Page 1


CORFU VILLAS

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CORFU VILLAS Prices start from £75.00 per person per fortnight

We have a superb selection of villas, mainly in the Nissaki/Kalami area, which are without doubt the best on the North East coast, many of them being privately owned. Villas range from the ultimate in luxury with private beaches, to simple Greek cottages in unspoilt fishing villages. Perhaps the greatest compliment is that the large majority of our clientele is made up of guests returning year after year, or friends of guests who have been recommended our holiday. We are quite unique in that we offer a super holiday for ALL age groups, and offer fully inclusive in the cost.

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The BLUE & ROYAL VOL. 1

NO. 4

1973

FOREWORD 1972 has been yet another year in which the greatest demands have been placed on the Regiment. Northern Ireland

Colonel-inC/tief: Her Majesty The Queen.

has Colonel and Gold Stick: Field-Marshal Sir Gerald Templer, K.G., . G.C.M.G., K.B.E., D,S.O., Deputy Colonel: General Sir Desmond Fitzpatrick, G.C.B., DSO. M. .

M.C:,A.D,C:

featured

1972 The Lieutenant-Colonel Commanding The Household Cavalry and Silver Stick: Colonel H_ D. A. Langley, M.B.E.

in

our

activities

and

the

detachment of squadrons to Cyprus has continued to place demands on the Regiment as a whole. The main event of

was

Guidon

the by

presentation our

of the

new

Colonel-in-Chief,

Her

Majesty The Queen, at Windsor on 14th Commanding Officer: Lieutenant-Colonel J. A. C. G. Eyre. July. Officer Commanding Household Cavalry Regiment (Mounted): Lieutenant-Colonel W. R. Edgedale.

As always the Regiment continues to draw great strength from the support and

enthusiasm of the retired members of the Association. It was a great source of pleasure to the serving members of the Regiment to

BATTLE HONOURS

see so many members of the Association at the Guidon Parade, and also at

Tangier (1662-1680), Dettingen, Warburg, Beaumont, Willems, Fuentes d'Onor, Peninsular, Waterloo, Balaklava, Sevastopol, Egypt (1882), Tel el Kebir, Relief of Kimberley, Paardeberg, Relief of Ladysmiih,

Combermere Barracks, for the Regimental ‘At Home’.

South Africa (1899-1902),

events. Perhaps the most important of all is that in July the Regiment will come

Le Cateiau, Marne (1914), Messines (1914), Ypres (1914), Gheluvelt, Ypres (1915), Frezenberg, Loos, Arras (1917), Ypres (1917), Somme (1918), Amiens, Hindenburg Line, Cambrai (1918), Sambre, Pursuit to Mons, France and Flanders (1914-1918).

1973 will be marked by certain main

together complete at Windsor for the first time. The last time the Regiment was

complete March,

Souleiuvre, Brussels,

Nederrijn,

Rhine, N. W. Europe

together 1971.

A

was

in

second

Detmold

most

in

important

(1944-1945), Iraq

feature will be the Regiment’s conversion (1941), Palmyra, Syria (1941), Knightsbridge, El Alamein, Advance on Tripoli, North Africa (1941-43), Sicily (1943), Italy (1943-1944).

to

the

new

Scorpion

tracked

armoured

reconnaissance vehicle. Already. A Squadron has been equipped with the vehicle. There

can be no doubt that this is one of the best military vehicles produced for the British Army, and it opens up new possibilities for the use of armoured reconnaissance troops. All the instructors

CONTENTS HQ Squadron A Squadron B Squadron C Squadron The Mounted Squadron Spon Rallying in Cyprus

and crewmen concerned with the conversion have been most enthusiastic for this new equipment. As the year progresses we can

expect to get further vehicles of the same series. This will put the Regiment in the forefront of the British Army, with the

Presentation of New Guidon

best and most modern military equipment.

The Band of the Blues and Royals The Household Cavalry Mounted Sports The Household Cavalry Training Squadron The Windsor Forest Hunt C KCLY Sharpshooters Squadron, the Royal Yeomanry Governor General’s Horse Guards The Royal Canadian Dragoons The Story of Combermere Barracks Letters to the Editor The Museum The Zetland Trophy The Blues and Royals Association Report The Blues and Royals Association Accounts and Balance Sheet Obituaries Nominal Roll

On the afternoon of Wednesday, 30th

May, 1973, Her Majesty The Queen, as Colonel—in—Chief of both Regiments of the

Household

Cavalry,

will

present

new

Standards to The Life Guards and to The Blues and Royals on Horse Guards Parade. Each Regiment will receive a new Sovereign's Standard and three new

Squadron Standards. The Standards of The Blues and Royals will bear the same battle honours as are embroidered on the new Guidon. A separate letter giving details of making applications will be sent to you all.

I

very

much

hope

that

as

many

members of the Association as possible will make arrangements to attend this Parade. Finally, I should like to reiterate how much

the

serving

Regiment

enjoys

its

“The Blue and Royal” printed and published by Service Publications Ltd.

continued contact with the retired members

Caxton House, Shoreham-by-Sea, Sussex.

of the Association, and looks forward to seeing as many of them as possible in the

THE NEW REGIMENTAL GUIDON The

Cover

Depicts Her Majesty the Queen and Escort Windsor Castle during the Gutdon Parade.

approaching

coming year.


DIARY OF EVENTS 1972

In proposing the toast of the troopers of the Regiment at Christmas lunch, 1971, the Colonel wished his Regiment a Happy Christmas and an arduous New Year. For A Squadron, C Squadron, and HQ Squadron, it probably was a happy Christmas as most of them were on leave or, at any rate, stood down over the holiday period.

State Visit of Queen Juliana at Windsor and ending with a visit by the ADC to the French Defence Minister. Sandwiched in the middle was a visit by the French Army Football Team, which certainly provided an eye opener for the block cleaners and the Quartermaster's department as to how

On the 2nd of July, A Squadron returned from Northern Ireland and set about the necessary preparations for the parade. From the 10th to the 12th of July the early morning rehearsals on the exercise ground took place. Fortunately for everyone

the other half lived. Judging by the trade

However,

marks they left behind it was quite obvious that they were accustomed to living without

marvellously fine and sunny. On the 10th of July we were told that B Squadron was

for

B

Squadron

in

Northern

Ireland it was a somewhat different affair and most of them spent the time put aside for their Christmas lunch on a turnout or shivering in some wet and rainy ditch alongside the Commanding Officer and the Regimental. What is certain is that 1972 was an extremely arduous year for everyone serving at Regimental Duty. Undoubtedly the highlight of the year was the presentation of a new Guidon on 14th July by Her Majesty The Queen.

the weather held and both mornings were Captain

J.

Williams——Customary

pastime

returned from the Middle East just in time to accompany B Squadron on their recruit

to return to Northern Ireland for a further tour beginning on the 15th. Interspersed with the rehearsals there was therefore the urgent programme of revising the IS drills for those in B

in the Household Cavalry Museum of the

and

Squadron who had been to Ireland before,

old

and initiating those who had not.

service in the 14th of July. After a Church

The Guidon Parade itself has been covered elsewhere in this magazine but suffice it to say that it was a fine day, that

Square during which the old Standard and

either running water or modern sanitation! On the lst of May, Captain Roberts

conversion

firing

at

Castlemartin

at

the end of the month. During early June detailed preparations for the Guidon Parade began and on the 23rd of June the Adjutant, the Regimental Corporal Major and the Deputy Ranger of the Windsor Great Park, carried out a hay

everything went well and certainly no one

Standard

Service a

and

short

Guidon,

taken

parade was held

out on

of the

Guidon were handed over by Field Marshal Sir Gerald Templer to Colonel Baillie, who

was at the time Chairman of the Museum. The Master Cook contrived to feed some two thousand people in the Troops Dining

Presentation. The hay crop

taking part in the recce at the beginning of January could possibly have wished for a greater success. Early in the morning on the 15th of

in Northern Ireland mid-way through their

July, B Squadron left for Northern Ireland,

with

was poor and badly grown and certainly

gave the impression that it was unlikely

and by 12 o‘clock all the stands for the

Mounted

tour, and C Squadron preparing to go to

to be ready in time. The day following this. there was an

Parade. which had seated 4,000 people the

side-shows and vehicle displays. We were

Norway on Exercise Hardfall. It also saw

day before, had been demolished. At the beginning of September the Major General visited B Squadron in Ireland. For the duration of their tour

most grateful to Mr. Evans and Mr. Edwards for so kindly coming to show us the film which they made of the Guidon Parade. Fortunately the Commanding

However, there

were a

number of other

events both before and after that which bear mention. The New Year started with B Squadron

the beginnings of the preparations for the Guidon Parade which began on the 7th

January on a cold and rainy afternoon in Windsor Great Park, far removed from the hot and languid day in July. February

was a more or less uneventful month with A

Squadron

returning

from

Norway

to

start their IS training. and B Squadron beginning to think of their handover to A Squadron. March brought visitors in the form of Brigadier Redgrave doing the Regimental FFR, and Major General Glyn Gilbert, GOC 3 Div. On the 17th March,

B Squadron returned to Windsor and A Squadron assumed their IS role at RAF Aldergrove and began operating in Belfast.

inspection of the Cavalry Exercise Ground, which was to act as the parade ground for

the Guidon

IRA demonstration in Windsor which turned out to be something of a damp squib. For a start there were undoubtedly more policemen present than demonstrators, and all of

there them

were had

miscalculated the distance from Slough to Windsor and arrived outside Combermere Barracks thoroughly footsore. On the 29th of June a timed run for the Guidon Parade Escort was carried out using Corporal Henderson and the brake. Half way up the Long Walk we were all surprised to find an enormous horse box being photographed against

the

backcloth

of

Windsor

Castle

for an advertisement. It was rapidly packed

This was A Squadron’s second tour in this

up

particular role, only some eight months after they had returned from their previous experiences. Once again they found the RAF in their usual form and the Irish as barbarous as ever. April turned out to be rather a cosmopolitan month, beginning with the

Corporal Henderson appeared on the scene. only to drive straight round it on the grass to the annoyance of the photographer and

10

and

was

just

being

driven

off

as

the horse box crew. Later that morning the drum horse also made the trip in rather slower time, taking a total of 34 minutes from the parade ground to the Castle.

the

squadron

lived

in

the

Drumahoe

Factory, Londonderry, and operated in the town and surrounding country which was at least a new stamping ground. In the third week of September RHQ and elements of Headquarters Squadron took to the field The Plain may not have any special

for

exercise

purposes.

Room

and

the

mounted

afternoon

sports

Squadron,

was

taken

up

by

the

provided and

a

number

of

Otlicer‘s luck with the weather held good and we hope that everybody enjoyed their day. The exercise season being over the

Regiment‘s energies were then directed to converting

B

Squadron

for

their

role

in

UNFICYP. This was the first individual

on and around Salisbury Plain. appeal

The Silver Stick, Colonel Baillie, The Gold Stick, Field Marshall Sir Gerald Templer and the Reg/mental Adjutant Major Hamilton—Russell during the laying up of the Guidon.

but

it

certainly did provide a welcome change from the racecourse at Soltau and the problems of denying Point 118 to the enemy until dawn! During October, B Squadron was on leave following their return. and the rest of

training that the Regiment had been able to do since its return from Germany, and as usual :1 great deal had to be crammed into a short space of time. On the 9th of December. B Squadron departed for Cyprus for a six months unaccompanied tour in the United Nations Forces. Once again they were abroad for Christmas but this time in much more pleasant circumstances.

the Regiment was involved in organising the Regimental ‘At Home' Day on the 15th

The year ended with prospects of another

of October. This combined an opportunity

arduous year ahead and the certainty that the regiment would be together again in

for past members of the Regiment to come and see us in barracks with the Laying Up

the summer for the first time since March. 1971.

The Blues and Royals instructors at Lu/worth—Corporal of Horse Stacey, Corporal of Horse Thomas, Corporal of Horse Fortt. Stall Corporal Hayward. Corporal of Horse Livingstone


HQ SQUADRON

Exercise strong express—Left to right: Lance Corporal Buck/e,

Trooper McLeod, Trooper Barry, Trooper Hilsdon, Lieutenant Messel

Their patience and long-suffering is much

Trooper Brown, Lance Corporal Howard, Lance Corporal of Horse

Scorpions

in

Windsor,

appreciated.

for all the administrative help received.

Wall, Lance Corporal Manning, Lance Corporal Quinn, Captain

Squadron

in

the

NORWAY, EXERCISE HARDFALL ’72 After some very intensive winter warfare training in Windsor. A Squadron set sail for Norway on the 9th of January.

spent a lot of time on skiis, achieving a

A

Squadron

has

being

British

had

the

Army

equipped with this vehicle.

to

a

first

In

Driver. However, the squadron did manage

to send a contingent to Malaya and a second party to ski in Scotland. Major Barrie has taken over command

of the squadron and SCM Rainger took over from SCM Hearn, whom we will all miss. SQMC Hague departed to learn about Hovercraft and handed over to SQMC

Jamieson.

He

in

turn

fled

to

Knightsbridge and SQMC Wilkinson is now in that chair. The QMs department has also come up for a face lift over the past few months. having said farewell to RQMC Martin who has gone to help the AAC with their flying.

missed by all who worked with him. We congratulate Lieutenant Handley on

ourselves, The

his

group was placed under command of the

well

deserved

commissioning

from

RQMC(T). is

There is concern that RQMC(T) Hunt trying to set up a new flying hours

record with one three week trip to Cyprus under his belt and with yet another trip in the offing in May. RHQ Troop has also had a busy year supplying troops for Ireland and Recruiting. Their best exploit was delivering a Christmas cake by Saracen (it was a large cake) to a school in West Wickham. As the cake originated in Northern Ireland it was not surprising when volunteers were not forthcoming for

this event.

MALAYA

helm.

The rumour at the beginning of last

year that RHQ Troop might go to Malaysia produced a mass of volunteers

has now

taken

the

He served the Regiment well and will be

Royal

I-Iussars

between a

Hussars.

and The

host of tasks have been accomplished and

This composite

a lot of characters have left and arrived. Lieutenant Messel gave up the joys of

2nd Battalion The Parachute Regiment who

were horrified when paraded.

Each

the contingent first

regimental

quartermaster

had had his own idea on how to equip troops for service in the Far East. The

first

shock was

discovering

that

all eager to be posted to the troop. The rumour became fact and the first flight left

England on Slst December to celebrate the New Year with coffee. somewhere over France.

The RAC contingent attached to the exercise was supplied by three Regiments,

‘ADC ship‘, and is now Fifth Troop Leader. Lieutenant Corry Reid arrived from Cyprus just in time for Exercise Strong Express in

Norway, and Lieutenant Armitage avoided it by being posted to the Guards Depot. Captain Lewis left us before Christmas and

the allocated training areas were only suitable for dismounted work. The second

we have Captains Wilkinson and Wyburd

shock was the fact that the monsoon period

to

had not finished and the first two weeks of the exercise took place in torrential rain.

relinquished his command of Second Troop to take over Signals Corporal in RHQ. and Corporal of Horse Scammel has joined us

The

training

carried

out

on

this

exercise was extremely arduous, consisting of long navigational manoeuvres and learning to live and survive in the jungle. We also supplied the enemy to all the

SQMC Wilkins has now left the department to look after the Officers Mess. With all these high powered NCOs in the department. Trooper Juchau and Trooper Russell are hard pressed to get all the work done, being the only ‘Indians’ in the stores. Sadly we have bid farewell to Captain Williams, our Tech QM since April. 1969.

RQMC Wood

I3th/18th

Royal

as his replacement. SCM Wood has left us

become

RQMC.

Staff Corporal

Hill

from B Squadron. Both these changes took place soon after Northern Ireland and we were extremely sorry to see them go. We

be divided

from the first fortnight, was sufficiently good to give all members a healthy sun

Ireland. and Strong Express; these appear

tan.

time,

under separate headings. It is not possible

of

to mention all the personalities involved.

smelling like a municipal garbage dump

all those we depend on for the success of

after a few days in the jungle, and of a certain senior NCO setting fire to his bivi one night in his attempt to fight off what

our various tasks. But it is possible to mention the wives and families who have been extremely patient while their husbands.

The

memories which

remain

are

for survival) as the Norwegians experienced their mildest winter for many a year. Needless to say we discovered some very cold and bleak hilltops where we practised Squadron harbours: putting tents up in three or four feet of frozen snow. to the accompaniment of howling East winds. The

couraging. This will be of particular use

in Norway this year as the Squadron will be equipped with this vehicle.

NORTHERN IRELAND, FOUR MONTH EMERGENCY TOUR The main party of the Squadron

of the barrel to be picked up by a grinning

three distinct phases: I—Iardfall 72. Northern

this

amenities and comforts of the camp. In the first instance we were extremely lucky/ unlucky (depending on one's enthusiasm

During our stay in Norway we had the

opportunity of watching Scorpion in action which proved most interesting and en-

you. SCM#we survived! The camp was comfortable durable. We were fortunate in

apart

during

secondly the

into

SQMC. The past year can

weather

primarily the weather and

exhibitions.

fired the first rubber bullets of our tour. Unfortunately it ‘plopped‘ out of the end

making of booby traps as used by the VC in Vietnam. The

had been based in the area during winter so we were particularly apprehensive as to the various conditions to be encountered:

slopes and even more fortunate in not having to call on his services. despite some very sensational and over-ambitious skiing

should want to camp on the highest ground West of Sweden in a snow storm. Thank

Staff

become

This was the first year that British troops

ski patrol. We were fortunate in having Surgeon—Major Page with us on the ski

our performance but surprised that anyone

interesting week was the instruction on the

has

Our destination was Rinnleiret. a Norwegian Cavalry camp North East of Trondheim.

reasonably high standard and certainly being capable of producing a cross country

our

wish them luck in their new jobs. WOII Stephenson has taken over as SCM and Edwards

Although snow was scarce the Squadron

arrived at Aldergrove on the 16th of March to take over from B Squadron who seemed happy to leave. Lieutenant Scott‘s Troop

Para Coys for a week. Perhaps the most

Corporal

fathers and sons have been soldiering away from home for over 60“.} of the year.

be

lot of different vehicles have been used, a have been in a unique position. HQ Squadron is on detachment and is visited occasionally by a sabre squadron. There is still a shortage of Indians and rumour has it that the RCM and SCM will have to take their turn on the Main Gate and Duty

Trooper

to camp the food would be hot and fires lit, (I am not referring to the fire in the camp cinemal). We are extremely grateful

again

Weston, S/Corpora/ Hill and Lance Corporal Pearce.

Since arriving in Windsor we seem to

and

very full and exciting year. We started 1972 with Volvos in Norway; we finish with

Once

Trooper Gray and Lance Corporal Howard lunch in the jungle.

Lance Corporal Robinson Ayscough—Be/iast

Norwegian

farmers

seemed

impressed

at

if not having

Captain Williams and ten Administrative Stafi from HQ Squadron attached to us

for

the

duration

of the

Exercise.

This

enabled us to achieve maximum training in the knowledge that when we returned

youth. No doubt it is now in America. We were busy immediately—Troop recces in Belfast. escorts and searches in the country. On Monday the 20th of March the

Mulhouse

Street

Discotheque

came

under fire while Lieutenant Massey‘s Troop was taking some well earned refreshment.

he claimed to be a large rat.

13 12


B SQUADRON

Lance Corporal of Horse Brown back from patrol

CoH Cain and Lance Corporal Cooper, working on the Volvos

They dived to the floor, not a drop of beer was spilt! The IRA were extremely hard-pressed

NORWAY, EXERCISE STRONG EXPRESS A Squadron left for Bardufoss

at this stage as can be seen from the sitrep of the 21st of March when a house search revealed the following: one shot gun circa 1890, one ball cannon, (6” diameter)

Northern Norway on tember. The soldiers

turned out and the vehicles were gleaming: such a splendid array of men would have

ambush the first elements However, having disguised hedgerows and cedar trees a cup of coffee, they are

circa 1690. At times the Squadron was heavily committed in Belfast and Ferrets were

been a sight to gladden the heart of any

unable to find each other again: a sorry

despairing General and strike fear into the hearts of the enemy. However. let us now take a look at our gallant force two weeks

plight. as enemy tanks can be heard rumbling through their area even now. Fourth Troop are. amazing as it may

Sergeant Davies and his LAD section did

later. deep in the Norwegian mountains. The time is mid-day, a lazy river meanders through the edge of a fir wood.

seem. busy, engaging the US Marine Commandos in the South. (There must have been some confusion in somebody‘s

an outstanding job in keeping the vehicles

and the rattle of enemy machine gun fire

orders.)

battleworthy at all times.

can be heard less than a mile away to the North. Yet. 'Hark’. what strange droning noise is this. so close at hand. what unnatural fly is that sitting on the water?

being deprived of their lights and macrilon

shields at an alarming rate by the accuracy of youths armed with paving slabs. Staff

One of the roles was reassurance visits to country areas. leaving a Squadron visiting card with our telephone number and address in case of emergencies. The purpose of the visits seemed to be misunderstood in one case when Corporal of Horse Lloyd

in

Sunday. 10th Sep— were immaculately

Little would one know that one was, in fact. in the centre of Squadron Headquarters,

Third Troop have distinguished them» selves as being remarkably good at camoufiaging themselves while they wait to of the enemy. their vehicles as they retired for now completely

Fifth Troop. in the meantime, can be

unearthed trussed up like chickens to flag poles.

with

wireless

aerials

and

leads

sticking out from every part of their anatomies: they are none other than the rear link. Thus one can capture an inward glimpse into the lives of those worthy

Christmas Day, 1971 — Aldergrove Camp outside Belfast. B Squadron prepares for Christmas lunch: the Commanding Officer and RCM have very kindly come across from England for the day. The call—out alarm goes and the Squadron ends up eating its cold Christmas lunch in various operational positions in Belfast. This Northern Ireland tour finished on March 17th. Luckily nobody was killed,

On

returning

to

detail the

various actions and exploits of every Troop involved in the Squadron. Suffice it to say there were some very exciting moments. A

lot

of

extremely

ugly

incidents

were

controlled due to the prompt action of individual car commanders. We received some very fine words from those we had

worked with, and the Squadron felt that

14

Parade.

and Lieutenant Lukas disappeared to the Guards Depot. The Squadron took off in May to help the recruiting effort in Cardiff and the Welsh

Valleys,

and

from

there

on

to

Castlemartin Ranges for recruit firing. On returning to Windsor Major Burbury sadly gave up commanding the Squadron for a desk in London District. Major Morris

go on

record as

the

coldest and wettest

across the border. Lieutenant Lukas and L/Cpl Howard both received injuries to their ear drums when their Saladin was mined and blown off the road. Another Saladin accidentally went up in flames and, but for the prompt action of CoH Sibley getting back into the blazing vehicle, his

Reece parties in Scotland were recalled rehearsals for the Guidon Parade continued,

driver would have been burnt to death. There

and a four day crash internal security course was instigated. This was retraining

was also the usual series of injuries from broken bottles and stones thrown very

accurately by small children. Even L/COH Woollard's ration truck was shot at regularly.

M1

for

Liverpool

and

then

across

home for the next ten weeks, Drumahoe,

enemy lines.

in

Guidon

a dusty and deserted factory which at times contained over two thousand soldiers. When we arrived Londonderry looked as

deserved.

It is unwise to explain

freedom fighters.

the

over command of Headquarters Squadron

it’s month’s leave in August had been well

answer to a call from a 70 year-old widow in distress. The task was to move a sick cow from one loose box to another! The saddest event of the tour was the death of Lance Corporal Chillingworth. when his scout car overturned whilst on patrol. Our deepest sympathy is extended to his widow and family.

after

England we lost Captain Barrie, who took

June in history.

in

immediately

Northern Ireland to Londonderry to our

scars.

for the crowds of admirers who will be lining the road sides at home in Blighty.

out

Leader

passed on the news that the Squadron, with its vehicles, was to proceed to Londonderry

the

facial

The rest of the Squadron heroes are away doing battle to the bitter end. First Troop can be found trying to extricate their vehicle from assorted ditches: if ever they survive this war. they will have to become plumbers and drainers. as they have a weird fascination for ditches and drains. Second Troop. after an early morning spell of amateur dramatics in which they claimed most of the Norwegian Army and half of the Navy as well. can be found sleeping it off on a main road behind

rushed

Squadron

the

sinister

took the Squadron to Thetford for two weeks troop training in June, which must

MT

the

in

On 16th July the squadron set off up

Hurricanes is lined up on the quay ready

from

and

assembled

for some and complete initiation for others.

season) the ‘glorious and noble' trout.

section

gymnasium

was

but as a result of stones and bottles thrown,

Nevertheless. came the day for the Squadron's alcoholic acquisitions while once more a dashing display of Captain

a

squadron

CoH Sibley nearly lost an eye and Cornet Browning and CoH O'Halloran still carry

A Squadron. The Blues and Royals. However. little would Headquarters know that anybody else was there either; the reason being that 50"], are asleep. and the other 50“! are guarding the Squadron Leader who is attempting to catch (out of

plus

Four days before the Guidon Parade the

though the

City centre had been

blitzed

as it was a pile of smouldering rubble. Shooting and explosions took place most days and every night.

5&3

Col—I Hughes and his driver, Tpr Lee, were the first to be mined. The explosion was heard four miles away whilst from the smoking wreck over the wireless net. was picked up, ‘Hallo Two. this is Two Four

Bravo, I have been Claymored. wait out.’ The crew were shaken and in spite of over three hundred bullets raining down on the

Needless to say the only supporters at the

other end are suspicious figures in blue who show an unnatural interest in the Squadron's alcoholic acquisitions while being abroad. I have. unfortunately. not had the space to mention the names of the heroes involved in the war. so T will dedicate the article to a few of the all time

great

compo

cookers

such

as

Tprs

Butler. Buckman. Allen and Greer and the omnipotent father of them all Corporal of Horse Adams.

In took

late June, Major Parker Bowles over command and we started

practising

for

the

Guidon

Parade.

This

ceremonial driving practice was much needed although it was not a B Squadron vehicle that dislodged a lump of masonry from the Henry VII Gateway leading into the Windsor Castle quadrangle. Besides training for the Guidon Parade. recce

troop from the Creggan. Cornet Browning used his Saladin to tow the wrecked Ferret sideways to safety. took

On 31st July ‘Operation Motorman’ place. Cornet Browning's troop led

parties were sent to Scotland in preparation

the lst Bn Royal Scots into the Creggan and L/CoH Stacey‘s armoured car was the first vehicle into the Bogside. While on foot patrol Cornet Lingeman

for a two week Brigade Exercise due to

and Tprs Perkins and Thorpe were injured

start four days after the Guidon Parade.

by shrapnel from a mine detonated from

4

Major

General

Commander

D.

United

Prem

Chand,

Nations

Force

Force

in

Cyprus on his first visit to B Squadron being met by Major A. H. Parker Bow/es.

15


Lieutenant Brownings Troop taking a break during

border

patrolling,

Londonderry

B Squadrons Assault Troop during their training led by Cornet Lingeman

F.F.R. Inspection—3 Troop drive past—Lance Corporal of Horse Chair, Corporal of Horse Fisk

We thankfully left Londondernj on let September having made many new military and civilian friends. a

Gibbs.

Cornet De

Cornet Lesley-King, Master of the Dhekelia drag hounds

In February Major Wright handed over as Squadron Leader to Major Loekhart who had just completed a two year staff job at the Armour School at Bovington.

Three weeks of leave was followed by hectic trade training programme. Over

This handover coincided with a visit by fifty members of the Squadron were involved in these courses and it was during this time we said goodbye to SCM Rainger and SQMC Harty and welcomed SCM Bell. On

25th

November an

the Regimental Lieutenant Colonel. Colonel

Baillie, and by the Regimental Adjutant. Major Hamilton-Russell. Major Wright then disappeared off to Kenya to play polo prior to taking Lip his new job at the Joint Warfare Establishment at Old Sarum. April saw the emphasis change to

advance party of

thirty arrived at Glenneagles Camp, Nicosia. donned their light blue UN berets and started to take over the job of United

gunnery as the intention was to carry out

Nations Force Reserve from D Squadron. The Royal Scots Dragoon Guards.

our annual tiring during May on Akamas Range at the extreme Western end of the

A successful and happy handover took

island.

Unfortunately this coincided with

place and many Scottish drinking habits the were handed on. The main party arrived

write—up in the Horse and Hound. The Squadron moved to Akamas Ranges on Saturday, 6th May. The journey

Officer. Lieutenant Greenwell and Comets

there on its own made the trip worthwhile as the road followed a most picturesque

Holcroft and Lingeman joined us on their arrival with the Regiment. AQMS Chequer

route past Aphrodite‘s birthplace. through Paphos. and then North to Akamas. The Squadron arrived sal'cly with the exception ol‘ Cornet De Chair who decided to take

also joined us in Londonderry to run the LAD and in Cyprus to run the squadron sailing boat and the speedboat. CoH runs the Squadron Signals Troop,

16

Horse

minutes the whole show ground was awash. The immediate action was for everyone to move into the various bur tents to ensure that the bar profits at least would not suffer. In spite 01‘ this setback all events were completed and the Horse Show was reckoned by all to be a great success and even had a full page

Administration

Preece, having left Uganda in a hurry. now

Dhekelia

Jumping, the heavens opened and within

took on the troopers at football, basketball

as

the

well. Then on the second day at about l2 o‘clock in the middle of the Open Show

and bicycle polo. Throughout the year there have been many changes. Captain Roberts arrived in May as Second-in-Command. Captain Wyburd did a stretch in Londonderry and Captain Giles has joined us from the Regiment

for

Show. a task which fell almost entirely on to the squadron. An enormous amount of work went into this. and at first all went

on 9th December with pale faces. ready for a six month tour in the sun. This year we sat dowu to a very different Christmas lunch: still away from our families but now sitting in blazing sun and the only injured being those four officers and Tpr Hunter. who became casualties when the officers and NCOs

Mounted

preparations

A rare rest period for fighting First troop—Lieutenant Hee-Felstead (seated), Corporal Evenden, Trooper Tonks, Trooper Row/and and Trooper Kempster.

Lance

a

short

cut

across

his private car.

a

mountain

range

in

He was eventually found

Mrs. Heath presenting prizes to Trooper Hayward, Corporal of Horse Partridge—Dhekelia horse show by some Australian UN Police having walked for many miles through the mud. The firing went well and we received a \‘cry favourable report from the Gunnery School compiled by our Lulworth 10,. Capiuin Gabbey. However. the good result was the end product of a lot of hard work by [the Squadron Gunnery Instructors. CoH Chapman. CoH Garvey and L/CoH Muti. in June we had our second personality change with the departure oi SCM Heath. He had been Corporal Major of C Squadron for two years and we were extremely sorry to see him go. He always took great interest in all aspects of squadron life and he will be especially

Musician

Hempseed and

Lance

missed as umpire on bolh the hockey and cricket fields. We wish both him and Mrs. Heath the best of luck in their new job. However. we were very glad to welcome in his place SCM Hunter and Mrs. Hunter who arrived from Rheinduhlen. Corporal Major Hunter decided that hockey umpiring

went with the job and immediately put himself on a hockey umpires course. The summer was now well and truly with us and on top of the continuing requirement for trainin" : ance. we were active in just about every known sport. Endless opportunities exist for the enthusiast

ot~ adventure training activities: in Dhekelia alone we have u gliding club. a parachute

17


which was remarkable in the case of those representing

the

Boer

Commando

which

involved them in some fairly hair raising mounted charges, firing blanks at the gallop

from horses which had never heard a rifle shot before. This of course meant that the horses

tended

to

go

in

the

opposite

THE MOUNTED SQUADRON 1972

direction to that required, having first deposited their rider in the dust. Anyone who fell off had to pretend to be dead. In one engagement which was meant to result in the wiping out of the entire

battalion, the whole Commando was to be seen ‘dead’ on the ground. Now Christmas is almost upon us and everyone is working very hard preparation for the various parties;

in the

Pergamos village children, the under lls, the over 115 and so on. For most of these occasions a lot of the hard work falls on the cooks who are required to produce anything from sticky cakes to a full buffet supper. We are very lucky in the squadron, having a first-class team of ACC cooks attached, under L/Sgt Freeman. They are Part of the squadron filming for the television series—“The Regiment"— Lett to right on foot: Trooper Walsh, Lance Corporal of Horse Muff, Trooper

to be congratulated on maintaining a very high standard

of cooking throughout the

The year has proved as usual a very

busy one for everybody at Knightsbridge. Not only were we involved in the three State Visits, Birihday Parade, Garter Service

and Opening of Parliament celebrations, but this year we had the added attraction of the Presentation of the new Guidon to the Regiment at Windsor, and lastly and by no means least, the very successful

Escort for Her Majesty The Queen on the occasion of her Silver Wedding Anniversary. All these functions required a great deal of hard work and preparation and it is a

Meredith, Trooper Brzozowski.

club,

a

sub-aqua

club,

not

to

mention

water ski clubs, sailing clubs, and also many others. So anyone who says he is bored really only has himself to blame. In league competitions we had no great

Oflicer spent two days at Pergamos and toured the camp which provided a useful dress rehearsal for our inspection in three weeks

time.

We

were

very

sorry

that,

for being the most sporting football team.

because of flight complications, Mrs. Eyre was unable to visit as well. At about this time occurred our third

Our main sporting successes were individual

personality

with L/CoH Elmslie producing outstanding achievements in the swimming pool and representing the Army versus the RAF at backstroke. Tpr Lampard was suffering the loneliness of a long distance runner, but producing some most creditable results on the athletics field in 5,000 and 10,000 metre races. The tennis team consisting of the Squadron Leader and 21C Captain Olivier distinguished themselves by failing to win a single set throughout the whole

Olivier, departed for the wilds of Scotland. We were very sad to see both him and Mrs. Olivier go and our thanks go to Captain Olivier for all his hard work on behalf of the squadron and to Mrs. Olivier for all she did for the Wives‘ Club.

successes though we

did win

the trophy

season. By now we were beginning to think

of our FFR inspection which was place on 13th September with the staff visits happening at the end of We decided we would have a culminating

with

a

mounted

to take various August. parade

drive

past,

so early morning drill parades became the order of the day. The square (which is also the hockey pitch) was not really big enough for intricate manoeuvres, so the drive past was in the form of a large figure

of eight moving on to the adjacent square (which was also the football pitch). It sounds odd but in fact it worked quite well. Towards

the

end

of

August

the

Commanding Officer and Mrs. Eyre came on a holiday to Cyprus. The Commanding

18

The

change

inspection

as

the

came

21C,

and

Captain

went,

the

inspecting officer being the General Officer Commanding

Near

East

Land

Forces,

Major General H. Butler. The report followed a fortnight later and was extremely complimentary except for our physical fitness which apparently left something to be desired.

year, and especially on their most notable

credit

achievement

continuing the high standard that is still

of

winning

the

Inter-Unit

to

those who

have

taken

part

in

NEAREL Cooking Competition. The LAD under S/Sgt Waterman have

maintained at Knightsbridge.

kept our ageing fleet of vehicles

in the squadron over the past few years, due to operating well below the accepted strength of the Regiment. We are more

on

the

road and helped us to achieve a very good grading on our vehicle and equipment inspection. They have also been most active in motor rallies and a separate article on this has been written by S/Sgt Waterman. The grooms under L/COH Catlin and

Life has not been easy for the Dutymen

fortunate now and it is hoped that by the middle of 1973 we should be well up

to strength, thereby reducing the frequency each soldier is required to go on duty.

The Guidon Parade is well covered stamps

L/CoH Partridge have maintained their usual high standards and have always ensured that the Dhekelia horses look better than any others on the island. The

Dhekelia Drag Hounds have just started up again under the mastership of Comet Leslie-King.

elsewhere

in

this magazine and therefore

will not be dealt with here. Similarly the Mounted sports activities which have been

State Visit of the Grand Duke of Luxembourg—Left to right: Major Boucher, S.C.M. Doxey, Her Majesty The Queen, Captain Davies and Lieutenant Walker—Okeover.

enjoyed by many members of the squadron come under a separate series of notes.

There have been a considerable number of changes in the squadron. Firstly Major Crisp and Captain the Earl of Normanton

Polo has flourished throughout the summer with the Squadron Leader, Lieutenant Corry Reid, Tpr Harvey and Tpr Hayward playing regularly. Cornet Leslie— King has started to play as have L/CoH Partridge and Captain Hayward who has

both left the squadron in March, 1972, the

Our visit to Windsor for the Guidon

and to individual othcers for Hunting, and

former to Catterick and the latter to a well earned rest in civilian life! They were succeeded by Major Boucher as Squadron Leader and Captain Davies as Squadron

we hope the change of air will do all

taken over as Secretary of the Saddle Club.

Second-in-Command. Major Boucher‘s tour

We have never been short of visitors

Parade was also coupled with our annual summer camp which, while not as ideal as the normal camp, was much enjoyed and a great refresher to all. Everyone thoroughly enjoyed riding in the Great Park and although the Sports Day was

battalion. This sounded fun so we agreed

one Iranian, five Naval officers and

to provide one or two extras to help out. One or two extras rapidly became virtually the whole squadron and committed us totally for about three weeks. Unexpected

Midshipmen, 40 Air Cadets, and to visit ll members of Parliament, one Peer, one

of duty sadly only lasted for six months but included a very successful Birthday Parade and also the Guidon Parade. Major Boucher is now at a clever place of learning and handed over the duties of Squadron Leader to Major Morris in September, who has come from Second— in-Command of the Regiment. We have said farewell to CsoH Preece and Smart, the former to a far shortened tour in

Deputy Under Secretary of State for Army,

Uganda, and the latter to the delights of

and one Pop Star.

complications appeared such as when it was realised that the modern young soldier has no idea at all how to slope arms with a Mauser or .303 rifle, and as for resting on arms reversed... I! But we survived,

It is difficult to mention everyone who deserves mentioning, but the whole squadron is in very good heart. enjoying Cyprus but looking forward to rejoining the Regiment in 1973.

drilling aspiring young officers at Sandhurst. We welcome in return Csol-I Jones and

and

although

we

cannot

quite

compete

At about this time we began to hear

with A Squadron's figure of 48 ‘stars’ last

rumours of a visit by a BBC Television team to Cyprus to film further episodes of “The Regiment’, the story of ‘The Cotswolds’, a mythical English Infantry

year, we can muster some 39, and at least

they were all British! On the miscellaneous side we have had to stay ten members of an Israeli Basket ball team, three Jordanians,

15

Bright. Col-l Garvey has also just joined us from Cyprus and although new to

Knightsbridge, and settling down well.

extremely

sore.

is

held in torrential rain everyone seemed quite happy. especially Mr. Goodall‘s troop who won the Inter—Troop Shield. For the Silver Wedding Anniversary celebrations Major Morris was the

Field

concerned a power of good. In addition, due to the increase in manpower we have

found it possible to send complete troops to

Windsor for

a

fortnight

in

order

to

improve their horsemanship whilst operating as

a

troop:

this

is

proving

extremely

successful and popular. These

notes

would

not

be

complete

without a mention of the fact that the

Officer and Captain Wilkinson was Escort Commander on his last ceremonial appearance during his tour here. A

Adjutant. Captain Wilkinson. is returning to Regimental Duty in January after a successful tour here. He is shortly to be followed by RCM Clark on retirement.

Guildhall Escort is nowadays a rare occurrence and is not an easy one to control, but for all those who took part in

Cavalry character. will long be remembered not only here at Knightsbridge but also

it. it will be remembered for many years to come. With the winter months upon us, as many horses and grooms that could be spared have been sent to Melton Mowbray

RCM

Clark.

a

well

known

Household

in the Regiment to which he has shown long years of affection and loyalty, and so often has added his own brand of sense of humour. We sincerely wish both he and Mrs. Clark a very happy future.


FOOTBALL On

were

arriving

soon

back

to find

from

out

Detmold

that

there

we

was

going to be no ‘let up' in the football world. The Regiment had been entered for

the Army and Cavalry Cups and a team had been entered in the London District lst

Division.

However. with

C

Musician King, Craftsman Munn, Troopers Hinton and Russell, Lance Corporal of Horse Woo/lard and Sergeant Anchors on board Gladeye

Squadron

in Cyprus and A or B Squadrons continuously away it was difficult to

SAILING

produce a regimental team. Although there were problems in finding regimental

Many members of the Regiment sailed this year, both in the Regimental dinghy based on Hawley Lake and also either in

standard players. there was no lack of willing players, with the band producing a

privately owned yachts or Gladeye.

large number of the team. In the league the regiment did well, finishing in second

The major excursion in Gladeye took seven members of the Regiment to France for a week. Needless to say the majority

position. although it is true that we were helped out at the end of the season by

of those on board had never sailed before and the experience was limited to Lance

the full regimental team when we were training up for the Cavalry Cup. During this period we never lost a league game.

Corporal of Horse Woollard and Craftsman Munn.

Having

One of these was the match against Home PCCD Royal Engineers who eventually beat us for first position. In the Cavalry Semi»Final UK Zone by the Royal Hussars. This match went into extra time and we blamed the defeat on the lack of the team together,

caused

by

Northern

Ireland tours and so forth. The following team runners up

in

London

District—Back How:

very long day (having played five games). This match was against the 2nd Battalion Coldstream Guards and it too went into extra

time

when

we

were

beaten

by

a

single goal. The team had put everything into their performance and were awarded the runner

up

medals.

Their

names are:

CoI-I Sibley. L/CoH Lloyd. L/CoH Bond. L/Sgt McKenna, Tpr Lock. L/Cpl Henderson.

20

Saddle Club helped to distinguish those higher class ponies from their lesser

stables troop also provide players from amongst the grooms, and Troopers Hayward, Tucker, Chiles and Harvey have become keen supporters.

comrades. The multi purpose role has taken its toll and trained ponies have been

If the weather holds out it is hoped to bring on at least six more ponies for

reduced to a dangerous minimum of eight.

the 1973 season for which Major Lockhart

This is not the only problem: another one is the shortage of players as very few

participants

come

from

outside

the

Sibley, L/Cp/ of Horse Bond, L/Cp/ of Horse Lloyd, Tpr Lock. Front Row: L/Cpl of

demonstrated the art of walking on water.

Horse Henderson. Private Patterson and Lance Sgt Turner

fully clothed. in sight of the Royal Yacht Squadron. and Sergeant Anchors patiently removed the marks on the topsides where the Skipper had attempted to park a 58 foot yacht beside a 30 foot long quay. During the summer various officers raced each week-end round the Solent, and took part in Cowcs Week.

BASKETBALL

could still do emergency tours in Northern

After a long year of inactivity on the Basketball Court we have at last attempted

Cyprus

Ireland. prepare for a six months trip to

Further afield Lance Corporal of Horse Wall is the Regiment's selection for

has plans, which include a visit by the Jordanian Army and a Association Team to Iran.

Cyprus

Polo

Squadron. Cornet de

Chair, a

somewhat heavy

officer, took to polo in a very enthusiastic manner and could often be seen galloping over the fields half a mile away. This premature departure from a chukker was

usually put down to his equally enthusiastic pony. At the Army Horse Show held at the Dhekelia Saddle Club the Squadron Leader‘s pony. Kelly, took first prize and Lieutenant Corry Reid on Collette came

CoH

This was not the end of the season. There was still the London District 6-Aside Competition. We entered two teams. of which the Band made up one team which, on paper, weakened our chances. The other team, however. reached the final after a

the

In Cowes. Musician King unsuccessfully Regimental six-a-slde football

was the team: CoH Sibley. Sgt Cartwright. L/CoH Birt, L/CoH MacKenna, L/Sgt Turner. L/Cpl Ford, L/Cpl Dean, L/Cpl Henderson, Tpr Porterfield and Musn Healey and Musn Baines.

negotiated

numerous sandbanks of Poole Harbour. Gladeye set sail for Cherbourg where the crew over indulged in Fruits-de-Mer and gallons of Muscadet. This, combined with a heavy swell on the sail back, successfully disabled the majority of the crew, and there were surprisingly few customers for Captain Barne's compo stew at midday.

Cup we were unlucky to be beaten in the

playing

successfully

However, the time spent pursuing polo balls across the ground at the Dhekelia

third. The Cyprus Polo Association sponsors

six matches during the season. which extends from April to October with a two months

rest period

in

July

and

August.

One of the best tournaments is the Inniskilling Cup which was originally presented in Cairo in 1908. This is played

for annually between the Independent Squadrons of Cavalry and the half

RUGBY 1972/73 The Regimental Rugby XV have had

a fairly active first half of the season playing a game a week since the end of September. Results to date are as follows: Opponents Result Score

SEE Arborfield 2nd XV AAC Arborfield P Staff

L D

Alamein Coy Sandhurst

W 69— 3

2nd Bn Coldstream Guards (Army Cup) Staines Police SEME Bordon 2nd XV Slough Technical College lst XV

3—12 9— 9

L 12—24 L 12—25 W 3— 0 W 27— 6

Barclays Bank (Reading & District)

W

8— 7

SEME Bordon 2nd XV

W 22— 4

No 1 District Metropolitan Police L 0—16 ACC Training Centre W 34— 0 Summary: Played 11. Won 6. Lost 4. Drawn 1.

Points for:

199: Points against:

106.

to get under way. As with every sporting event we too have had our problems. what with the squadrons being in Northern

thrashing. even though it fielded the RCM,

the Round the World Race. However. it is not yet known whether he will be taking

who

part.

battalions of Infantry. This year C Squadron was fortunate enough to win this Cup. With the rain holding off until after Christmas it was possible to continue with

Ireland, Cyprus. Norway and Greece and

showed

PERGAMOS POLO 1972

polo one day a wcek into the New Year. During this time the Tyrrcll Martin Cup

has not had to call off a fixture because of shortage of players. Postings. courses and

On arrival in Cyprus C Squadron found a reasonable number of polo ponies. though more often than not they were to be seen in the riding school or in

was played. and lost to the RAF Episkopi team. Polo has been boosted recently by the

injuries have cut the original 28 down to 18 but these 18 players have proved to be

pursuit of Comet I.cslic~King‘s Draghounds.

seven regimental officcrs are playing. The

‘the Gymnasium being used for parties or being backs

rebuilt. But we have

in spite of these set held a Knock-Out

Competition in November which was very successful and showed that B Squadron

and

still

threatened

give all

HQ

who

Squadron

scored

for

a B

Squadron with extra duties. The competition

that

hidden

beneath

the

snow

smocks. dirty denims and OJs. was a lot of

talent. We now are trying to organise some friendly matches to bring this talent into the open and hope to enter the league competition next year.

arrival of B Squadron at Nicosia. and now

At the beginning of the season a squad of some 28 players was built up by Maior Schorah. This has paid off as the Regiment

tremendously

loyal.

Several

members of

the team had played little or no rugby before this season but under the guidance

21


RALLYINC IN CYPRUS With C. SQUADRON

by S/Sgt. P. J. Waterman Cyprus is an ideal location for rallying

just prior to this point. Shortly after this

providing many miles of unsurfaced bondu roads and tortuous mountain tracks. In the summer the major hazard is the dust

stage in the rally, due to exceptionally bad weather conditions, the organisers changed

thrown

up by preceding vehicles, giving

the contestants and there were very few

Waterman navigating for Lance Corporal

way in the winter to mud on the central

finishers, none at all in the military class.

Wright RCT in a Ford 1300 ‘Sport’ managed to gain third overall place in

plain and treacherous ice and snow in the Troodos and Kyrenia mountain ranges. C Squadron has entered vehicles in rallies throughout the year with varying degrees of success.

Tpr MOWBRAY

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

a lack of experience was obvious when the

Army Cup game was played and the Coldstream Guards had players with several seasons playing experience in their team. It was encouraging to see that during this

game a lack of confidence was gradually overcome and the last ten minutes of the game were spent on the Coldstreams line. A certain ‘fire’ developed for the first time in the game and has continued in

subsequent games. (NB. Moral: If you‘re going to take a swing at an opponent, try

not to let the referee see it. In any case do not do it in full view of both the referee and the Commanding Officer!) The

following

players

have

so

represented the Regiment this season: Captain PLATT EME S/Cpl EDWARDS A Sgt PRATT (Capt) LAD L/CoH BACK HQ L/CoH FELDWICK A L/CoH FREEMAN HQ L/CoH GARNETT A L/CoH HATHERALL HQ L/CoH LLOYD HQ L/CoH PENTITH B L/CoH BUCKLE A L/CoH MANNING HQ L/CoH QUINN HQ Musn BULLOCK Band Musn HEALEY Band L/Cpl ANGUIN RAMC Cfn UMPLEBY LAD Tpr AYSCOUGH Tpr ELLIS Tpr BUCKMAN Tpr BEYNON Tpr GAMBRELL

far

NAPIER EDMAN SCANNELL VAUGHAN

Tpr WENDON

against military teams in the United States and India: also he and Major Parker-Bowles

were selected as members of a Household Division team invited to Amman by the Jordanian Armed Forces in March, 1973. kept

Guards

in

the

Inter-

Regimental semi—final at Windsor, went on to the final against the l7th/21st Lancers,

members

of

the

Regiment

and

tough match extremely well supported by many members of both regiments, and including some spectacular falls, the l7th/

No 2

Major A. H. Parker-Bowles.

No 3

Major J. H. Pitman.

Bk

Major W. S. H. Boucher.

5-2

were

designed

navigational events rather than sprints. The same vehicle (long wheelbase Rover)

after running it in it was decided to try a couple

Division Club ponies, Regimental polo players riding them for no less than 273

the finish. It was because of this that the

anything more high powered. The ‘Diamond

squadron lost the team prize. The two surviving vehicles crewed by Staff Sergeant

Rally’ sponsored by Limassol Motor Club

chukkas during the season. In spite of ever increasing expense and the exigencies of the service, P010 is going strong; we hope that the 1973 season

will again provide the numerous Polo players in the Regiment with the opportunity

placed

and

fifth

in

class

next

major

event

early

in

and it was later learned that so many

February, 1972, was ‘The Winter Rally’, :1 high powered affair organised by The Cyprus Automobile Association, the results being worked out by computer during the

re-run. Lance Sergeant Little had also gone ‘private’ and prepared his SAAB 96. Ably

course of the event. This time only two

assisted

Rovers were entered, crewed by the finishers of the ‘Safari‘. Although we set

attempted

off full of high hopes that at last the Rovers would come into their own in the mud

and

snow.

we

were

soon

brought

people

all the way, with the majority of vehicles

due to L/CoH Henderson and Tprs Kelsey

dropping back, the Rovers more than most. However, there was a generous fuel stop

driver) was entered in the ‘Aries‘ and the ‘Tiger‘, and thanks to accurate map reading

a much better Royal Navy team. entered for the first time ever in this Tournament. The team was: No l Lt P. B. Rogers.

racing in the traditional manner. It is very much hoped that

No 2 Captain H. W. Davies. No 3 Lt P. R. L. Walker-Okeover. Bk Captain R. N. O. Couper. During the year Major Pitman was selected for Army teams on tours to play

the Household Cavalry will be able to be represented in the FE] 3-Day Coaching

in

1973

Trooper

both

the

the

event

Armishaw

‘Diamond'

was

he

had

and

the

rather than

speed.

took

the

class

award

The

Squadron

had

now

been

in

Cyprus just over a year and the ‘East Cyprus Safari' was with us again. This year the squadron team of Rovers was crewed as follows: Sergeant Seear — Corporal of Horse Anslow — Lance Corporal of Horse McLean— Lance Sergeant Holmes —— Lance Sergeant Carr —

in both events. Craftsman Wormstrup

absorbed all their rally lateness.

other Rover with Lance Sergeant Little and

The main opposition in the military class in all the events entered is 58 Squadron RCT and 26] Signal Squadron, with the occasional civilian entry. They all use short wheelbase Rovers and consequently they are that much faster and more manoeuvreable in the mountains than

Craftsman Wormstrup had run out of time

our long wheel base Rovers.

In the second half the timings were very tight and at checkpoint seventeen, after being late at three controls, the computer issued a reject slipitlie Anslow/

Waterman Rover had been eliminated. The Events which are becoming such a popular

and fascinating pursuit for the drivers of teams of four horses.

by

that

Fiat. Lance Sgt. Holmes and Lance Corporal of Horse McLean with the only Land Rover that completed the ralley.

Any success that the Coach had is entirely

at the half—way mark. and both our entries

complained

‘Scorpio‘ rallies with similar results as the

and crew (Staff Sergeant Waterman— navigator, Corporal of Horse Anslow—

It was a pity that the cold weather marred two amusing days at Ascot when a lot of people enjoyed the ability to go

attempting

been. The Fiat retired in the early stages

The

and Hunter.

before

Rally‘ held shortly afterwards was a minor

spare. and that was over a so-called ‘Slack’ section. From then on it was a struggle

to

events

respectively.

to enjoy the game.

HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY COACHING CLUB, 1972 The Household Cavalry Coach was represented at all the major shows during the summer and successfully beat the only other regimental entry on all occasions. We were lucky enough to be placed well up the list on nearly all occasions against what is becoming a larger and more

third

club

disaster. The route instructions were of a type not encountered before and the controls were not where they should have

Sergeant Little and Craftsman Wormstrup

were

of

was successfully completed but the ‘Scorpio

Waterman and CoH Anslow, and Lance

Household Cavalry Coach was placed first in their section and well up the list overall.

down

be homeward bound before the hearing date is set.

in Cyprus (there must be money in catering). It was 21 Fiat 128 ‘Rally’ and

the second half of the rally the vehicle, crewed by Captain Marsh and L/Cpl

hitherto. On all occasions when the competition was divided into sections, the

went

to be brought to court. Thankfully the processes of the law are painfully slow in

Lance Sergeant Freeman ACC was by now on to his third new car since arriving

since 1969, won the Inter-Regimental twice

which

the ‘Crusader Rally' at the expense of a left hand front wing and a summons. The charge of dangerous driving is still waiting

as

The Regiment has now, in the four years

team

were

Cyprus, and with luck ‘The Accused’ will

Association,

back to earth when the faster of the two Rovers made it to the start of the first special stage with only two minutes to

inexperienced

types

Rally‘, both organised by the RAF Motor

Sports

competitive sport than has been the ease

and been defeated on the other two occasions by the Tournament winners. Perhaps 1973 will improve this average further. In the Captains and Subalterns Tournament the Regiment fielded a fairly

rally

Thompson, left the road and did not reach

played this year at Tidworth. In a very

21st Lancers deservedly were the winners. The team was: No 1 Major B. H. F. Wright.

been designed for the fast car and

driver, and we were at a considerable disadvantage from the start, but in April and June the ‘Aries Rally‘ and the ‘Tiger

full use was made of the twenty Household

England and four in Cyprus. The Regimental team, having defeated

Coldstream

by

(crazy?)

entering in their private cars. Staff Sergeant

Up to this point the rallies seemed to have

In England nine private ponies were

POLO 1972 During 1972 the Regiment had no fewer than thirteen officers playing polo: nine in

the

‘The East Cyprus Safari Rally’. Although not yet familiar with the island, the whole team arrived at the half-way stage well within the permitted time allowance. It was most unfortunate therefore that during

enthusiastic

UZUZUZ

enced players, standards have improved tremendously. Major Schorah, the Rugby Officer, even suspects that most players know at least some of the laws! However,

Soon after our arrival in late "II a team of three Landrovers was entered in

:1: L1: w>o>w>ow

Tpr LOCK Tpr MILLER

of Sergeant Pratt (LAD) and other experi-

the route but it was too late for most of

By this time the rally bug had really caught hold and some of the more

N~Navigator

D—Driver

The two civilian cars previously mentioned were also entered, with Staff Sergeant Waterman navigating for Lance Sergeant Freeman in the Fiat, and Lance

Sergeant Little navigating Armishaw in the SAAB.

for

Trooper


Presentation of New Guidon Windsor Great Park, 14th July, 1972

757},Mit'fiiijsoiheegiieia'fffleé’é’s'gn,TaIZinReog'maenfgjft’é“fig;

Her Majesty the Queen presents The GUIdO” to The Regiment

General Sir Desmond Fitzpatrick, The Queen. Captain Wilkinson.

The Mounted Squadron led

Field

24

Marshal

Sir

Gerald

Temp/er,

Major

Hamilton-Russell

the Trot Pass

the Commanding Officer at

Cornet Scott, SQMC Edwards, Cornet Armitage. Lieutenant

Cornet Lingeman, Corporal 0/ Horse Burton-Johnson. Cornet Browning, Lance-Corporal of Horse Carroll. Lieutenant Couper. Colonel of Horse Sibley. Cornet Holcroft during the drive past

Captain P. T. Miles, Ex W07 W. H. Wood, ROMC Wooton. BSM. Ex Staff Sgt Farr and Sgt Turp

,

Boone. Captain Lewis, Major Smith-Bingham during the drive past

V the Mounted . Squadron past The band leading the Queen In the Quadrangle—Windsor Castle

Her Majesty


BAND OF THE BLUES& ROYALS

Household Cavalry Mounted Sports

The year has been as busy as ever and we have performed a record amount

of Mounted Band duties, including State Visits to Windsor of Queen Juliana and Prince

Bernhardt,

and

The

President

of

West Germany; Windsor Horse Show. Beating Retreat on Horse Guards Parade. The

Trooping,

Presentation Great Park. Our

and

of

course

of the Guidon

civilian

engagements

our

in

own

Windsor

have

been

numerous and we have been well received at various towns. including Eastbourne, Bournemouth, Brighton, Nottingham and

Coventry. to mention a few. On the TV screen the Band and Trumpeters have appeared in ‘Stars on Sunday', also for

‘Our Heritage” and ‘The Strauss Family’ programmes. We took part in various recruiting performances up and down the country, visiting places such as Wolverhampton,

Blackpool, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne and Liverpool. The displays and performances, including a dance in Newcastle, seemed to be enjoyed and very good publicity obtained. A very successful Band Dinner and Dance was held at Combermere on 30th November, attended by some 200, and with

a much younger Band the evening went with a good swing when dancing to the guest

dance

combination

from

the

RAF

1972 has been another successful year for our riders. under the training and management of the Riding Master, Captain Jackson, LG. In March Captain Wilkinson, riding Unisex, won a section and the cup

Services Open Competition and was also in the winning teams at this show and at the Royal Tournament in July. Later in September this combination won the

for the fastest novice horse across country at the Crookham Horse Trials. This combination was also placed 4th at Hawley and 6th at lmber Court.

Horse Show.

The Show Jumping season also started well with SCM Doxey riding Usk, being placed 2nd in the Foxhunter competition at Epsom Horse Show. They were also members of the winning services team at the Royal Windsor Horse Show, when the

Tweseldown. Captain Wilkinson and SCM

Household

of

Cavalry

Regiment

won

the

W. Jeanes during the State Visit of the President of

Uxbridge. The Band Dining Committee comprised of Trumpet Major Wilson,

this appointment he was WOl Bandmaster

L/Cpls

of The Royal Dragoons.

Sowter

and

Parsons.

and

Musn

Bowden. 1973 will see quite a change in the structure of the Band. Major Jeanes retires after 10 years as our Director of Music and nearly 43 years army service, and is succeeded by Captain Evans from The

Royal

Artillery

Senior life

are

Band,

members

Corporals

Larkhill.

leaving of

Horse

Prior

Due to the State Visit of the President Germany

again

on

Usk,

was

placed

2nd

in

the

Army

unable

to

send

year. However, L/CoH McGregor on Unicorn, and Captain Wilkinson on Unisex, were 2nd and 4th respectively in the team

competition. At Aldershot Horse Show SCM Doxey

the

were

Captain Wilkinson and L/CoH McGregor

in the novice horse trial championships at Cirencester Park

to

we

riders

Captain Wilkinson and Unisex competing

Hunter Trials

this

Hunter trials at Hickstead at the end of October.

for civilian Commins,

The Household Cavalry Training Squadron From the beginning of the year until September recruiting had been on a steady decline with June being our leanest month,

with only about twenty recruits in training. It recovered in the Autumn and we are now running at a steady fifty with a further

to Corporal of Horse Clayton, and Corporal of Horse Howells, who returned to HCR respectively.

took

over

under the auspices of the Depot swimming

of

team easily won the inter-company swimming competition. We have also achieved a certain measure of success in

as

the boxing. football and basketball.

Recd-Felstead

in June. only to be whisked away to B Squadron for Operation Motorman. Cornet Armitage from A Squadron then filled the Troop Leader gap. We have said goodbye

recruit

had

thoughts

of

We celebrated our Squadron holiday.

Regiment

officer (the Squadron Leader), the Squadron

from lieutenant

guard

El Alamein Day, by taking all our recruits to watch the RAC Centre fire power

the

After the enormous numbers of last year we are now producing enough new

always, finds itself very busy. Captain Matthews arrived in May as Second-in-Command and Lieutenant Lukas

foot

greater things.

and

to

twelve at Catterick.

forty ex-junior guardsmen at the end each of their terms. the squadron.

a

Lance Corporal of Horse Cummings has joined us.

and

On the sporting scene the squadron has more than held its own. In the summer,

blood to keep all three regiments topped up, and with the injection of thirty or

The Blues and Royals band during the Guidon Parade with S.C.M. Rainger in the loreground in a Ferret

Doxey, having qualified for the Midland Bank Horse Trials Championships, both competed at the Cirencester Park Horse Trials with creditable performances.

to

Briggs and Riddell. All of them have served a full pensionable period, plus extended service. We wish them well and success in their new venture.

Lieutenant Goodall, riding Tiara for the first time, came 3rd in the military section at the Army One Day Event at

Queen‘s Cup for the third year in succession. were in teams that were joint 2nd in this The Director of Music, Maior E. West Germany

Services Competition at the RMA Sandhurst

ln

May

we

organised

an

armoured

display ranging from Ferret to Chieftain. and we are grcatly indebted to the Mounted Regiment for the strong contingent they provided. Over 2.000 people saw the display

and for the majority of them it was their first view of armour. and we felt that many

demonstration at Lulworth. This was a great success: a lot of first round hits were achieved and that evening we returned to Pirbright well fed and watered, and very impressed. This year we have been quite involved with Regimental life and it is comforting not to feel left out on a limb. A large party from here saw the Guidon Parade

and we had a Laying-Up

marching

Ceremony.

We

party have

for the made

several visits to Windsor and HCR. and in December welcomed a party of 15 NCOs who came to watch the Junior Guardsmen‘s Wing passing out parade. Any Household Cavalry visitors are always most welcome.

27 26


THE WINDSOR FOREST HUNT One will remember well the pack of Weser Vale Bloodhounds which Captain

Stringer formed in Germany and the sport he showed so many while the regiment was stationed

at

Detmold.

That

pack

was

handed over to The Life Guards and in September, 1971, Captain Stringer formed a new pack of bloodhounds. These were formerly the Burton Constable Hounds in Yorkshire,

but

owing

to

their

Master‘s

inability to carry on Captain Stringer bought them and they are now kennelled at Englefield Green, Near Windsor.

(Blood Hounds)

of action for the remainder of the l97l~2 season. hounds managed to meet no fewer than twenty times under the hand

C KCLY SHARPSHOOTERS SQUADRON THE ROYAL YEOMANRY

advantage of the early morning training meets to start getting their horses fit for Leicestershire. Whilst The Life Guards

of Major Loyd. The Life Guards. who

Mounted Squadron was at its summer camp

came to the mastership.

the

at Pirbright. the Hounds met at the NAAFI

The efforts that were nrade during the past year to open the country up for the present season have enabled the hounds to meet more often. Training meets took

exciting hunt. The Hunt tries to meet at

place

in

the

rescue

and

took

over

C Squadron Tire Royal Yeomanry has once again had a busy year. The Squadron

early

mornings

as

soon

as

the harvest was in. prior to the season starting. and this proved to be most useful.

is fully recruited although new recruits are

In July we had a big squadron exercise

year.

against the Sherwood Rangers which covered parts of Oxfordshire, Buckinghamshire and Northampton. We had a wide variety of supporting forces ranging from paratroopers to infantry, gunners and RCT.

In February the Support Troop organised a 20 mile route march over the

During August and September the squadron was slightly less active due to the

just done a fast withdrawal over a bridge,

South Downs, which gave a lot of people

holiday period. However, we did our usual

some unaccustomed exercise.

job of communications at the Eridge Horse

taking two hours to meet us again. We discovered that at night, in thick fog, it

and

Royals.

The

following

account

is

some of the more amusing incidents of the Pirbright sometime during the season for

Brigadier Davies-Scoufield invited the

first working with the Queen’s Own Hussars and then with the Regiment. This was largely a withdrawal exercise and there were the occasional moments when the ‘fog of war", to quote the Brigadier, descended.

always welcome and as from February, 1973, the permanent staff were all Blues

tent. for what proved to be a very fast and

the benefit of the Junior Guardsmen who are very keen equitators. The Meet is normally at the Officers Mess.

Army Display at Aldershot, aided by other Yeomanry squadrons.

In April we took part in the TAVR

Trials and started to prepare for camp.

display at the Duke of Yorks in Chelsea, and on the first week-end in May the entire Squadron went to Lulworth to fire

Camp this year was in Germany and the whole regiment crossed by Prinz Line Ferry to Bremerhaven and set off down

both the armoured cars and scout cars on

the autobahn to join in the BAOR autumn

the range. The week-end was punctuated with every type of hazard. Shipping, fog

exercises. During the first week the squadrons worked independently and we were attached to 11 Brigade. We had a

and cows on the range stopped our firing at one time on another. Later in the month

The difficult problems of a rapid withdrawal were added to by a very thick real fog which after first stopping the complete exercise, then resulted in SHQ, which had

is surprisingly difficult to map read at speed down narrow country roads. This camp was for most of us unique in that we were never in barracks but were

living

in

the

field

fortnight.

We

took

our

Armoured

Car

Regiment

for

the

place in

the

entire

as

an

regular

army exercise and were treated throughout as members of the Division with which

fairly hectic but amusing week acting as we were serving.

the Honorary Colonel kindly his home, before we fired our arms classification, and several that swimming. intentionally

put us up at annual small people found or otherwise,

at 11 o'clock at night in May is not the warmest of occupations. At the beginning of June we had our first full squadron exercise on Salisbury Plain against the Oxford OTC. This gave us some good cross-country practise that we were to benefit from while at camp. Later in June we manned a stand in the

enemy to the whole brigade, which kept us

going continuously in a wide variety of different jobs at all times of the day and

It was particularly gratifying to receive afterwards a number of compliments from various Generals and Brigadiers. which

night. the

included the Divisional General. He said that he had noted the extremely professional

to

manner in which the regiment went about

visit us, we rejoined the rest of the regiment in a concentration area NE. of Detmold.

its business. ‘in the very best traditions of the Yeomanry’. and the Brigadier of II

For

Honorary

the

middle

Colonel

week—end,

kindly

when

came

out

and the usual parties and bus trips to Hamburg were organised, The second week we were attached to

7th Armoured Brigade. the squadron at

Brigade who said of the Squadron. that he particularly liked the gentlemanly way in which we tackled any unusual task he chose to give us!

GOVERNOR CENERAL'S HORSE GUARDS DOWNSVIEW. ONTARIO

Denison Armoury, 3621 Dufferin Street

Hon C017 C01 R. Michener CC CMM CD Hon Lt Col -— Lt Col J. W. Graham ED QC The training season 1971-1972 continued to

be

successful

Commanders.

under

Major

the

Burns

Squadron

and

Major

Maclntyre. The training conducted at local

headquarters and at CFB Borden exercised the troops in the skills taught during the

Captain Stringer and Surgeon Major Page at the Kill, West Wycombe Park

year as individuals and collectively. Trade courses consisted of General Military The Country is the old Garth Monday Country. loaned to the Windsor Forest Hunt by the Garth and South Berks Foxhounds. Its northern boundaries stretch

Hounds hunted well on lines that were

Hunt to meet at Tidworth House on 27th

Training, Crewman and Advanced Crewman.

from twenty minutes to an hour and a half cold through varying scenting

December, where the field consisted of no fewer than 129 mounted followers and

Qualifications for rank courses produced a large number of Horse Guards eligible

from Henley along the Thames to Maidenhead and Slough. The Western

acknowledge their quarries. This was primarily through there being too many

the most successful meets of the season.

boundary lies from Henley to Reading. to Wokingham. then along the A30 to Staines.

people on foot at the finish.

much the Hunt is indebted to the Land—

Because of the closeness of the country hunted. the number of people able to

owners and Farmers for allowing us to come across their land. There is no word which can convey our appreciation

The Hounds meet every Saturday with

an occasional by-day (there were five in December). The first season of the Windsor Forest was a great success. In spite of the

nasty fall which put Captain Stringer out

28

conditions.

and

only

twice

failed

to

follow on horseback is limited to thirty. Six of these are soldiers from the Household Cavalry. Many officers took

some 20 car followers. This was one of It

can

never

frilly

be

known

how

for promotion. The Band under Captain Fitzgerald fulfilled a large number of engagements because of their expertise. which makes them one of the better Bands in the

Canadian Forces. It

is SOP for the Cavalry Squadron

sutlicicntly and it is these generous people

under Captain

that we thank for the past two successful seasons.

Mounted Escorts for the Opening of The Legislature. The Queen‘s Plate and The

Constantinides to provide

CO DCO

Lt Col H. K. Forbes CD ADC —

Major D. E. Friesen CD

Royal Winter Fair. Their expertise is attributed to the high morale and expert instruction they receive each week throughout the year. In 1973 they will provide a Mounted Escort for the Queen when she visits Canada in June. The Cadet Squadron under Major Chicoine is 125 strong and conducts so much training that they continue to win

the efficiency trophies year after year. Summer Concentration this year had the Regiment in the field for the entire week counselled by the VIII Canadian Hussars at CFB Petawawa. Troopers Chamberlain. Cookman and Neal were sent on Exercise Pegasus at Lahr. Germany. Major Maclntyrc has been posted to staff at

Toronto Militia District Headquarters. joining Major Weinschiemer who has been there for some time. Trooper Hall has gone

Adjt

Captain C. R. Ahrens

RSM

e

CWO H. G. Busch CD

to England and joined The Blues and Royals and now serves with the Household Cavalry. Some important items to note this year are that the Regiment celebrated the lSOth anniversary of the formation of Denison's Troop on 16th August. The official

celebration took place on the Mini Reunion week-end 10th-12th November. with the Governor General in attendance at a parade that had 300 all ranks march past at Toronto City Hall. The Regiment provided a large contingent for a mass parade of 12 units. marking the official change of

command from Colonel Neal to Colonel Lewis on 23rd September. 1972. at Toronto

Militia

District.

The

Regimental

Cap

Badges came under fire this year with the possibility of their elimination from all units. However. public opinion changed this course of action.


THE ROYAL CANADIAN DRAGOONS

The Story oi

COMBERMERE BARRACKS by W02 C. W. Frearson

Brigadier General E. A.

C. Amy, DSO, OBE, MC, CD, Colonel of the

Regiment, inspects C Squadron, accompanied by the Commanding Officer Lieutenant Colonel R. J. Brown, CD, during the parade commemorating

the

72nd

Regardless of Oriental claims, 1972 was definitely the year of the Scorpion for The Royal Canadian Dragoons. The

at which the Regiment bade farewell to Lt Col P. H. C. Carew and welcomed Lt Col R. J. Brown.

debate, albeit decisively undecided at the top level, has actively continued in our ranks, more often coupled with a fervent prayer that we remain heavy armour and continue to play our decisive role.

It was during the summer that the autonomous tactical helicopter squadron

Scorpion has had the happy effect of rekindling our enthusiasm and interest in all

aspects

of

armoured

warfare.

Un-

fortunately we have left 1972 not knowing what, if anything, will replace our faithful but tired Centurion. Our training year commenced with a

January

Gun

Training

Camp

Centre

at

at

the

US

Army

Grafenwoehr.

The

weather was in keeping with the time of year

and

gave

us

ample

opportunity

to

assess our winter gunnery techniques. We were also faced, however, with the unexpected problem of tracers starting grass fires in knee—deep snow fields! Grafenwoehr was easier this year since we have had more practice at deciphering the incredible litanies of US range control nets and accommodating the American penchant for regulations and uniformity. Combat

March/April

team

in

training

followed

Munsingen

in

in

the

Schwabische Alb. Affectionaly called ‘Little Siberia’ by local soldiers, Musingen lived up to its reputation as we commenced

our bivouac in a snowstorm and for the next three weeks successively endured rain, sleet, snow, fog and hail—the sun remained

conspicuously absent. During this period we were joined by two groups of ten soldiers each from the Second Royal Tank Regiment and the Fifth Battalion, 68th US Armour. Both groups worked with our tank squadrons, the British slightly amused

after Chieftain and the Americans captivated by the ‘modern’ stabilised gunnery system.

was formed in 4 CMBG, resulting in the departure

of

our

KIOWA

equipped

Helicopter Troop of the Reconnaissance Squadron: that a small group led by Lt Col Brown witnessed the Presentation of the Guidon to The Blues and Royals by Her Majesty The Queen; that another group spent a brief time with the Second

Anniversary

of

the

Battle

of

Leliefontein

The 72nd anniversary of the Battle of Leliefontein was observed in the first week of November. The celebrations included a regimental sports afternoon, a mounted Trooping

of

the

Guidon.

and

respective

mess functions. The Colonel of the Regiment, Brigadier General E. A. C. Amy and Mrs. Amy. were present for the week—end, the Colonel taking great delight

watching the Regiment troop on the sacred turf of our airfield! Post Leliefontein activity was aimed

Regiment in

Bovington, and

that members of the Regiment took part in the NlJMEGEN MARCHES. In late July, following our participation in the NlJMEGEN MARCHES the

unit over the summer months; upgrading trades qualifications; swimming our amCommander‘s Annual Inspection and firing

or

and

on the Indoor Miniature Range.

several kinds of deer were found deep in

horses. It should be said at this point that

the end of Peascod Street and the barracks

the gravel below what is now the Headquarters Squadron Block. They were

this

was surrounded by fields.

British NCOs, it was a nostalgic return to

We have just completed our Christmas and New Year‘s festivities which included an officer/Senior NCO broomball game on ice. won conspicuously by the Senior

BAOR. RAC Gunnery Wing, Fourth Royal

NCOs; the serving of the Men’s Christmas

Tank

Dinner; the observation of the Regiment‘s

Regiment returned ‘home’ to fire at Bergenhohne. For our older soldiers who remembered Sam Browne belts, khaki

uniforms,

and

the

Regiment

and

unfiagging

the

wit

Queen‘s

of

Own

Hussars, welcomed us back to the fold and invariably made our stay easier, socially enjoyable, and professionally successful. B Squadron had the distinction this year of training in Valdahon, France. They spent two weeks practicing combat team operations with three Mechanised Commando. During a portion of the training a platoon of AMX 305 from the resident

30 ieme Dragoons joined the Squadron and followed officers.

the

orders

of

bilingual

RCD

The US Army Training Centre at Hohenfels saw the return of four CMBG in September. Mercifully we spent this

vehicles:

preparing

for

birthday, 215t December; and a portion of leave.

the

generous

As we close this report the Regiment is preparing to move with the other units

of 4 CMBG to the area of Wuerzburg to participate in the annual US exercise that involves the flyover of their Reforger brigades. In summary, the year 1972 has afforded members of the Regiment the opportunity to

train

in

southern

Germany,

northern

Germany and France: to participate in the NlJMEGEN MARCHES in Holland: to visit their sister Regiment, The Blues and Royals. and the RAC Centre in England;

and to renew their contact with members year in barracks rather than the seven week tent city of last year. The training

of

the

American,

British,

Dutch,

French

and German Armed Forces. In closing may we wish all ranks of The Blues and Royals continued prosperity

marked

mobile defensive operations.

in 1973.

Day,

1

July,

was

or

the Change of Command Parade

and the wives were permitted to live with

16 acres were conveyanced to the Barrackmaster General for the purpose of building a barracks to house 400 men and

phibious

special significance to the RCD as it also

National

Circa 1800.

at training crewmen who rotated into the Royal Tank

period culminated with a Battle Group exercise, appropriately named ‘CANADIAN CLUB’, during which our troops practiced

Our

Foreground: The old barrack square on which four new barrack blocks now stand—The two old barrack blocks flanking the green (now the square) with the Officers House in the background screened by chestnut trees—The tree, centre right is still surviving and was planted

When the barracks we call ‘Combermere‘ was being rebuilt in 1867, remnants rhinoceros,

mammoth,

aurochs

was

the

first

great

barrack-building

period of the Army's history. Ever since the Mutiny Act of 1697 the British Army

their husbands in divisions of the barrack rooms. The streets of Windsor began at

It was to this barracks, just completed

once roamed the Thames Valley in warmer times and before the last Ice Age reached

had been billeted in ale-houses, a practise

this far south, about 20,000 years ago. Some of these skeletal remains found their

public relations. The Napoleonic Wars had

on 26th October, 1804, that The Blues came. Nearer the town, in what is now Victoria Barracks, the first occupants were the Stafiordshire Militia, who remained

swelled the Army to 700.000 men, most of

there for many years. This barracks was

way to the Guildhall Museum at Windsor.

them

known

said to be the remains of animals which

The site of the barracks is really within the old parish of Clewer and did not come within the bounds of the Royal Borough of New Windsor until relatively recent times. In the thirteenth century, a leper hospital, dedicated to the Blessed St. Peter stood near here and is recalled in local

which was bad

in

both for discipline and

England.

These

early

barracks

supply of the lepers, the buildings of the 1804 barracks were on the same foundations as those now occupied by the Headquarters Squadron Block and the Troopers‘ Dining Hall, with a small hospital on the site of supply came from the Bourne Ditch, which flows

from

Cranbournc,

Highstanding

under

the

middle

Hill of

at the

until

King George III moved into permanent

almost invariably in a Captain‘s uniform of the Regiment and had his own Troop. He frequently attended the early morning

parades and inspected the Regiment: his visrts were not always announced save by the Duty Trumpeter as the King entered the gate. When the Royal Salute was sounded, Officers and men paraded on the

old Square (the site of the four smaller barrack blocks). He arrived one morning

Barrack Square and the London Bus Depot.

acres to St. Peter‘s Hospital, but by 1445 leprosy had so diminished that Henry VI granted the original lands of St. Peter‘s to

thence across Frogmore to join the Thames

his newly founded Eton College.

measured

Eton College until lst January, 1800. when

Barracks

residence at Windsor Castle 21 week after the arrival of The Blues. He dressed

still

The lands remained the property of

‘Infantry’

Barracks were completed on 26th October. 1804. Standing largely astride the old Bourne Ditch, the boundary and water

what is now the Boiler House. The water

barracks itself is marked on early maps of Windsor as ‘Spital' Barracks. In 1251. Henry III granted a purpresture of 120

the

1900.

history and on the Ordnance Survey map as ‘Spital’fia word Shakespeare uses in Henry V to denote a leper hospital, the

as

were largely Jerry built and the Spital

at Datchet. Lighting was by candles, stuck to the walls of the barrack rooms which 16 feet by 28 feet and were 10

feet high, in two storeys built above the stables.

There

were

no

married

quarters

when the officers were at breakfast and, entering the old Officers House by the rear door. caught the Surgeon (McGrigor) —who was excused paradesibreakfasting in carpet slippers and shirtsleeves. The Blues remained at Windsor until 14th June. 1821. as only two squadrons were employed

31

30


Continuation

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Story ol

To The Editor:

The Household

Regimental Headquarters. Household Cavalry, Horse Guards.

Combermere Barracks

Cavalry Museum

WHITEHALL. London, SW1.

Dear Sir. Household Cavalry Memorial Zandvoorde

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission sent us their Annual Report in November. 1972. in the Peninsula Campaign and three in the Waterloo campaign. They thus spent 17 years in the Borough and had virtually taken root,

From

1821

the

lst

Guards and The Blues between Regents Park,

and

2nd

Life

rotated annually Hyde Park and

Windsor Barracks. In 1806, at Windsor, King George 111 formed the first band of The

Blues

and

during

the

summer

each

Sunday every evening they played to the King and the local population on the terrace at Windsor Castle (North Terrace then). The 2nd Life Guards, who relieved The Blues at Windsor in 1821, caused

much local annoyance by discontinuing these concerts and after much exhortation were compelled to renew the custom which

has continued until today, albeit only when the Queen is in official residence and, of course, on Sunday afternoons. On

Saturday.

3rd

December.

1864,

barracks. The cost of building it, and it has not altered at all in size, was £2,056. Church parades in those days were followed by a kind of ‘open day' on the

They

state

that

the

Memorial

at

Zandvoorde is in good condition both horticulturally and structurally. The gravel-

VISITORS Just

under

2,000

visitors

signed

the

visitors book between 1st January and 31st December, 1972. This did not include organised parties such as schools, youth clubs, cadets. recruits, etc. Few visitors

led path is free from weeds and the Cypress

came

trees on three sides of the Memorial are

vicinity. Foreign visitors came front America, Australia, Brasil, Canada, France, Germany, Holland, Jordan, Monaco, New Zealand, Portugal, Rhodesia, Sweden,

from

Windsor

or

the

immediate

barrack lawn. where the band played and

the locals. especially children. flocked to spend the afternoon. The Garrison Church of Holy Trinity was built between 4th

neatly clipped.

A. J. Dickinson. Joint Hon. Secretary.

April 1842. and 1844, Prince Albert laying To The Editor:

the first stone. In

1900

the

Foot

Guards,

who

apparently did not relish living in ‘Infantry Barracks”, permission

sought and to rename

gained Royal their barracks

‘Victoria Barracks‘. At the time a detachment of the lst Life Guards was stationed at the Cavalry Barracks. Unable to find a more revered name than Victoria (except gained

The Almighty) permission to

123 Rotunda Road, EASTBOURNE, Sussex.

they sought and rename Cavalry

Barracks as ‘Combermere Barracks‘ after their Gold Stick of 1829-65.

Switzerland and Zanzibar. We hope to get assistance in advertising from the Ministry

Windsor each year.

Captain Simeon Hirst (RHG) who rose from Trooper to Captain between the reigns of George III and Victoria.

almost complete up to 1945). THE ANNEXE This building has four walls but no

ACQUISITIONS

RECORDS

roof at the moment. Its main showcase, made to our own design and measuring

The major items added were of course the 1927 Regimental Standard of the Royal

the

new annexe is complete we should expect

Hailsham, Sussex. which is near Eastbourne. The proprietor is an ex-Blue, Mr. John Power, and we meet on the second

Cavalry to the million tourists who visit

Horse Guards and the 1954 Guidon of the several

ex~members

of

during the past year and will be, it is hoped,

of the reign of George IV and relics of

of the Environment this year and if the to be able to report in 1974 that we are doing more to publicise the Household

including

melancholy splendour in a place of honour. By the generosity of Mrs. Betty Newman, on behalf of her late husband, Professor S. T, M. Newman, we have also acquired a rare R. H. G. Royal Cypher Standard

completed in 1974. The only gaps to be filled are, 1st and 2nd Life Guards and Horse Grenadier Guards from 1714 to 1788: The Blues from 1714 to 1749, and The Royals from 1939 to l969—(the latter

Dear Sir, I am a member of a Guardsmen‘s Club with its headquarters at the Deanland Wood Country Club at Golden Cross,

Wednesday of each month. There are at present approximately fifty members

The Floya/s Guidon and the Blues Standard laid up in The Household Cavalry Museum

the lst

Royal

Dragoons,

which

hangs

in

The library is now in all probability most unique of its kind in any

25ft. by 7ft. high is already being made.

Regimental museum in Britain. Officers records have been brought up to date

Regiment. If it is possible, I would be most

We are desperately short of 17th and 18th century relics of The Royals but hope to get assistance from National museums.

Queen Victoria visited the Spital or (as The date of the lst Life Guard Order

grateful

if

this

information

could

be

it was by now called) the Cavalry Barracks. announcing

She actually inspected the barrack blocks and the men's quarters. which she

the

Permission‘ was

renaming

‘by

lst February.

Royal

1900, but

the 2nd Life Guards and The Blues ignored condemned for “the lowness of the ceilings

which were much too low for healthful ventilation”.

If

anyone

could

make

the

Barrack Office ‘move‘ it seems to have been Queen Victoria. The phenomenal amount of £30,000 was spent on rebuilding the new barracks (exactly on the site of

the old buildings) and the programme was

this impertinence and continued to head orders and correspondence from ‘Cavalry Barracks” when they were at Windsor. In 1922 the 2nd Life Guards amalgamated with the lst, but The Blues still continued to call the barracks by its old name.

included

in

Regimental

your

next

Magazine.

copy with

of a

the

special

invitation to all ex-members in the area to come along and join us, where they will be made most welcome. J. S. Williams

THE

To The Editor: Yeomans. Sandpitts Lane.

PARKER GALLERY

PENN. Bucks. Founded 1750

Dear Sir. completed in 1870. It was during this period that the prehistoric animal remains were found.

Between 1953 and 1963 the barracks we now occupy was built in phases. The lawn disappeared first and became the Square, the Troopers Dining Hall replaced

The 1870 barrack blocks were much

the old Officers House which was rebuilt

higher. Stables were on the ground floor and the two upper floors were connected

on the southern end of eight acres of land once called the Barrack Field, which had been added to the original 16 acres in 1903, by purchase from the Bulkeley family.

by iron verandahs as a fire precaution. But the new barrack rooms measured 12 feet by 40 feet and the ceilings were 16 feet 8 inches high. I must add that the Bourne Ditch still supplied the water and the rooms were still candlelit. The men cooked their own rations (11b. bread. %lb. beef or mutton and 11b. of either cabbage or

poiatoes~but not the latter both together). A canteen for the men was built on the site of the present museum and 35 married quarters were built along the line of the present RHQ to the NAAFI Shop. A new riding school was built in 1881

and is now all that remains of the old 32

I thought I would draw your attention to the fact that at the Guidon Parade at Windsor in 1972 I and ex~Cpl V. Tompkins

2 ALBEMARLE STREET PICCADILLY LONDON, WIX 3HF

were the only two ‘on parade’ who were members of The Blues Squadron of the Composite Regiment that landed in France on

one

Telephone: 01-499 5906/7

16th August. 1914. Furthermore I was

of

the

mounted

sentries

at

Horse

Guards on the day war was declared on The Main Gate of George Ills old Spital Barracks (1804-1870) became once

Germany (4th August, 1914).

again

44

the

Main

Gate

and

the

name

‘Combermere Barracks‘ went up on the wall

Specialists in Military Prints, Water Colours, Paintings, etc. Also in Sporting, Marine and

I am particularly proud to have served years on the Committee of our

by the gate, so in the end the lst Life

Comrades Association which I believe to be a record. This was with the break of a

Guards triumphed. But. be it Cavalry, Spital or Combermere Barracks. it has never been occupied by any other

year when the two senior members retired. I was then re-elected at the following AGM and served until my final retirement, The

ROYAL HORSE GUARDS (THE BLUES)

Regiments

Cavalry

Secretary sent me a charming letter after

Signed and Dated H. J. Partridge 1891

when the Kings posted here to

my final request not to he considered for renomination due to health reasons.

than

the

Household

except once. That was Dragoon Guards was

replace

the

lst

Life

Guards

alleged to have mutinied in

who

1892.

were

Ernest W, Wilkins.

Formerly SCM The Blues.

Topographical Pictures and

OIL PAINTING ON CANVAS 28" x 36”

Cleaning and Restoration of All Types


Lawrence Dundas, lst Marquess of Zetland (1892) was commissioned 2nd Lieutenant into the Royal Horse Guards

The

THE BLUES and ROYALS

on 31st August, 1866. He retired 29th May, 1872.

ASSOCIATION

Shortly before his retirement from the

Regiment he is said to have been asked by

ZETLAND TROPHY

ANNUAL REPORT 1972

his fellow Subalterns at dinner one evening, ‘what he intended to give as a ‘leaving

present‘. The reply it is claimed, was ‘0. Membership

Applications for tickets on the enclosed

The Blues and Royals Club The Annual Dinner will take place at Hyde Park Hotel on Tuesday, 5th June,

I don‘t know. Why don‘t you go out and The Membership of the Association is

order something and send me the bill.’ The result was the Zetland Trophy and the bill, from Hunt and Roskell was

now: Oflicers

Mark is for 1874 and one takes it that two years of labour was required to produce it. The quadrangular base. which is richly ornamented with military trophies and the Royal arms at the angles. supports at each corner an equestrian statuette. and these figures represent an officer of the regiment, a trumpeter, a private. and a trooper, time

of Charles 11. Above this base rises a square pedestal. bearing in relief an inscription showing the names of the principal battles in which the Royal Horse Guards have been engaged. the Royal

Arms and the arms of the Earl of Zetland. From the pedestal springs a column. decorated with a representation, in alto-relieve. of the final charge of the Guards at Waterloo, and bearing on its

summit the figure of Mars. Grouped around the column are the four standards of the regiment, decorated respectively with

The annual subscription of 37p is now due. Please complete the enclosed proforma. (Life Members do not pay this subscription). Addresses

All Members are reminded that it is their responsibility to keep the Hon. Secretary informed of any change of address.

be

John,

This will be held in the WOs and on Saturday, 5th May, 1973. All members are entitled and encouraged to attend. The Agenda will be:

1.

held on 6th May,

On

three occasions he

received

the

much coveted Colonelcy and twice resigned. He also took the appointments of Master

Committee. (21) Under

London, SW1.

Rule

13

the

members of the Committee due to resign: 1. Mr. J. Hammond.

are

PRl Shop Ties, Blazer Badges, Car Badges and Ash Trays can be supplied on application.

Assemble at 10.50 a.m. on Regimental Marker in Broad Walk East. The Association Banner will head the contingent. Members to ensure a

large turnout.

Hyde Park Barracks.

ASSOCIATION REPORT FOR 1972 The year 1972 has been a busy and also an historic year for the Association with the Annual Dinner, the Combined

Annual Reunion Cavalry Parade and the Service in

Details of the Annual Reunion will be the subject of a separate letter in due course. Queen’s Birthday Parade

following

Anyone interested contact Mr. A. C. Millin, 92 Southcoast Road. Peacehaven, Sussex. (Tel: 07-914 4140).

Service will be held in Hyde Park on Sunday, 6th May, 1973. Dress: Lounge Suit (Overcoats). Medals will be worn.

requested

Sec-

Association Visit to Zanvoorde

The Combined Cavalry Old Comrades’

are

the Joint Hon.

retaries. Price 13p.

An extremely limited

number of free

tickets for this Parade on Saturday. 2nd June. 1973 and for the Final Rehearsal on Saturday, 26th May. 1973, are normally available to the Association. The majority

of tickets are for the Inner Line of Sentries (standing). ledged.

Applications

Hyde

Park. Presentation of a new Guidon to the Regiment. Laying up of the old Standard and Guidon combined with ‘At Home‘ Day. and the Field of Remembrance Service at Westminster Abbey.

are

not

Annual Dinner, 6th May, 1972

This was held in the Other Ranks Dining Room at the new barracks at Hyde Park. A total of 265 attended which included eight official guests. After the

acknowdinner a proforma was sent to all members

2. Mr. G. Hayward MM. In accordance with Rule 13 the undermentioned members of the

Field of Remembrance

Association are recommended by the Committee to be appointed

The Field of Remembrance will be opened at 12 noon on Thursday. 8th

members of the Committee: 1. Mr. B. Austin. 2. Mr. J. Clements. Mr. W. Thomas was elected by

November. 1973. Assemble in St. Margaret‘s Churchyard at 11.30 a.m. The Badge Cross will be planted by the Colonel at 11.45 a.m. Dress: Lounge Suits. Medals will not be

of the Association asking for their views on the 1973 venue and if the function should be held in an hotel or remain in barracks. The replies gave a three to one majority to holding the dinner in London and just over two to one that it should

again be held in Hyde Park Barracks and not at an hotel.

the Committee to fill a resignation

worn.

vacancy. To be confirmed under Rule 14.

Christmas Cards

May

NB.

Members requiring The Blues and Royals Card should order through: PR1.

Service was held in Hyde Park on Sunday,

Combined Cavalry Parade and Service, 7th

We are very grateful to Lieutenant Colonel R. North who has compiled a bibliography of The Blues and Royals, the foreword

General of the Ordinance and Commander— in-Chief of the forces in Southern England. Advance orders may be placed through your local bookseller or may be sent to the Author: Mrs. Patricia Dickson 119 Ebury Street BELGRAVlA

available from

be

1972.

Confirmation of the Accounts for year ending 3lst December. 1972.

Duke of Argyll and lst Duke of Greenwich (1680-1743) whose Biography—under the title—‘Red John of the Battles’ is shortly to appear.

Minutes of the Annual General Meeting Points arising from these minutes.

EXAMPLE & PRECEDENT

2nd

at the door. As usual no ladies will admitted to the Gymnasium Bar.

NCOs Mess Hyde Park Barracks, at 6 p.m.

and the Silversmith gave the horses ‘jowl plumes’ which were worn only by trumpeters horses at that time.

described

Association Badge Lapel badges for the Association are

After the Parade, Members will be welcome with the Household Cavalry Regiment at

Annual General Meeting

‘A remarkable Colonel of “The Blues' may

Tickets will be issued on a first come first served basis and no tickets will be on sale

Cavalry Memorial Service

NOTICE Thus

1973. Black Tie. 7.30 for 8.15 p.m. Major E. A. Calvert in the Chair.

Subscriptions (Annual Members only)

figures are carrying infantry pattern swords .- ..,.-.-

1022 622 46

2076

the rose, shamrock and thistle, the Royal arms, and the initials RHG. The total height of this fine piece is thirty six inches, the base being twenty four inches in width. It has only two errors in design. The

Theuietland Trophy

386

Life Members Life Members (Serving) Annual Members

for two thousand guineas. The London Hall

proforma to the Hon. Secretary by Saturday, ZIst April, 1973. Tickets will be limited to one per member and an overall number of 260. There will be no guests.

of

which

is

reproduced

below.

The Bibliography will be held by the Household Cavalry Museum entirely for anyone who wishes to make use of it. “History has of any operation form of military measure on the

shown that the conduct of war or, indeed, any activity depends in great recorded experience and

precedents afforded by previous examples.

These are both a guide and an inspiration. This Bibliography, to some degree selective. is an attempt to show the extent to which the practice of recording history

has been carried out rclative to The Blues and Royals.

Under Rule 13 two members

of the Association may forward names for consideration by AGM. Names to Hon. Sec. at least six weeks before AGM. 5.

The Blues and Royals. Barracks. Windsor. Berks. Notices 1.

l HCR Dining Club

7th May. and the Salute was taken by the Colonel of the Regiment. Field Marshal Sir Gerald Templer. It is gratifying to have to record that

our Association was the second strongest

Any other business. The

The compiler acknowledges with gratitude the loan of material by Mr. D. W. King, Librarian MOD, Major C. W. .1.

Combermere

The Forty Eighth Annual Parade and

Annual Dinner The Annual Dinner will be held at

Lewis. and SCM C. W. Frcarson. Household

Hyde Park Barracks at 7 p.m. on Saturday. 5th May. 1973. Dress: Lounge Suit. No

Cavalry Museum.“

decorations. Bars will be open at 6 pm.

Twenty-seventh

Annual

Dinner

association on the Parade. and it is hoped

will be held in London on Saturday.

that this trend will continue.

27th October. 1973. All enquiries to: Mr. A. Quincy (Assistant Hon. Secretary). 54 Francis Avenue. llford. Essex. (Tel: 01—478 34521.

Parade most members adjourned to the Hyde Park Barracks where bars had been

After the

laid out in the various messes and in the Gymnasium.


into

the

church,

let

of the Regimental Association from the Oliver Montagu Fund. There are however ii i

i

i

ini i i

It

is

strongly

recommended

as

an

ideal home for any pensioner at present living on his own. i

«_

W i

Regiment, and then the Standard and the

Guidon

were

handed

over

to

Colonel

Baillie, who is Chairman of the Museum.

and taken off for safe keeping. With the Parade complete

members

then proceeded for an excellent lunch which

had been provided by the Master Cook and his staff. The number of luncheons served that day totalled 1642. the

afternoon

various

side

take

this

opportunity

of

thanking

Mr.

Edwards and Mr. Cole-Evans for the excellent film they produced that day which had been taken at the Guidon Parade. The only complaint heard was the

fact that it was impossible to meet everyone

Sir Gerald The regimental association marching passed the Gold Stick, Field Marshal Temp/er during the laying up 0/ the Royals Gutdon

Miscellaneous Receipts

Annual Report and Magazme: Cost of Magazme Less: Sales

Auditors‘ Remuneration Printing, Stationery and Postage Miscellaneous Expenses Reunions. Wreaths. etc. less

Chartered Accountants.

HOGG, BULLIMORE, GUNDRY & Co.

£2.300.42

£646.76 285.75 V

,

w \l

during the day due to the numbers present.

REPRESENTED BY ACCUMULATED FUND

During

shows and exhibitions were given including a mounted sports period by the Mounted Squadron. In addition films were shown for those interested, and we should like to

them with the Book and Vouchers of the Association and certify them to be in accordance therewith.

getting

4‘ AUDITORS’ RI I’ORT TO THE MEMBERS OF THE BLUES AND ROYALS ASSOCIATION

in

£2.701.85

assisted from that fund and if not a member difficulty

alone finding a seat. After the Service the Regiment formed up outside and were then joined with a party from the Association under command of Colonel Hopkinson. Everyone remarked on the strength of this party. On arrival back at the Barracks the salute was taken by the Colonel of the

£3,780.74

Pirbright, marched to Holy Trinity Church

with the Band. The Church was packed to capacity and late arrivals found great

EXPENDITURE Grants and Assistance to Members Subscriptions and Donations Annual Dinner: Cost of Dinner Less: Sale of Tickets

in Combermere Barracks for this ceremony.

It was also considered that this would be an ideal time to have an ‘At Home’ Day at Windsor. The Regiment, together with a party of recruits and junior troopers from

£l.270.40 1.424 19 7.26

normal pension or a service disability pension. At present the Regiment has two members of the Chelsea Pensioners and there may be others who would like to enter. Anyone requiring further information about this should apply to the Honorary Secretary of the Blues and Royals Association at Windsor and this will be given. Arrangements if necessary can also be made for a visit to The Royal Hospital and to talk to our two members.

£2,400.16 1,375.29 5.29

for anyone who is in receipt of a service

Subscriptions and Donations Dividends on Investments (Gross) Badges, Ties, etc.

to

INCOME

assist

serving Officers, Warrant Officers. Non— commissioned Officers and Troopers of The Blues and Royals and their dependants in need of assistance and former Officers, Warrant Ofi‘icers, Non—commisioned Officers and Troopers and their dependants of The Blues and Royals, The Royal Horse Guards and The Royal Dragoons who are in need of assistance. Loans are not made from the fund. As far as possible if the person requiring assistance is a member of The Regimental Association they are normally

It was arranged that the old Standard

and Guidon should be laid up in the Household Cavalry Museum at Windsor on 15th October, thus enabling as many serving members as possible to be based

. v INCOM L i4 ND f1 XP ’NDITUR 1] ACCOUNT for [he your clulod 318! D l ClJMBER 1 9 72

is

to a re-building programme there are vacancies at The Royal Hospital in Chelsea

£40,007: 1971 £33,132)

Fund

Information has been received that due

place the

NET ASSETS

The object of the

took

INVESTMENTS

When the amalgamation two funds were merged,

THE ROYAL HOSPITALH-CHELSEA

Royals.

Major A. J. Dickinson.

by The

Colonel The Honourable Julian Berry.

organised

HON. SECRETARY

Fund

Telephone: Windsor 61391. ext. 20.

24,544 (1971 23,641) Shares in United Services Trustees, Combined Charitable Fund at cost 31st (Valuation at October 1972

Royals

HON. TREASURER

careful consideration' Hon. Sec. The Blues and Oliver Montagu Fund, Combermere Barracks,

Auditors' Remuneration

Aid

£29.32 1.25

Total ...... £443 Cases should be reported to the following and each case is given the most

Windsor, Berks, SL4 3DN.

THE BLUES AND ROYALS OLIVER MONTAGU FUND This Fund was originally the Oliver Montagu Fund belonging to The Blues and the

LAYING UP OF STANDARD AND GUIDON COMBINED WITH ‘AT HOME’ DAY, 15th OCTOBER, 1972

been

LESS: CURRENT LIABILITIES

Regiment to ensure that refreshment tents

were on hand where members could meet before and after the parade. The attendance of Association members at this parade was most satisfying.

hare

f29.321.25

as those who were presented. It was not possible for members of the Association to return to Combermere Barracks but care was taken by the

refunds

£31,019 34

thoroughly enjoyed this occasion as much

sum

City Gate House, 39-45 Finsbury Square, London, EC2A lQP.

Regimental Association ...... £118

this

We have examined the annexed Balance Sheet as at 3lst December, 1972. together with the Income and Expenditure Account for the year ended on that date and compared

This letter would not be complete without taking the opportunity of thanking all members of the serving regiment for all their help and hospitality over the year. Despite their various operational commitments they have done their utmost to ensure that our comfort and well being have been carefully considered.

Of

£1 ,69809

received— Army Benevolent Fund ...... £325

N.B.

EXCESS OF INCOME OVER EXPENDITURE for the year

until after Her Majesty The Queen Mother had inspected the plot.

£2,082.65

a total of fifty members of the Association were introduced to both Her Majesty The Queen and His Royal Highness The Duke of Edinburgh. It is obvious that they both

TOTAL EXPENDITURE

Total aid granted ............ £1,357

29,349.09

Cases refused

(C)

The weather was dry but rather cold, but

£31,019.34

Total cases dealt with

(b)

£1,720.25

(a)

armoured squadrons were extremely high. After the presentation of the Guidon

this did not deter members from remaining

7

given as under:

Stock—in-hand Members Badges at cost Cash at Bank Cash in Hand

Association attended this Service and we were again honoured by the Colonel of the Regiment planting the Regimental Cross.

1972 the following

cases have been considered and assistance

CURRENT ASSETS

the

2 7.849. 1

During the year

from

£28 919 82

party

£29,321 25

representative

Balance at lst January, 1972 Excess of Income over Expenditure for the year

in every possible way. We could not have

had better weather. The turnout and drill of the Mounted Squadron and the two

A

special cases when they also receive assistance from the Oliver Montagu Fund.

DECEMBER 31s! 1972

Those who attended this parade will agree that this was a very excellent Parade

FIELD OF REMEMBRANCE— WESTMINSTER ABBEY— 9th NOVEMBER

BALANCE SIIEE T

14th July

THE BLUES & ROYALS ASSOCIATION

Presentation of a new Guidon—Windsor—

36


THE BLUES AND ROYALS ASSSOCIATION OBITUARIES

Major P. G. Thin MC

Lady Makins

by Lieutenant Colonel P. B. Fielden MC Formerly The Royal Dragoons

by The Hon. Mrs. M. Freeman Thomas

Brigadier S. C. Dumbreck of India. He returned to regimental duties

Major A. R. Cook Capt D. A. Crewdson Lady E. Makins The Earl of Sefton

in 1927 and retired to the Reserve in 1930. He rejoined the Regiment at the beginning of the Second World War during

Major P. G. Thin. MC

which. owing to age and seniority. he served in this country. During his service he held the respect and affection of

304411

G. Fox 92 Beckford Road

His

183 London Road Boston. Lines. A. J. Duke 76 Pendle Road

loyalty.

in—Waiting to Edward VIII at the time of

his friend he would support you through

15. 8.72

have ever seen. He was a law unto himself. and could be awe-inspiring to those around

Southampton.

him.

S. J. Oxford 5.72 C. White 12.71 I. Hankin 6.72 H. Buckby 31. 3.72 Ste 8-1255 Comox Street Vancouver 5 BC. A. Axworthy 1.72

his life. He had more personality than any man I knew and was the best looking man I

A fine and efficient regimental soldier. he earned the respect and affection of all

ranks

in

his

command.

To

a

calm

great tonic to others, particularly in a tight situation. Keen on games, in early years he often represented the Regiment at

the death of Brigadier ‘Bones‘ Dumbreck in June, 1972, with great regret. Joining the Royals from Sandhurst early in 1915 he served in France during the First World

Association football and played cricket for them on several occasions.

War. Later, after a period as Adjutant, he

time before his death. Our sympathies are

rose to become a Squadron Leader. Having

extended to his wife and family.

Brigade Major of the 2nd Cavalry Brigade

Major the Earl of Sefton

early in 1935, and after that the remainder

Late Royal Horse Guards (The Blues) By Lieutenant Colonel

the Middle East. His last appointments were on Civil Affairs both in the Middle the

United

Kingdom,

when

he

he retired

was

reserved,

but

when

that

up his face. amusing and

He suffered a great loss in his youth. His younger brother, to whom he was very close. was killed as a Midshipman in HMS Lion at the battle of Jutland. Thereafter he was left rather a lonely boy and drifted to older people for friendship. He was essentially a traditionalist. His

family in direct line had held the land of Altcar for the Waterloo Cup and Aintree for the Grand National, since the 12th Century. Though he never won the Grand National, he did win the Waterloo Cup a

few years before his death.

He had been in failing health for some

passed through the Staff College he became

during 1942 and later became Second in Command of the 8th Armoured Brigade in

He

attractive smile lightened nobody could be more convivial than he.

Brigadier S. C. Dumbreck

There will still be a great many old

of his service was spent in a variety of staff appointments, and during the Second World War commands outside the Regiment. He was promoted Lieutenant Colonel at the end of 1941 while acting as 6501 of the 42nd Division. He commanded the 45th Battalion Royal Tank Regiment at Alamein

Major P. G. Thin, MC

Peter Gordon Thin died from a sudden heart attack in his own home on 7th December,

to follow what he considered to be the right course. Gifted with a very good sense of humour, his hearty laugh was a

Royals who will have seen the report of

ceremonies that have taken place since then. Lady Makins was a grand old lady: she will be greatly missed by her many friends. both old and young.

thick and thin. No one will ever know, for he would never let it be known, the number of ‘lame dogs” he supported and to whom he gave infinite pleasure during

L/Cpl K. Chillingworth 14. 6.72 Northern Ireland. F. Capps 31. 5.72 121 Broughton Green Road Northampton. V. J. Ives 28. 4.72 139 Osborne Road

was promoted Brigadier, and from the Service in July, 1946.

She took a great interest in the amalgamation of The Blues and Royals and it was sad that, owing to increasing age, she was unable to attend the various

wilderness. He was the same with lesser fry. If you were fortunate enough to be

Brigadier Sutherland Campbell Dumbreck by Colonel R. C. G. Joy DSO Formerly The Royal Dragoons

38

was

his abdication and followed him into the

temperament was allied great determination

East and

quality

With Hugh once a friend, always a friend. He was a great personal friend and Lord-

Streatham, SW16.

390609 304267 23726847

outstanding

Ernest house RegiErnest made

Square, where she continued to welcome members of the Regiment, their wives and children. and was never happier than when talking about the past and present doings of the Regiment.

R. Saunders 29 High Street Waddesdon Aylesbury, Bucks. W. Falkinder Sunnymede

and a

room for it and shared his enthusiasm for the collection. After Sir Ernest died in 1959 she moved to a smaller house in Chelsea

everybody who had the good fortune to serve with him.

Croydon.

With the death of Lady Makins last year the Royals lost a great friend staunch supporter of the Regiment. She was so proud when Sir was made Colonel. The walls of the at Queensgate were crowded with mental pictures, but every time Sir appeared with yet another one she

He was a pillar of racing. a Steward of the Jockey Club for many years. yet he never had the lucky ownership which he deserved. He was also joint master of the Cottesmore between the Wars, and Lord Mayor of Liverpool in 1944.

Sir Richard Cotterell Bt CBE

There

goes

Hugh,

one

of

the

most

Formerly Royal Horse Guards (The Blues)

remarkable and lovable men I ever knew.

Hugh Sefton died at the age of 73 on 13th April, 1972, after a long illness. I feel very diffident about writing this note

The tragedy is that the long tradition

about him because. although I knew him

so

as a brother officer and in private life as

to inherit.

well as anyone. he was not an easy person to describe. He joined The Blues towards

the end of the First World War and served in

France.

During

the

Twenties

he

was

ADC to the Governor-General of Canada. the GOC Madras District and the Viceroy

of

service and leadership of the Molyneux family now comes to an end. There is, far as

is

known.

no

male

All our sympathy goes to

Molyncux

Foxey. his

widow. who helped him so ably over the last thirty years to carry on all the best traditions of the Molyneux family, Reproduced by kind permission of the Editor of the Guards Magazine.

1972,

shortly

after

returning

from a day's shooting with John, son of his

first

Commanding

Officer,

the

late

Reggie Heyworth. He was 60. Peter joined The Royals in Palestine and in June, 1941, when the Regiment, after conversion to armoured cars, moved into the Western desert, he was commanding a Troop. During the next two years the Regiment achieved a reputation that has ever since been a constant source of pride.

There is little doubt that the Troop Leaders at that time, finding unique responsibilities in desert warfare, contributed in no small measure to the place of honour won for the grey beret. For gallantry during this

period

Peter

was

awarded

the

Military

Cross and was Mentioned in Dispatches. Later in Italy and North-West Europe he was able to capitalise on the experience gained in the Desert, when he successfully commanded an Armoured Car Squadron. In 1962 Peter became a racecourse

starter.

By a

mixture of fairmindedness

and firmness he quickly established an ideal relationship with the jockeys and by June 1972. when he was appointed Senior Starter to The Jockey Club, he had earned the respect and friendship of countless men and women involved in racing throughout the country. All members of the

Association

will

wish to extend their sympathy to his widow. Susan. their son. Christopher, and their daughter, Camilla. Their loss can only be partly compensated by memories of great happiness and inspiration such as it is given to few in this life to invoke.


NOMINAL ROLL as at 3Ist December 1972 REGIMENTAL HEADQUARTERS

5th Troop

Lt Col J. A. C. G. Eyre Captain E. N. Brooksbank

A SQUADRON

Lt A. S. Lukas CoH O'Halloran, D. A. L/CoH Rumbelow, H. W. L/CoH Smaldon. L. A. L/Cpl Wasp, G.

Squadron Headquarters Troop

Administration Troop

Major J. H. Pitman RCM Lane, B.

Major J. D. Smith-Bingham Captain J. W. S. Lewis SCM Stephenson, A. CoH Adams, K. L/CoH Triggs, J. L/CoH Haine, M. L/CoH Docherty, J. L/Cpl ReId, P.

L/Cpl Price, B.

L/Cpl Mead, R. L/Cpl Smith, A. L/Cpl Brown, D. L/Cpl Mazurkiewitz. J. L/Cpl Haley, C Tpr Wright, J. Tpr Gambrell, R.

1st Troop Lieut M. A. Corry-ReId CoH Scammell, J L/CoH Cousins, P. L/CoH Garrett, J. L/Cpl Cooper. J.

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Redman, G. Atexandrou, P. Patrick, W. Johnson, S. Hall, L.

2nd Troop Ct N. C. J. Scott CoH Villers. L. L/CoH Smith, D. L/Cpl Butler, J. L/Cpl Gillingham, S.

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Buckman, N. Gulley, N. Harding, D. Whittaker, A. Guest

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Palmer, I. Stewart. 8. Shaw, I Mowbray, P.

Tpr Tpr Tor Tpr Tpr

Herratt, C. Bunting, C. Simpson, C. Bowhay, D. Fawkes, W.

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

SQMC Weeks, L/CoH Wootlard, R. L/Cpl Kempster; I. K. L/Cpl White, M. J.

Pugh, M. H. Barratt. A, L. Hulme, P. J. Anyon

Tpr Gardiner, R. L. Tpr Murnan, D. Tpr Munson. A. V.

MT Troop CoH Stevenson, D. L/CoH Robinson, D. L/CoH Pentilh, T. L/Cpl Gregory, J. Tpr Dempsey, J. Tpr Quinn, J. Tpr Appleyard. I.

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

McKenzie, A. Humberstone. A. P. Cooke, L. Perkins, P. Featherstone, A. C. Hyndman, W. T.

Officers Mess

CoH Patterson, M. L/CoH Harris, D. L/CoH Lyons, T. L/Cpl Gellatly, W.

Tpr Lee, S. B. Tpr Windrass, R.

WOs & CoHs Mess L/CoH Williams, R. J. Tpr Finlay, F. C. Tpr Dunderdale, M. T.

Tpr Leah, R. A. Tpr Moss, T. M.

L/CoH O‘Callaghzn, A. J. L/CoH Whyte, J. A.

Tpr Giblette, J. E. Tptr Bullock, R. K. Tpr Millard, W. P.

Lt L. T. de C. Messel CoH Pomroy, H. L/CoH Brown, M. L/Cpl Buckle, R. L/Cpl Grimes, F. Tpr Lloyd, R.

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tor Tpr

Seddon, J. Reid, J. Barry, C. Hilsdon. P. Tabor, B.

A1 Echelon CoH Cain, P. L/CoH Feldwick, L. L/CoH Crowley. P. L/Cpl Morley, A

Tpr Mundy, P. Tpr Hughes, D. Tpr Ayscough, F.

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

L/Cpl Doubttire, B. L/Cpl Webb, D. L/Cpl Callaghan, K.

Beynon, K. Whiting, B. Ellis, K. Hibbert, S.

S/Sgt Davies, J. Sgt Hook, M. L/Sgt Fazakerley. S. L/Sgt Whittle, A. L/Cpl Inder, A. L/Cpl Barnes, M.

L/Cpl Smurthwaite. W. L/Cpl Forsdike, B. Cfn Tring. J. Cfn Graves, P. Cfn Umpleby, B.

L/CoH Freeman, E. S. P.

AOMS Chequer, D. J. Sgt Dale, A. Green, N. Tollan, H. Wildman, K. J. Bittles, D.

L/Cpl Eccleston, A. W. Cfn Bennett, R. T. Cfn Burton, S. Cfn Carter: T. J. Cfn Marks, A. C.

OM

Norton, A. Mulgrove, F. Hopkins, J. O. Pte Francis, P. J.

Pte Marsden, K. Pte Scott, I. G. Pte Wyllie, I. A.

RAPC

L/Cpl Wilkinson, B. D. L/Cpl Storer, P. B. L/Cpl Chamberlain D. A. Tpr Hulland. . A. Tpr Miller, G. T. Tpr Tucker, R. M. Tpr Murrow. F. A.

Tpr Blake, G. G. Tpr Sackett, N. P. Tpr Wendon, H.

Major B. J. Lockhart Captain A. N. D. Bots SCM Hunter, J. R. CoH Pinks, M. J. CoH Sproats, R. J. L/CoH Elmslie, I. L/CoH Morris, W.

L/Cpl Guy, N. M. L/Cpl Brady, A. Tpr Shell, J, J. Tpr Meredith, L. T. Tpr McLuckie, A. W. Tpr Davies, D. J. Tptr Davidson. J. Tptr Hempseed, R.

Lt A. J. T. Carter Ct A. J. S. Bagge CoH Stubley. I. L/CoH Williams, B.

L/Cpl Fuller. J.

L/Cpl Marshall, J. Tpr Tuckwood, A. R. Tpr Savage, |. Tpr Caley, P. J. Tpr Oilin, M. D.

L/Cpl Padgett, J.

2nd Troop Lt The Hon. M. S. A. Agar CoH Melbourne, D. W. L/CoH ReId, H. L/CoH Muff, E. L/Cpl Chaloner, G. H.

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Scarrott. J. P. Byrne, D. J. Walsh, N. Evans. B. R. Porterfield, A.

3rd Troop

fst Troop Ct M. H. Lingeman CoH Martin, M. A. L/CoH Stacey, M. B. L/CoH Smith, T. J.

Tpr Tpr Tor Tpr

James, G. R. Rushton. D. M. Tonks, R. P. Thorpe, G, J.

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Lock, M. J. Hunter, H. W. Gregory, M. R. Hartley, J. A.

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Riley, D. L. Rogers. W. Fa'rbrother, .4. J. G. P. Budden, A. E. G.

Ct S. C. De Chair CoH McKenna. D. L/CoH Benn. T. L/Cpi Stickels, J. L/Cpl Steel, P.

L/Cpl Blake. J. Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Rochford, A. Gowland, J. W. Bates, P. G. Jibson

5th Troop 2nd Troop Ct. H. St. J. Holcroff CoH Sibley, S. F. L/CoH Hill. B. B.

L/Cpl Smith, N. A. L/Cpl Young, D. P.

Ct T. B. R. Leslie-King CoH Fisk, P. L/CoH Norris, E. L/Cpl McGowan. G. M. Tpr Lampard, B. D.

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Wright, P. A. Brzozowski. S. Broderick, K. Duke. I. Peachy, R.

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Bramley, M. Steven, T. Cufhbert, M. H. Fairclough. D. A. Metcalfe, E.

CoH Howells, D. L/Cpl Salisbury. R. Tpr Arnold. A . Tor Hart. I. A. Tpr Stoddon. K. A. Tor Averill, R.

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Napier, C. M. Stretton. P. F. Fallon, D. Seddon, A.

MT Troop CoH Smith. G.

L/CoH Gibbs. o. L/Cpl Rose, C. Tpr Armishaw, P. D.

Tpr Tpr Tor Tpr

Birchall, R. Hastings, A. P. Jones, K. R. Measor, J. F.

LAD Captain A. G. Flatt ASM Guthrie, W. S/Sgt Althorp, C. B. S/Sgt Milne, J. M. Sgt Watkins, D. T. Sgt Pratt, K. G. W. Sgt Lewis, K. G. L/Sgt Ramsden, E. W. L/Sgt Truluck

Cpl Barker, 5. A. Hartley, G. Howltt, J. Love, R. Masters, T. L. McKeen, W. R. Buxton, C. Cfn Lockyer, P. D. Cfn Pienaar. R. J. Cfn Smith, V.

HEADQUARTERS SQUADRON THE HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY REGIMENT RHQ Captain R. C. Wilkinson RCM Cla. k, D.

0R S/Cpl Desborough, J. A. L/CoH ChiIIIngworth, G. D.

SHQ Captain R. N. O. Couper L/CoH France. A. G. L/CoH McWilIiams, J, S. Tpr Grafton, A. E. Tpr Pike, P. M.

L/CoH Staveley, T. N. Tpr Winstone, B. C Tpr Miller, G. E. Tpr Aindow, R. J.

Equitation Staff L/Cpl Tompkins, S. F. L/Cpl French, C. J. Tpr Cotter, R. C. Tpr Power, P. D. Tpr Goodwin, E. J.

L/CoH MacGregor, J. S. L/Cpl Johnson, L. S.

L/CoH O’Dwyer, J. A. L/CoH Law, K.

L/CoH White, R. A.

L/Cpl Maddams. R. J. Tpr Hague, S. R

Quartermaster‘s Department Captain (QM) W. A. Stringer CoH Murfagh, M. J. L/CoH Mansfield, R, L/Cpl Lazenby, R. M.

L/CoH Lloyd, c. u.

Medical Centre

L/Cpl Hafherall, B. S. Cpl Craig, A. J. L/Cpl Copsey. R. J. Tpr Juchua, M. A. Tpr Russell, L. G.

L/CoH MacKenzie, I.

L/Cpl Thompson, P. Tpr Boardman, K. J. Tpr Waterman, D. E. Tpr Pitman, T. N. Tpr True, L. A.

Pharmacy FOMC Woodman, E. J.

Provost Staff L/CoH Westwood, M. J.

L/CoH George, G. (LG)

NCOs Mess

L/Cpl Stalnsby, D. J. L/Cpl Gimblett, K. L/Cpl Blomquist, I. R. Tpr Marrloft, A. D.

Tpr Ogilvie, T. B.

Tpr Fletcher, S Tpr Latfan, M. J.

Regimental Barber L/CoH Fisher, J. E. P.

Gymnasium L/CoH Arnold, E. G.

Tpr Nixon, R. J. Tpr Golding- Bosworth Tpr Reeks, G. J.

Holdees Lt Col D. J. Daly Malor H. 0. HughSmith SCM Frearson, C. W.

SCM Mackay, J. CoH Shearn. CoH Smart, R. E.

MT S/Cpl Hunt, C. W. M., B.E.M., L/CoH Gregory. D. L/CoH Young, D. L/Cpl Eastwood. P. L/Cpi Godding, D L/Cpl Prltchett, .I L/Cpl Ford, M. J. L/Cpl Toney, J. Tpr Finnis, J. F.

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tor Tor Tpr Tpr Tpr

Bird, P. Graves, T, J. Houghton, D. Lanchesfer. N. E. Rickefts. H. R. Scannell, T. J. Dearden, J. P. Hewitt, J. W.

RHO Troop Captain I. M. D. L. Weston

S/Cpl HIII, M. J. L/CoH Shaw, S. M. L/CoH Wall, B. G. L/Cpl Howard, J. L/Cpl Pearce, D. J.

L/Cpl Oulnn. T. J. L/Cpl Manning. M. J. Tor Brown. J. H. Tpr Gray, R. E. Tpr Shakespeare, T. H. Tpr Rees, M. A

WOs & CoHs Mess CoH Williams. R. T. L/Cpl Maskell, P. M. L/Cpl Mellor, D. Tor Birch, L.

Tpr Ikins, T. R. Tpr Thompson, E. J. Tpr Davidson, T. W. T.

Officers Mess S/Cpl Harty, J. L.

L/CoH Black. I. L/Cpl Henchlon, M. L/Cpl Sedgwick. G. G. L/Cpl Grocott, G. S.

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Hinton, J. G. Lloyd, M. W. Manners, D. Miller, D. G. Harris, R.

Orderly Room ORQMC Vales, R. B. OR CoH Lee, P. A. L/CoH Weston, A. J.

L/CoH Back. R. Tpr Reeve, A. D, Tpr Wainwright, J. H.

Post NCO

THE BLUES AND ROYALS SQUADRON HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY REGIMENT SHQ Major T. C. Morris Captain H. W. Davies SCM Doxey, A. SOMC Sellars, J. W. CoH Marchington, L. J. L/CoH Warren, W. J. L/CoH Henderson, C. P. L/CoH Lees, C. A.

L/CoH Smith, B. L/CoH Twlnn, M. J. L/Cpl Church, M. T. L/Cpl Henesy, M. J. L/Cpl Gowling. K. Tor Hows, J. V. Tpr Williams, M. Tpr O'Gorman. P. W. P. Tpr Bourne, N. W. Tpr Gardner, P. Tpr Bowden, D. J. Tpr Foley, S. E.

Recruiting CoH Norman, E. W.

L/CoH Frampton, D. J.

L/COH Cooksey, P. D. L/CoH Freeman, K. R.

Innes. A. Reynolds, 3. J. Webb, C, J. Douglas, M. R. Rainger, C. M. Stonehewer, G. Frankland. D. McCuIIy, D. I. Fenton. J. Mitchell. J. MacGregor, P. Popple. S. Hutf, N. J. Burnham, R. L. Piwowarski, J. S. Dykes, A. Cornock, S. M. Holbrook, S. P. Coffey, J. P. R. Blackman, P. H.

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Healey, A. R. Jervis, J. M. Kelsey, J. Nicholson, M. G. Oliver, N. Panter, S. R. Stevenovlc, L. Floresco, D. Cox, T. P. Robinson, K L. F.

Tpr Drake, W. D. Tpr Goodyear, A. M.

2 Troop Tpr Harding, J

ACC W02 Hastie, J. R. Sgt Inman, D. A.

Tor Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

1 Troop Lt. C. R. Goodall CoH Belles, E. N. CoH Lawson, P. B. L/Cpl Waldron, R. V. L/Cpl Drogomlreckl L/Cpi Sldebottom Tpr Beecham, K. D.

L/CoH Kearns, B. J.

Provost

4th Troop Ct A. R. Browning CoH Burton—Johnson, H. L/CoH Carroll. W. L/Cpl Owen, R. P. Tpr Wilson, A. L.

SIIro/Malor J. P. A. Page S/Cpl Fielding, D. R. R. L/Cpl Hallows L/Cpl Anguln

L/Sgt Fllzgerald, R, J. Cpl Hedley, W. G.

T

Assault Troop

3rd Troop Lt J. P. Greenwell CoH Hughes, K. C. L/CoH Finch. P. R. L/Cpl Page, I.

L/Cpl Ashcroft, B. L/Cpl Massey, R. T. L/Cpl Hudson, D. L/Cpl Wilson, P. Cfn Booth, J. C. Cfn Scott, A. J. Cfn Wormstrup, H. Cfn Barratt. M. G.

Medical Centre

C SQUADRON

Captain I. C. Clarke S/Sgl Jones, G. F.

Sgt Ellis, F. F. Tpr Harvey, N. R. Tpr Goodman, P. J. Tpr Chiles, |. T.

QM(T) Lt J. G. Handley RQMC(T) Hunt, H. S/Cpl Macdougall, W. R. CoH Birt. R. V. L/CoH Haighton, B.

1st Troop Squadron Headquarters Troop

Major (GM) 0. M. Prlce RQMC Wood, N. L. P. CoH Clay. K. S/Cpl Wilkins, G. CoH Howick, D. A. L/CoH Taylor, K. A. L/CoH Hennessy, W. L/CoH Barrett, J. A.

Carter, 5. F. P. Scott, D. C. Malcolm, P. Jarvis McVey

RAPC

HEADQUARTERS SQUADRON

L/CoH Bond, a. T.

L/Cpl Stephenson, W.

Major A. H. Parker-Bowles Captain N. M. B. Roberts Captain R. R. Giles SCM Bell, P. G. CoH Preece, G. R. L/CoH Lane, E. L. L/CoH Maskell, W. L. L/CoH Standen, D. C. L/Cpl Evenden, R. D. L/CpI Baker. K. H. L/Cpl Murray, 8.

S/Sgt Waterman, P. J. Sgt Seear, S. Sgt Welch, J. W. Carr, J. W. Holmes. P. R. Little. A Melton, R. Whittaker. J. L/Cpl Carr, R. D.

LAD

L/CoH Phillips, c.

B SQUADRON

L/CoH Catlin, D. L/CoH Partridge, R. L/Cpl Nisbet, R. Tpr Hayward

Pte Pte Pte Pte Pte

CSMI J. Pollock L/Cpl Wischhusen, D. J. L/Cpl Claridge, D. J. L/Cpi Perry, S. L/Cpl Thomson, S. Tpr York, Tpr Johnson, K. G. Tpr Seaborne, M. A. Tpr Piper, S. Tpr Rose, D. S. Tpr Davis, J. H.

Stables

L/Cpl Stevenson, N. V.

Squadron Headquarters Troop

LAD Section

Captain H. T. Hayward Captan (QM) W. R. Marsh SQMC Greenwood, C. E. CoH La Roche, M. J. CoH Chapman, L. CoH Anslow, R. J. L/CoH Bradley, A. L/CoH McLean, S. L/CoH Wood, M. L/Cpl Bramble, D L/Cpl Edwards. G. M.

L/Cpl Conway-Lee, M. C. L/Cpl Eckhart, W. L/Cpt Tucker, A. J. Pte Buttle, D. R.

APTC

Administration Troop

Medical Centre

Tpr Rowland, W. S.

L/Sgt Vearncombe, B. J.

Sgt Cartwright G (RAPC)

RAPC L/Sgt Evans, D. L.

Major C. M. Barne W02 Rainger, P. D. SOMC Jamleson, M, S.

L/Cpl McAnuIty, R. E.

A2 Echelon SOMC Edwards, J.

L/Cpl Shaw, K. Pte Spenceley, R. J. Pte Reed,

SHQ

Squadron Bar

5th Troop

Freeman, 5. T. Broomfleld, T. Hewitt, C. M. Ducketf, R. W.

Squadron Police L/Cpl Collett, T. G. Tpr Dakers, A.

4th Troop Lt H. P. D. Massey CoH Pearce, D. L/CoH Dodsworth, R. L/Cpl Gard‘ner, T. L/Cpl Allen, R.

L/Sgt L/Sgt L/Cpl L/Cpl

LAD

L/CoH Stratford, J. Tpr Hosken, J. R. Tpr Walden, S.

Squadron Office

3rd Troop

L/Cpl Hatfield, p. A.

ACC

L/Sgt Boyce, T. L/Sgt Suffolk, M. K.

Lt P. B. Rogers CoH Bright, R. J. CoH Jones. C. E. L/CoH Griffiths. J. R. L/Cpl Currah, M. T.

L/Cpi Brammer, M. Tpr Burness, J. H. N. Tpr Burton, V. C. Tpr Dane, |. R. Tpr Davles. J. 0.


Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Gott. M. J. Higham, J. Johnstone, J. B. Protopapa. S. A.

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Tpr Burns, J

Tpr Salisbury,MK.FW. an ers

or

.

Mosley, R. G. Campbell, W. Edge. N. P. Swindlehurst, G. W.

T r Pate , M. J.

.

y

p

Tpr Milward: K. P.

RAC Centre S/Cpi Burroughs, M. G. CoH Ford. D. N S/Cpl Hayward P. M. F. CoH Livingstone, J. A. CoH Lloyd, W. J.

Lt P. R. L. Walker- Okeover CoH Clayton, J. W CoH Holt, M. L. L/CoH Lees, M. J. L/Cpl Shillabeer, M. A. L/Cpl Flude, A. J. Tpr Barber, P. E. J. Tpr Brough, G. W. Tpr Walker, S. Tpr Roberts, P. J. Tpr Bubear, A. J. Tpr Plank, A.

Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr Tpr

Edwards, A. J. Frew, J. L. Hobson. D.

CoH Idle, B. M. L/CoH Ayres, C. E. L/CoH Thornton, A. P. Tpr , . Tpr . . Tpr . Tpr . . Tpr Moore, R. D. Tpr Morrison

Tpr Claws, J. A. CoH Desborough. W. c. CoH Jones, N. W.

. . Toghill. C. T. Vasey, M. A. Youdate, R. G. Pitt, C. J. Grun, A. C. F. Hyett, S. P.

Established 1865

Tpr Perrin, S. P. Tpr Sangster, S. Tpr Wilde, G. E. Tpr Railton. D. (952) Tpr. Railton, D. M. (470) Tpr Cready Tpr Ward CoH Garvey. J.

Tpr Gouldlng-Bosworth, M.

SHIRTMAKERS AND HOSIERS

MV 8: EE Tpr Curtis, A. (K) S/Cpl Robson, P. (K)

RCM Tucker, T. w. (A)

Recruiters CoH Friend, E. (Preston) CoH Hooper, G. (Manchester) CoH Whitworth. B. (Wolverhampton)

CoH McEvoy. J (Surblton) CoH Sampson, w. H. (Newcastle-Upon-Tyne)

INCORPORATING

ROMC Martin, K. E.

Poulson Skone

Army Air Corps S/Cpl Baylay, D. N. CoH Cox. B. R. S/Cpl Denny, J. E.

L/Cpl Mills, K. 0. Tpr Smith, I. E.

& Co.

JLR (RAC) S/Cpl Hales. N. J. CoH Tucker. J. R.

BLUES AND ROYALS AT THE GUARDS DEPOT

RAC Training Depot

HCTS

CoH Cook, K. L/CoH Cummings. G. J. L/Cpl Auker-Howiett. A. Tpr Wells. G. Tpr Gilbert, L. C. Tpr Gurdin, M. T.

OROMC Wenneli. D. J. SCM Story. J. E.

BESPOKE HUNTING AND SERVICE BOOTS

RMCS RCM Clarke, J. A.

2 ADS (RAC) S/Cpl Cox, W. G.

7 CTT

Junior Guardsman‘ 5 Wing

AND

CoH Davis, J. L/Cpl Maioney, J. L/Cpl Dalziei, J. L/CoH Fox, G. L/CoH Thompson, G. L/CoH Timmis, R. L/Cpl McGinley, G. L/Cpl Harkness. P. Tpr Watson, J. Tpr Sutherland. J.

UK Sp Unit SHAPE L/Cpl Kennard, S. D. A.

CoH Proctor. B. E.

J. Gene of Eton

Berlin Int Bde CoH Deacon, E. S.

3 Div HO & Sig Regt L/CoH Fisher. D.

L/Cpi Kemp, I. G.

TOWN AND COUNTRY SHOES

AYSC (South) CoH Greene, B. F.

Guards Depot MT Section S/Cpl Ellis, D. L/CoH LIddeII, J. A. L/Cpl Webb, P. J.

S/Cpl Kelaall. C. G. CoH Thurston, D. R. A. L. Tpr Vaughan, R.

Household Cavalry“ Hospital S/Cpl Fielding,D .

TraInee Troop

Major D. V. Smiley Captain G. H. Tweedie SOMC Wright, J. CoH Wilmott, R., B.E.M. CoH Hawley, J. CoH Sayer L/CoH Shatwell, R. L/CoH Harman, B. L/CoH Austin, J. L/CoH Forrister, R.

NEW & LINGWOOD

Royal Yeomanry

3 Troop

Captain J. W. Matthews Lt A. M. Armitage SCM Peck, J. CoH Donnelly, J. M. L/CoH Butler. R. L/CoH Barden, F.

CoH Thomas, L. H. S/Cpl Scriven. R. J. CoH Strudwlck, J. CoH Stacey, M.

Kuwait Liaison Team Tpr Cooper, B. Tpr Russell. P. F. Tpr Ford, P. O.

SCM Hayes, B. W.

AA College CoH Owen, W.

CoH Midwinter, J.

Guards Depot Ouartermaster‘s Dept

Print

The Eton Slipper 5 Colours

RMSM

CoH Aucott, G. A.

CoH Watts, 5. A.

Guards Depot Orderly Room L/CoH Strattord, B.

1 Div H0 & Sig Regt

Guards Depot Sergeants Mess

S/Cpl Whlttlngton, D. HQ LONDON District

Tpr Lewis, W. D.

CoH Preece, D.

Troopers under Trade Training at Catterick Tpr Underwood

Tpr Weightman, P.

200 Hovercraft Trials Sqn RCT S/CpI Hague, M.

Troopers awaiting Posting Tpr Giles Tpr Jay, W.

Tpr Dawson, C. T. Tpr Youngman, C. C.

Mercian Yeomanry

RCM Heath, J. M.

Troopers Awaiting Trade Training

Rheindahlen Garrison

Tpr Harris, C. W. Tpr Nicholson, G. A.

SCM Meiia, P.

Tpr Rex, N. P.

A complete printing service is offered to those kept busy worrying about things that printers should attend to.

Hong Kong Regt (V) SCM Simpson, F. A.

BAND OF THE BLUES AND ROYALS

As printers. publishers and advertising contractors we can deal with print from the rough visual stage through to final printing in either monochrome or full colour. We offer

247 Provo Coy SCM Varga. G.

Musn Musn Musn Musn Musn Musn Musn Musn Musn Musn

L/CoH Hayne, G.

Musn Marsh, P.

L/CoH Manslield, R. L/CoH O'Donnell, D. L/CoH Tanner, R.

Musn Morrison. M. Musn Parker. R. Musn Prosser, K.

L/CoH Whenneli, R. C

Bull. M. Cheaters, M. Leslie, J. Orrilt, C. Parsons, A. Philp, R. Platt, S. Sowter, R. Turner, H. Brammer, M.

Atkinson, D. Baines, S. Buckley, A Cooper, J. Creedy, A. Frew, J. Grlmths. E. Healey, A. Jaskulski, C. King, P

Musn Rougvie, M. Musn Rowden. R Musn Sabourin, 5. Musn Spurs, D. Musn Stephens, K. Musn Watts, P. Musn Ward, C. Musn Watson. D. Musn Williams. P. Musn Becker, J.—Pupil Kneller Hall.

BLUES AND ROYALS SOLDIERS AT ERE RHO Household Cavalry

11 Armd Bde L/Cpl Robinson, R. D.

extremely competitive terms, a free advisory service and can

LONG SERVICE LIST

deal with the layout and presentation aspect of leaflets. catalogues. booklets and publicity material, etc. Moreover we can arrange for the preparation of art work and blocks at very economical rates.

RCM Kidrnan. J. F. ROM Godtrey-Cass, D. L. F.

CoH McLachlan-Kitchen, A. R.

OFFICERS AT ERE Lt Col T. A. K. Watson Lt Col J. B. Evans Lt Col D. S. A. Boyd Major A. Dimond, M.C. Major J. Hodgson Major J. S. Wilkinson Major Miller Major S. H. Boucher Major J. F. Scott Major H. F. Wright Major T. Kelghtley Major 8. Crisp Major A. Aylen Major . G. Hamilton-Russell Major N. P. W. Burbury Major M. R. Brook Captain J. S. Olivier Captain R. D. G. Corbett Captain G. T. R. Birdwood

‘7‘“.“5-IPUS-Euums-

Major Jeanes, E. W. S/Cpi Middleton, R. S/Cpl (Tpt Major) Wilson, P. CoH Commins, T. CoH Briggs, E. CoH Riddell, G. CoH Biogg, G. CoH Daniels, D. CoH Todd, R. CoH Wise, P.

HO UKLF H0 DRAC RMCS AAC CHEPSTOW MOD JSIS NEAR EAST BRIXMIS NATIONAL DEFENCE COLLEGE IRAN TRG TEAM JW E HO 2 DVI HO NORTHUMBRIAN DISTRICT H0 UKLF RHQ HOUSEHOLD CAVALRY HO LONDON DISTRICT UNION DEFENCE FORCE PARA COY APE

It your present printing arrangements are proving to be an expensive burden—don’t feel sorry for yourself—contact us. We do assure you that no effort will be spared in meeting your requirements to your complete satisfaction—

SHIRTMAKERS AND BOOTMAKERS TO MANY FAMOUS REGIMENTS

53 Jermyn Street

You must surely be interested in us.

St. James’s SERVICE PUBLICATIONS LIMITED

CAXTON HOUSE SHOREHAM-BY-SEA, SUSSEX, BN4 SQD TELEPHONE 4536 (tour lines)

01-493 9621

S.W.1

ALSO AT

Captain (0M) T. J. Williams CoH Acton, G. R.

Cpl (L/CoH) Oakes, W.

S/Cpl Cross C. J.

Cpl (L/CoH) Sturrock, V.

CoH Dean, C. E.

RMAS CoH Brown, D. J.

Captain E. Fletcher Captain J. C. Leech Li D. M. Reed-Feistead Ct J. M. M. Carr—Ellison Cl C. A. Coriat

MVEE (K) 7 AVN REGT JLR RAC DURHAM UNIVERSITY TRINITY UNIVERSITY

ETON AND CAMBRIDGE

01—499 5340


18,000 Iimbless Ex-Servicemen

need your help We urgently need money to help these men to conquer their handicap. And to equip and maintain homes in which they convalesce and are given care and comfort in their old age. We are not aided by the State. So we depend on you. These veterans gave much when they lost arms or legs or eyes fighting for their country. Now won’t you give something? Please, please help. Please remember them in your will and send a donation to Major the Earl of Ancaster, KCVO, TD, Midland Bank Limited. 60 West Smithfield, London EC 1A 9DX

BRITISH

LIMBLESS EX-SERVICEMEN'S ASSOCIATION

To Lloyds you’re a name not a number Whether

you're

the

com-

manding officer or the recruit we do our best to make you feel welcome. By Appoinlmenr In Her Maiesty The Queen Ltvery Tailors

(So

that's

several

headaches

less!) Savings and investments, taxation and insurance — all are covered by our comprehensive

We havetheanswers toallyour

services to the Services. Insur—

financial problems because Lloyds

ance is specially important, of course, if you’re being posted abroad.

have had agreatdealofexperience in dealing with the Services.

WELSH & JEFFERIES

We can give you sound prac— tical advice on any financial mat-

LIMITED

ter, and we'll take care of all your regular bills by banker’s order.

If you would like to open an account please call in at your local branch or fill in the coupon below.

_-__--_—-------—---------—--_-_-1

CIVIL AND MILITARY TAILORS

To: Mr. D. P. Gardiner, T.D., Services Liaison Officer, Lloyds Bank Ltd, Cox’s and King's Branch, 6 Pall Ma//, London SW7 Y 5NH.

Regimental Tailors to the Blues and Royals

Jr

I would like to open an account with Lloyds Bank. Could you please send me details. NAME

RANK

ADDRESS

Lloyds Bank looks after people like you : 7 and 8 SAVILE ROW, LONDON WlX lAF LX9 Telephone: 01-734 3062


GUARD YOUR FUTURE with a SEOURIGOR JOB Security is our business. We provide it for customers all over the world and we ensure it for all those who work for us. That’s why a Securicor job offers you much more than a good income . . . it offers your guaranteed sick pay, a good pension, freedom from redundancy, plenty of chances to climb the success ladder—in fact everything that takes

(“Buy through ‘Naafi—HPorcash -andgeta

? N U O C S BIG DI

present and future worries off your shoulders.

Services Re-Settlement Bulletin No. 2/71 will tell you about the career advantages provided by Securicor . . . so will your Re-Settlement Officer. Then all you have to do is to send details of your age, service career and where you intend to live to the address below—and leave the rest to us.

OHYOUI”IICWCEII' 01‘ caraVEIL Down comes the cost of most new cars and many touring caravans when Naafi introduces you to a UK dealer. Terms are easy and you enjoy the advantages of Naafi’s car and I caravan service across the globe from UK to Hong Kong — in Western Europe, Gibraltar, Malaysia, Singapore.

The Employment Officer, Securicor Limited, 40 Wilton Road, Victoria, London, S.W.1.

SECURIGOR CARES for customers, co-workers and the common good

(HP charges are low and without strings such as annual subscriptions. Special export prices. A Naafi introduction means l5°/,, off Vauxhall and special prices for most Austin, Morris, Triumph and Rover cars if you are being posted abroad from the UK or from one overseas country to another. Basic price discounts range from 7§ ”0 to 12$ 0,, off most popular British cars and 75",, to llof, of? touring caravans bought — through a Naafi introduction _ from a dealer in the UK for UK or overseas use. Delivery. Your car or caravan will be delivered to the airport when you arrive in UK. to your home town or new UK station; or to an overseas port, as you wish. All the usual dealer services.

THESE ARE THE WORLD-WIDE ADVANTAGES OF USING NAAFI’S GAR/CARAVAN SERVICE

Rogers, Jo n Jones

0 Entitlement to full dealer services retained 0 free personal insurance . insurance cover against three quarter-s of your liability to purchase tax and import duty on a car —subjecr to simple conditions ~ if prematurelv repatriated from overseas O Naafi provides deposit saying facilities to help you build up a deposit for a future purchase.

Naafi will also finance the purchase of used cars in UK and Germany. See your Naafi manager for full details or in case 0fdij7‘1”cultv complete this coupon without obligation.

Car Sales Manager, Naafi, London SE 11

Cl New car for use in

Please send me details of Naati HP

facilities without obligation. I am interested in

State model D New touring caravan

(block letters) ADDRESS

E]

(block letters)

16 Clifford Street-Savile Row-London-WlX 2HS Tel: 01734 2248 ALSO AT CAMBERLEY DURING RMA TERMS

Ude car

_ ‘ , D Dcposrt saying (to enable

me to build up a deposit for a future purchase) .

.

Please tick whichever (Iflplit’X


CODOLETTE

PROGRAMME CODOLETTE

FOR

BLOODSTOCK

CRUMBS

(14Ib. drums)

containing over 50% Cod Liver, Oil and Malt extract

TO CONDITION BLOODSTOCK FOR HARD WORK, SALE OR SHOW

POLIENTA TONIC FEED ADDITIVE

(56Ib.ba9s)

containing massive quantities of stabilised vitamins A and D3 plus E, trace elements and protein

TO BOOST THE PERFORMANCE OF BREEDING BLOODSTOCK

ECKERSLEY HICKS & CO. LTD.

POLIENTA

SALTS

(11m. buckets)

containing a new and attractive spice for horses :8 MAINTAIN BLOODSTOCK AT PEAK CONDITION ALL THE YEAR U D

Wrile or telephone for details to:

THE POLIENTA COMPANY 2 Woodland Avenue, Northampton, NN3 ZBY

Telephone: Northampton 32645 (STD Code 0604)

Established 1878

COLES LTD. 21 College Hill Cannon Street London EC4 2RP

SHIRT

AND

PYJAMA

MAKERS

REGIMENTAL SHIRTMAKERS TO THE BLUES AND ROYALS Ready Made and Bespoke Shirts

Silk Ties

Telephone 01-236 2323 & at Lloyds

147 KNIGHTSBRIDGE, LONDON, S.W.l Telephone: 589 4798 589 8552 I31 SLOANE STREET, LONDON, S.W.l Telephone: 730 7564 AND 33 SAVILE ROW, LONDON, W.1 Telephone: 434 7290

Rosehill Instruments Insurance Brokers to THE BLUES and ROYALS

All musical instruments and ceremonial equipment bought, sold, exchanged and repaired. Hand emblazoned coffee or telephone table drums as illustrated make ideal gifts. (Price around £50) For personal attention ring Trevor Austin ex-R.H.G. Band 1948-1953.

AUSTIN CATELINET LIMITED 26 Wattieton Road, Beaconstield, Bucks. (Off A40 behind Nursery Garden Centre)

Beaconsfield 4692


The blue and royal the blue and royal 1973