For a solution to the country’s dollar crisis and a guide to Anglo—American relations consult our established solicitors—Soltan,

Silberrad and Roe. *

*

*

Overheard—an ”A” Squadron Tpr. to a soldier in the Welch Fusiliers—“ We carry shovels to dig ’em out, chum, not to dig theb . . .’s in!” *

*

*

Exercise “ Stonk ”—A day’s work wasted by numerous conferences of Lieut. Colonels and L /Cpls.

*

Who’s afraid of military policemen ? Escorts arranged through any part of the British Sector by application to Cpl. Rickuss. *

entering barracks in the early hours of the morning, in spite of the fact that they all had late passes.

*

*

*

remember who the six civilians were, seen

Old Comrades’ Visit to Berlin

*

*

The rumour that S.S.M. Palmer has volun— teered for Commando training is cate— gorically denied. It is confirmed however, that the record pike caught by him, surrendered after only ten thunderflashes had been thrown. *

*

We congratulate 4th Troop on charging down two companies of the Queen’s Royal Regiment on an exercise and gaining six V.C.'s.

* *

*

the British and one in the Russian Sector, the

latter being frequented only by those who remain undaunted at the prospect of mining salt in Siberia. With such a variety of amusements, it would indeed be difficult for a member of the

”A" SQUADRON BERLIN COMMENTS

*

Owing to many conflicting rumours from time to time of the Squadron's return to the Regiment the following sources of information are published in order of reliability :— Any “A” Squadron wife,

The blockade lifted, the road was open And (long before) a word was spoken Visitors from far and near Their course towards us they did steer. Surprise and apprehension grew But only those above us knew What brilliant future lay beyond If of these critics we grew fond.

Cpl. Clarke,

Since then our lesson we did learn

Tpr. Cooke, Tpr. Leese, The Squadron Leader.

And now treat " Stonks ” with unconcern

We face inspections with eyes wide Take extra duties in our stride.


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A phone bell rings and all is planned For yet another last ditch stand The scene is set amongst bushes tall Where clueless men ’neath canvas sprawl.

Another Saturday comes far too quick(ly) And from our ranks a team we pick Then turn our face towards the west As humbly we make this request.

Black shadows flit from bush to tree For now their goal they clearly see And boundless energy they’ll gladly spend On the rude awakening they intend,

One brief encounter is all we get Of N.S. men who do their bit But in between their come and go They fill us with their tales of woe.

With fitters crying out for work Our daily task we dare not shirk By paint box, brush and artists skill We keep them waiting at our will.

As on the upward path we tread We find the Care Less slogan dead W'hile new friends come, and old ones go Lets spare a thought for those we know That small but gallant throng Of Regulars who carry on. E.J.

The trail lies deep in busy streets Sometimes an accident one meets And though it never will be said That signs are often wrongly read.

“B”

SQUADRON

THESE notes are made somewhat difficult to compile by the fact that the personnel in the Squadron are continually being posted elsewhere in the Regiment. In May we lost nearly all the 5th Draft to “C ” and “ H..”Q Squadrons, and the gap was filled by the 6th Draft which had com— pleted their technical training in “ C ” Squadron. At the same time Sgts. Brennan and Jones went to ” C ” Squadron and Sgts. Baker and

Kurpiewski arrived in their place.

Send us men with knowledge, nay But many who a game can play So that we again lift our head When on the field of sport we tread.

and had a sing—song. Early the following morning we were raided by O.C. “ H..’Q Squadron, the Quartermaster and their assistants. It is understood that the guard were not experienced in the use of pyro— technics which were showered upon them, but the Quartermaster sprained a stomach muscle and QC. ” HQ.” Squadron a wrist as they beat a hasty retreat. In fact a good time was had by all. (580 report of raiding party below.)

We were

sorry to lose Sgt. Rapkin, but glad to see him promoted to S.Q.M.S. of ”C ” Squadron. 2/Lieuts. Browne and Silberaad joined “A" Squadron in Berlin, though both have now been demobilised. Their places were taken by z/Lieuts. Bradish-Ellames and Hutchi— son, but the latter has also departed to "A" Squadron recently. At the end of July we were further re— inforced by the 7th Draft, and for six weeks the Squadron actually consisted of 94

persons. The whole Squadron went to camp in the Harz Mountains for a week in August. Everything depended on fine weather, but unfortunately rain made camping condi— tions far from ideal for the first four days. Nevertheless it was a successful camp in ideal surroundings, though the weather made bathing in a lake nearby a duty rather than a pleasure. We lit a vast bon— fire on our last night, drank plenty of beer

The Squadron was well represented in the Brigade Shooting Competition. S.S.M. Austin won the individual prize in the Warrant Officers' and Sgts’ Match, and Tprs. Smith and Hodgkinson were first and third respectively in the Young Soldiers' Competition. At the time of writing the Squadron is only on a skeleton basis, as the vast majority have joined part of “ F ” Squadron, which has gone to the French Zone for manoeuvres. We hope they are acquitting themselves well. Captain Barker is taking over command of the Squadron (at the end of September) from Major Graham, who is leaving the Regiment to become a D.A.Q.M.G. at HQ. B.A.O.R. Incidentally the Squadron Leader is writing this article, and he would like to take the opportunity of wishing all ranks of ” B " Squadron the best of Good fortune in the future.

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" B ” SQUADRON GOES SCOUTING (for what P) OR NIGHT RAIDERS HE event of ” B ” Squadron going camping in the Harz Mountains brought many and varied comments from those Officers not participating and threats of a Night Raid were made, but these were taken

lightly by most although some of the younger set were seen looking a trifle pen— sive and muttering threats of retribution should anything disturb them. However,

nothing did happen until the Squadron’s third night out. Led by Major Win— stanley, seconded by Capt. Lewis, with

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The operation successfully complete the raiding party withdrew with only two slight casualities. Capt. Lewis had the misfortune to find a tree stump waist high (his waist) and ran in to it and Major Winstanley forgot the sunken road and sprained a wrist. It was learnt later that the lack of response was due to the fact that blankets over the head made an effective screen from light and sound. A further “ Raid " was made on the way back but that is another story. Ask Lieut. Hamner. MARRIED FAMILIES

Capt. Davies—Cooke, Lieut. Hamner, Lieut.

Lewis as the “ assistants ” (see “ B ” Squadron Notes, above) the raiders left Wolfenbiittel

at

0130 hrs.,

dress,

black

denims, cap comforters, gym shoes with blackened hands and faces. The Guard Commander nearly had a fit when Lieut. Hamner gym—shoed in to the Guard Room to book the car out, looking like something released from under a very heavy stove.

The party drove to the Harz Mountains, the latter 2 miles without lights and went the last mile on foot. Not a sound could be heard. There was no moon, but plenty of stars and visibility was possible up to 25 yards when one’s eyesight became accustomed. They lay up till 0400 hrs., watching the camp. The Guard Room, the back of a 3 Tonner, was quickly found and watched for some time for any sign of movement. There was none and Lieut. Hamner made doubly sure by looking in and then pulling the inspection light out of the dashboard. No one moved. Two sen— tries eventually arrived for relief and were allowed to settle down again. The new sentries went and stirred up a bon-fire that ” B " Squadron had been sky—larking around that evening. That made them pretty useless since you cannot see a thing after staring into a fire at night, and it illuminated the Camp pretty well. The attack was put in. The first thunder flash went into the Officers tent and a couple were put round other tents. The Guard Room was “ flashed ” and the two sentries who had been fire-watching saw one coming towards them and promptly ran into the woods. Verey Light cartridges and several more “ flashes” made the hills echo with explosions, but no—one, (at least no one was seen) stirred except the Guard which soon disappeared.

HERE are about 60 married families in Wolfenbfittel now. The school has moved this term from the Barracks to Brunswick where the children go each day by bus. The Nursery School, which is under the supervision of Miss Joan Bayliss, has also moved into Brunswick. The families were delighted to have the use of the new Regimental bus for the first time for our annual outing to the Harz Mountains in July. Ably driven by Tpr. Sims the bus was packed to capacity with mothers and children and we drove first to Bad Harzburg where.we bathed and ate a picnic lunch. Later we went on up to Hahnenklee for tea. The weekly club continues; plans are being laid for net ball and badminton this winter. The families much appreciate the bi—weekly shop run by the P.R.I. where we can buy fresh vegetables at most reasonable prices. Among other activities a most excellent Whist Drive organised by Mrs. Morgan was held in the “ Guest House." All food and drink was home made and given by the families. As usual the Regiment has a fair number of babies and we are glad to welcome Sister Lyons, our new S.S.A.F.A. sister now resident in Brunswick. We should like to congratulate the following :—Major and Mrs. Winstanley on the birth of a son, Sgt. and Mrs. Dawes and Sgt. and Mrs. Joyce on the births of their daughters. Mrs. Graham and her family are shortly leaving to join Major Graham at Bad Oeynhausen. VVeare all most grateful to her for the hard work she has put in rep— resenting the Regiment as Chairman of the local S,S.A.F.A. Committee and starting and organizing our Nursery school and In any other activities connected with the families and we shall all be sad to lose her.


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” Squadron, for the last two and a half years has been the technical training Squadron. In this we have received all drafts, and taught or tried to teach them D. and M., Gunnery and Wireless. A review of the Orderly Room Card Index shows that 81% of the Regiment have had or are having their technical training in this Squadron. Our permanent staff of instructors and drivers are slowly changing. Lieut. Evans has hand— ed the D. and M. Wing to Lieut. Ferrand, Sgt. Nash has now been installed in the Gunnery Wing and his predecessor Sgt. Vowles is sampling the pleasures of Berlin with “A” Squadron. S.Q.M.S. Crockett has deserted to the Orderly Room. We were very sorry to lose him as he has been with the Squadron since it was re—formed in June, 1947. We believe he is happily settled in his new job, but the dog net reports that Rover finds the absence of stones and presence of Minor in the vicinity of the Orderly Room distinctly imitating. Sgt. Appleton has gone to ” H.Q." Squadron to help the M.T. Troop with their spare tools. we wish him the best of luck in his new job. He will need it, because only the slightly psychic and astutist N.C.O.s’ can get

the Married Families Bus to the right place on the right day. However, in spite of the above changes, the Squadron will continue merrily on receiving drafts, and moulding them into the “ Charlie ” Squadron pattern, Royal Dragoons, Mark I.

The following are congratulated 2* The Squadron Leader on his new gong. Sgt. Fletcher and Cpl. Bujko on their marri—

ages. L/c. Welsh and the Squadron Office on its policy of ” jobs for the boys," everything from coppers to cooks, drivers to defaulters. Sgts. Brennan and Jones on their successful swimming. Cpls. Hamilton, Raftrey and Simpson, and Tpr. Bonham on being selected to represent the Squadron in Regimental Cricket Matches. The forced labour gang who helped the Squadron win the Garden Competition. The P.R.I. for the prize of a barrel of beer. The following are not :— Sgt. Appleton on his grasp of the situation when brutally assaulted; it was fishy !! The Sgt. Major on his pedigree bitch and her family of six. Tpr. Norris on his ration forecast. Tpr. Forward on his driving. In conclusion, we wish the best of luck to

the following old members of the Squadron who have gone to civilian life :— L/c. (Rhythm) Green. Tpr. (Mauler) Butler. Tpr. (Jock) Cormack. Tpr. (Haggis) Hogg. Tpr. (J. Arthur) Shelley.

H.Q. SQUADRON DESPITE our many losses over the past few months we still seem to keep up our strength, both numerically and other— wise! The Squadron now has to support the Regiment with a mere 250 or so but there are hopes that we may creep up to the 300 mark again in the near future. More of those whom we thought were permanent fixtures have left us for the ” Crippsian ” joys of civilian life ! Notable amongst them is of course O.R.Q.M.S. Kelly, that pillar of the Adjutant, who after 22 years with the Regiment decided he needed a change. We wish him the best of

quickly followed by Sgt. Fookes and Cpl. Entwistle the former “ to be a farmers boy ” and the latter wondering whether or not steel is to be nationalised I S.Q.M.S. Crockett came to the rescue however and is now coping valiantly with Army Forms, K.Rs, Courts of Enquiry, etc. and Capt. Hodgson. S.Q.M.S. Palmer has removed himself and his wireless aerial to Berlin and we congratu— late him on being promoted S.S.M. We only hope his aerial stands him in as good stead as it did in the ponds of Vienenburg. We

luck in his new post with the N.S.P.C.C.

from Berlin to take over the duties of S.Q.M.S. Occasional rumbles are heard from the store when some unfortunate

His going apparently caused some apprehension in the Orderly Room since he was

did a straight swop and Sgt. Finch arrived

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1tries to “ get away with it " in his demob *it. Our M.O. Capt. Church decided he didn’t really like the Army and has gone to try the " benefits " of the National Health Service. We welcome in his place Lieut. Craig and hope his stay with us will be longer than appears to be normal with M.O’s these days. Major Massey has left us for the pleasures of the Chief Instructor’s office. If the amount of pleasure can be judged by the amount of ” bumph " turned out then he must be having a simply wonderful time therekwe are overwhelmed! Major Winstanley is now Squadron Leader in his place. Sgt. Colyer left us to go on Python but the ties were too strong and he was back again within a month—he is now Sgts. Mess Caterer. Two other stalwarts have also left us for civilian life. Sgt. Wilkinson, Signal Sgt., and Sgt. Weller of the QM. Stores. It is rumoured that after his last night in the Sgts. Mess Sgt. Weller only needed a pen and he would still have been with us. We wish both of them the best of luck. We welcome Tpr. Chesterman who is now Squadron Clerk and Tpr. Snow (posted from ” B" Squadron) who substitutes himself for S.S.M. Bayliss occasionally when the latter is called away on other duties. In the field of Sport we have more than held our own. After an exciting Inter— Squadron Athletics meeting in May we emerged victorious by a narrow margin from “B” Squadron to win the Scissor Cup. It must have been one of the few occasions in history when the Tug O’ \Iiar team virtually settled the issue. The cup was presented by Mrs. Heathcoat—Amory to Capt. Houston who received it on behalf of the Squadron — moustache bristling in triumph I “e turned out two teams in the Inter— Squadron Cricket league. H.Q. ” A ” led by Capt. Hodgson and H.Q. “ B " led alternately by Sgt. Slade and SI. Taylor. The last match of the season was to decide whether H.Q. “A" had a clear cut victory or whether they shared the honours with H.Q. “ B.” Thanks mainly to Capt. Hodg son and Sgt. Stone H.Q. ”A” emerged victorious and won the De Lisle Cup. It is reported that although the cup was reposing in Capt. Hodgson's car he was either too shy or too modest to take it out for presentation to himself after the match.

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We also supplied the bulk of the Regi— mental Cricket Team viz. Capt. Hodgson,

Sgt. Slade, Sgt. Bailey, Sgt. Stone, Cpl. Corfield, L/c. Hilton and Tpr. Evans. Amongst our many representatives in the Regimental Swimming Team was that fine swimmer, Tpr. Montgomery. Many congratulations on his magnificent performance in the Brigade Championships. We are sorry to record that on his pre— release leave he was admitted to hospital suffering from a form of paralysis. We hope that it will not be long before he is quite fit again and are sure that this will be the case if it depends on his cheerfulness and good spirit. We were pleased to see Lieut. Cubitt keeping the name of the Regiment to the fore by being selected to ride for England at Dublin and the White City. There is every confidence that the Winter season will see us equally successful in the Sports field. Finally in the Births and Marriages Dept. we offer our congratulations to Cpl. Barrington on his marriage and to Major and Mrs. Winstanley on the birth of their son. It is rumoured that the B.M.H. had to provide a specially strengthened cot to take the weight ! At the time of writing the hare season has just opened—~we are waiting to hear the result of Cpl. \Velton’s first bag—sitting or otherwise. P.S.—The QM. has managed to get him— self attached to “ F ” Squadron for their trip to the French Zone. What he is hoping for we can only guess~perhaps we shall hear more on his return i l .

ALT. Troop Notes HE MT. Troop has been running more or less on the same roads as mentioned in the last ” Eagle." Those drivers who thought the roads too narrow have found that trees are usually found on both sides. Ice cream vendors with dashing habits, now look where they are going. Their numbers are one less. Falling asleep has been tried out and found not to be an ade— quate excuse even for the M.T.O.l Tpr. Nobody is the most popular member of the Troop by smashing garage doors—gr—IS—o ! Now that all recreational transport has to be paid for the office looks like the Bank of England. Sales of tickets and


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cash transactions take place daily.

In the

first month the total is nearly £40—the M.T.O. is hoping for a rake off ! Short story—true. Driver goes shooting —washes shirt on return—work ticket in pocket of shirt—M.T.O. slightly peeved. Rumour has it that we are shortly to lose Sgt. Bradley and that his place is to be taken

by Sgt. Appleton.

rr DIDN‘T

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I would be very much obliged to you if you would get this case cleared up and let me have the result of it as soon as possible. Please reply to my Wolfenbiittel address. Yours sincerely,

X P X P X” History has not as yet recorded the Squadron Leaders re—action or actions!!

The troop await his

arrival with bated breath. Also having left us for Civilian life are Tprs. Cattermole, Caswell,

Cook,

East,

Hutchinson,

Corfield,

Tpr.

Kendall

and

. Ian/“N33; “Ir/47:34.)? , . . 1‘“ \ EA w

\

with more hope for the future. The first time we actually reached 65,000 before a tree or ice cream merchant (mentioned above) was ruled out. Wonders never cease—but we are wondering if it is possible to combine two of the targets into 100,000

and take a leave in UK.

“ The 17th Task ” Left to Right : Tpr. Chittam, L/Cpl. Luff,, Tprs. Plumblv, \Varburton, Grayson, Burnett, Renfrey.

The sporting side of the Troop has scored several wounds in the vanities of other departments in the Regiment. Last season

the Tech. Dept. were defeated both 1n Cricket and Football. This year has started well with the cricket and we hope to be able to have some good games of soccer with the Tech. Group and others. Congratulations to L/c. Narraway and Tpr. Rockall on being chosen to play foot— ball for the Regiment and also L/c. Luff and Tpr. Stapleton for representing us at Ruggcr. It was mentioned in the last " Eagle " about the hope of reaching 50,000 miles without accident. Well, unlikely as it may seem, this has happened—in fact twice and

DRAGOONS

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Sgt. Bailey still rules with a‘ firm hand over the Ration Stores and now has the help of Tprs. Edwards and Houghton, two new members of the Group. With congratulations to R.Q.M.S. Old upon completion of 24 years service with the Royals, we say ” Here’s to the next time.”

Signals Group

Tpr.

Sienkieweick on their marriages. \Velcomed to the troop are Tprs. Burns, Drury, Chittam, Coverdale, Connelly, Green, Heg— garty, Heritage, Kettle and Smith.

ROYAL

QM Group

Leah,

Leyland, Montgomery and Perry. \Ve wish that every success may be theirs. We offer our heartiest congratulations to

Cpl.

THE

”Deal/L of a HENNE ” As an example of our trials and tribu~ lations the following letter was recently received by H.Q Squadron Leader from a civilian resident in Wolfenbiittel. Subject : Grievance. ” Dear Sir, the driver of a big 3 t truck, which passed our house at I245 p.m. yesterday,18—8— 1949, in an enormous speed, killed one of our hennes. My mother tried to see you personally about this case yesterday—afternoon, because she wants either a new henne from this driver, or the money for it, which is about 15 DM, but my mother was told that the CCG (KRO) is responsible to pay for it. This driver belongs to the Army and I can’t see at all Why the CCG shall have to pay for it, because in my opinion the Army is to blame for it. It is quite a clear case for me, the driver can draw some German

money on the next pay—day instead of BAFSV’s and can send us the money down.

I SUPPOSE it is inevitable that group notes must always start with “ many changes have taken place since the last edition.” Well, we are not in a position to alter it. Our first big loss was Sgt. Weller, whose shining countenance is missed pro— bably more by the Group than the Sergeants Mess although it is hard to decide where he spent most of his time during the latter part of his 12 years service. He was followed by Cpl. Milthorp who we are sorry to say had to retire owing to ill health. We feel sure that his many friends will be pleased to know that he is recovering and enjoying life in Blighty. After frequent changes their positions are now being ably filled by Sgt. Goring and L/c. Burgess respectively. L/c. Sheppard BR. and T. (Boot Repairer and Tailor) having now quite settled down, has taken up competition with Sgt. Goring in the tales of “ The big one that escaped in

the sugar beet.”

The competition is now

much keener as it is rumoured that L/c. Sheppard has changed from 12 Bore to Bren Gun, Sgt. Goring, not to be outdone, recently indented for a 2” Mortar. The QM. has contracted his annual bout of Football Fever, and his latest order is

for a stand to be made for his office on which he hopes to place the Cavalry Cup ! ! After a long uphill struggle, Tpr. Rockall has at last succeeded in regaining control of the Volkswagon, but the QM. insists that “ Minor ” be allowed to drive back from where ever they govexcept on Saturdays. Anyone passing the Carpenters Shop these days is likely to. hear the strange sounds of thumps and groans. It is alleged that Cpl. Shone is knocking himself and other members of the Group into shape for the coming Boxing season. We wish Tpr. Griffiths the best of luck upon returning to civilian life and welcome Tpr. Wells as his successor, in the office.

E have had almost a complete turnover in the last few months. june saw ngn. Munro and Tpr. Webb leave the troop, followed closely by Tpr. Jordan in July. During August we lost ngn. Griffiths, Tpr. Britton and Sgt. Wilkinson, while in September L/cs Davies and Bell were demobbed, with ngn. Peck being posted in early October. We welcome those who have joined the troop~mainly Regimental Signals, Cpl. Unitt of the Royal Signals being the most recent member of this happy band. Much of the time during the summer has been taken up with schemes, and we can claim to have concocted dishes not many people have seen or tasted—and lived ! We humbly thank the hen for providing us with that never failing dish—the egg! The recent French—Zone scheme has left the troop with only Sgt. Nutton and four signals stalwarts—and much peace in H.Q. block. Ehrwald has been the main attraction for short leave, eleven of the troop having been there at various periods. As far as athletics and sports go, we can say that in almost every Regimental activity we have had at least one representative. Looking into the future we can see—that, at frequent intervals, there will be someone

leaving us for the long trek home, a promise of many celebrations to those fortunates left behind. We are sorry to lose Tpr. Moffat who has been with the troop for the last six months and who has been evacuated to hospital in the U.I\.

Tech. Troop Notes HAPPY is the age that has no history says the Statesman, but not so happy for those whose lot it is to compile departmental notes for the “ Eagle.” The summer is


18

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traditionally the silly season of the news— paper when Man bites Dog is the height of sensationalism

in

headlines,

but

at

the

Tech. Group news conference held shortly before going to press we were bound to admit that except for “ Fitter finds—missing

sparking plug ” we couldn't produce any— thing in the least sensational. However a service no less distinguished than that which we provide has been content to be silent since Alfred brewed up the burgoo, and so shall we. We have of course, been carrying on as usual. Staff cars still manage to stagger out of work— shops on Saturday mornings after their usual Monday to Friday treatment, and the number of Daimlers suffering from their habitual complaint of “ Schwarze Auspuff ” has received attention. By the way of variety we were privileged to fit a set of new ball hearings to Master Patrick and Miss Priscilla Grahams’ perambulator, light utility, 4x0 only the other day for which we hope they will roll all the more smoothly. To turn to the human interest side of the story we have heard fromvour late tower of strength Mr. (ex T.Q.M.S.) Hill, who by all reports, continues to flourish on as broad a front as ever; in fact the only discordant note in his letter was caused by the fact that he’s blown the big end of his demob utility pinstripe while still running in. We congratulate Cpl. Wilson and L/Cpl. Tarry on being Ist and 2nd in the Brigade Individual Shooting Championships for Cpls and Ptes, thereby demonstrating that they can wield a rifle no less dexterously than their more usual weapon the redoubtable Wrench Bihexagon Jenks Bros. Sgt. Stone and Lj'Cpl. Hilton have fre quently played cricket for the Regiment and

“F”

ROYAL

” C

and H.Q. Squadrons, and was just al‘out scraped together on the 10 September.

DRAGOONS

THE

acquitted themselves with credit. Our representatives in the Regimental Swimming team which was so successful were L/Cpl. Tarry and Tpr. Reachill whom we also congratulate. In order to forestall any cries of the for— gotten Army Variety we should mention our absent friends. First our Berlin de— tachment with “A” Squadron whose doings

are as unpublicized and inscrutal le as tl‘ e rest of the goings on in the mysterious East— Zone. We do hear from them from time to time over the telephone—usually one of those 999 sort of calls and the bush tele— graph reports that they are still enjoying themselves. Of our even further flung outpost—the “ F” Squadron Fitters now in the French Zone. Up to the very moment that they left it was touch and go whether all the vehicles would be on the road in time. Luckily Mr. Cosgrove returned from leave at the psychological moment to give the final touch~they went. It is hoped that, at the time of writing, their battles are going according to plan, that the weather keeps fine for them, and that their cookers are

still working. They will doubtless have many stories to tell on their return and the rumour has already reached us that Sgt. Empringham has single handed routed a battalion of goums with a grease gun. Finally we would like to say goodbye and good luck to all those who have left us in the last 6 monthsgLiCpl. Tildesley, Tprs. Bourke, Culcatt, Darwent, Grayling, Lock—

wood, Thompson, Creenway and especially to Sgt. Lee who had the great ill—fortune to be invalided out of the Army. Our best wishes go to him and Mrs. Lee who are taking up their Civilian abode in Denmark.

NOTES

Major Starkey was Squadron Leader with the Adjutant, Captain Hedgsen, as 2 i/c. Each trrrop had a war train(d Troop Sergeant. The Technical Adjutant and his staff, the Signals Officer and the Quarter Master all worked wonders to fit us with vehicles, wire—

less sets and equipment.

With the QM. in

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OF

charge of the echelon and S.Q.M,S. Venn as his assistant we knew that we would not go short. “"0 didn’t. Squadron training was carried out until the 24th September when we left by train for the French Zone. One thing stands out from that Squadron training period. After the first Squadron night leaguer Ist Troop found itself with no tea, sugar or milk for the morning brew. Cars were searched without success. Someone thought that the vital materials had been left in the rub— bish pit at the leaguer, anyway Ist troop had hot water instead of a brew. It was rumoured however that 4th troop who were

leaguering next to Ist troop had an especi— ally large brew that morning. One other thing. Lieutenant Chappell was lucky to escape when a Dingo, in which he was travelling turned over. On 22nd September Ist and 2nd troops went to the Ioth Hussars at Sennelager, joining us at Paderborn on the Sunday night. We moved off again by train, en— joyed the journey up the Rhine from Cologne to Koblentz and arrived at Wit— tlich at 6 pm. The Troops tell their own stories from here.

IST TROOP NOTES

Ist Troop started the battle with 2nd Troop against the Ioth Hussars at Senne— lager. We were greeted there at 1030 hours by worried umpires saying that the battle had started half an hour ago and would We please hurry! After frantic shunting we drove

SQUADRON

EARLY in August we received orders to send a squadron to the French Zone for manoeuvres at the end of Septtml‘er. With “ A ” Squadron still in Berlin ” F ” Squadron was produced frcm “ B

THE

into the battle,

about turned

on

meeting the Ioth Hussars in a village, left them one Dingo which had caught fire and withdrew three miles. Leaving 2nd Troop we found ourselves good positions, the Troop Leader’s being so good that he stayed there for 5 hours and wore out two starting handles. Finally mobile again we were told that we just couldn’t move as we were by then a famous landmark for the tank battle. raging round us. After a day of mechanised troubles followed by a quiet night we were off at first light the next morning to join a Company of Grenadiers. There was a signal from them, “ Come immediately.” We did and overshot into a surprised “enemy" troop of tanks. It then poured with rain

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and we did little else except throw thunder— flashes at odd shapes beyond the 50 yard visibility line. After two hours the shapes were found to be “ friendly " Bren Gun carriers. At 12 noon someone said the exercise was over and we brewed up. Sgt. Baker produced his gun and looked for sport which was produced by a member of 2nd Troop in the shape of an old hare skin stuffed with two empty tins. Sgt. Baker suddenly saw this in the middle of a field, advanced and “ brewed it up ” to every— one’s delight. We returned that night to Scnnclager, kipped down at 0100 hours near the very hospitable IO Hussars and had a pleasantly late reveille. We joined the Squadron train at 3 a.m. next morning and spent a pleasant day in the train. On the 26 September the Troop Leader walked a good five miles in the wrong direction look— ing for the parachutists whom we joined on the 27th. We were shocked to see them at 8.30 am. doubling around in P.T. pants but they soon calmed down. Then followed 0 Groups and Recees and at 1030 pm. the promise of a quiet night. This was not to be, and we spent the night watching a six mile front. Neither the wireless nor the Enemy disturbed us however, despite the efforts of Tpr. McCormack on the “ blower ” We found Tpr. Kennedy to be an expert sign painter and were soon flying handker— chief pennants with a remarkable design. Next followed a lucky escape when 2nd troop was captured behind us and we said goodbye to their “dogs.” After a with— drawal the troop was split, and Cpl. Miche— lagnoli was captured by the French who (lid not accept his “ French." Tpr. Robinson drove an armoured car over a bridge which disintegrated 30 seconds later. After a hectic battle during which the Troop Leader and Sgt. Baker enjoyed a roving Commission behind the enemy's lines the battle was halted by a phenominal number of French umpires and one British Umpire. The Win— ners of the Battle were not announced after an hours parlcy. Later we relieved 4 TrOO} whose leader, with his wireless on “A"

set was heard speaking thus : " O.K.. ad— vance . . . now this looks a nice place . . . turn around this triangle . . . pretty place this isn’t it . . . good, well done . . . ()h l.” After a glorious day lazing in the sun and watching the lovely Moselle valley, 2nd Troop reported Tanks, withdrew and we were sent to find out what was happening.


20

THE jOURNAL OF THE ROYAL DRAGOONS THE JOURNAL 01" THE ROYAL DRAGOONS

2ND T1200]> NOTES.

We also started with 3 days at Senne— lager where we learnt, in company with the “ Perfect Troop ” a lot about things that can go wrong. We had a good exercise after we had re—stowed the vehicles so that turrets could turn without crushing bed rolls. Torrential rain hampered the last day of the exercise, we had trouble with

exploding ammunition and an unseen slit trench prevented a certain vehicle from running over Sgt. Baker. So it was with the distinct advantage of experience (not necessarily military) that we rejoined ” F ” Squadron in the French Zone. Early mishaps here were the near loss over a precipice of the troop Leaders car and the loss of a White Scout Car which vanished and only returned at the end ofthe exercise. This however was a mere detail as

a couple of hours later the whole troop

headed by the troop leader and travelling flat out hurtled past a column of vehicles which turned out to be the enemy. There

At this point one of the operators was busy jamming the French net with a morse key and for some inexplicable reason none of the vehicles would start! To ease the situation the French released us. A small battle later took place at the crossroads misnamed “Somerset" Was it the per— fect troop that got bored with their maps here 3’ The next day we patrolled the river bank, a task made more pleasant as the enemy had run out of petrol miles away and there was a good orchard nearby. On our arrival 4th troop was seen ” haring ” down the road towards us and as we ourselves were late we could only assume that 4th troop were later and reached the river bank in the wrong place. They still deny this. More than once we nearly had trouble with the French Umpires who had only a smattering of English and we didn’t have even a smattering of French. One of them at one stage produced a map and was immediately asked where the enemy were crossing. Looking up he said “ I must not say a thing ” and pointed to a large star on his map. Later we had a battle in the village of Henzerath. An Umpire heard to be teaching Sgt. Edwards the art of arm— oured car tactics was evidently seen off pretty quickly. The Gunners were also

peeved when an umpires jeep descended and kidnapped their O.P. staff. Umpires were therefore banned although their lack of knowledge of the power of a two-pounder was useful as they credited us with knock— ing out a large number of tanks before we withdrew to avoid capture. The troop leaders car on this occasion was last seen in a cloud of dust on the wrong road. This was the last action seen by most of the troop. On the last morning a mysteri— ous red and green sign with the words

“ STATION SERVICE—ESSENCE " appeared. It now rests outside the most ap— propriate place in the Officers Mess.

the

Scammel

21 arrived

before

Sgt. Kurpiewski could gather up a team of carthorses. On Friday morning Sgt. Kur— piewski had a brief encounter with the enemy. Owing to his gunner, Tpr. Davies, being absent behind a hedge, the result was a broken window in a nearby barbers shop. In the afternoon we undertook a very hazardous drive up and down mountain roads where, I feel sure, full marks must be

\

vanee.

\\j \\\\J\\ F.

was a sharp corner, accelerators were of no

avail, we had to stop and were taken prisoner. The French were delighted with their capture but crestfallen when a ” Schwer” lorry shot off the road, over— turned and completely blocked their ad—

Whitbread,

-1 \\ \\\\\

We found four German lorries innocently unaware of the flap they had caused ! Later the dogs nearly had some fun with an enemy section, L/Cpl. Phillips had bumped into and escaped from by persuading the enemy that he was French and had always been on their side. The dogs were dissapointed however as we had to withdraw before they could take action. The next day we were in reserve at 4 pm. \Ve had orders to with— draw, take up a position and let 4 troop withdraw through us. we did and they did but only a mile behind us they started what appeared to be a tremendous battle with French armoured cars. Anxiously we asked for the exact position of the enemy. They said “what enemy . . . where? ” It was later admitted to be a slight tiff be— tween friends. The enemy at this time ran out of petrol and we withdrew to leaguer. The battle soon ended for us, we cleaned up and took part in a March Past memorable if only for the fact that the Inspecting General arrived whilst the troop leaders were still playing poker dice, and that 3 Troop leader lost control of his mount when leaving the parade. That was the end of a grand schene which many will remember for doubtless other reasons than those printed here.

3RD TROOP NOTES. Arriving at Wittlich we unloaded without hitch#unlike a certain other Troop, and proceeded to the Leaguer area. The leading car found map reading rather a strain, but with the help of sign posts and the spot light we arrived at our destination where we had a well earned wash and sleep. The next day was spent resting and trying to acquire some fresh meat which I am sorry to say was unsuccessful. On Tuesday we moved up to the forward areas which proved to be a very pleasant and uneventful drive except for Cpl. Harrison and his dogs who brewed up despite several warnings from the Squadron Leader. That night proved very hectic for all of us, especially Charlie who was found stationary in the middle of the road with Tpr. Briggs fast asleep inside it and his foot pressed hard down on the accelerator! Tpr. McCracken was also found having a good ” kip ” propped up against the Troop Leader’s Daimler ! During the course of the night we took a party of French engineers under our wmg—I may add that they didn’t stop very long. On Wednesday morning the Troop accounted for 2 enemy tanks, despite the R.A.E.C. umpire! The rest of the day passed un— eventfully except for certain 1nd1v1duals falling asleep. That night saw the Squadron withdrawing across country. Here special praise must be given to Cpl. Whitbread for his brilliant map reading. The only mishap being Charlie, whose Com— mander, L/c. Nobbs suffered slight head injuries. On Thursday the Troop suffered disaster by Able and Baker getting bogged down. However, thanks to some very efficient Indian smoke signalling by Cpl.

given to all the drivers. However, our efforts were not fruitless because Sgt. Kurpiewski spotted 2 enemy tanks with their trousers down behind a haystack. During the action which ensued, disaster fell upon the Troop Leader’s wireless. A spare drop lead found its way into the recorl system, and to remedy this, another shot

was fired which proved to be very frighten— ing to onlooking Frenchmen! That night we had the honour of defending Brigade HQ. Here Tprs. Harrison, Pavey and Russell excelled themselves by throwing a sign-post into a stream‘much to the annoyance of onlooking Germans. It was shortly after this that the battle mysteriously ended; where upon the Troop Leader's car and Baker had a jolly good brew up in a mill. The rest Of the Troop had theirs under the stars. Saturday was spent preparing the cars and ourselves for the final march past on Sunday ; when we all looked very smart. The journey back to Brunswick on Monday went according to plan, except we were still eating Spam and Steak and Kidney pudding! Like all other good times, this one has come to an end, and I am

sorry to say we are now broken up; some of us in Berlin, some back to duty, and the

more fortunate ones on leave.

4TH TROOP NOTES

The troop travelled down to the French zone with the rest of the Squadron arrivmg on the Sunday evening. The battle started at 0630 hrs. on the Tuesday when the troop was under command of “ D ” Company, lst Parachute Battalion. We took up a defensive position and at 1900 hrs. the troop Leader went round the positions with the Company Commander. Troop leader de— cided that the farm yard at the back of the “ Gasthouse ” made a good troop HQ. .It seemed rather incongruous drinking Wine out of a tin mug. At about 2200 hrs. the S.Q.M.S. arrived with the petrol lorry and


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of us found out the beauty of the early morn— ing ! We did one more exercise in the Harz and found out even further the necessity of quick brewing and the difficulties of a wire— less set when the stores were not handy. At last came the great day, and we went down to Brunwick to load, and left for the French

Zone at about 22.00 hrs. Our journey was through Cologne, Koblenz and the Mozelle Valley, which were all most interesting and the latter very beautiful in the late afternoon light. s

" 2nd Troop—The Schwer Lorry.”

left, declaring that 4th Troop were better off than Squadron “ H..’Q \Vednesday, 0300 hrs. Troop leader woke to see operator holding the headphones at arms length. Headphones were saying . . . “ Tell your b . . . sunray to get in a position where he can be kicked by you ! ” Sunray crawled out of the other end of his bullock cart in time to answer “ W'ilco . . . out.” Charlie reported a jeep load of enemy fifth column. It was learned later that they saw this jeep approaching their roadblock,

sat

still

until

the

“ enemy ”

started dismantling the road block and then fired. After the “ enemy” had been held prisoners for 12 hours it was learned that they were French Officers who knew nothing of the exercises. Just before dusk that day a Brigadier and a Colonel asked the troop leader where the troop leader was. Some— what embarrassed on enlightenment they congratulated the Squadron on a spectacular withdrawal. Thursday. Called 0620, moved to Thor— wich on the Moselle. Visibility was only 50 yards and, with the troop leader turning left instead of right on the main road we arrived at Leiwen before our position was established. we went back as fast as we could, passing 2nd troop who claimed that they knew what they were doing. Later we were awakened by a shattering roar as the “ Perfect Troop ” arrived to relieve us. Not content with relieving us they seemed to be trying to relieve the enemy on the opposite bank so near did they go before stopping. Friday. \Vorked with the 3lst Dragoons (French Army). Squadron Leader pleased to hear that a certain sitrep was coming but changed his mind when he saw that it was

” ;\ Brew 17p.”

written in French. The Slst reported enemy to the south but they did not know where. 4A and 4D found a village just south of them full of umpires but free of enemy. The 3lst were very relieved. No little chaos was caused when we took up a defensive position round the village which happened to be umpires HQ, and we were ordered to stop all umpires as the enemy were believed to be dressing as such. The troop leader told the Colonel in charge that we were holding all umpires. The Colonel said “ All umpires have their passes,” but the troop leader mentioned forgery. Eventually the Colonel said, “ I was in England in 1942 and understand your manoeuvres.” They parted on friendly terms with much hand shaking and saluting. Later in the day the troop leaders ear captured an enemy aeroplane. The troop leader questioned a little man in blue and said “ Etes — vous le navigateur ? " He replied, “ No, in actual fact I’m the pilot

The prize was left as the troop leader, al— though renowned for sprocket skill, was no pilot. Our last action in the battle was when we had to cover the withdrawal of the Parachute battalion. We were brewing up when the battalion left rapidly in T.C.V.s, an Officer saying “ We're the last and there are enemy half tracks on our tail. With a White careering down a track, frying pan of half cooked chips over one side and a six—gallon dixie of char on the other, we saw the last of

the battle.

5TH TROOP Norns

After two days of instruction in barracks, we went on our first 24 hour scheme, and some

We arrived at Wittlich at about 2000 hrs. and unloading began apace. However, just as Fifth Troop were to be unloaded, a Daimler got wedged in between two trucks. Cold salmon that night l By eleven o'clock, however, all was unloaded, and some mem—

bers of the Troop found how warm Tank Suits were, if working. The warmer mem‘ bers were cooled down by the march to camp, and thirst quenched by beer on arrival. Fifth Troop Leader found his voice had great penetrating power that night. The next day we went to a new leaguer where we stayed for 24 hours. We began to know our good friends Steak, kidney and spam. The game in this area was not in presence when the marksmen went out to kill for the pot. The N.C.O.’s were introduced to the folding of seven maps on a 1’ 6” map board, and many said what they thought of maps and map boards. A troop flag was introduced by kind permission of Cpl. Howley’s P.T. pants, and after Tpr. Clemence had got to work with the white blanco a tasteful little creation appear— ed. On the Tuesday afternoon and evening, we moved forward to our positions for battle and were joined by half a platoon of lst Battalion Paratroops, who stayed with us for 24 hours. By 0700 hrs. we had moved to our forward positions and about 1000 hrs. Fifth Troop met the enemy. During this engagement, Cpl. Chandler was seen making a single handed—attack with the upmost bravery, luckily there were no umpires ! Sgt. Benson in his car did a cavalry charge which demoralized the enemy, especially as when the gun tired, it was a little difficult to tell if the car was on fire or not. We then retired. Cpl. Howley got captured and Cpls. Chandler and_Fletcher got lost in a village, of not more than a dozen houses. However. they more than redeemed themselves as they got cut off from the Squadron and during the afternoon made their way back through the enemy’s lines to us. Even Tpr. Bradford

THE

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23

praised his car, and Tpr. Burrows found out how useful a wireless can be. Those of us who got back to the Squadron found the brews were on the. other cars. Tpr. Hayes was heard to tell Tpr. Fell just what he thought of schemes and particularly of people who get captured with the grub aboard, and though we tried, we could only capture a motor cycle and an ambulance who came up a mined road and then said they did not fight with at least four machine guns draped round them. We then slowly retired back and captured two motor cyclists who followed us. Unluckily for them, the Troop Leader was unable to read a map, but luckily no one in the Troop recognized French blasphemy. We retired to the area of Squadron H.Q. and after dark the Squadron repelled a tank attack. We then did a night march back over the Moselle. Tpr. Mauchline will not forget message pads ! The next day the Troop did not move till 2 o’clock and the only enemy we saw were lights coming down the hill on the far bank of the Moselle. The day goes on record as the occasion when one member of the troop threw his clothes and bedding around the country—side. On the last day of the scheme we saw no enemy, though we heard of great battles on either side of us, and the White Section tried to

produce some enemy in our rear with little success. However, we did see Tprs. Clem— ence, Robson, Bonham and Beardsall digging in with good results. It was rumoured that the Troop Leader flapped late in the after— noon ; this he hotly denies. That ended the exercise, and the next day was spent cleaning up the cars. In the afternoon we moved to \N’ittlich but before moving up to leaguer we tried to march past. The Troop Leader’s cars seemed to be practising for Silverstone and 2 il/c. changed direction with chaotic results. Even Tprs. Johnstone and Messer were seen to give a watery smile through the layers of dirt. On Sunday we had the cars ready for the march past. Before this we practiced a few wheels which caught us rather unprepared. We didn’t know the accelerator peddle went that far. After a long wait we were inspected and marched past. We then, on the following day, returned to Brunswick where the Squadron broke up. I think Fifth Troop enjoyed the scheme, and I only wish it could have lasted far longer. We have now returned to training trainees with memories of beautiful scenery, brief excite— ments, steak and kidney and 6 inch nails.


24

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DRAGOONS THE

The Royal Dragoons Aid Society The following letter has been received from Colonel F. W. Wilson—Fitzgerald,

D.S.O., M.C.: ’MZ‘V, I J I 949

Dear Mr. Editor,

At the last meeting of the Old Comrades Association I was horrified to learn how few of the Old Comrades seemed to have any knowledge of the work of our Regi— mental Aid Society, or even to be aware of its existence. The objects of the Society are to assist past Members of the Regiment to establish themselves in Civil Life, and to help them and their families when in need. Help, in exceptional cases can also be extended to the families of Serving Soldiers, on the re-

commendation of the Commanding Officer. The Society is not an employment agency, but contributes annually to the National Association for the Employment of EX Regulars for this purpose. Men in search of work should communicate with this organisation at I4 Howick Place, London S.VV., or make application to the nearest branch if the address is known. The address of the Royal Dragoons Aid Society is 92, Victoria Street, London S.W.I, and enquiries should be addressed

to the Secretary. Cases are investigated in the first instance by the Secretary and later referred to a representative of the Committee. Men taking their discharge should register on AF. 5258 which is issued to them by Record Office. It should be sent to the Secretary for indexing after which it will be returned to the owner. Old Comrades, or others who hear of Royals in distress should bring such cases to the notice of the Society in writing, or through the Secretary of the Old Comrades Association. I hope that all Royals will realise that the Society is most anxious to help all genuine cases. All enquiries are regarded as confidential and in cases where financial need is not of the first importance the Sec— retary will give confidential advice or refer the applicant to the proper channel. In these days of State Welfare Schemes the Society is often called upon to advise as to the proper method of procedure and is only too ready to do so. Those in need of advice or assistance are asked to get in touch with the local office

of S.S.A.F.A. which often proves a valuable link between the applicant and the Aid Society. Yams sincerely, F. W. WILSON FITZGERALD

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Our Annual Camp with the K.D.G’s in Northern Ireland was a great success and enjoyed by all. We went to Camp for a fortnight from 25th June—9th July with 22 Officers and 154 O.Rs and had glorious weather. The maximum use was made of the vehicles, and the Regiment was organised into two Squadrons at approximately field strength. Troop and Squadron schemes took place the whole time and finally there was a Regimental scheme. Two nights were spent out on bivouac, one at Magilligan near Portrush and the other in the area of Lough Earne. We were particularly grateful to the

K.D.G’s for their hospitality and in particu— lar to Major Cairns and Capt. Cassels who took endless trouble with our schemes and training. Our weekends in Fife are kept busy with more troop training and Range Practices at Barry A.T.K. range. We have had a scheme against the Scottish Horse who invaded the Kingdom of Fife from Perth, and St. Andrews University O.T.C. A demonstration at Leuchars Aerodrome in conjunction with the RAF. Battle of Britain Anniversary was very successful and caused much favourable comment. Recruiting exhibitions and parades have been taking place throughout the year and our strength is now just over 200. The K.D.G’s sent us a Demonstration

Troop to help show the flag and aid recruit—

FIFE

AND

FORFAR

DURING the inter Eagle period we have said goodbye and good luck to Sgts. May and Illingsworth. Sgt. May is now learning to be an Engine Driver with the British Railways at Sunderland, and Sgt. Illingsworth with Rotherham Police Force. We welcome from the Regiment Sgts. Wood, Hard and James, bringing with them a whiff of Regimental air and all the up to date " griff." We hope their tenure of office will be pleasant and well remembered. We also welcome Tprs. Wallace, Coutts and Johnson. Wallace and Coutts found themselves almost on their home doorsteps and soon disappear into the ” Scotch Mist " after duty. S.S.M. Stevenson who lives away at

YEOMANRY

(T.A.)

ing. They toured the country and usually managed to end up outside Haighs Distillery at Markinch. Although no immediate re— sults were obtained from their efforts, later

Dunfermline we see occasionally looking more like an old ” Black cock ” than ever. Unfortunately early in the New Year we shall be bidding him farewell after 23 years valuable service with the Regiment. Sgt. Hobday who left the Regiment in March ’49 is to be seen occasionally peering through a cloud of sawdust at a local sawmill where he is working. Tpr. Humphrey is to be congratulated on his marriage in Cupar on 26th August and we wish him and Mrs. Humphrey every happiness. . Our Annual training season is now drawmg to a close and we hope much knowledge has' been gained. Certainly Squadrons and troops look more like an Armoured Car unit and are now able to function as such.

a few recruits did enrol as a result of their propaganda. We have now raised a nucleus of a Regi— mental Band in Kirkcaldy, and have every hope that it will be able to play at functions by Christmas. During the training year we have had many visitors most notably Mr. Shinwell,

Lieut. Gen. McMillan G.O.C. Scottish Com» mand., Gen. Herbert Director T.A., Major Gen. Barber and Major Gen. Arbuthnott, G.O.C., Highland District and Col. Tiarks,

R.A.C. Records. We were also glad to welcome Capt. Hodgson who paid us a Visit in the summer and will always be glad to see more members of the Regiment.

THE

ROYAL DRAGOONS

Bri fish Legion FOUR years after the cessation of hostilities there are still many thousands of ex—Servicemen and women who, like wreck-

age after a storm, are left drifting “ on a sea of troubles ” or lie washed up derelict on the beach of despair. This perhaps is an inevitable situation but one which must be acknowledged and dealt with in a realistic manner. The Government has institu— ted new social security schemes, but many of these men slip through the wide meshes of the official net. The Government schemes legislate for the general and not the individual, and in the name of humanity provision must be made for those who do not come under its influence. The problems are so

widespread and varied that it needs a nation-wide organisation to deal properly with the situation. Each Regiment has its own Association which continues the comradeship of Service and deals with problems which concern the needs of its own members, and much good

work is done by them in alleviating tempor— ary need and the finding of employment etc. On the wider issues which affect ex— Servicemen generally it is essential to have official representation. No single Regi— mental Association could fulfil this need and it is in this respect that the British Legion—— which is representative of all three Services is of extreme importance. The Legion is not a substitute for, nor a competitor with, the Regimental Associations. It co—operates with them in every way possible. During the past 28 years it has built up a Welfare Service which is quite unique, and its influence is applied corporately on behalf of all ex—Servicemen and women wherever their interests are affected. This authority to speak on their behalf is already recognised by its representation on all important advisory bodies concerned with welfare and rehabilitation. Legion policy is decided at National Conference by the members themselves, many of whom also belong to their respec— tive Regimental Associations as well. It is only by the whole—hearted support of all ex—Servicemen and women of this National Organisation that their interests can best be served. There is a Legion branch in almost every town and village in the Country and where all ex—Servicemen and women will be welcome.


s Q ¢ 6 is

k Q) "to

s

4.

N

I.

s m

Lady Godiva. (Sgt. Jones). In the background——The Cow and others. 2. H.Q. Sqn. Stores on the move. 3. The Greasy Pole. " Miss ” Montgomery of the W.V.S. 5. The CO. and Mrs. Heathcoat-Amorv in the Blindfold Race—direction a1 assistance by Major Winstanley.

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Waterloo Day, 1949 THE next time I have to write notes on ‘ Waterloo Day I shall do it the day after and not four months later when I am begin— ning to think of the next one. But we had a good day and I remember the high—lights. In the morning we had a clear holiday with Sunday routine and an extra hour in bed. In the afternoon however, we had a lively and enjoyable gathering on the sports field and we were delighted to have six Old Comrades with us. They returned from Berlin just in time to enjoy some of the festivities. The chief events of the afternoon were a fancy dress competition, greasy pole, dog races, tug of war, blindfold races and a

demonstration of trick motor cycling given by Lieut. Hammer and his assistants. Leading competitors in fancy dress were Sgt. Jones as Lady Godiva, Tpr. Markey as one of the seven dwarfs and Tpr. Mont— gomery (of swimming fame) as a member of the WVS. HQ Sqn stores on a hand cart moved around the sports field in a somewhat erratic manner but judging from the absence of Courts of Inquiry afterwards, no stores were lost, although it was reported that Tpr. Hawthorne had lost some blood and was topped up with beer in lieu. Although not officially entered for the competition the wireless truck produced by Sigs. pro— vided entertainment as for most of the after— noon it was swarming with signallers trying to make the loudspeaker system work so that Lieut. Hamner could announce to the crowd as well as to the inmates of the truck. There were many side shows and Capt. Houstoun was a successful bookie for the dog races and helped the PR1 to pay for the prizes which were presented by Mrs. Heathcoat Amory. The winning dogs seemed delighted with their be-ribboned bones. In the evening Sgt. Hill and his cooks produced a wonderful array of food for the Cpls. and Tprs. and all had the traditional free pint. A most enjoyable dance was held in the Sergeant’s Mess to which officers and their wives were invited and again we enjoyed the company of the Old Comrades.

Rifle, Bren and Sfen ABOUT ten days before the Brigade Small Arms meeting in July, the Regi—

ment was detailed to produce a team despite many commitments and the non avail— ability of several good shots. Major Park-

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house was appointed team captain and told to raise a team. From known good shots and from a hasty grouping test six officers, six W.Os. and Sgts. six young soldiers and nine Cpls. and Tprs., (not young soldiers but not really long enough in the teeth to be called “old soldiers”) were selected for training. After one week of fairly intensive firing and zeroing the team went to the all arms Training Centre at Sennelager for the Brigade meeting. The results were surprisingly good considering the short training period. The Officers team was third, the W.Os and Sgts. were second, the

young soldiers were second and the Cpls. and Tprs. were third. N0 team wins but we made up for it with our individual winners, Capt. Davis Cooke was third in the individual officers rifle match ; S.S.M. Austin

won the W.Os and Sgts. individual rifle match; Tpr. Smith won the young soldiers match with Tpr. Hodgkinson third, and Cpl. Wilson won the Cpls. and Tprs. match with L/Cpl. Tarry second. Six Royals (out of I3 competitors) were selected to fire in the Brigade individual rifle Championship. Had we fired better with our Brens in the team matches we would have won some of these too ; our rifle shooting was good, our bren shooting was bad. The Sten team, found from members of the other teams, did

not disgrace itself despite the lack of practice and borrowed weapons and Cpl. Wojda fired well, getting the second highest score of the meeting. Two teams from the Brigade were entered for the B.A.O.R. Small Arms Meeting in August. We were one of them. In the midst of other activities we were not able to get in much more training between the two meetings. We had to go to Sennelager again (wotino beds) and al— though several individuals fired well with the rifle we did not bring back any prizes. The most successful rifle shots were L/Cpl. Tarry, Cpl. Wojda, R.S.M. Morgan, 2/Lt.. Bradish Ellames and Sgt. Wilkinson who was selected to fire in the B.A.O.R. individ— ual rifle championship (competed for by the 12 best rifle shots in B.A.O.R.) .22 shooting on the miniature range has not yet commenced but there will almost certainly be competitions during the winter and we hope to do as well, if not better, than last winter. Several of our best shots are in Berlin with “A” Squadron but we still hope to produce some good teams from ” the rest.”


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safely leave you to guess just how much we appreciate this gift, and hope that the repro— duction here will do it justice. Another presentation most pleasurably received was the gift of a silver cup by Sgt. (O.R.S.) R. A. de B. Fooks on his leaving us, and suitably inscribed for an annual Mess Darts Championship. This is the first piece we have had presented to us since before the war, and a photo of it is shown. As we have now had two pieces this year, we are all

NOTES

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forelock, presumably an old Southwark custom in the face of such a heavily gonged weight of authority. Nowadays, of course,

they simply walk the other way.

'

Talking of photos, we have also to thank the Old Comrade, at present unkown, who so

kindly sent us the copy of the South African Roll of Honour, which is now framed and

hung in Mess. We were very pleased to receive the following cable :

The Warrant Ofiicers Fron’ Row (left to right) : M.Q.M.S. Cosgrove, R.Q.M.S. Oli, R.S.M. Morgan, M.M., Lt.~Col. R. HeathcoatAmory, M..,C B. M. Trythall, T.Q..\I.S. Hill, Q.M.S.(ORS.) Kelly. Back Row : A.Q.M.S. Churcher, R.E.M.E., S.S.M. Butterworth, S.S.M. Bayliss, S.S.M. Maguirc, S.S.M. Austin J

M.M., W.O. II Maple, R.A.E.C., A.Q.M.S. Pettitt, R.E.M.E.

GENTLEMEN,

we beat the

Officers

Old Comrades, Thomas, Hutchins, Hewitt, Stares, Plumb, and Hatherill in \\ olfenbuttel, Brunswick, June 1949.

at

wondering where the third one will come from —perhaps. Dick Fooks has gone off to become a farmer, and also to get himself married, so it looks as though he is going to have his hands full. He has the best wishes of all members for his future. The summer of 1949 has been a disastrous one for Mess Members. We have had the unfortunate experience of losing such stal— warts as Micky Kelly, Bunker Hill and Bertie Butterworth from our midst. Their absence is most noticeable, especially as we can now comfortably get to the bar with Bunker out of the way. Sgts. Weller and Wilkinson have also gone, and many will be sorry to hear that Jigger Lee went home pending probable discharge on medical grounds.

cricket by 76 runs to 68. The unsporting say it was the barracking coming from the outfield, but we like to think it was

our demon bowling. However, we lost only one match during the season, and that was to the Corporals,

who beat us by 2 runs. We had a very full summer of social and sporting activities, the greatest event of which was, of course, the visit of our Old Comrades during W’aterloo Week, Messrs. Stares, Thomas, Hutchins, Hewitt, Hatherill

and Plumb. This last called himself “ The Rebel.” We didn’t enquire why. We were delighted to have them and gave them several jolly evenings. We are told they enjoyed themselves hugely also in the Mess in Berlin. A more detailed account of their doings will no doubt appear elsewhere, and perhaps more of them will honour us with a visit next year. The most delightful surprise of it all has occurred, fortunately just before going to press, in the shape of a beautifully engraved silver salver, bearing the signatures of those Old Comrades who came out. We can

As Bertie Butterworth was in Berlin, and Bunker for once was in barracks, both

Cup presented by Sgt. Fooks for Annual Championship.

Darts

awaiting their marching orders, there occurr— ed but one opportunity of getting all the \Narrant Officers together, and of course a photo was taken. Recruits walking past the group during the operation were seen to be taking off their berets and humbly pulling the

The Old Comrades’ Salver.

” We will be drinking a toast to the health of our Sister Regiment at our ‘Annual Re—Union Dinner on 3 Sep 49. Sgts.’ Mess Royal Canadian Dragoons.” To which we replied: " Sgts.’ Mess The Royal Dragoons send every good wish to their comrades of Sgts.’ Mess Royal Canadian Dragoons on their Regimental Re—Union.” When we held our combined Horse Show with The Blues they very generously invited us for the weekend, including families. We had a grand time with them to be sure, and were impressed with their extremely fine hospitality. Needless to say, our Messes are in constant touch with each other, and we are

now having them down with us for a return visit. The Greys have also held a jamboree to

which they invited us and The Blues, and a strongish party travelled up to them. A very fine time was had by all, and we returned in good order and properly dressed. We congratulate Bunny Austin on winning the Brigade W.O’s and Sgts. Rifle Champion— ship and Mick Kelly on being the first to win the Fooks Cup. Sgts. Brennan and Jones continued to do well at swimming and greatly helped the


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JOURNAL OF Regiment to win the Brigade Shield and Water Polo Cup. represented B.A.O.R. in the pionships and did very well place and a 6th in two diving Congratulations go to :7

Championship Sgt. Brennan Army Cham— to get a 4th events.

S.S.M. Palmer, T.Q.M.S. Mantle, S.Q.M.S. Rapkin and S.Q.M.S. Finch on their promotion. Sgt. Goring on entering the Mess. M.Q.M.S. Cosgrove, S.S.M. Palmer, Happy— go—lucky Goring and Vic Bowen on their Rooti gongs. If ever there was a grave miscarriage of justice, this is it. Sgt. Dawes, R.E.M.E,, on becoming a father. All our expectant fathers. If this sort of thing keeps on, we will be in the happy position of not recruiting Royals, but breeding them. The Old Comrades, who came, saw and con-

quered the R.S.M. The S.S.M. who didn’t know you polished our nice new medals. Bunker Hill on his going away party “ striptease.” The Mess, 0n Duck Colyer going away.

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Duck Colyer on coming back. The Tpr. who mistook the Quartermaster for the B.M. and is still alive. The Bandmaster on being mistaken for the OM. All Members of the Mess were sorry to hear that the Adjutant will soon be leaving (yes, really they were I) to take up an appoint— merit on the Staff at Sandhurst. He has been a staunch supporter of the Mess for a long time, and his absence will be much noticed, particularly from our social gather— ings. We are now making plans for Christmas, and as this Journal is due to appear about that time, we say “ Cheerio,” and wish all our

Old Comrades the best of luck. We all hope to see many more of them next year and perhaps on Waterloo Day. We end our Notes with best wishes to all Royals, present and past, past help, redemption, recovery, and artificial respira— tion, present in transit, drafted, posted, blasted and benighted, and future, whether

knighted, blighted or merely near—sighted. All can be assured of ahearty, wheezy, wet

The Regimental Athletic Team, Winners of 31 Lorricd Infantry Brigade Inter—Unit Championships

week-end if ever they pass this way again. Standing .' Tpr. Morton, L/Cpl, Nicholson, Bdsm. Lock, Sgt. Hall, Tpr. Edwards, Cpl. Raftery, Tpr. White Tpr. Tedder, L/Cpl. Griffiths, Cpl. Peake, Bdsm. Kerr, Cpl. Barrington. Seated : Cpl. White, Capt. Miles, 2/Lt. Roe, Capt. Barker, 2/Lt. Brewster, Capt, Houstoun, Sgt. Foukes.

Front .' L/cpl. Murray, L/Cpl. Wilkinson.

SPORTS Atk lg 'ies ESPITE ”A” Squadron being in Berlin we decided to enter for the B.A.O.R., inter—unit Athletic Championship again this year. We started the season by Squadron train— ing and competitions early in May which were followed by the Regimental inter— Squadron competition on May 27th. Every— one expected HQ. Squadron’s 300 men to prove the victors which they did, but not without a struggle. “B” Squadron were second and “C” Squadron third. There were no outstanding performances but a consid— erable amount of good material was unear— thed which gave Captain Barker a nucleus on which to base a Regimental team, and it was

noticeable that in almost every event the times or distances were better this year than they were last year. A mixture of keenness and apathy attended Athletic Training in preparation for a triangular meeting on June Ist, the

NOTES Brigade inter—unit on June 7th and the 7th Armoured Division inter—unit on June 16th. The Blues Very kindly offered to be hosts for the triangular meeting with us and the Greys, which we had won last year. It was only decided to hold the match five days beforehand and no tribute can be too great for the organisation and hospitality

of our hosts.

Both competitors and spec—

tators enjoyed themselves thoroughly and all ranks were invited to various forms of entertainment in the evening. On the Athletic track the Blues proved too good for us however and we could only win the Long Jump and 5,000 metres while Trooper White came first in the 1,500 metres in 4’ 50” though our team was second. We did however manage to beat the Greys and finished second. Our next venture was the Brigade inter— unit championships, in which we were competing against the \N’orcesters and the Foresters, and we thought their superiority

in numbers would be the deciding factor. After a terrific fight which included an exhausted 1,500 metre team being forced to run an extra lap we managed to win by the narrow margin of two points from the Foresters with the Worcesters four points away third. But the whole match was decided on the last event, the 4 x 400 metres which produced considerable nervous ten— sion though we won by 30 or 40 yards. The Regiment won the following events :—~ 4 X 100 metres (z/Lt. Brewster, z/Lt. Roe, Cpl. White, Tpr. Tedder). 4 x 200 metres (Capt. Barker, z/Lt. Brewster, 2/Lt. Roe, Cpl. White). 4 x 400 metres (L/Cpl. Titmarsh, Bdsm. Kerr, Tpr. Grifliths, Tpr. Tedder). 2 x 120 yds. Hurdles (z/Lt. Roe, Cpl.

White). High Jump (Capt. Barker, Cpl. White). Long Jump (Capt. Barker, 2/Lt. Brewster) Javelin (2/Lt. Roe, Cpl. Barrington). Perhaps the most notable performance was the Long Jump in which our team beat the B.A.O.R. team record by I’ 10%” with a combined jump of 41’ 11%”.

Despite our victory we knew that we would have to be superhuman to be placed in the 7th Armoured Division inter-unit competition where we were competing against the three Parachute Battalions, who had beaten the Blues, Ist R.T.R., 5th D.G., the Rifle Brigade and the Foresters. It was sad to see our 5,000 and I,5oo metres team bringing up the rear in both events where there were 24 runners but it is perhaps worth reflecting that the winner of the Regimental 5,000 metres in 1947 won in just over 20 minutes whereas our winner this year has done under I8 minutes. So it can be seen that the standard was very high. In fact in the two events We won, the high jump and long jump, we had to clear II feet and 41’ 4%” and beat the B.A.O.R. team records by 5” and I’ 3%” respectively in doing so. It has become abundantly clear that the Regimental team will never be more than average until our runners realise what it means to be fit, and in the longer races it is very much up to the individual to see that he is fit, especially as our time and facilities


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for training are so limited. Further we must find in the Regiment some others who can put the shot and throw the hammer and discus at all of which events we are lamentably bad. Strength and stamina must be our aim if we are to do better next year. In the 7th Armoured Division Individuals our entries were unplaced except for Captain

SWIMMING THE finding of a Regimental Swimming Team has always been a difficult task as compared with Football, Athletics etc. Anybody can and will run if the necessity arises but few can negotiate water. Fortunately our last year’s champion, Tpr. Montgomery was still with us and together with him, Sgt. Brennan, Capt. Davies Cooke, Sgt. Jones, Lie. Tarry, Cpl. Clark and Sgt. Edwards formed a nucleus around which the team was formed. The additional members were Major Park—

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Barker who won the High Jump (5’ g”) and was second in the Hop, Step and Jump

_ 33

delightful setting, the bath being surrounded on 3 sides by the Harz mountains. The Inter Unit events were all relays of four persons, each of whom had to complete the distance prescribed. The other units taking part were the rst Foresters, last years

(42' I035”)Finally a word of thanks to the four men from “ A” Squadron who proved so utterly indispensable to the team and who, to help us, had to suffer untold privations journeying to and from a Berlin only just free from blockade.

NOTES,

ROYAL DRAGOONS

winners, and the 1st Worcesters.

The afternoon began well with Tpr. Montgomery, Cpl. Clarke, Tpr. Chestman and L/c. Marshall winning the 4 x 100 metres Free Style Relay. In the next race, the 4 x 100 Breast Stroke relay, our team

1949

(Major Parkhouse, Capt. Davies Cooke, L/c. Tarry and Sgt. Jones) came second. The 4 x 50 metres Back Stroke was won by Tpr. Chesterman, Sgt. Perry, Sgt. Brennan and Tpr. Montgomery, the latter starting his lap of 50 metres a clear five yards behind the leader and pulling out a grand finish with two yards lead. The Diving team, Sgt. Jones and Sgt. Brennan, then won the I metre Diving with some polished performances and later in the afternoon also won the 3 metre Diving with the same grace and precision. Fur— ther wins were accomplished by Tpr. Montgomery, Capt. Davies Cooke, and Tpr. Stapleton in the 3 x 100 metres Medley

house, Sgt. Perry, Cpl. Quinn, Lfc Marshall,

Tpr. Chesterman, Tprs. Stapleton, Fennel, Markev, Reid and Riacbil]. Training was started towards the end of May in the Brunswick indoor bath and eventually was able to be done in the open air when the end of June was in sight. The \Vater Polo Team consisting of Major Parkhouse (goalie until Sgt. Edwards re— turned), Capt. Davies Cooke, Sgt. Jones, Sgt. Brennan, L’c. Tarry, Tpr. Montgomery and Tpr. Cook (unfortunately whisked

relay, which included Back Stroke, Breast

Trooper .11onlgomery

Winners 31 Lorried Infantry Brigade Championships Slanding .' (Left to Right) Tpr. Reid, L/Cpl. Tarry, Tpr. Montgomery, L/Cpl. Quinn. L’Cpl. Marshall, Sgt. Perry Seated : Major Parkhouse, Cpl. Clarke, Sgt. Brennan, Capt. Davies»Cooke, Sgt. Jones. Tpr. Chesterman.

Tpr. Stapleton.

away on a course at the last minute) got valuable practice against the local Wolfen— biittel German team in two matches which were lost 4-3 and 4—1. Those that played are still wondering whether a referee in a diving suit should be employed in the future! The match played against the Ist Foresters in the final of the 31 Bde. Infantry Brigade Water Polo was a most exciting game. At full time the score was I all, which then meant extra time would have to be played. After about 25 minutes in the water both teams were beginning to feel cold but not before two more goals had been scored by Sgt. Jones and Brennan. The Foresters retaliated with another goal but were unable to net any more. Thus a hard and clean fought game ended in a victory to the Regiment by 3 goals to 2. A special mention goes to L/c. Marshall who took Tpr. Cooks place in the team. He played a stirring game considering his lack of experience. The 31 Brigade Championships were held at Bad Harzburg Swimming Pool. A

Stroke and Free Style and the 4 x 50 Breast Stroke in which the swimmers were the same as the 100 Breast Stroke. The Final race was most exciting. The Regi— ment's representatives being Cpl. Clarke, Bdsm. McNamara, Sgt. Brennan and Tpr. Montgomery. Tpr. Montgomery swam last string and had an exceptionally fast swimmer in the Ist Foresters ahead of him when he took the water. The race was decided by a touch, the Foresters being first. The result of the day was Ist—Royals, 2nd~— Foresters and 3rd#Worcesters. The following day was for the individuals and the Regiment swept the board clear in every race with the exception of Plunging and 400 metres Free Style, there being no entries for these two. The winners were Capt. Davies Cooke, 100 Metres Breast Stroke, Sgt. Brennan in the I and 3 metre Diving and Tpr. Montgomery who romped home in the 200, 100 and 50 metres Free

Style and the 100 Metres Back Stroke. Our married families were also represented and we were very pleased to see Mrs. Brennan, wife of Sgt. Brennan the diver, come second in the Ladies’ 50 metres Breast Stroke against the strong opposition. Also to be


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congratulated are S.S.M. Bayliss’s daughter Jeanne for coming second in the 20 metres any style for children under 12, and his son John, for being third in the same event. The same evening the team moved to Bielefeld, a distance of 120 miles down the Autobahn and were eventually abed by 0100 hrs. on Wednesday, 20th July. It had been a tiring day terminating with ” difficulties ” at Bielefeld but no one stirred till mid—day \Vednesday and were more or less recovered when the first event of the 7th Armoured Division Inter Unit began at 1430 hrs.

This Championship had the same events as the 31 Brigade Meeting but not the same successes for the Regiment. The Unit teams taking part were the Ist Royal Tanks, H.Q. B.A.O.R. Signal Regiment, 3rd Parachute Regiment, HQ. 16 Inde— pendent Parachute Brigade Group and our— selves. The Regiment were unable to take more than three firsts owing to the excep— tionally high standard and these three were the 4 x 50 Free Style with Cpl. Clarke, L/c. Marshall, Tpr. Chesterman and Tpr. Montgomery ; the 4 x 50 Back Stroke with Sgt. Perry, Sgt. Brennan, Tpr. Chesterman and Tpr. Montgomery and the 3 Metre Firmboard Diving with Sgt. Jones and Sgt. Brennan. The final result of the meeting was :—

1.

THE

Group, with

DRAGOONS

The following day Thursday, 215t July, saw the Individual Championships for the 7th Armoured Division. The Regiment was represented by Sgt. Jones, Sgt. Brennan and Tpr. Montgomery. Sgt. Jones was second in the 3 metres Firm—board Diving with 34.06 points to the winner L/c. Gibbons 5 D.G. with 36.07 points. Sgt. Brennan was third in the 1 metre springboard diving with 41.0 points. This event was also won by L/c. Gibbons 5 D.G. with 49.0 points. Tpr. Montgomery, having played water polo directly after lunch, made an extra— ordinary recovery and romped home first in the 100 metres Free Style, time I minute 12.6 seconds and also the 200 metres Free Style time 2 minutes 54.8 seconds. He was unfortunate to come up against Sgt. Eggleton of the R.A.E.C. in the 100 metres Back Stroke, which prevented a hat trick for the Regiment. This race was won by Sgt. Egglestone with Tpr. Montgomery second in the time of 1 minute 29.9 seconds. Sgt. Egglestone was a possible for the 1948 Olympic Games in the Back Stroke. So ended the Regiment’s Swimming career, having won the 315t Brigade Meeting and come fourth in the 7th Armoured Divi— sion Meeting, an improvement on the 1948 performance in which the Regiment was second in the 315t Brigade Meeting and 5th in Hanover District. It is sincerely hoped that the 01d and new members at present

H.Q. B.A.O.R. Signal Regiment, with . Ist Royal Tanks, with . 3rd Parachute Regiment with . . . . Royals, with . . HQ. 16th Independent Parachute Brigade

ROYAL

serving with the Regiment will read, mark,

107 points 80 points 78 points 77 points

63 points

CRICKET,

learn and inwardly digest this article and not give the Swimming Officer a headache by their tardiness in coming forward next year. It was a great shock to the Regiment and especially to the Swimming Team to learn that Tpr. Montgomery was striken with infantile paralysis shortly after the Divis— ional Championships. We all wish him the speediest of recoveries.

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Captain Hodgson taking 6 wickets for 22. The fielding on our side, despite the ground, was good. Sgt. Link caught two very difficult catches. This opening match set the seal for the rest of the season.

As long as we had our full

team, we usually won. We were hampered until early August, by Sgt. Slade being unable to play through having had appendicitis in April. However he came in just at the right moment, made top score of the season,

84, and bowled well. The mainstays in the batting were Sgt. Bailey, Captain Miles and Cpl. Hamilton, whilst Captain Hodgson, Cpl. Raftery, L/Cpl. Griffiths and Tpr. Evans were the chief bowlers. First L/Cpl. Greatrex then L/Cpl. Nobbs kept wicket. The latter also made runs. The match against the Greys had to be abandoned owing to rain. In the B.A.O.R. Inter Unit-Competition, we played the Ist Battalion Worcestershire Regiment at Gottingen. We won the toss and fielded first. We were a pretty weak team through leave and courses and our Scorer, Tpr. Hingston had to play at the last moment. However, we managed to get the opponents out for 113 in 26.3 overs. These matches are played on 35 overs per side basis. We had several stoppages due to rain, and bowling and fielding was difficult due to a wet ball. When we batted the rain had stopped for good. All went well until 18, when Captain Hodgson was bowled for 11, Fulton was out two balls later and with Captain Miles in, (he had the previous day returned from short leave in Italy), the game from both sides became tense. If the Worcesters could have got two more wickets quickly, they would probably have won. However, L/Cpl. Hilton remained until 47, batting doggedly and was followed by L/Cpl. Nobbs who, after being dropped 4 times before he made 10 went on with Cap— tain Miles to win the game for us. We next had to play 1st Battalion Forest,ers whom we had defeated easily before this

HE season opened on April 30th, in weather conditions which implied that it was not quite cold enough to skate. This year with several good cricketers including Major Greaves in Berlin and Lieut. Evans on a long course in England it was thought that it would be difficult to get a good team together.

However, after numerous Squadron games and two Regimental Trials we felt ready to try our luck against the Royal Horse Guards on May 14th at VVesendorf. On this ground two years ago the Regiment was defeated by 84 G.C.C. R.A.F. However, this time thanks to a spirited innings by Captain Miles, we made 94. Our opponents replied with 84.

season. But they produced a better team than before and the Regimental team still troubled, with Cpl. Hamilton away and Major Greaves unable to come from Berlin, were

beaten easily. The Foresters batted and made 148—4. Over bowling was not very effective although Evans bowled well at times. Our fielding

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was not good and the Foresters were not afraid to take risks. When we batted Evans was very unlucky to be hit on the face and then fall back on his wicket. For a time it looked as though Sgt. Bailey and L/Cpl. Nobbs might pull the game round. But some good spin bowling by Captain Chisholm was too much for us and we were all out for 88. During July and August, a Squadron League was run. HQ. Squadron produced two teams and “ B ” and " C ” Squadrons each one team. The winning team, led by Captain Hodgson, received the De Lisle Cricket Cup. Tpr. Evans of Hg.“ A ” team made 66 and was top scorer n the league. In conclusion it can be said that, whilst it

was realised that our chances of doing well in the B.A.O.R. Competition were small with “A” Squadron away, at any rate more people have played cricket this year than in any year since the war. RECORD OF MATCHES : SQUADRON LEAGUE Played

Won

Lost,

Points

1 2 2 3

60 48 36 24

6 5 5 REGIMENTAL TEAM

Played 13, Won 6, Lost 5, Drawn 1, Matches Abandoned 1. May 14th 1). R.H.G. Royals 94 (Capt. Miles 27 Retired Hurt). R.H.G. 84 (Capt. Hodgson 6-22). May 22nd v. C.C.G. Brunswick

C.C.G. 113 (Cpl. Raitery 4-31) Royals 114-6 (Sgt. Bailey 27). May 28th ‘11. Worcesters Worcesters 54-8. Royals 64—7. June 9th v. I Foresters. Foresters 54 (Capt. Hodgson 5-16) (Is/Cpl. Griffiths 2-3). Royals ti7»4 (Sgt. Bailey 48 not out). June 11th 1). Greys Match abandoned owing to rain. June 25th v. 31 Brigade. Royals 1209 declared (Cpl. Hamilton 38), (L/Cpl. Nobbs 25). 31 Brigade 112-9 (Evans 4-40). July 1!. I Paratroop Battalion. I Paratroop Battalion 190 (Cpl. Hamilton 3-14), (L/Cpl. Nobbs 3-34). Royals 88 (Cpl. Hamilton 26), (Tpr. Fulton 2(3). lnlv 24th v. G.C.C. Brunswick. K C.C.G. 171—5 declared (Bdsm. Smith 2-36). Royals 145 (Sgt. Slade 84), (Sgt. Stone 24 not out). July 30th v. 31 Brigade. 31 Brigade 83-0 (Capt. Hodgson 644). Royals 4o (I./Cp1. Griffiths I7).


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Ist

v.

Guards

Independent

Paratroop

Company. Royals 127 (Tpr. Evans, 31, Capt. Hodgson 25, Cpl. Corfield 2 1). Guards 48 (Capt. Hodgson 4-5), (L/Cpl. Griffiths 2—5). Aug. 3rd 1;. W'orcesters. \N’orcesters 114 (Capt. Hodgson 7—45), (Sgt. Slade

1\. Q.\I. S. Old b 2LL. \Nilson— Fitzgerald. Sgt. Link b z/Lt. Wilson-Fitzgerald Sgt. 11inch 11L Capt. Ilodgson .. Sgt. Slade c z/Lt. \\11son Fitzgerald b Capt Hodgson SS.I. Taylor c A b 2/Lt. V\1lson Fitz— gerald .. Sgt. Stone c Capt. Houstoun b Capt. Hodgson .. . Sgt. Acres b Capt. Hodgson

Nobbs 44 not out). Foresters 148-4 (Tpr. Evans 2-32). Royals 88 (Sgt. Bailey 30).

Sept. 7th 1,1. 3Paratroop Battalion. 3 Paratroop Battalion 163-8 (Capt. Hodgson

4-65).

Sgt. Nutten b Major Parkhousc

Royals (58.

T.Q.M.S. Manbtle b Capt. Hodgson

BATTING AVERAGES

Tpr. Evans

Tpr. Fulton L/Cpl. Greatrex

L/Cpl. Griffiths Cpl. Corfield

L/Cpl. Hilton

mm UI

Capt. Hodgson

132 87 80 93 47 60

E xtras

26 . 33 21.75 .00 .50 .16 .oo

104

Sgt. Courts 2/Lt. \lilson Iitzgerald Sgt Jones 11.0.

Axerage

TOTAL Bowling 3»? 2/Lt. \Vilson Fitzgerald

Capt. Hodgson

.00

39 73 53

'

.13' - I3 ~83

43

.60

35

.00

33

3 . 5o

17

3.4

178

104 82 57

00.:-

H

H .4

61 1 16 1 16

H48 ON 030k“

Sgt. Slade L/Cpl. Simpson Tpr. Evans

.2 >4

Cpl. Raftery

OHmO|Q\lN—JSH

Lijl. Nobbs L/Cpl. Griffiths Bdsm. Smith

Wkts. 37

Average 6.67 1 1.25 11.61

1.11.1

BOW‘LING AVERAGES.

Hooocw

Tarry, Tpr. Bonham, Bdsm. Smith, Bdsm. Maberley.

Runs 247 45 209

.7. 1 _.-

Major Massey b Sgt. Slade

.

Lt. C.ol Amory c R. Q. M. S. Old 11 Sgt Slade .

2/Lt. Hutchinsonn. o. .. Capt. Barker 1) Sgt. Slade Major Graham c Sgt. Link b Sgt. Major \\ instanley b Sgt. Slade . .

been of great assistance and has given a great deal of his time to endeavouring to ensure that all players arrive on the field fit to play for 90 minutes.

TOTAL

Sgt. Slade 10 —~ 4 — 29 —— 7 SS.I Taylor 9.3 —— 2 —- 20 — 3

asset, have shown great keenness and are

Bowling 5%

FOOTBALL WE have now been playing football for two months and it is very gratifying to find that among the recent drafts received from U.K. there are several players of pro— mise. This is very unusual as a player of note is invariably taken on the establishment in U.K. It may have been due to the fact that they arrived here during the close season and therefore their ability as a footballer had not been noted.

must thank SS.I. Taylor, A.P.T.C., who has

Due to the rapid demobilisation of Na— tional Service men we have to continually change, but there is no doubt that those National Service men who are or have been 'in the Regimental Team have been a great

Extras ‘

14.83

17.40

thoroughly fit by the time that we play our first match in the Army Cup. For this we

Capt. Houstoun Hit wicket 11 Taylor

Team

13ac/eRow.T..QMSMantle I‘pr. Slater T.pr Glennan, L/Cpl. Nobbs Tpr. Goldie, Tpr. Baxter, Cpl. Tarry. [17011111301115 S/Sgt. Taylor,Cpl Raftery Tpr. Bix, Sgt. Edwards, Capt (Q.M.) Lewis, Cpl. Lawrence, L/Cpl. 9 Shipton, Tpr. Evans In front Minor."

12 .20 12.88 14 .'5o

20.50 57.00

“A

8 L. 1

1 Capt. Hodgson c Sgt. Jones b S. S. I. Taylor 2/Lt. Wilkinson b Sgt. Slade Major Parkhouse b Sgt. Slade . 2/Lt VVilson Fitzgerald b S. S. 1. Taylor

2nd/Lieut. Morris, and/Lieut. Porter, Sgt. Link 2nd,’Lieut. BradislyEllames, L/Cpl. Simpson, Cpl.

Mdns. 20

...- 3 L. 40 w 5

3

OFFICERS.

Also Batted: 2/Lieut Fitzgerald R.1:2. M. S. Old0

Name. Overs Capt. Hodgson 144. 3 Cpl. Hamilton 14 Tpr. Evans (119) 75.1

94 ,, . 2 7— 22 — 4

11

Major Parkhouse

O‘UI-hWN

L/Cpl. Nobbs

0 8 8 7 5 6 6

OOHOHOON-SNOONH

6 6 C?

Sgt. Bailey Capt. Miles Sgt. Slade Cpl. Hamilton Sgt. Stone Cpl. Raftery

Highest Score

DRAGOONS

SERGE ANTS.

Aug. 20th U. Foresters.

Times Runs Not Out

RO YA].

OFFICERS 11. SERGEANTS Played on Friday, 9th September.

Royals 1233 (Capt. Miles 46 not out), (L/Cpl.

No. of Innings

THE

Also Bowledszl. Corliehl, 211(l/Li0ut. Fitzgerald, l./Cpl. Brown, Tpr. Bonham, Sgt. Bailey Tpr. Sellars.

3—36)-

Name

OF

O‘NWWHOO

Aug.

JOI‘RNAL

We have played quite a number of games and we are regularly playing an "A" and " B " team each week. This has proved highly successful as due to injury, duties and personnel leaving the service wecseldom play the exact team twice.

Our reserves are very

capable indeed and have acquitted them— selves extremely well. Efforts are now being made to ensure that all the players receive training and are

quite willing to train and assist in every way. Our greatest difficulty has been caused by one or two of the older players who now think that they know all about football, and do not need to train or attend instructional training. This has been their undoing and it is hoped that othei members of the team have gained some knowledge fxom the fact that these men an: a hindiancc to a team, although they may be able to play football Teams cannot \11n matches unless plaveis are. fit, and if they mecnot fit then it is far bettei that they be left out of the team, and players not so clever, but fit me installed in their places. It is may good to note that this

only applies to a very isolated few and the majority of the men are extremely keen. Again we must thank Sgt. Edwards for his great assistance as Captain to the “A" team ; he still plays as well as ever. He has also been selected as Captain of the B.A.O.R. team for the present season and information has just been received that he will captain the B.A.O.R. team which is playing the French Army in the Saar in December. Another member of the Regi— ment who will be present at this game will be Captain (Q.M.) C. W. J. Lewis who has been selected to referee the game. We should like this opportunity of thank— ing the following players who have assisted the Regimental team for some time and who still continue to play extremely well :—~ Cpl. Raftery (Left Back), S.Q.M.S. Rapkin

(Captain of " B ” team), Cpl. Lawrence (Left half), L/C. Shipton (inside left), Tpr. Glennan (inside right), Tpr. Goldie, Tpr. Rockall and Cpl. Smith. The following players have also acquitted themselves well and although a large number of them will have left before the season ends we wish them the very best of luck in civilian life and trust that they will enjoy their games then as much as they do now.


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ROYAL

DRAGOONS THE

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ROYAL

DRAGOONS

“B” Team Back Row : Cpl. Tarry, Tpr. Bonham, Tpr. Smith 30, Tpr. Hickman, Tpr. King, Cpl. Barrington, T.Q.M.S. Mantle.

Front Row : S/Sgt. Taylor, Tpr. Lane,var. VViddup, S.Q.M.S. Rapkin, Capt. (Q.M.) Lewis, Cpl. David, Tpr. McCracken, Tpr. Rockall. “ Minor.” Grand Prix Rotterdam

"A" TEAM L/C. Nobbs, Tpr. Johnson, Cpl. Raftery, Tpr. Bix, Sgt. Edwards (Capt.), Cpl. Lawrence, Tpr. Baxter, Tpr. Glennan, Tpr. Slater, L/C. Shipton, Tpr. Evans. Linesman, L/C. Tarry.

“A" TEAM—continued Versus Schoppenstedt. Away. Lost 3-2. Germania. Drew. 0—0. Royal Horse Guards. Away. \Non

5-0. Dettum. Away. Won IO-O. Royal Horse Guards. Home. Drew. I Para. Bn. Home. Drew 3—3. I Worcs. Regt. Away. Won 10-0. 16 A/B VV/S. Away. Won 4—3. 16 A/B W/S. Home. Won 6-4.

“ B ” TEAM Tpr. Hickman, S.Q.M.S. Rapkin (Capt.), Tpr. Lane, Tpr. McCracken, Cpl. Smith, Tpr. Vv'iddup, Cpl. Barrington, Cpl. David, Tpr. King, Tpr. Goldie, Tpr. Bonham. Reserves, Tpr. Cavill, Rockall. The following games have been played during the present season with result as shewn :— ‘ “A” TEAM Versus Hornburg. Away. Lost 2-0. ,,

Schladen.

Away.

VVolfenbfittel.

Lost 3-2.

Away.

Lost 7-].

STABLE URING the season the Regiment took part in 15 shows and met with a very fair share of success in both the Show Jumping and Dressage events. The honours for Show Jumping go to Cascada, who, admirably ridden by Major

“ B ” TEAM Versus Wolfenbiittel. Away. Lost 5—1. Germania. Away. Lost 3—0. Schoppendstedt. Away. Won 6—0. Civil Labour. Won II-I. Brunswick. Lost 5—0. I Para. Bn. Away. Lost 2—0.

NOTES Starkey, hit form in July and has jumped brilliantly ever since. Amongst this horse’s major successes have been the Open jumping at our show, the B.A.O.R. International Show,

Show.

and

the

Rotterdam

International

She has seldom been out of the

A/Iajor Starkey 0n. Cascada Rcceivmg the Grand Prix from Prime Bernhard of The Netherlands at Roltardam.


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DRAGOONS

Major Starkey on Cascada, winning the Open jumping at the Royals/Royal Horse Guards combined Show. Maj. Massey on Boxer, Lieut. Cubitt on Cascada. Lt. Col. Amory on Barleycorn at the 7th Armoured

Division Horse Show.

first four in any event in which she has taken part and it is true to say that this combination is one of the best in Germany today. Pascha, well riden by Lieut. Cubitt is another horse which has done well particularly over the type of course where speed and handiness tell. His best performance was probably at the Rotterdam Internation— al Show Where he won the Timed Touch and Out Event.

Barleycorn, skilfully piloted by the CO, started the season well with two firsts at the 16 Paratroop Brigade Show at Hanover and two seconds, one at the 5 D.Gi Show and one at the 7th Armoured Division Show both after a jump off for first place. Towards the end of the season, however,

age and his legs began to tell on this grand old horse and he became increasingly reluctant to face his fences. At the Ger— man Horse Show at VVittingen, however, he showed himself to be still the best jumper in Germany on his day, when exuberantly ridden by Lieut. Cubitt, he won the Klasse S.b. event, being the only horse to obtain a clear-round over fences five to five and a half feet high. In the Dressage events Radian has been nicely ridden by Mrs. Graham to be in the money in a number of Hack class and Dressage events, notably obtaining a second at the Rhine Army Show and a first at

Hanover.

THE JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL DRAGOONS

Our own Horse Show was held this year on I6 and 17 July in conjunction with the Blues. An admirable course was designed by Major Rooke near the air strip at Wesen— dorf,which provided excellent going amidst a pleasant setting. There were eight events. Cascada won the open jumping with Barley— corn third. In the combined A and B grade event Cascada was second, being just beaten on time. Other regimental horses to com— pete in the show were Boxer, ridden by Major Massey, Radian by Mrs, Graham, Gandhi by Lieut. Reid and Riskov by Mrs. Starkey. Pasha might well have been in ' the money but unfortunately his rider Lieut. Cubitt was still tied together with plaster as a result of diving through his hat on the Hanover Race—course and so this horse was not entered. Mention must also be made of the Rhine Army International Show. Cascada, Major Starkey up, won the Open F.E.I., was fourth in the Allied Nations Individual event, and was a member of the British Army team in the Coupe de Nations. Pascha, Lieut. Cubitt up, was second in the Class B Jumping and second in the Timed Touch and Out. A second was also won by Cascada and Pascha in the Pair Relay event. Mrs.

Graham was second on Radian in the Dressage event and the Regimentai team, Cascada,

Pascha,

Boxer

Barleycorn,

from Ireland a five-year-old thoroughbred, Dathador, out of Menani by Dark Artist,

bought on the Regiment’s behalf by Major Victor McCalrnont. This horse is being trained for the Olympic Three Day Event in 1953. It is too early yet to say what chances of success this project has but from the looks of this horse there is every hope that he will turn out really well. At present he is on light work to acclimatize him to this part of the world, a process which notoriously takes anything up to six or eight

months. During the winter an equitation course will be run for young officers from amongst whom we expect to find successful pilots for next year's events. No resume’ of the Hack Stable’s activities would be complete without reference to the men who actually do the work—the British

Capt. Hous‘toun has also done

well in these classes on Quick Tempo and on The Shaikh. He was recently second on The Shaikh in a very good class at Helmstedt.

Lieut. Cubitt on “ Pascha.”

and

won the Inter—Regimental Team Jumping event. Altogether a successful week-end as a result of which Cascada and Pascha were selected to represent the British Army team at Rotterdam. In August Lieuti Cubitt brought back

Lt. Col. Amory on Barleycorn at Hanover Show, 1949. " Poosh "

41


42

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OF

and German stable staff. The Hack Stables are not to be compared with a pro—war cavalry troop where a strict stable routine could be adhered to with no fear of incon~ veniencing the riders, nor to a private stable where the amount of feed given is only limited by the owner’s pocket. The labour that is required to turn out horses that look and are a credit to the Regiment may be more readily understood when one realizes that the government controlled basic ration of oats is Slbs. per horse per day and further~ more that the times of exercise (upon which the times of grooming and feeding are de— pendant) is unavoidably governed by the ever changing times at which riders can make themselves available. Nevertheless the stable staff through hard and willing work managed to overcome these incon— veniences as the many rosettes pinned to the doors of the horse boxes so conclusively testify.

'ational Association for the

Employment of Regular Soldiers, Sailors and Airmen The following letter has been received from the Director Royal Armoured Corps: 19th August, 1949 To .'—The Commanding Officers of all Cavalry and Royal Tank Regiments “I have been asked by the Adjutant— General to help publicise the objects and successes of the National Association for the Employment of Regular Soldiers, Sailors and Airmen. I feel that the aims and the work of the Association are not as well known among Regular soldiers in the Army of to—day as they should be. The Association has no

THE

ROYAL

THE

DRAGOONS

Ministry

of

Labour's

Employment

Ex—

many vacancies in fields of employment which would not normally come to the notice of the Ministry of Labour’s officials, and claims, quite justly, to provide the special help which past experience has proved to be needed by many ex—Servicemen and particularly by ex—Regulars. The declared object of the Association is to recommend to employers selected men of good character and of all qualifications and

OF

the

patronised and we have many first class

Association seeks :— (a) To discover in each man his existing and potential employment value in civil life by close enquiry into his character, past experience (both in and out of the Service), hobbies and family surroundings. To inspire employers with a true appreciation of the value of these men. To provide much needed guidance to men ignorant of the commercial and industrial world regarding the best chance of earning a living (particularly long—service men who, by virtue of their

players of snooker and table tennis; Troopers Brunton and Chapman, who are

trades,

and in connection with this

service,

often abroad, have lost per—

sonal contacts) and to help them to solve the often difficult problems created or intensified by domestic responsibilities and restricted choice of residence. Arrangements have been made for the last annual report of the Association (for 1948), which is a very full guide to its work, to be distributed down to units through the Army Publications Depot. 1 would point out that of 49,845 Army personnel who registered or re—registered in 1948, 38,652 were placed. These figures include nonRegulars who were entitled to the help of the Association. The figures for Regulars only were 11,236 registered and 11,107 placed, a magnificent result as you will agree and worthy of being given more publicity. These results speak for themselves, and I would ask you, therefore, to publish pro— minent notices in Regimental Magazines and Journals and to take any other action you may think fit in order that both serving and ex—members of your Regiment should be given every chance to benefit from this organization.

W.V.S.

desire, nor is it qualified, to compete with the changes. It does, however, claim to be in close touch, through its job finders, with

JOURNAL

We believe this is the first contribution by the W.V.S. to the “ Eagle,” so perhaps it would be as well if our function in the Regiment was explained. We are here to assist with the welfare side of the men. Our club rooms are attached to the N.A.A.F.I. premises as we are spon— sored by N.A.A.F.l. for this work. Our

amongst our star players, reached the finals of the doubles championship for B.A.O.R. in table tennis, at the beginning of the year. Tournaments are held throughout each week for these games, with a cash voucher as prizes for the winners and runners—up of each ; these are welcomed by the men as by the middle of the week they are usually “ financially embarrassed.” On the musical side, there is of course, the

radio and the electric gramophone on which the records go round and round, until we almost go around with them. In order that we can keep our feet on the ground for a few nights of the week there are dancing classes ; these are slowly but surely improving as the pupils have dis— covered that, instead of two feet they have

BAND WE have now been re—united with the Regiment here in Germany for two years and are beginning to feel quite “ Old Baorians,” having acquired a fair amount of colloquial German, impressive Flutes, Panzer Bassoons, Synchro—Mesh Horns, Bicycles and Radios etc. ; it really is amazing how one becomes localized and to many of us the time has passed very quickly indeed. Compared with many bands, we have not fared so badly regarding discharges, and up to the present only five have returned to civil life. Due to this low percentage of wastage we have been able to maintain a good outfit in all aspects. As these notes go to press, the band have just completed their privilege leave and by all appearances a good time was

DRAGOONS

43

a left and a right. We have a considerable amount of really good talent amongst the men. Our star turn being Trooper Sim on the accordian Cpl. Hamilton the drums and L/Cpl. Simpson at the piano; these are an excellent trio, and for the Musical Evenings in theCanteen they are joined by four vocal— ists who croon into the microphone in a most professional manner. The programme is presided over by our able announcer Cpl. Raftery whose versatility knows no bounds. On Sundays, after the morning Service, there is a day trip to places of interest, which are numerous in this part of Germany. These are made in the comfort of a de—luxe coach which has recently been acquired by the Regiment. As a final note we would like to say how much we appreciate the assistance, financially and otherwise, rendered to us by the P.R.I.

NOTES before we had passed Braunschweig West the majority of members were “ overcome ” and loud chattering as to the pros' and cons’ of the bus gave place to louder snores and

quite a fair amount of “ Dollar Shortage.” It was indeed a great day in July when we noticed a large and luxurious Diesel Coach in the area of the Tech, Garages and Band room ; we believe we were first in the

library; and of course, the W,V.S. office.

The games rooms are more than well

mode of travel, ” a' la Drei Tonner,” and

two table tennis rooms, a lounge for reading and writing and an extremely well stocked

ROYAL

had by all, but as usual there seems to be

field in the P.R.l's Office to ” book ” it for an engagement at Hanover when we played at the combined R.E.M.E. Sports held at the Hindenburg Stadium. It was a change to travel in such comfort after our usual

club rooms here consist of a billiard room,

THE

,

“ You 586, it is a Semi—qrmver'

—Btlsm-. filozmtifield explains.


44

THE

JOURNAL

groans—«or was it Hank on his super— charged Adler-Bazooka .3 Band engagements have been fairly plentiful in this sector of the Zone and our usual privilege of playing at the Hanover Race Meetings has been shared with the Band of the Paratroop Regiment stationed at Brunswick. Programmes were given at \Vesendorf for the combined “ Blues and Royals ” Horse Show last July and the Dance Band Section shared the stand with a well known German Dance Orchestra at the C.C.G. College for the Officer’s Ball given by the Commanding

Officer and Officers. The Band were attired in pre-war “ Reds ” on this occasion after much trouble in finding sufficient \Vellingtons. Our congratulations to the Dance Band section on this occasion for the first class show they put up as many notable personalities have had nothing but praise for the manner in which they acquitted themselves. The Band Sgt. should also be congratul— ated.

He, although behind the scenes, was

miraculously able not only to produce a dance band complete in “ Reds ” but also to fit out the special guard which had been detailed for duty at the same function. He

OF

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

hopes to start a dress agency for Comic Opera when he retires from the Band which is not yet, we understand, for years and years and years ! ! July and August were quite busy months for us and engagements were carried out at Bad Harzburg Swimming Pool when we were able to spur the Regimental swimming team on to a decisive victory in winning the Brigade Triangular Sports. This was followed by an engagement at the C.C.G. College when we played for an afternoon Garden Party and a farewell party at night. It is the first time we recall eating our dinner so late at night and in the fresh air too. There was no moon to guide our wandering forks and it was quite a feat endeavouring to eat off the correct plate. The Bandmaster became quite. adept spear— ing spuds with his baton. ’ Later in August we were detailed to go to Berlin as a “ Duty Band ” due to the fact that the three bands permanently stationed in B.T.B. were on duties elsewhere and the tour was a most enjoyable break for us all. we travelled and were conducted to our billet by 2/Lt. Browne who met us at Char— lottenburg Station. We all agree that we could not have had more convivial surround-

THE

JOURNAL

OF

ings as the billet turned out to be none other than the Berlin Short Leave Centre situated on the Reichsportfeld, the scene of the 1936 Olympic Games. The Band soon felt really at home; meals were exceptionally good and were served by not unattractive waitresses which added to the enjoyment of sitting down to eat.

We. were kept busy with odd jobs and the performances that we gave were much appreciated especially the concert given to an all German audience of 1,500 people at the open air Theatre in the Freilichtbiinne am Juliusturm, Spandau. The British and Allied Horse Show B.T.B. was held at the Reitungplatz where we played for both days and ended the pr0~ grammes with some marching and Trumpet Fanfares. A programme was also given during the tea interval at a cricket match between the Free Foresters and B.T.B. Our stay in Berlin was unavoidably broken as we had to travel back to the Zone . in order to play for a Ceremonial Parade at Wesendorf. Our hosts on this occasion were “the Blues” who sent their coach to pick us up and we travelled back by road. Billets were quite rough compared with Berlin but it was only a matter of three days. The Parade took the form of a General Parade and Dedication Service when the VIP unveiled a wooden Roll of Honour in Memory of Officers and Men of the Blues who fell during the 39—45 war. Major—General J. C. O. Marriot, C.B., C.V.O., D.S.O., M.C., General Officer Commanding

London District took the salute and at the conclusion inspected the Band and spoke to several members. He complimented the Band on‘a good parade and smart turn—out. We were very anxious to return to Berlin, especially the Don Juans who lost no time in loading the baggage lorry. The Band Corporal had never before seen such willing and fast workers. Most of the work that we did on our return was for “ A” Squadron and on the Saturday night a small dance band volunteered to go to the Sergeants Mess which proved a very successful evening. On Monday, 22nd August, a Squadron All Ranks Dance was organised and the very excellent ballroom situated in the Malcolm Club was hired for the event. ‘ Only one thing marred the evening, as far as the Dance Band was concerned, and

The Band playing at the combined Royals/Blues Horse Show at Wescndorf

that was untimely running out of beer which

THE ROYAL DRAGOONS

45

was a catastrophe for them especially as it was such a hot summer night. Again the praises have been sung for the large Dance Band which worked well and sounded even better. The Area Commander and his wife attended the dance and seemed to enjoy it immensely. The tour ended with a concert which the Military Band gave in the Barrack Yard of “ A ” Squadron. All the items were appreciated and Mr. Elloway, Bandmaster of the Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire Regiment, who was paying his first visit to the Squadron was roped in to conduct the overture. The Squadron challenged us to a cricket match whilst there and we saw their boots off, winning by seven wickets and 'sixty odd runs.

This however, was too, too much

for them and another was soon arranged in' order that they could vindicate themselves which they did in real good style. : A much stronger team was fielded led by Major Greaves who, without a doubt put a different complex on the game. Still, it was most enjoyable and was aided by the timely arrival of the Church of Scotland Mobile Canteen. All agreed that the trip ended too soon and we would once again like to thank Major Greaves and Officers, S.S.M. Palmer and all

for their help and kindness to us whilst in Berlin. We look forward to seeing them again in the not too far distant future. Arriving back in Wolfenbiittel we were informed that a parade was the next spot of work for us at Fassberg, the U.S.A.A.F. Base connected with the Berlin Air Lift. It was to be the final parade of the Unit there, finishing up with the pilots and crews who had distinguished themselves being decorated. We were informed that American Trans— port would convey us there and return us the following day. Well, it was a wonder we ever got there let alone come back. Our own M.T.O. need have no fear with his drivers as we can now stand up to anything and all comers, v I We reckon the two ‘Pool room ” G.I's were endeavouring to “ take off ” on the autobahn with the coach, which, we think was brought over from the Middle West,

USA. for the job. Apart from hitting the baggage wagon twice in passing and overtaking, the trip was non-eventful. Cpl. Old's Rootv Gong kept falling off his best 5.1). as did some of the others too


46

THE

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OF

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS THE

and it was only by the Grace of The Al— mighty that there was not a massed funeral on the agenda. After a flying visit to see the 854’s on the airfield we were pushed, bungled, and bundled in and out of the transport and finally taken to the dining hall where we were handed a piece of dented metal plate which looked more like a side

panel of the Tech. Adj’s car.

This was

the plate all right and after having all the various compartments loaded with odd pieces of food we proceeded to eat same along with several G.I’s of all races and creed. Food was plentiful at each meal, but Oh Boy, what a mess, it looked to yours truly. Give me roast beef and Yorkshire pud any day. Due to the heavy rain next day the intricate parade was some— what curtailed and the ceremony was held in one of the large hangers. Our journey back to the regiment was not so tense,

thank heavens,

as the drivers

were changed, much to our great relief. We can look back on the amusing side now but that trip to Fassberg was no picnic, No Sir.

Education

During the war years education in the Army was carried on mainly in the form of weekly ABCA lectures as most soldiers will remember. But since then it has gradually intensified until in the last few months there is once again a real incentive, quite apart from pure gaining of knowledge for knowledge’s sake. Army Certificates of Education were reintroduced in June of this year and they

were once again linked with promotion. The Education Centre ceased from being a mere respite from maintenance or a haven for one of two examinees and became the scholastic workshop of over 60 Regular Soldiers who wanted or hoped for promo— tion, or who wanted to be confirmed in their rank at a later date. It is hoped that the initial enthusiasm will not wane and soldiers will realise that Education and Rank do go together and that the earlier they start in their quest for certificates of education the sooner they can quaff their pints in the luxury of the Sgts. Mess and the longer they will have to do it in!

War Pensions SPECIAL REVIEW TRIBUNALS TIME LIMIT

The Minister of Pensions announces that applications for the review of cases by Special Review Tribunals cannot be accep— ted after 30th November, 1949. The Special Review procedure applies only to persons whose claims arose out of the 1939 War and whose appeals were disallowed by Pensions Appeal Tribunals before Ist August, 1946. It will be recalled that Special Review Tribunals were set up in 1946 because cer~ tain judgments in the High Court in Eng land and the Court of Session in Scotland had affected pension law. It was felt that persons whose appeals had been disallowed before those judgments had been given should have the right to have their cases reconsidered.

JOURNAL

OJ?

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

Promotions and AppomimeizZs——(C()1zt£nued) 21001510

RA/Cpl. Ayrton“, A. ..

19038454

IPA/Cpl. Ballard, D. P.A/Cpl. Harrington, P. 1’.A/Cpl. linjlro, H.

19035410

7901849 852960 21001875 14189125 14408304 21044500 I9035145 19044500 14457595 404129 19048204 21056514 21067145

14188357 320393 22041143 21128184 14480151 14184283 19032107 409140 403777 4200030 22007715 22007735 22070398 21125065' 14471842 22029428 19030002

831714 14415084 788458: 21001499 334714 21125011

P.A/Cp1. Cahill, K. P.A/Cpl. P.1\/Cpl. P.1\/Cpl. P.;\/Cpl. RA/Cpl. P.A/Cpl.

Carter, A. Clarke, C. Corfield, E. Davison, T. Harrison, C. Lawrence, C.

" ;-Granted W/Cpl. w.e.f. 20 Jun., 49.

PIA/Cpl. \Vilson, S. V\'/Sgt. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. \V/Sgt.

Bowen, F. . Critchcr, B. Green, E. Hilton, 1). Sarll, R. .. Tarry, (J . Maxwell, C. Underwood, l“. Greatrex, L. Griffiths, J. .. Eyers, D. Rapkin, R.

P.A/S.Q.l\l.S.

.. ..

.. . .

.. ..

" l‘sAppointed P/L/C wet. 25 Jun,. 49

' l .7 Appointed P/L/C w.e.f. 24 Jun., 49. . .

Promoted P.A/S.Q.M.S. w.e.f. 18 July, 49. Promoted P.A/\\'.O. II w.e.f. 18 July, 49. Appointed P/I.,1'C w.e.f. 19 July, 49.

Palmer, C.

Tpr. Tpr.

Burgess, 1\. . . Monks, H.

Tpr.

Nobbs, B.

Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. Tpr. \V/Sgt. \V/Sg't.

Phillips, G. Bromley, J. Sager, li. .. Underwood. l). Cook, E. Gnnn, J Mantle, I’. liineh, T. l‘.

l’.;\,’Sgt. l-lall, L. Tpr. Tpr.

Promoted P.A/S.Q.M.S. w.e.f. 26 May, 49. .. 1 . . ‘ . \rApponited P/L/C w.e.f. 31 May, 49. . . l

Gnnn, J. .. Blacktop, G. .\.

..

LAPPOinted 1:’/L/C “"e‘ f' 25 JUIy' 40‘

l

lAppointed A/U/L,1Cpl. \\'.0.f. 1 Sep., 49. Appointed A/U/L/Cpl. w.e.f. 12 Sep., 49.

Appointed P/L/C w.e.f. 1 Sep., 49. Promoted P..—\/VV.O. II w.e.f. 30 Jun., 49. Promoted P.i\/S.Q.M.S. w.e.f. 31 Aug, 49. Granted \\';Sgt. w .f. 19 Man, 49. Appointed Pij’C/Cpl. \v.e.f. 1 Sep., 49. Appointed P/L/Cpl. w.e.f. 10 Sep., 49.

lie-Engagements 401541

5.5.31.

liayliss, 1\. .. \\'hitbread, l“. G.

Re»cngaged 011 a three year supplemental engagement wet. 20 July. 49. Re—engaged to complete 22 years wet. :5 July, 50.

7937074

W/Cpl.

\V'elton, (2.

Re-engaged for a 1 year S.EE. w.e.f. 31 Oct.

410891

\V/Sg‘t.

Acres, l).

Re—engaged to 11 Jan, 50.

'l‘pr.

Burton, l\'.

0915972 \\"/’Cpl.

40.

THE

BEGIMENTAL

GAZETTE

complete

2:

years

w.e.f.

Strength I)ecreases

Promotions 14458814 19048764 558566

. . .

Raftrey, G. .. Poulter, R. Howley, T.

14461670

.

Mellors, R.

19032785 19043863

. .

Hughes, J. .. Haynes, T.

19047021

.

Collins, P.

19032394

.

Lapington, S.

and

Appointments

1903711‘17

401§33

'l‘.()..\l.5.

4 10530

\\',Sgt.

Hill, C. D. ..

.. l . rPromoted P.A.,°'Cpl. w.e.f. 27 May, 49. \\'clle1‘, li.

~.91 14473240

Promoted P.A./Cpl. w.e.f. 2 July, 49.

\\"(‘pl.

Blaekl)111n,\\‘.

Posted to R.:\.C. Depot. Bovington Camp, Dorset for completion of discharge by purchase w.c.f. 8 Jun, 49. Posted to R.:\.C. Depot. Bovington Camp, Dorset, on completion of free discharge after 10 years service. Posted 011 27 J1111., (l. Mined

to

lx’..-\.C.

Depot,

Bovington

Camp,

Dorset, 011 completion of regular engagement. 0 July, 41). . Posted to R.:\.C. Depot, Bovington Camp, Dorset. for completion of discharge by purchase, 1': July 41').


48

THE

JOURNAL

OF

THE

ROYAL

DRAGOONS

Strength Decreases—(Continued) 14190979

Tpr.

Clarke, M.

..

..

..

..

..

Posted to R.A.C. Depot, Bovington Camp,

Dorset, for completion of discharge by 408969

S.S.M.

Butterworth, G.

..

..

..

..

4802257

Tpr.

Bourke, R.

..

..

..

..

19031001

Sgt.

Fooks, R. A. de B.

..

..

..

purchase, 17 July, 49. Proceeded on posting to R.A.C. Depot, Bovington Camp, Dorset, for completion of discharge by purchase, 15' July, 49. Posted to R.A.C. Depot, Bovington Camp,

Dorset, for discharge on completion of regular engagement.

. \

.

- ,

_

Everywhere on the m11D 0f Britain is reasonably “(331‘ 10 a Ford Dealer. There are hundreds of them, strategically stationed 4 throughout the length and breadth 0f the country. This means that the Ford owner, wherever he may be, is within easy reach of

.

'

':-\ ,

1/, ,

Posted to R..~\..C. Depot, Bovington Camp, DOTS“ for completion 01 discharge by

-‘ .

purchase, 14 Aug, 49.

.

14068168

..

Caswell, V\".

..

..

..

Posted to R.A.C. Depot. Bovington Camp, Dorset, for diSChdrgC on completion 0f

1.

regular engagement.

.

7893674

Wilkinson, RW'.

..

..

'

..

~

..

.. Posted to R.A.C. Depot, Bovington Camp,

400010

Dorset, for discharge regular engagement.

friendly help and service, from men equipped to give immediate

.

4 - I

Posted to R.A.C. Depot, ,Bovington Camp, Dorslct, for discharge on completion of

..

assistance. ,

'

rcgu ar engagement.

(O.R.Q.M.S.)Kelly, 11.11.

i

'

on

completion

ot

,

.

Spare parts (if needed) will be present and correct: ._

.

.

.

.

,

.

Fo‘d'mmc‘l “Chm“ W111 d0 theJOb- The ”1965mm Land 3

. ‘

End to John O’Groats are fixed at the same low figure. North. South, East or West, the Ford owner finds that the purchase price of his vehicle covers an invaluable extra : friendly service facilities always on call.

Y O U R M O N EY Major 316823

\V/Sgt.

C. E. Winstanley .. ..

Joyce, E. H.

. . ..

. . ..

.. ..

Birth of a son Peter Charles on 15 July, 49, at 29th British Military Hospital, Hanover. Birth of a daughter Naomi Charlotte, on

6% . ,

GOES FURTHER IN A

-

7 July, 49, at 84 (Berlin) British Military 7601211

Sgt.

Dawes, N. E.

..

H

..

..

401395

Cpl.

Dover J. E.

..

..

..

..

-

-

.

.

7V

.

.

. .

Itord Blilt’rprlsejor Units/z PrnspvrI/j'

Hospital. Birth of a daughter Jennifer Annc on 7 Sept, 49, at 29 British Military Hospital, Hanover. Birth of a son on :1 Oct., 49 at 2t) British Military Hospital, Hanover.

IS WHAT HAPPENS

' co

Marriages Tpr.

Markey, A.

.,

..

..

..

2548845

\N/Cpl.

Bush, J. A. . .

..

..

..

..

5960482

Tpr.

Blackmail. C. S.

..

21128470

17961851 Sgt. Ostrowski, R. 14740583

Tpr.

Dent, N.

..

..

..

..

.. .. ..

.. .. ..

.. .. ..

Married at St. John's Parish Church, South Bank, B'Iiddlcsborough, Yorks, to Jean Morgan on 1: Main, 49. Married at Parish Church, Tidenhanl, Glouccstcr to Mary Evelyn Yickcry on 2 April, 49. Married at 31 Lot 1111. Bde.. Geslar, to (xcrtrude Hermione Anna Munch on 3 Jun. 49.7Marricd at Standosaint, \\oltenl>t‘1ttel,

May, 49' 14407256

\V/Cpl.

..

Kimble, l".

..

..

..

Bujko, H.

..

..

..

..

..

'

.

..

..

..

..

VV/Cpl.

Corfield, E.

2 ’ 14733 Ob 19035416

“V ‘ . ,Cpl VV,i’Cp1.

Fletcher, F.

..

..

..

..

Barrington, P.

..

..

..

..

..

..

..

..

L/Cpl. ' X”79618=,3 Tpr. i . 320729

Taylor, L.

..

Sienkiewicz, (fr.

..

..

..

..

_ ‘»

,

V

You take ‘ASPRO’—and a minute or two after the headachy, feverish, shivery and uneasy sensations of that oncoming cold have gone. The reason is that, although colds develop quickly, ‘ASPRO’ acts

k

A

more quickly still. All you need do is to take two iASPRo. tablets with a hot drink and in a minute or two the antl-pyretic (fever-reducing), analgesic

. _‘

_ i,

that it excels. That is why of action, combined withthesafety, slow-atting, unscientific remedies ‘ASPRO’ has eliminated

* .

”'

ofyesterday. Thousands takeadvantage,too.ofthe wonderful

.

relief ‘ASPRO' affords for rheumatic and neuralgic aches and pains. _ 9% kfsy‘rs R544 THIS ,1 Dairieslltrsl’must writeyou in praise Egrtxlézgab' .‘ . ,

., 7 9

,

1 i

7” FEVER,5””555 0 055

‘ASPRO’ swiftly starts to set you

.

'

y

Married at H.Q. 31 Lor Inf. Bdu, to lilfricdc (icrtrud Homann on 19 Aug” 49. Married at Parish Church, 5 italgate, Lincolnshirc, to Winifred Pask (iii 24 Aug, 49. Married at Barracks Chapel, \\'olicnbiittcl, to Luise Schulz on 27 Aug” 49. Married at Registrar‘s Oilicc, Birmingham, tn Jesse Gaunt on 3 Sen. 49. Married at Stainlesaint, \Volienhiittr-l, tn \i\'nltranrl \\'armt'rnv on : lnlv. .it).

”W

(pain-relieving) action of free from the Symptoms of the cold. You are your old self again. iAspRO, is a modern medicine—it. is in speed

'

,,

i

i‘

:

Married at Registrar’s Other, Poole, Dorset,

I

.

' ‘

' Vi ,. ‘

to Catherine Mary McLean on ll) July, 49. 14468304

_

,

g

"

.-

-_j- _ .

:.

‘ .

Brackiey, Registrar’s ()liicc. Married at Northampton, to Kathleen Yvonne Bcnbon

0” 1" “I.“ 49' X/7901849 \V/Cpl.

. .

.

, .

.‘

/\

,

t0 .Souja 801]“)me (”1.16 Jun, 493 . Married at Barracks Lhapel, r\\olicnhtittel, to Christine Berta Marta ()hrens on 23

1

( \'

LDS “fl .

L‘ _ "Ill! — for Gm and

I

I.

,

I had a shocking cold this morning and took three ‘ASPRO' and by three p.111. my cold was J. v. E. \ours faithfully, nearly gone. Made in England by FROM ASPRO LIMITED. N,A.A.F.l. CANTEENS Slaugh. CHEMISTS AND fl ”ma“ Bucks ASPRO‘ EVERYWHERE


makes atidydifference to

'"

'

'

Let Brylcreem look after your hair and you’re bound to benefit—for Brylcreem gives your

BooT P OLISH

hair this double benefit. (1] Day-long smariness.

(2) Lasting hair healih.

0' QIIICk’.

Besides setting the hair naturally, Brylcreem with its pure emulsified oils keeps the roots active and promotes natural hair-growth.

’0'easy

Dry

Hair and Dandruff soon become things of the past when you Brylcreem your hair. Ask for

VI ‘ M

”(109*

Brylcreem, it gives hair life.

Caunzy Perfumery Cm, Ltd” Stanmore, Mx'ddx.

royds 65/32

CHISWICK

PRODUCTS

LTD.,

LONDON,

WJL


CARRINGTON & CO., LTD. Regimental .Sin/eumitée

Court Jame/AH

130 Regent Street, London, W.l MANUFACTURERS FOR THE SUPPLY AND REPAIR OF MESS PLATk

"-3133???“

SILVER CUPS, BOWLS SALVERS, CLOCKS, etc.

r.1.,me.aacsm mm

For Presentation—Always in Stock

Hy Appammwn

Regimental Badge Brooches, Sleeve links, etc.

Boot Maker:

Boo: Melon

By Appointment to the Lute King George V

By A poinzmen: to the rlnce ol Waln

Designs and Estimates Free

l920-l936

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lncorporlllu Flick 8‘ Smlch

487 OXFORD STREET LONDON, W.l MAYFAIR 9626

RIDING

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appointment

Pmduced for the Editor, "The Eagle," The Journal of the Royal cone, )3 Combl ed S i ficfiéliflsfilgggt’sfigfiofit 6611835211Iaorfiloltl'i S.W.1.dPrglxlt§d til), Greg:1 12.321911 {y F. J. $arsoerg, 01765“tfiégfiggngigggé: , . - r , as use an 0 ea ne. ve ment ems: Serv N ..

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('Phone: wumnm

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The eagle royal dragoons magazines the eagle december 1949