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fm-world.co.uk / July 2016

PAY AS YOU GROW – BIFM PAY & PROSPECTS SURVEY 2016 | THE CHANGING FACE OF FMS | ON-SITE WASTE MANAGEMENT

DATA DRIVE How FM is becoming both a people and data business

MAKING AN IN-OUT DECISION Choosing between client and supply-side roles

ANAEROBICS CLASS The evolving market for a new waste management form

PAY AS YOU GROW

fm-world.co.uk | July 2016

What research says about the typical FM professional in 2016: Younger, better qualified, increasingly female – and earning more

p01 FM world cover July 16 FINAL F.indd 1

28/06/2016 12:37


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27/06/2016 12:04


LE A D E R COMMENTS

MA RTI N R E A D

JU LIE KO RT E NS

Chairman’s welcome Welcome to the first of a new style FM World developed for BIFM members and the wider facilities management profession. Over the past few months I’ve been excited to see the magazine as it has evolved, in consultation with the membership, stakeholders and our editorial team, and I really hope that you will like the end result as much as I do. Our intention is to create a magazine that supports you in your facilities management roles and personifies the role FM plays in enabling effective and productive workplaces. I hope that it will provide insight and ideas about different working practices to inspire you in your work and to support the development of our profession. This refreshed approach covers a range of features from useful ‘How to’ guides and case studies through to demonstrating the role FM plays in wider society, business and the economy. All of which is in line with BIFM’s strategic ambitions. You will also see a new Facilitate section, a new title, which focuses on how FM enables productive environments for people and business. See page 4 for more about the revamped FM World and how you can become involved. This month we welcomed our new CEO, Ray Perry. You may have already met Ray as he has been out getting to know members and volunteers at ThinkFM, Members’ Council and the Facilities Show. I’m sure many more of you will meet him over the months ahead. Finally, it just remains for me to wish you all a happy World FM Day on 13th July! I hope you are able to attend one of the many events scheduled, all of which work towards raising the profile of FM. Join us in promoting FM within your organisation or online through social media #FacMan #WorldFMDay. Updates activities can be found at www.bifm.org.uk/worldfmday.

JULIE KORTENS is chairman of the BIFM

FROM THE EDITOR

I

nitial responses to Brexit will be inevitably drowned out by further dramatic developments in the months ahead, making any comment here very likely superfluous come publication. But while the result of the referendum will assuredly affect us all, another significant issue has also been trending lately. The talk is of robotics and artificial intelligence, and the apparently inevitable automation of tasks that currently sit within the facilities manager’s purview. Surely lives of leisure lie in wait for us and our clients when robots take over facilities functions? Well, in a word, no. Automation will continue its gradual march, of course, for example through self-starting floor sweepers and the like. But let’s be frank, we’ve been talking about impending automation since the 1950s. Those who watched newsreels of shiny silver robots serving drinks would have been shocked if told back then that this seismic shift in the labour market still wouldn’t be part of 21st century life a whole sixty years later. The fact is that our human reaction to automation tends to manifest itself not in fewer jobs but in new ways of doing things. Way back in the 1980s, car manufacturers promoted themselves on the virtues of the robots introduced on to their assembly lines. But what we now have is a market supporting more and more specialist manufacturers. As automation has occurred, human ingenuity has developed new forms of markets to keep us all busy. As for FM, there’s a good reason why it’s described as being all about the people — because truly effective facilities services are the result of qualitative conversations and constant engagement with those served. We humans crave communication and community, and the most successful technology is that which supports these needs. Which brings me to your new-look FM World – a community-based magazine focused on best practice through professional development. FM World is now monthly in print, but we’ll be reflecting even more voices in these pages to help shape debate in this incredibly dynamic profession. There’ll be nothing artificial about the intelligence reflected in these pages. Tell us what you think of our new look via editorial@fm-world.co.uk.

“LET’S BE FRANK, WE’VE BEEN TALKING ABOUT IMPENDING AUTOMATION SINCE THE 1950S”

MARTIN READ is editor of FM World magazine

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July 2016

30/06/2016 10:12


YOUR NEW

FMWORLD So here it is, your first monthly edition of

the new FM World, the magazine from the British Institute of Facilities Management. Over the next few months, we’re rewiring the print magazine - so we thought we’d explain our intentions.

We’ve always sought to inform and entertain in equal measure; to report the profession, reflect its character and give timepoor facilities management professionals the kind of concise insight and knowledge that can be put to practical use whatever their membership grade or level of experience.

OUR WIDER ROLE Facilities management professionals have long since recognised just how much this dynamic profession can drive economic growth, improve the lives of workers and help protect the environment. We’ll be doing everything we can to highlight the status of the facilities management profession p o ess o and a d its ts importance po ta ce to the wider world of work.

p04-05 FM world Contents July16 v4dt.indd 4

HERE’S WHAT YOU CAN EXPECT TO READ

HOW YOU CAN BE INVOLVED

Considered analysis of the issues affecting you and your work. Expansive new features in special single-issue sections detailing the economic, social and environmental role of facilities management. Interviews with the people whose work is most likely to impact on the work conducted by FM professionals. Interviews with FMs to help share best practice. More features on soft skills to go with critical technical and compliance content. More data dashboards and infographics to help make densely packed detail more accessible. A forum for people in and around the profession to debate topical issues as they affect them.

BIFM is known for offering a forum in which FM professionals come together and debate the issues they face. FM World is key to that offering, in print and online. And so, most importantly: this is your magazine. We will always value your involvement, whatever the capacity. We’re keen to ensure that the great sense of community conferred through BIFM membership is reflected in our pages, so always feel free to correspond with us on anything we publish, whether it’s a detailed response to our content, a quick comment or simply a suggestion for the topics you’d like us to cover. Email us at editorial@fm-world.co.uk with any comments you may have.

30/06/2016 10:18


F M WO R LD J U LY 2 0 1 6

CONTENTS COM M UNI TY

2 2 PE R SPE C TIV E S The four most interesting and insightful opinions on FM expressed this month 24 T HINK TA NK How much do productivity concerns affect FMs in their organisations? 27 BE HIND THE JOB The University of Sussex’s Stephanie Kirby on networking and hawks

A NA LYS I S

7 O N THE RE CORD We delve into the biggest stories in the FM industry this month 8 B REXIT: N E XT STE PS In the aftermath of June’s EU vote, what does Brexit mean for FM?

28 JU LY @ BIF M The people and projects currently informing BIFM activity 3 2 C A LL S TO AC T ION The events, surveys and discussions that deserve your attention

KNOW LE DG E

3 5 BIG PIC T U R E The functional beauty of glassboards offering ‘clean and clear communication’ 3 6 -3 7 C A R E E R D E V E LO P ME N T Making the most of LinkedIn – and what 2016 employers look for in an FM’s CV 3 8 STE A M A ND FA L S E A L A R MS Why steam can set off alarms and what you can do to prevent it happening

10 A C ULTUR AL DIVIDE UK workers value their company culture less than workers in other nations

41 A NA E ROBIC D I G E ST I O N How does it work? How is the market developing? What is the future for AD?

12 H I GH NOON FOR HIG H HE E L S How the exact height of heels led to a 100,000-signature petition

42 WA STE T R E AT ME N T Five points to consider when setting up an in-house waste treatment facility

13 NE WS MAK E RS The stories proving most popular with FM World’s online visitors this month

44 M OD E R N SLAV E RY AC T 20 1 5 Ensuring supply chains are free from slavery and human trafficking

FM World’s new in-depth analysis section 48 SH OW U S WHAT YO U’ VE GOT In an increasingly fluid jobs market, FMs are presenting themselves as comprehensively trained, communications-savvy individuals ready for any task. Our 2016 Pay & Prospects survey shows how FMs’ wings are spreading. 52 2016 PAY DATA IN DE TAIL

50 LE ARN ING POTE NTIA L A comprehensive qualifications structure is helping to change the face of the profession. 56 TR AN SFOR M ING E XPE C TATIONS A new form of FM professional is emerging with powerful interpersonal skills and a wider range of experiences

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5

to call upon. But a technical background still has its place. 6 0 SC HOOL S OF THOU GHT Choosing between in-house and outsourced service provider can put FMs on significantly different career trajectories. What should inform this decision-making process – and how do such choices affect employability?

JULY ’S TOPI C

PAY A N D PROSPEC TS

July 2016

30/06/2016 10:56


One solution to optimise your workplace Tomorrow’s businesses demand much more. ENGIE is a new kind of energy and services company – a strategic partner to help you meet today’s needs and tomorrow’s challenges.

engie.co.uk

FMW.JULY16.006.indd 2

27/06/2016 12:08


INSIDE 07 10 12 14 18

What does Brexit mean for FM? UK workers ‘don’t value company culture’ High noon for high heels? Supply Side: the month’s FM business news FM service sector majoring on ‘people and data’

FRONT DESK THE MO N TH’ S MOST I MP O RTA N T F M STO R I E S

Early indications from built environment specialists are that Brexit will have at least some negative shortterm impact

P O LIT IC S

WHAT DOES BREXIT MEAN FOR FM? W O R D S : H ER P R EE T K AU R G R E WA L

I

n the early hours of Friday 24th June, the results of the EU referendum trickled in. Jenny Watson, chief counting officer for the referendum and chair of the Electoral Commission, announced that 48.1 per cent of people had voted to remain in the European Union and 51.9 per cent had voted to leave. There was widespread shock, the pound dropped to a 31-year low, billions of pounds were wiped off markets and there were even rumours of major American banks relocating workers to other European cities.

Think tank IPPR’s chief economist Catherine Colebrook said: “Markets have responded to the news that the UK is to exit the EU by selling sterling assets, causing the pound to fall. This will be felt in higher costs on the high street in the coming months.” She added: “In the weeks and months following this initial financial market reaction, we will be hit by the perfect storm of reduced consumer spending power, a reduction in business investment as businesses put their plans on ice, and the heightened risk of a downturn across Europe.”

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17.4

17,410,742 people in UK voted to leave the EU (51.9 per cent)

New BIFM chief executive Ray Perry said he ended his first week in post by calling on the government to “lead us through the short-term volatility” caused by the referendum decision to leave the European Union. Calling the decision “a historic one”, Perry said that “we will not know the full impact or meaning of this for years to come”. However, Perry, also said: “It does immediately create a period of uncertainty for the UK economy and the facilities management services that supply it.”

July 2016

29/06/2016 21:04


F RO NT D E S K

“The government and supporting organisations must get to grips with the task swiftly, putting partisan politics aside to lead us through any short-term volatility towards a stronger and more stable position. We need to focus on market confidence and stability. “The negotiation period, when Article 50 is invoked, provides an opportunity for our members to understand, adjust to and make the most of the new environment that this decision will create. “Our immediate priority is to canvas the views of our members and the profession in order to understand their position. Doing so will provide us with clear and valid data to be able to respond and support those operating within the sector.” Peter Cheese, chief executive of professional body the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development, prescribed caution. He said: “Now that the British people have had their say on Britain’s future relationship with the EU and voted to leave, it’s important that the government and UK businesses take time to properly assess the long-term impacts of any decisions that they take going forward. “The impact of a ‘leave’ vote is much bigger than simply changing the political landscape of the UK. It stands to have a significant impact on the world of work and future planning within organisations. We need a broad and thorough consultation between

SOUND BITES

PHOTOGRAPHY: GETTY

A N A LY S I S

“IT DOES CREATE A PERIOD OF UNCERTAINTY FOR THE UK ECONOMY AND THE FACILITIES MANAGEMENT SERVICES THAT SUPPLY IT” government, organisations and employees across all sectors and representative bodies.” For most businesses the “immediate impact of this historic decision will be limited as major changes won’t be able to occur for a while”, He said employment law, immigration and the ability of employers to bring the right skills they need into their business were “key themes focused on in the campaign that will potentially be subject to change going forwards, and these things will no doubt be on employers’ minds”. But he warned that now is not the time for “hasty decisions or knee-jerk reactions from government or employers”. Several environmental bodies

16,141,241 people voted to remain in the EU (48.1 per cent)

RUBY MCGREGOR SMITH, chief executive of SM Mitie Group plc, said: said “Brexit could lead to delays and share price uncertainty in property and FM and p this leads to longer d decision-making, which we do not need for tthe FM market. “We are a great se sector and we employ great people. Now w we will need to find ways to grow our reven revenues – also outside the UK. keen to do so – so we just “We are kee need to get more reassurance that this does not impact investment decisions.” decision

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16.1

8

are calling for the industry to come together to ensure that the green agenda continues to be a priority in the wake of the UK’s decision to leave the European Union (EU). Julie Hirigoyen, CEO of the UK Green Building Council (UK GBC), said: “Both economic and political uncertainty will have some people asking whether the green agenda needs to be de-prioritised while business goes into firefighting mode. This must and need not happen. “The incentives remain strong for business to address climate change and other urgent sustainability challenges. Arguably now more than ever we need to minimise future risk, reduce costs, add value for clients, generate new commercial opportunities and ensure we have the best people working as productively as possible. A sustainable built environment is fundamental to these objectives.” Other were more upbeat. The president of the Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers believes that there will be “life

NEIL MURRAY, regional chairman, Sodexo UK & Ireland, said: “As a global company which operates within 22 EU member states, we would have preferred for the UK to stay part of the EU. However, we do not believe leaving the EU will have a major impact on our business.   “Sodexo has operated in the UK since 1988 and employs 34,000 people across the region. As a services company, most of our client relationships operate on a market by market level. We are a local player in the UK and work with local suppliers and local employees.”

July 2016

29/06/2016 21:05


F RO NT D E S K A N A LY S I S

BR E XI T ’ S I MPAC T ?

IMPACT OF BREXIT ON THE UK GDP (2030)

1.55%

-2.2% Brexit worst case

-0.8%

Politically realistic range

0.6%

Brexit best case

Value of GDP in 2030 based on economic modelling of the trade impacts of Brexit and analysis of the most significant pieces of EU regulation, if Britain left the EU on 1 January 2018. (Pre-referendum estimation) Source: Open Europe Today

SHARE OF WORKERS IN EEA NATIONS BY SECTOR 14%

2006

2010

2014

12% 10% 8% 6% 4% 2%

s rie st du in ll

bl Pu

A

ic a de dm fe in nc / e

/s o wo cia rk l

lth ea H

Tr an s st po or rt ag & e

n io ct ru st Co n

in /s se upp rv o ic rt es

Ad m

M

an

uf ac

tu rin g Ac co m fo m od od se ati rv on ic / es

0%

Source: www.migrationobservatory.ox.ac.uk via Open Europe Today

after Brexit”. He said: “We do not anticipate any significant alteration in the very positive engagement we maintain with members across the globe and suggest that the referendum result creates significant opportunities and commitments to

increase engagement with regional, national and global interests.” Separately, the Local Government Association said councils in England “need a seat at the table” as decisions are made on waste and other legislation, to replace EU laws.

PETER HOLBROOK, chief executive of Social ial Enterprise UK, said: “Wise commissioners will continue to consider onsider the social and environmental aspects of contracts, regardless of how bumpy a post-referendum ride we are in for. Sociall value is increasingly being embedded in organisations’ ations’ DNA, and if Brexit does have any effect in n this respect, it is likely to accelerate that trend. d. Longer term, there are clearly implications for public ublic sector procurement policy and competition etition law, much of which has been agreed reed at an EU level before being incorporated into domestic law.” w.”

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8 things Brexit may mean for FM

1 2

London office building values decrease – these could fall as much as 20 per cent within three years of Britain leaving the EU.

3 4 5 6 7 8

Weakening in occupier demand – this could happen in the short term, but the impact on rents could be limited. Uncertainty about direction and timing will ‘adversely hit’ real estate activity.

Less influence in health & safety laws – the UK will probably have less influence in developing further health and safety laws up to the time it officially exits the EU. Many EU Health and Safety & Environmental directives are transposed in UK law so nothing changes until the UK government puts in place mechanisms for further deregulation.

Small & medium-sized enterprises – SMEs may find office space more affordable as a result of Brexit. Renting – London market may see drop-off in demand, but regional markets should escape relatively unscathed. Institutional investors may think twice before committing any more capital. Prime property – London’s safe haven status will be damaged, and international investors may move their ‘golden bricks’ elsewhere. Energy performance rules – all governed by the EU under the Energy Performance in Buildings Directive – will be up in the air. Rules preventing poor performing buildings from being rented have just come into force. OJEU – the directive governing public procurement which typically makes it unviable for smaller or private firms without massive balance sheets to bid for public projects – such as TfL or Olympic contracts – will not be missed much. Sources: Green Street Advisors LLC, International Institute of Risk & Safety Management, Blackstock Consulting, and JLL

NICK ATHERTON, managing ma director of M&A at Morphose, a support services, defence & consultancy, said: logistics property con “The overwhelming majority of clients have bullish. The FM and outsourcing remained quite bullis market historically tends ten to perform well in of our construction clients crisis periods. Some o due to concerns over their have frozen activity d European exposure, but b I expect this to come back once the dust settles. Clients in the with a large amount maintenance sector se authority work are waiting of local a hear whether potential extra to hea works will be put on hold.”

9

July 2016

30/06/2016 11:23


F RO NT D E S K A N A LY S I S

E M P LOYM E NT

UK WORKERS DON’T VALUE COMPANY CULTURE W O R D S : H ER P R EE T K AU R G R E WA L

U

K workers suffer from “mixed feelings” regarding engagement and workplace satisfaction metrics, according to an international report (17 countries, 12,480 participants) commissioned by office furniture manufacturer Steelcase. Most UK workers enjoy connecting with their colleagues and get a sense of personal achievement from the work they do. But compared with all other nations, they are less likely to value their company culture or recommend their company to others. They’re also more likely to have

Not only does one in five UK workers describe their office as cold, the highest response from the study run in 17 countries – 13 per cent think it is ugly too, around twice as high as the global average

problems concentrating or working in teams without interruption. Interestingly, the UK has by far the most entirely open-plan offices in the world, which the report says is more than double the global average.

Space matters Monica Parker of workplace strategy firm Hatch, told FM World: “While some of the figures are certainly impactful, they’re not

PARTICIPANTS Participants

Gender

Age

Job title

particularly surprising to us as they are directly aligned with our global database findings (which run across 30 countries). “We know that culture matters. Ninety-four per cent of Hatch respondents say that the more meaning their job has, the more likely they are to be engaged. But space matters too. For example, we find that almost half of UK workers say they don’t have a sufficient variety of settings to be effective in their work.” Researchers for the Steelcase report also suggest workers “struggle to manage their need for privacy, and are not able to focus”.

Employer focus

816

54% 46% Female

Male

35%

25%

9%

33%

18-34

35-44

Senior manager

Manager

25%

15 %

20%

38%

45-54

55+

Technician associate

Clerk+service/ sale

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Workers in the UK also say they are less likely to be able to choose where they want to work in the office, leaving them feeling a lack of control over their daily work experience. In Parker’s opinion “since the economic downturn of several years ago, employers have not been focusing on their employee

July 2016

29/06/2016 16:06


F RO NT D E S K A N A LY S I S

S URVE Y

Engagement and the Global Workplace Perception of company culture

UP

(%agree)

Would you say that your company:

62%

Attaches great importance to the health and safety of its employees

69%

UK

Global

63% Gets the best out of you

61%

ENGAGEMENT

Engagement and satisfaction cluster analysis UK engagement levels are slightly below global averages. Workers’ dissatisfaction with the work environment is a contributing factor.

UK

Global

UP

Highly engaged

11% 13%

18% 21%

SATISFACTION

FINDING MUTUAL TRUST Paige Hodsman, concept development manager of Office Environments at Saint-Gobain Ecophon, who has worked in both the UK and the US, says: “British workers value one another and the relationships they form at work to a great degree, but often work is seen more as a means to an end rather than a source for deep-rooted cultural connection.” Despite the economic climate, Hodsman says British companies could do more. “British companies do care about the people who work for them,” Hodsman told FM World, “so they’d be wise to facilitate engagement by offering learning and development opportunities and by providing workplaces that actually support the work their employees have been hired to do. This would facilitate mutual trust and undoubtedly benefit both sides.”

Highly dissatisfied with workplace

Highly satisfied with workplace

31% 29%

28% 12%

26%

11%

Highly disengaged

Access to shared areas

(%agree)

UK

Global

Does your workplace have:

63% Sufficient meeting rooms

70%

58% Cafeteria/ canteen

61%

PHOTOGRAPHY: GETTY

64%

wellbeing, but more on the perceived “bottom line”. Because of this, we are now looking at the highest rates of global attrition in decades. Clever employers will understand that the bottom line in knowledge work organisations always hinges on people and their engagement”.

Private space

53%

23%

45%

Sports/Exercise facilities

22%

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71%

Relaxation areas

11

July 2016

29/06/2016 16:07


F RO NT D E S K NEWS

NICOLA THORP, temp

FRO NT O F HO USE

“The female supervisor said I was required to wear 2-4-inch heels. I pointed to a male colleague who was wearing smart flat shoes and asked why he was not required to wear heels. But I was told that was what the policy was and if I was going to wear flat shoes that I should leave. I felt I was being sent home because I was a woman. Why are high heels required? High heels make women taller and slimmer and that’s not a job requirement. My argument is that some employers require women to look attractive but they cannot write that in their policies. I abided by the rules and left. I called an employment advice line. They said high heels were the only accepted kind of formal shoes and told me that my employer was acting within their rights… the only way to change it was to change the law. The day the petition went live Portico changed their dress code. PwC has also scrapped their entire dress code.”

HIGH NOON FOR HIGH HEELS W O R D S : H ER P R EE T K AU R G R E WA L

PHOTOGRAPHY: ALAMY, GETTY

A

petition demanding a change in workplace rules on dress code for women gathered more than 130,000 signatures over the last few months, which means it could now be debated in Parliament. The petition was started by receptionist Nicola Thorp after she was sent home without pay by reception outsourcing firm Portico for not wearing high heels for a temp job at accountancy firm PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) in London. Her story subsequently went viral on social media sites. The petition is titled “Make it illegal for a company to require women to wear high heels at work”. FM World asked those involved and experts about what the implications of the petition could be.

ANNA BIRTWISTLE, partner, CM Murray LLP “I have not come across a dress code policy that has actually stipulated that women must wear high heels. I think the public interest in the story demonstrates the shift in society’s views about the expectations of what women should wear in the corporate business environment… It is difficult to envisage the government putting in place a law specifically banning high heels as a dress code requirement where presently there is no statutory law dealing with dress codes as a whole. The law in this area is determined by the courts by reference to the specific facts of a case, including the role of the employee and the workplace in question. From a practical perspective, I would expect that the spotlight that has been shone on this question may ultimately achieve the same result with employers reassessing their policies on female footwear.”

“THE PUBLIC INTEREST IN THE STORY DEMONSTRATES THE SHIFT IN SOCIETY’S VIEWS ABOUT THE EXPECTATIONS OF WHAT WOMEN SHOULD WEAR IN THE CORPORATE ENVIRONMENT”

SIMON PRATT, managing director, Portico “Portico does expect high standards of professional dress from all our team members and have historically recommended plain court shoes for our female colleagues and have generally allowed plain flat shoes when requested. We are totally committed to being an inclusive and equal opportunities employer, actively embracing diversity and inclusion within all our policies and procedures. We therefore immediately made it very clear, as soon this was brought to our attention, that all our female colleagues could wear plain flat shoes or plain court shoes as they prefer. We are glad to take this opportunity to improve our practice.” PWC’S RESPONSE “Ms Thorp worked for our front-of house contractor, Portico, and it was their uniform policy. We are sorry that any individual had a bad experience with us and that’s why we took immediate action with Portico. We are pleased that Portico responded to our concerns and updated its uniform with immediate effect. We place a great deal of emphasis on providing a progressive working environment for all of our people and we feel strongly that this must include third-party employees working in our offices. At PwC we have had a flexible approach to how our people dress for work in the UK for a number of years. It’s important that our people can be themselves at work and that we respect our clients and colleagues. We trust our people to use their judgement on what is appropriate to wear.”

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July 2016

29/06/2016 16:24


F M -WO R L D.C O.U K / N E W S

Ten of the top stories from FM World online last month

F RO NT D E S K TOP STORIES

NEWSMAKERS Workplace lifts are burning 36 per cent more energy within office buildings than predicted by manufacturers and standards, according to a study by consultant SVM. tinyurl.com/FMW0716-Lifts

36%

1/6 “Not value for money”

3/6

“Premiership” pay “The chronic skills shortage in the utilities, energy and construction industries means companies are fishing from the same small pool of talent, which is inevitably pushing up salaries” – Chris Wood, CEO, Develop Training Limited tinyurl.com/FMW0716-Prem

The government’s Next Generation Shared Services scheme, which merges back-office functions for Whitehall departments, has saved around £90 million over twoand-a-half years – substantially less than the £128 million originally forecast, according to a National Audit Office report. Investment costs have reached £94 million. tinyurl.com/FMW0716-NAO

7/6

Missing the target “Increasing the volume of food waste that is collected separately is critical to meet our legally binding recycling target of 50 per cent by 2020. There is an urgent need for new policy; collaboration and consensus are the strongest tools we have available to achieve it” – Jeremy Jacobs, REA tinyurl.com/FMW0716-foodwaste

10/6 MBE at No.10 Alfred John Smith, the former facilities manager for the Prime Minister’s residence, 10 Downing Street, has been awarded a spot on the Queen’s birthday honours list. He was granted Membership of the Order of the British Empire for his services to No 10 Downing Street. tinyurl.com/FMW0716-No10

Comfort

87%

R

P

13/6

14/6

Lighting

P

The most important factors perceived to be driving employees’ sense of satisfaction with their workplace can be bracketed under ‘getting the basics right’, according to a report from the British Council for Offices. tinyurl.com/FMW0716-FMbasics

86%

85%

Temperature

10%

Only 7 per cent of young people plan to do an apprenticeship, according to a survey by YouGov. The research also found that 72 per cent of those aged 13 to 18 plan on going to university or college. tinyurl.com/FMW0716-apps

17/6

20/6

£750,000 Veolia fined Veolia Environmental Services has been fined £750,000 after a worker was crushed to death by a refuse collection vehicle. tinyurl.com/FMW0716-veoliafine

20/6 Failed savings

Efficient estates

Universities across the UK could save 10 per cent on their estates repair and maintenance bills by implementing efficiency drives, particularly for procurement of materials. tinyurl.com/FMW0716-universities

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An FOI request has found that three-quarters of English councils that have reviewed procurement procedures since 2014, as part of the National Procurement Strategy, have failed to identify savings. tinyurl.com/FMW0716-councils

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INSIDE 16 16 18 18 19

Market update: FM in care homes In Focus: Simon Weston on his new FM venture Graeme Davies on a mixed bag of FM results Minor fall in M&A activity reported Your round-up of contract wins in the sector

M E RG E RS AND ACQUISITIONS

FM MERGERS SEE SECTOR MAJOR ON ‘PEOPLE AND DATA’

PHOTOGRAPHY: ALAMY

T

he facilities management market is evolving from a ‘people’ business to a ‘people and data’ business, according to a report from business advisory firm BDO LLP. The BDO FM UK Market Outlook Report 2016 found that M&A (mergers and acquisitions) analysis of the sector reveals that just over half of deals completed in the past two years involved businesses in the building management systems, M&E and compliance services sub-sectors. The report notes that the government’s austerity drive in the public sector is making life difficult for service providers to win contracts on any factors other than price. Slim margins are also being pressed by a number of regulatory requirements such as the introduction of the National Living Wage, says BDO. M&A transactions are seen as a way to achieve efficiency savings to

help position contractors for future growth, adds the report. The number of mergers in the sector in 2015 increased by 43 per cent on the previous year, with hard services accounting for 77 per cent of transactions. M&E maintenance transactions in particular recorded a four-fold increase in 2015, compared with 2014. Management buyouts (MBOs) accounted for 22 per cent of FM deals last year. Nearly four in 20 M&E services deals were MBOs. Satvir Bungar, head of facilities management at BDO LLP, said: “Despite the pressures faced by FM players, businesses have muted optimism for the year ahead and see a wealth of opportunities

More than half of deals have involved businesses in the building management systems, M&E and compliance services sub-sectors

including stickier contracts, developing strategic relationships, and initiating new service lines. FM operators are embedding themselves more closely in their client organisations to provide valuable data-led services such as predictive maintenance, asset management and space optimisation services.”

COMPANY RESULTS

£93.1m revenue in FM operations in 2015

-3.4% on previous year

£96.4m (2014)

Mace

Mount Charles

Macro’s parent company Mace has reported its 2015 figures, which see the company increasing its annual turnover by 19 per cent to £1.77 billion with a pre-tax profit of £36.2 million. Mace’s FM division reported a 3.4 per cent drop in revenues in 2015 to £93.1 million, down from £96.4 million. The company saw a substantial growth of its infrastructure business, winning a number of major programmes, including National Grid, TfL and Highways England.

Service provider Mount Charles has reported revenues of £28.1 million in 2015 – an increase of £2.6 million on the previous year. Mount Charles attributed £7.3 million of contract wins as a key factor in its growth. In November 2015, the Northern Ireland firm was awarded a £500,000 cleaning contract at Belfast International Airport. Its first contract win in England came in 2012 at Exeter Airport, where it provides catering services as part of a £10 million deal.

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£28.1m revenues in 2015

10.2% on previous year

£25.5m

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30/06/2016 10:57


SUPPLY SIDE

DIV ISIO NAL SALE

BILFINGER SELLS ITS FM DIVISION TO SWEDISH PE FIRM FOR £1.2bn

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he executive board of support services group Bilfinger SE has agreed to sell the building and facility business segment to Swedish private equity firm EQT for €1.2 billion (£1.0 billion). The decision is the result of an intensive review of several purchase bids for the segment. The transaction remains subject to approval from the responsible authorities, according to a statement from Bilfinger. The agreement comprises two purchase price components that are payable when EQT re-sells the

O U TS O U RCE D S E RV I C E MA RK E T N E WS

company. This entitles Bilfinger to 49 per cent of the resale proceeds from EQT. Bilfinger continues to participate in “a proportionate amount in the development of the sold divisions”. EQT grew support services firm ISS into “one of the world’s largest facility managers within a period of 10 years and successfully went public in 2014”. Among plans for the division, the European platform will be expanded and positions in areas such as

EQT was involved in the continued growth of ISS Facility Services over the past 10 years

digitalisation and energy efficiency will be strengthened. As a result of the purchase agreement, the building and facility business segment will be presented as discontinued operations in the financial statements for the period ending June 30, 2016.

M E RG E RS AND ACQUISITIONS

MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS

EIC enters administration Maintenance firm EIC Limited of Alcester in Warwickshire has gone into administration, following poor trading performance. Last month, business advisory firm AlixPartners LLP appointed joint administrators over the company, which previously reported £80 million in turnover and has a workforce of 400 people. In a statement, the administrators said the company’s financial distress was down to ”increasing pressure from its creditors as a result of a poor recent trading performance,

underpinned by an ever-increasing competitive market”. “After exploring all options available, management concluded that the cash pressures were too great and there was no alternative but to place the company into administration. As a result the business will cease to trade with immediate effect.” The news comes despite the company having won a sub-contract last year to deliver all planned and reactive maintenance work at 42 of the Ministry of Defence’s estates in south-east England.

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JLL

£226.1m Integral UK

15

JLL has reached an agreement to acquire Integral UK Ltd, a UK provider of mechanical and electrical property maintenance. The move, which has a total valuation of $330 million (£226.1 million), will make JLL one of the largest mobile engineering services providers for property worldwide. The acquisition will strengthen JLL’s ability to perform property maintenance for clients across Europe, Middle East and Africa, adding to the more than four billion square feet of property now serviced globally.

July 2016

29/06/2016 16:08


S U P P LY S I D E BUSINESS NEWS

MarketUpdate

Q&A

FM in care homes How quickly is this sector expanding? For FM service suppliers, the trend to consolidation in the sector as private operators have built up portfolios of care homes and tried to bring economies of scale to bear has offered significant opportunities. Larger care homes groups operate efficiently by outsourcing cleaning, laundry, waste services, and soft FM to groups that can service several sites. MTW Research suggests that the wider contract cleaning market will grow by £100 million this year.

What’s happened recently? The sector is something of a paradox. The population is ageing, so demand for care home space is rising, but the sector also faces a funding crisis, caught in a pincer movement of the squeeze on government spending that leaves local authorities struggling to support those who can’t afford to pay their own way, and pressure on costs caused by the introduction of the National Living Wage (NLW), which has hit operators’ margins. For operators that have built portfolios of homes through debt-funded acquisitions, the pressure on profits has merely been exacerbated.

Which FM providers have been most successful? Many work in the sector. Some of the largest operating in ancillary areas include Mitie and Mears Group, who have pushed strongly into domiciliary care, which has seen growth as the government tries to keep more elderly people in their own homes rather than in care homes. Smaller firms including Affinity CM, Bellrock, Paddon FM, Orchard, Walker Healthcare, Sanctuary Maintenance, and Norse Commercial have picked up significant contracts by offering services to the sector.

What is driving development? Cost pressures have led to significant opportunities for service providers. Those who have won contracts have been able to offer better efficiency to care home operators under pressure because of rising costs. Such pressures are only likely to grow as local authority funding falls and costs – such as the NLW, set to rise each year to 2020 – increase. This will require FM suppliers, themselves under pressure from wage costs, to improve their productivity.

NEW PARTNERS, NEW DIRECTIONS INTERVIEWEE: Simon Weston, chairman, Weston Facilities Management ISSUE: The security business

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ecently, Wales-based Weston Facilities Management Group signed a national security contract with integrated services provider Speedy Services. We spoke to its chairman, Simon Weston, CBE and Falklands War veteran.

What plans do you have for Weston Facilities Management? I set up the company around two-and-ahalf years ago with my business partner Paul Hartshorn. Then we merged it with Rob Richards’ dog guarding business. We want to take it as far as we can. We are always meeting people looking to change [suppliers etc] and if they like the way we do things, we can work with them and give them the best experience of FM that we can.

“SERVICE PEOPLE ARE GOOD AT FM AS IT REQUIRES GOOD ORGANISATIONAL SKILLS AND SO THEIR SKILLS DO LEND THEMSELVES TO THE JOB” How did your venture into FM begin? I went into a venture with Paul and two other men who turned were not as honourable as us. There are skullduggerous people in the world of security. Hopefully they will look back and say: “We missed out.” So Paul and I decided we could set up a successful company by ourselves.

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If people know one thing about me, it is that I don’t give up easily.

What attracted you to FM? It was something we had never done before. My son had been working for Paul, who ran a printing and signage business which we eventually dropped to focus entirely on security. Security requires attention to detail. It depends on the keyholders on the site. For instance, we try and make sure that people’s needs are addressed. Like if people are leaving a site late at night, they may need extra lighting.

Are you aware that a lot of servicemen and women end up in the facilities management industry? Service people are good at it as it requires good organisational skills and so their skills do lend themselves to the job. A lot of it is about controlling people and their movements. FM is often about turning up with the right equipment and clothes. But we believe in supporting and encouraging our staff to do their jobs, not shouting at them.

What else does Weston FM do? We do manned guarding, but not pubs and clubs as they are way too problematic. One of our guys worked for a club where a woman attacked him with her high heels but CCTV captured it and showed that he had been restraining her – not hitting her, which saved him a criminal conviction. We also have our own monitoring station in Torfaen in South Wales with cameras and we often help out police. We also do electronic guarding, remote coverage, dog patrolling and cleaning.

July 2016

29/06/2016 16:08


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S U P P LY S I D E BUSINESS NEWS

For more FM business news, analysis and contract wins, sign up for the FM World daily newsletter at www.fm-world.co.uk/news/e-zine

ANALYSIS

MA R KE T TR E N DS

Report shows minor fall in M&A activity in Q1 2016

FM FIRMS SIGN OFF ON A MIXED BAG OF RESULTS G R A E M E D AV I E S newsdesk@fm-world.co.uk

“G4S’S REPUTATION HAS TAKEN ANOTHER DIVE IN THE EYES OF INVESTORS, IN A SHARP CONTRAST TO THE IMPROVING PICTURE AT SERCO”

GRAEME DAVIES writes for Investors Chronicle

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PHOTOGRAPHY: GETTY

I

n the FM sector trading conditions have long been mixed, and more recently exacerbated by the uncertainty in the run-up to the EU referendum, and recent financial statements from the UK’s largest FM operators have proved to be a mixed bag too. The quoted FM sector has been roughly divided in recent years between those companies who appear to be well managed and performing solidly and those who are trying to recover their reputations with investors. In the latter camp are G4S and Serco – both struggling to return to an even keel after well-publicised scandals over government contracts. But a recent trading update from Serco hinted that the revival being plotted by former Aggreko chief executive Rupert Soames may be finally gaining some traction. Investors reacted positively to news of better-than-expected trading as well as positive contract news, which will lead to better-than-forecast profits for the current year. At G4S, though, recovery still seems some way off as the scandals of the Olympic Games security contract have been followed up by issues in the treatment of inmates at a youth detention centre in Medway, and the fact that a long-term employee, Omar Mateen, was responsible for the attack on a nightclub in Orlando that left 50 dead. d Although such things cannot be predicted, and indeed the FBI had ’s previously opened and closed an investigation into the attacker, G4S’s reputation has taken another dive in the eyes of investors, in a sharp contrast to the improving picture at Serco. Among those companies who have sailed rather more serenely er through the past few years, Babcock International produced yet another set of predictably solid financial results in May. After several years of steady gains in revenues and profits Babcock booked another 4 per cent rise in turnover and a 5 per cent improvement in profits. And Mitie cited better performance in the FM space as reason to ch. expect modest growth in its full-year revenues in the year to next March. as it continues to hold its own in a tough market, especially in care markets. It posted strong growth in revenues and profits and brokers forecast a decent uplift next year too.

Merger and acquisition (M&A) activity in the first quarter of 2016 has slowed slightly, according to the latest Insights Into Facilities Management report by business and financial adviser Grant Thornton UK LLP. The decline in activity is primarily attributed to a slowdown in the domestic market. A total of 21 deals were completed in Q1 2016, a 9 per cent decrease from the same period in 2015. This also represents a fall of 28 per cent compared with Q4 2015 when 29 deals took place, the highest number since Q3 2012. While the domestic market slowed, cross-border acquisitions remained fairly stable this quarter. Overseas investors, particularly in Asia, are still showing a clear interest in the UK FM sector – deals done include Indian company Mortice PLC buying the London-based Office and General Group. Notable deals this quarter in the private equity (PE) sector included Rubicon Private Equity taking on the utilities and services contractor Enserve from Cinven for a reported £60 million. PE investment has slightly increased this quarter, although investors appear to have become more selective and are showing more interest in buy-and-build platforms than pure play organic growth-driven assets. Usman Malik, M M&A partner at Grant Thornton UK LLP, said: “Following a strong end to 2015, fallen this quarter. M&A activity has fa This slowdown of activity shows how may already be the FM sector m feel the uncertainty starting to fe the EU referendum caused by th The potential on June 23. T impact of a ‘Brexit’ and the restrictions on free resulting res movement of labour into the be ignored. UK cannot b about the impact Concerns ab the operations of on th players in the FM play sector and their supply secto chains, generally chai reliant on a more relia transient workforce, trans remains to be seen.” rema

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29/06/2016 16:26


S U P P LY S I D E BUSINESS NEWS

F M -WO R L D.CO.U K / N E WS

CONTRACTS DEALS Sodexo wins five-year Scottish Government deal Sodexo has been awarded a fiveyear, £500,000 contract to provide a range of hard and soft FM services, including include cleaning, waste management and pest control at the Scottish Public Pensions’ head office in the Scottish Borders.

Graysons takes catering deal at British Library Caterer Graysons has been awarded a £4 million-a-year contract to cater for the British Library at St Pancras, London. The contract runs for five years and will see Graysons work in partnership with the library to manage public restaurant and cafés at the grade I listed building.

JLL shops at Interserve for £60m security deal Interserve has been awarded a contract worth £60 million over three years with JLL. It will carry out facilities services, including cleaning, security, pest control and electronic security system maintenance, at 18 shopping centres managed by JLL across the UK.

Churchill wins AET deal Churchill has taken a cleaning contract for three academy schools, part of the Academies Enterprise Trust (AET), as well as the trust’s head office, all in Essex. The contract is to begin on 1 July.

Mitie takes on FM contract at IoD Mitie has been awarded a three-year contract with the Institute of Directors (IoD), where it will provide maintenance services at the institute’s headquarters in London. The seven-storey grade 1 listed building includes a business centre, function rooms, restaurants, bars and lounges.

Imtech gets in the picture with Cineworld Imtech Inviron has been awarded a threeyear contract by GVA Acuity to maintain the portfolio of leading cinema group Cineworld. It is to provide planned and reactive maintenance, repair and installations across 80 cinemas in the UK and Ireland.

DE A L OF TH E MON TH

Facilicom gets charged up for Tesla deal Facilicom UK has secured work with electric vehicles company Tesla UK. Facilicom is to provide cleaning and maintenance services to all of Tesla’s UK sites, including its showrooms at Brent Cross, Heathrow Airport, Oxford Street (London), and Weybridge in Surrey.

CONTRACTS TICKER

Medway Norse expands its council services Medway Norse has expanded its contract to supply Medway Council with grounds maintenance services. Medway Norse now provides landscaping, horticulture, grass cutting, sports turf and vegetation management, tree assessments, monitoring and surgery – and fly tipping collection.

CHARTWELLS RETAINS £65 MILLION SCHOOL CATERING DEAL Chartwells, the education arm of Compass Group, has retained its catering contract with West Sussex County Council for a further five years. The deal, which is valued at £13 million annually, sees Chartwells continue to provide meals to more than 200 schools for the local authority. Some 650 Chartwells employees will carry on working with the council on the contract, which also has the option to be extended by a further five years. Chartwells said the contract helps to provide eight apprenticeships each year. Chartwells is the education arm of Compass Group UK & Ireland. In 2015, it won a £40 million contract to deliver catering services at the University of Salford, across its main campus and the university’s operation at MediaCityUK.

Amadeus to cater for Northampton abbey trust Catering business Amadeus has won a five-year, £3 million contract to provide catering services at Delapré Abbey Preservation Trust, near Northampton. Amadeus will run the site’s new café and provide event catering at the venue.

Norse wins catering deals at East Anglian schools • Mitie on track with FTI • Mountjoy secures Southampton Uni

extension • Beaver patrols London hospital trusts’ campuses • Harrow Green strikes deal with supplier YPO • Arthur McKay adds to work at National Records of Scotland • Oltec FM secures Wakefield centre deal • Cleaner Indepth gets trucking at Eddie Stobart

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INSIDE 21 22 24 26 28

Currently trending buzz-phrases explained Perspectives – four original opinion pieces ThinkTank – the productivity puzzle Seen and heard this month | Member interview July @ BIFM and Calls to Action

VIEW POINT THE BE ST O F THE S E C TO R ’ S DI S CU S S I O N A N D DE B AT E

Each month we explain the background to new phrases you may be seeing or hearing about as you go about your work

B U Z Z WO RDS

THE ‘INTERNET OF CLEAN’ So, The Internet of Clean what’s this all about? Heard of the Internet of Things (IoT)? Well, the Internet of Clean (IoC) applies the same principles and technology to the cleaning sector. It involves using small WiFi-enabled sensors and beacons to measure things like supply levels, temperature and equipment usage. All this data is then fed into a dashboard where it can be monitored and managed remotely.

Why the big fuss? The IoC will help FMs to spot potential issues before they become problems. A sensor can reveal that which is invisible to the naked

eye. This removes the need for an individual or team to undertake manual measurement – the data comes to you instead. Analysis of the data can also enable FMs to refine their cleaning operations, for example, to cover heavy-use areas with more staff.

How would it benefit my business?

Give me some more examples. Anything that can be monitored could in theory be connected to the IoC. Some of the applications proposed or already in use are: soap/disinfectant levels, floorscrubber battery life measurement, footfall heat-mapping, food temperature measurement e.g.

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cold storage and cooking facilities, and dishwater water usage.

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Aside from reducing costs, the IoC should improve the standard of workplace cleaning and hygiene, meaning increased staff well-being, less sickness-related absence, and reduced environmental impact, thanks to efficient use of resources. What’s not to like?

Where can I get my IoC? Currently there are only a few providers with a dedicated IoC platform. But the concept is now ‘out there’, and it’s only a matter of time before it becomes more widely available.

July 2016

30/06/2016 10:30


V I E W P O I NT Have your say

PERSPECTIVES

Can you see yourself in these pages? Get in touch by email – editorial@fm-world.co.uk Topical, inspirational, angry or amusing – we consider all relevant comment

PERSPECTIVES 1

2

Can you hear me?

FM could tell us all our yesterdays

EDWARD FINCH is a former professor in FM at Salford University and previously editor of the academic journal Facilities

L

ooking across the meeting table I see the facilities manager looking browbeaten. This is one of many project meetings for a new facility. Meetings with the designer, key stakeholders, planning authorities and the infrastructure team have started to overwhelm the FM’s diary. But this meeting is just about ‘users’; people that will inhabit the space. So how important are these user group meetings? Most of the important decisions have already been made. It’s now an exercise in ‘selling and telling’. I’ve now switched places. No longer am I an FM – I’m representing a section of the multifarious user group. I’m speaking up for disabled users. I raise concerns about access to the proposed health facility from the neighbouring bus stop. Has there been dialogue with the local planning authority regarding dropped curbs? The discussion moves on. Was I even heard? It’s a familiar story; the FM inundated with appeals from the more vocal. But do the lines have to be drawn in such an adversarial manner? Engaging in ‘coproduction’ is surely the way ahead.

I

was recently in Lusaka, Zambia, attending the African Development Bank AGM as an observer. We were hosted at the Mulungushi International Conference Centre, a modern facility in the centre of Lusaka. As we listened to the speeches at the opening ceremony I was wondering about the maintenance of the facility until a speaker referred to the centre’s history. The Mulungushi was built in 1970 by the Zambian government to represent freedom for all Africans from colonial rule. Zambia was one of the ‘frontline states’ – a coalition of southern African countries including Angola, Botswana, Lesotho, Mozambique,

Nevertheless, in a climate of organisational upheaval nurturing a collaborative environment is often difficult. Users may become withdrawn, entrenched or confrontational. The

“WAS I EVER HEARD? IT’S A FAMILIAR STORY; THE FM INUNDATED WITH APPEALS FROM THE MORE VOCAL” challenge for the FM is to eke out insights from people that intimately understand the day-to-day workings of an organisation. This may involve leading users through a process of self-discovery on what is truly important. Mention the phrase ‘disabled access’ and I sometimes notice a sense of dread from the FM. Does the design comply with legal requirements? No amount of legislation substitutes for input from the users. One of an FM’s greatest skills is the ability to listen – often to the less vocal and less powerful. Given that many of us will experience some form of disability during our working life, getting accessibility ‘right’ is in all of our interests.

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TUNDE OBILEYE is MD/CEO at Great Heights Property & Facilities Management, Nigeria

“AFRICA LACKS WRITTEN HISTORY; MOST OF IT IS TRANSFERRED BY WORD OF MOUTH” Swaziland, Tanzania and Zimbabwe – determined to ensure democracy based on majority rule was entrenched in the then South West Africa (Namibia) and South Africa. The centre remains pivotal. Infrastructure and its

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management are critical to preserve not just the facilities and buildings, but also the history of nations and peoples. Africa has a lack of written history; most of it is transferred by word of mouth. But recent history is directly linked to infrastructure. In Nigeria the FESTAC town in Lagos was built for the 2nd Black and African Festival of Arts & Culture in 1977 (FESTAC 77) – initiated under pan-Africanist leader Leopold Sedar Senghor (the first was in 1966 in Dakar). FESTAC 77 represented the largest cultural festival to have been held on the continent but FESTAC town today bears no semblance to this feat. Same with the National Stadium and National Theatre in Lagos; important landmarks have been allowed to rot. The Mulungushi thrives as a conference centre, but it does less to teach history to young Africans. FM provides a chance to bridge this gap. It can facilitate privatepublic investments to turn sections of such buildings into museums for historical documents, undertake maintenance to keep the original idea behind such buildings, and manage them as places where businesses can thrive.

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29/06/2016 16:27


V I E W P O I NT PERSPECTIVES

3

4

Perceptions of cleaners are changing

Here’s food for thought HEIDI STONE is sales & marketing director at Gather & Gather

JANET PARK is director of cleaning at Interserve

T

he cleaning profession in 2016 is unrecognisable compared with just a few years ago. The tasks cleaning teams perform are diversifying. They take a far more active role in estate management and are more customer-facing, directly engaging with building users and acting as a true face of the organisation’s brand. At one account I visited recently, one of our cleaning colleagues is providing lunchtime cover for the customer’s reception team. This was not originally part of her role, but because she had been provided with customer service training and had developed an extensive knowledge of the site, she was identified as an asset who could provide invaluable support to the front-of-house team. This is happening across the board. Cleaning teams are working closely with other building management functions and are increasingly providing additional services such as meeting room management, fire marshalling and AV support. Brought out of the shadows by the trend to daytime working, they are adding real value to

“CLEANING TEAMS ARE WORKING CLOSELY WITH OTHER BUILDING MANAGEMENT FUNCTIONS” ever more employees making the move from temporary to full-time roles; embracing the profession as a rewarding career choice, not just a job. Employers need to encourage this. They must make sure training programmes are available to help cleaning teams to build skills across a range of disciplines. They also need to ensure there are the pathways in place to allow those that shine to take the step from frontline service delivery into management positions. There is real ability and ambition in the cleaning profession. At a time when the industry is struggling to bring fresh talent into management positions, we ignore our cleaning professionals at our peril.

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A

re we getting the balance right between cost, productivity and employee engagement? Is FM about an endgame of cost managing, or creating great places to work that are efficient, dynamic and engaging, and so more productive and profitable? One prediction from March’s Smart Working Summit was that space allocated to catering would be reduced because technology will allow for ‘at desk’ ordering. Is the implication that all food preparation is off-site as kitchen space is removed, or does it mean that collaborative breakout spaces are removed too? Both are impractical for

customers and showing everyone what they are capable of. Importantly, perceptions of cleaning as a career are also changing. We are seeing

“PEOPLE LIKE TO SEE WHAT’S ON OFFER, TO SOCIALISE AND TAKE TIME AWAY FROM THE DESK AT LUNCH” any number of reasons within any sizeable office space. At desk ordering has never proved popular because people like to take time to see what’s on offer, to socialise and take time away from the desk at lunchtime. More importantly, ordering

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at the desk flies in the face of modern workplace strategy. The CIPD says that just 30 per cent of UK workers take proper lunch breaks; the idea of at your desk ordering implies ‘at your desk eating’ and the further erosion of the ‘lunch hour’, reinforcing a sedentary working life. Enlightened employers are smart enough to know that food plays a central role in employee wellbeing. The idea of encouraging a 45-minute break for lunch fosters more collaboration: conversations in the queue for food, a shared conversation over a coffee away from the desk – these are ways to enhance productivity and spark creative thinking. Knoll Workplace Research says the cost of poor health and wellbeing is about 35 per cent of payroll. And at least eight different studies showed a return on investment of wellness programmes between 144 per cent and 3,000 per cent. And healthy food is a critical element of modern workplace strategy. Savvy corporates invest in such strategies because they drive productivity and increase profitability. It’s archaic to think that at desk ordering has any part to play in FM, other than added value convenience for a minority of workers.

July 2016

29/06/2016 16:27


V I E W P O I NT T H E T H I N K TA N K

P RO DUC T IV IT Y

THE GREAT PRODUCTIVITY DEBATE

ILLUSTRATION: GETTY

May saw the launch of The Stoddart Review, a project aimed at ensuring business leaders fully understand the contribution workplace has to overall organisational performance (more details at stoddartreview.com). So we asked – is there an appetite in your organisation in the link between workplace and productivity?

WILL EASTON

CHRISTOPHER ROBERTS

IT’S ALL A MATTER OF SCALE

IT’S GOING TO BECOME HARD TO IGNORE

There’s definitely no connection [between productivity and the workplace] with one of my clients, but this is an area in which the FM needs to become a “workplace” specialist and start banging the drum with expertise in this area and step out of the reactive servitude that’s the typical mindset of many FMs. I’d go as far as arguing (antagonise in some people’s opinions) that the term ‘FM’ should be replaced by ‘workplace’ across the discipline going forward. Symbiotic in leaps and bounds as we move away from the the physical concept of a ‘facility’ and towards the bubble that surrounds the employee to carry out their work no matter where they are and at what time. It’s all about the future of work now. WILL EASTON MBIFM is a workplace management specialist

Most I know would be likely to say it hasn’t come up [as an issue], but I think The Stoddart Review will change this and provide significant management information for FMs to take smart working forward and make workplace management strategy a key business decision-maker (something which is currently difficult for many who are trying, but failing, to convert). Will it make a difference? I really hope so, as it’s really needed and with the data

CHRISTOPHER ROBERTS is a facilities manager at Computershare

MICHAEL OWEN

FOOD IS A KEY DRIVER Catering can have an effect on productivity that stretches beyond the food itself. It can create a community aspect by providing a space where people can interact and socialise within the work environment. We also developed a workplace model where we embed front-of-house

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from the Leesman Index it will be hard to ignore, right? Will Easton [left] makes a valid point, in that education is key and BIFM needs to lead this to ensure FMs not only have the tools and information, but also the know-how to use it successfully. This is not pure FM. While we can lead it and start it, within every organisation it needs to sit symbiotically with IT and HR. Thus, these relationships and shared visions need nurturing today.

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people and the FM is very visible. They understand the work schedules of different BBC teams and whenever they go out on shooting locations they realise that an area of space will become free for a period of time, which can be used by other people. It allows the BBC to make better use of space. MICHAEL OWEN is head of business development, industrial sector, at Interserve

July 2016

29/06/2016 16:51


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V I E W P O I NT T H E T H I N K TA N K

Join the Think Tank to have your opinion reflected here — editorial@fm-world.co.uk

R

S URVE Y R E S ULTS

ADAM PHILLIPS

ALL WE NEED IS THE AIR THAT WE BREATHE… One area in which facilities management can make a tangible difference to productivity is in improving the atmosphere in the workplace itself, so that staff are more likely to stay healthy. Adam Phillips, business development manager at Wates Smartspace, comments: “Our head office is in Euston Square, and Euston Road has some of the lowest measured air quality in all of Europe, so it’s absolutely critical that the air is of a suitable standard. “The guidelines say you have to replace air filters every 12 weeks; on Euston Road you need to change that to every two weeks. The impact that has on people is noticeable, and not just on those who suffer from pre-existing conditions such as asthma.” Just having a more visible FM presence, with cleaners working during the day rather than at night and wellpresented engineers being on-site, can help workers appreciate the office environment more. Another area in which FM can make a difference is to ensure more efficient ways of working, especially by ensuring that vital equipment is properly maintained and operational. This can have a direct link on productivity. “My previous role was in supporting data centres which were trading billions of pounds a day, so we needed to make sure we had equipment uptime,” says Phillips. FM’s role in this space should also stretch to training staff how to operate machinery effectively, and making sure they know how they could accidently damage it, he adds. “The next stage of that is looking into non-intrusive maintenance techniques, so using thermal imaging to service the equipment as opposed to turning it off, opening panels, playing around with everything and then recommissioning it.” These are areas which may not be possible through an in-house team, says Phillips. ADAM PHILLIPS is business development manager at Wates

31% 69% Is your organisation now considering the impact of workplace on overall productivity? (Yes or No)

17% 83% Is your organisation’s commitment to productivity through the workplace a recent development?

22% 78%

WE NEED BETTER METRICS “There are a lot of metrics within the sector, but there is no clear way of showing that FM services are directly linked to productivity. Research needs to be done to show the direct correlation. There are surveys which link to staff satisfaction, and have tenuous links to productivity, but I have never come across a measure to show the direct link.”

FIVE KEY ELEMENTS IN AN EFFECTIVE RELATIONSHIP

1 2 3 4 5

Outcome rather than input-based KPIs

Direct engagement between the provider and employees The opportunity to introduce best practice from other sectors

Regular reviews with clients to identify changing needs

ROSS ABBATE is managing director, Europe and the Americas, Macro

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Has there never been a connection between productivity and the workplace in your organisation?

Trust, based around open lines of communication

ROSS ABBATE

R

MARTIN PICK ARD

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We must move past FM as just cost reduction Outsourcing elements of FM to specialist providers should see the client benefit from being freed up to focus on its own speciality. “The theory of outsourcing is that you outsource to an expert who has systems, processes, capabilities and knowledge that you don’t, and can do things more effectively than you, even though they will add some overhead and profit on top,” says Martin Pickard, managing director of the FM Guru consultancy. The routinely used statistic from Leesman Index research is that just 56 per cent of employees believe their office helps them to work productively, meaning there is significant room for improvement. “A better designed working environment with improved air quality and light can certainly improve productivity,” says Pickard. “The question is whether that can be more easily achieved through outsourcing rather than doing it yourself, and the answer to that lies in the quality of our service providers.” Many outsourced contracts fail to deliver genuine improvements in productivity, and much of this is down to how organisations go about selecting and managing providers. “Intelligent clients buy into it and good inhouse professional facilities managers buy into it,” says Pickard. “What they struggle with is bringing with them their procurement and finance colleagues, who see outsourcing as a route solely to cost reduction. “We still find people buy from the lowest bidder and seem incapable of writing intelligent outcome-oriented specifications,” he adds. “But equally on the other side some service providers think the only way they can win is by cutting everything to the core and treating everything like a commodity.” FM providers need to be a bit braver in making the business case around improvements in productivity and innovation, says Pickard.

MARTIN PICKARD is managing director of the FM Guru consultancy

July 2016

30/06/2016 10:06


V I E W P O I NT SEEN AND HEARD

FM@LARGE

FEELING THE WINCH After we focused in May on the way FM is conducted in the 1 Netherlands, more Dutch workplace innovation aimed at preventing presenteeism has come to light. The BBC recently reported on a Dutch creative agency with a particularly unforgiving way of 3 making sure everyone stops work promptly - through the simple expedient of removing their office furniture. Heldergroen winches up its desks when the clock strikes 6:00pm, with Heldergroen’s boss calling the process a ritual which tells staff that there’s a time and a space to start work”.

Ideas eas and co com comments m made around e in aroun n the sector this is month mon 2

“COMFORT, TEMPERATURE AND LIGHTING ARE CONSISTENTLY THE MOST IMPORTANT CONSIDERATIONS FOR EMPLOYEES. THE FOCUS SHOULD BE ON GETTING THE FUNDAMENTALS RIGHT RATHER THAN TRYING TO REINVENT THE WHEEL” STEVE LANG, DIRECTOR, SAVILLS RESEARCH

“Leaders… are learning to be less the visionary, less the sage, less the objective setter, and more the shaper, the connector, the questioner” @ALISONCOWARD AT THE RECENT ALL ABOUT PEOPLE CONFERENCE #AAPCONF

tinyurl.com/FMW0716-BBC1 tinyurl.com/FMW0716-BBC2

BROUGHT TO OUR ATTENTION “Seeing your customer makes you better at your job” The mere sight of a customer motivates you to do your job better, claims fresh UCL School of Management research. Assistant Professor Chia-Jung Tsay says that the visual transparency between customers and providers can improve service and performance, creating value for both. Professor Tsay studied the food industry, with Ryan Buell and Tami Kim from Harvard Business School, and found that when chefs and their patrons can see each other, not only did the food quality receive higher ratings, service also improved. The research suggests that seeing customers makes employees feel more appreciated, more satisfied with their jobs, and more willing to exert effort. At the same time, seeing the workers allowed customers to perceive greater effort and they became more appreciative of the employees and valued the service more. “In many industries, effort is hidden from customers,” say the researchers. “But feelings about an office job that’s separate from the customer, for example, could change if suddenly the beneficiary of that work is visible. It’s being appreciated that makes people feel that their work is meaningful and what they do matters.”

NOTED&QUOTED “Too many companies buying FM think it is like buying paperclips” JULIE BIRCH, CONSULTANT MARKETING DIRECTOR

“STAFF ARE NOT THE BRIGHTEST OCCUPANTS OF A BUILDING”

MAXWELL STEPHENS’ PETER FORSHAW ON CLIENTS’ DEMANDS FOR EDUCATED FMS

WHEN IT COMES TO FIRE SAFETY, SUGGESTED SURREY COUNTY COUNCIL’S NICK HICKMAN AT THE RECENT FACILITIES SHOW

“Never before in the sector have we needed our modern day, mature approaches to improving the built environment. These include lean construction, a diverse and ethical sector, collaboration not silo’d isolation, sound training and development, BIM, and a restorative sustainability approach that is not weakened to doing even less just to reduce the built environments sustainability impact.” BUILT ENVIRONMENT CONSULTANT MARTIN BROWN ASSESSES BREXIT

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“QUALIFICATIONS ARE NO LONGER JUST NICE TO HAVE ANY MORE. TRAINING COMPANIES ARE GOING TO BE VERY BUSY.“

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July 2016

30/06/2016 11:14


V I E W P O I NT STEPHANIE KIRBY is estates services coordinator at the University of Sussex

A B IT AB O UT YO U

BEHIND THE JOB

What do you do? I provide administrative and operational support to the client function team that oversees the outsourced TFM (total facilities management) and hospitality contracts at the University of Sussex.

What attracted you to the job? You face different challenges all the time, and having that variety makes the work interesting and engaging.

What’s your top perk at work? The University of Sussex campus is fantastically vibrant and lively; there’s always something taking place, from open lectures to concerts to exhibitions. I love attending university events and knowing that I play a small part in making these happen.

How did you get into FM? Like many people, I fell into it when the role became available in my office. While researching the role, I marvelled at the variety and scope of FM – it’s such a huge sector with so many career possibilities to explore.

Your career high point to date? It will soon be the completion of my first BIFM qualification. I’m half way through my Level 3 (and loving it), and I already have my sights on Level 4.

STEPHANIE KIRBY Your biggest career challenge to date? That

As a new starter, everything I do is a chance to learn; for example, raising purchase orders familiarises me with our key suppliers and with how much things cost, and taking minutes allows me to listen in to interesting meetings and discussions between senior management.

Any interesting tales to tell? We regularly fly hawks around the campus

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That we just fix buildings. The human aspect of FM is by far the hardest and most rewarding element to work with.

that sustainability is becoming a more naturally embedded mindset, and this has driven some great innovations.

…and how will it change in the next five years? I’d like

“MORE BRIGHT YOUNG SCHOOL LEAVERS OR GRADUATES WOULD BE INTERESTED IN JOINING THE INDUSTRY IF THEY KNEW IT EXISTED”

What one thing would you change about FM? I’d like to see its profile raised outside of th industry, particularly the am among young people. I re really think more bright yo young school leavers o graduates would be or i interested in joining t industry if they the k knew it existed.

Which FM myth would you most like to put an end to?

How has FM changed in the last five years? I think

would be when I attended my first BIFM networking event after only a month in the job. I felt a bit of a gatecrasher, but everyone was so friendly and welcoming. I learnt a lot, met some very interesting people, and found myself already looking forward to the next event.

If you could give one of your responsibilities to an unsuspecting colleague, what would it be? Nothing!

impact on my local community is the best reason to get up in the mornings.

as an environmentally friendly way to deter seagulls from becoming too much of a problem. I often bump into the pest control officer on site, and it’s a wonderful chance to learn about these stunning birds (and to give them a quick pet!).

If you weren’t in FM, what would you be doing? Working in another part of the public sector. Knowing that the work I do has a direct and positive

27

to think that companies such as Google will inspire other organisations to take a brave step away from the traditional thinking about how working environments should look and behave, and to open ourselves to fresh and innovative thinking about how people and their surroundings interact.

What single piece of advice would you give to a young facilities manager starting out? Your network is a powerful tool – use it. Build relationships with colleagues at work, communicate with other industry professionals via social media, and approach people at networking and training events. There’s so much experience and wisdom out there to learn from.

Do your friends understand what FM is? I’ve not yet met anyone my age outside of the industry who knows the term. Each time I explain it, however, I see it as a chance to shine a light on FMs as the unsung heroes of all organisations and to spread the word on what we do.

July 2016

30/06/2016 11:15


JULY@BIFM

NEWS DIRECT FROM BIFM

BIFM pipeline

SUSTAINABILITY SURVEY UPDATE The Facilities Management Sustainability Survey 2016 has now closed. The results are being analysed and the conclusions drawn together. Sunil Shah, chair of the Sustainability SIG, said: “After the survey closes the SIG will be working closely with the BIFM research and information team through a series of workshops and direct discussions with opinion leaders from across the industry to gain their insights and views from the outputs of the survey. This year one of the workshops looks back over the past 10 years, another is forward-looking, trying to establish how sustainable practices will evolve in the years ahead, and the final workshop captures the views of operational FMs.”

Triple effect BIFM members highlight three useful ideas they latched on to at a recent members event

The results from the sustainability survey 2016 will be launched in early September

MARK WHITTAKER Deputy chair, BIFM North Region & business development manager

I recently helped to organise a seminar on Delivering a great customer experience. As two-time BIFM Award-winners on this theme, the obvious choice to host the event were our friends at Edge Hill University. The issue of service delivery is a critical one in the FM sector, and in my address I explained that gone are the days when engineers had no interaction with building staff and visitors. We must now actively seek the views of those receiving our services. Jamie McDonald, customer service experience director of Carillion, stressed the need to “measure what everybody thinks”, combined with team engagement, listening and empowerment. Bill Hancox, FM director at Edge Hill, stressed the importance of engagement. “Culture needs to be authentic. It is so much more than posters on the wall.”

BIFM SUPPORTS UK CONSTRUCTION WEEK BIFM has announced its support of UK Construction Week, which takes place at the Birmingham NEC from 18- 20 October 2016. The event features five trade shows and expects to draw more than 24,000 trade visitors. “This is a great opportunity for FM professionals to showcase the role they can play in delivering sustainable outcomes in construction programmes,” said Mike Packham, of Bernard Williams Associates, and a leading volunteer in BIFM’s Operational Readiness Group. BIFM sessions will include a session at SMART Buildings 2016 titled ‘Why Your Facilities Manager is More Important to Your Building Design Than You Think’. Further activities with the show will be announced over the coming months

TRAILBLAZER CONSULTATION

1

2

3

FM must not be insular in assessing what is good service. We must look at what innovations and best practice other sectors are adopting.

The right culture in an organisation is the glue that bonds an engaged team and an enabler for positive change.

People are the difference, not technology or processes. Engage, Encourage and Empower your people and see the impact it can make.

Service

Culture

People first

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The employers’ consultation on the proposed Assessment Plan for the Trailblazer FM Supervisor apprenticeship closed in early July. Fraser Talbot, Professional Standards & Education Manager, said: “The responses are now being reviewed by the employer group and any revisions to the Assessment Plan will be made. The Assessment Plan will be submitted to BIS by late July, as BIS is responsible for its approval and publishes all documents related to the new standards. The aim of the revised Trailblazer apprenticeships is that they are employerdriven, so we must ensure that we have as representative a cross-section of the industry involved as possible.”

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To be involved in the employer group for the FM Supervisor apprenticeship or future standards development contact fraser.talbot@bifm.org.uk

July 2016

30/06/2016 11:16


V I E W P O I NT J U LY@ B I F M

SIG FOCUS — INTERNATIONAL CONTACTS Chair: Steve Gladwin, steve.gladwin@ nodussolutions.co.uk Secretary: Joanna Lloyd-Davies, jld@joannalloy ddavies.co.uk @BIFMISIG

YOUR INSTITUTE, YOUR QUESTIONS JASMINE ROSTENEDWARDS, MBIFM FM professional operating in the leisure sector

tinyurl.com/BIFM-ISIG

I have recently completed my BIFM Level 4 Diploma. What are the options available to me?

FRASER TALBOT Professional Standards and Education Manager

Studying insights into cross-border FM culture Key themes The ISIG has developed knowledge and networking events based on international content from focus on specific markets to case studies of outsourcing models that work across borders and debates on cultural differences and their impact on FM. An insights programme has been launched, and links with other organisations have been developed to promote the value of FM around the world. Formalising our relationship with Polycom will enable more regular engagement with members outside the UK.

14 June will be shared at the breakfast session on World FM Day. Events in 2017 will be designed to coincide with BIFM’s international research such as the Business Confidence Monitors.

Events Synopses of February’s events – ‘Letters from America, Piloting New FM Practices’ and ‘The Perfect Ambassadors for International FM’ – and all ISIG events can be found at www.bifm.org.uk/bifm/groups/sigs/ intal/documents

Linking with other FM groups Developing a co-ordinated approach to World FM Day celebrations led by ISIG commitee member Will Bowen has been a real achievement this year. On 13th July three events are designed to coincide with different time zones so that our members and other FMs can participate remotely, thanks to Polycom’s technology. Output from the Leaders’ Forum that debated outsourcing across borders on

Forthcoming events include the relocation and reshaping of the FM service delivery model of a major financial services firm led by ISS, an overview of Herman Miller research with occupiers across the globe and views of the South African, Chinese and UAE markets. www.bifm.org.uk/bifm/groups/sigs/intal/events

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Congratulations on your exam success! I see that you also recently upgraded to Member grade based on both your qualification achievement as well as having significant FM experience. I’d advise you to look at our career development pathway on our website. If you want to continue your formal development you may want to progress to BIFM’s Level 5 qualifications – equivalent to the second year of a foundation degree, or Level 6 – equivalent to a bachelor’s degree. By working to Level 6 you will be able to upgrade your membership to Certified grade, which is only available through academic achievement. Both are available to study through our recognised study centres. I’d encourage you to consider your ongoing professional development plan and assess which areas you would like to develop, and review the ways you could achieve these through study or informal learning opportunities. Discover our careers pathway at www.bifm.org.uk/FMPathway

July 2016

30/06/2016 11:16


V I E W P O I NT J U LY@ B I F M

BIFM SHORTS

TH I S MON TH S BI F M L E A R N E R

Feature Profile

World FM Day ‘World FM Day’ – the worldwide celebration of the facilities management profession, takes place on Wednesday 13 July 2016. This year’s theme is about celebrating the role FM has to play in ‘Empowering people for a productive world’. It will look at how FM enables different business disciplines to collaborate to deliver high-quality business performance. In the spirit of World FM Day, BIFM members and FM professionals across the world have created a series of events to help showcase the role FM plays in supporting business as well as celebrating our profession. See pages 32 and 33.

Lifetime Achievement in FM Award

Name: Clive Douthwaite Job Title: Facilities manager Company: Loughborough University Studied: BIFM Level 5 Diploma BIFM recognised centre: Sheffield Hallam University He says: “In studying for my current qualification I found the experience to be challenging but rewarding. Having never had the opportunity to study at this level previously, I was surprised at the results I gained whilst having a feeling of achieving something I thought would be beyond my capabilities. “I enjoyed the experience of researching and writing to deadlines and was very surprised of how I have developed a style of writing and thinking in a totally different way. This has helped me to use these skills in the workplace to reflect on how and why FM operates and to question and challenge behaviours, p p y different manner.” processes and problems in a totally

The only 2016 BIFM Award category remaining open for nominations is Lifetime Achievement. This award recognises individuals who have made a significant contribution to FM during their career, with individuals assessed on a clear demonstration of their commitment to the progression of FM. Nominees must have: An established history and proven track record in FM; Exhibited professional leadership and inspiration to others; Made a positive and lasting impact on the FM profession; Gained the respect of their peers; and Gained recognition for their role in helping progress the profession. The full criteria are available from www.bifmawards.org/people/ lifetime16. Nominations close 29 July.

FACILITIES SHOW FM CAREERS ZONE The Facilities Show took place from 21-23 June at ExCeL in association with BIFM. For the second year running the BIFM Careers Zone was a central educational feature and hosted 26 career-focused sessions over the three days, covering everything

Review of 2015 & AGM Make sure you take the time to read this year’s Annual Review 2015, which is available to download from the BIFM website. The Annual General Meeting takes place on 13 July, 9:45m - 12:30pm.

from mentoring to entrepreneurialism, pay and FM qualifications. The zone also hosted BIFM Training, Catch22, COREcruitment, PIP Professional Training and Services, Sodexo and The FM Network, all offering career advice.

Lee Grant, BIFM’s head of membership & community development, said: “It was great to meet so many FM professionals, members and non-members alike, and be able to share details of the BIFM career pathway.”

To download the annual review, register and details of how to attend, visit www.bifm.org.uk/AGM2016

BIFM webinars

Career pathway webinar

Did you miss the recent BIFM webinars highlighting key aspects of asset management good practice? You can now log in and view these again at www.bifm.org.uk/knowledge. Also available are the webinars from our Operational Readiness Guide series. These aim to provide an overview of how to ensure long-term effectiveness in the design and construction process, and focus on FM’s role at each stage supporting the RIBA Plan of Work.

On the day after World FM Day, Thursday 14th July, we’re running a career development pathway webinar. To participate in this live event, register at the following address: tinyurl.com/FMW0716-WFMDWebinar

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July 2016

30/06/2016 11:18


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Electrical Installation Condition Reports Portable Appliance Testing Load Monitoring Recording Thermographic Surveys Electrical RectiÀcation Works

As a leading key service provider we operate throughout the UK and Channel Islands providing a very competitive “best value� service which has become very well recognised throughout the Facilities Management market Please contact us for immediate attention Email: qcltd@quantectest.co.uk Phone: (01634) 865750 Fax: (01634) 861195

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29/06/2016 12:15


V I E W P O I NT EVENTS

CALLS TO ACTION

BIFM TRAINING COURSES (All in central London unless advised)

Events, activities and publications worthy rthy y of of your yo attention

J ULY

19-21 Understanding FM [Foundation] 20-21 Fire Safety Law & Risk Assessment 20-21 Agile Working & Modern Workplaces

KE Y E V E NT

#WorldFMDay y #WorldFMDay Theme: Empowering people for a productive world Venue – International Date: 13 July - all day Events over 11-15 July

AUGUST

16-18 Understanding FM [Foundation] SE PT E M B E R

t seems to grow bigger each year, World FM Day is a worldwide celebration of facilities ties management. Make sure you take part in any of the many wayss available, see details below on how. ow. The celebration is run by GlobalFM FM and its member associations of which BIFM is one. BIFM is running a programme of special activities planned throughout the day and week with the institute’ss regional and special interest groups, there are plenty of events to choose from see the next page. There’s lots online too so you can take part anywhere!! On the day itself GlobalFM will also unveil the winners of the GlobalFM Awards, a highly coveted accolade.

I

#WORLDFMDAY G E T IN VO LV E D

There are so many ways you can take part. For full details, visit: www.globalfm.org

Join an event Events taking place all over the world from GlobalFM, BIFM and member countries. BIFM events listed on next page. www.globalfm.org

Hold an event Whether a small gathering or your whole office, take some time out to celebrate with your team, peers and colleagues, and post it on the WFMD map.

Posters and resources Posters, slide decks, web banners, and twitter ads available from www.bifm.org.uk/wfmd

Join in online All you need to do is tweet or post an update with #WorldFMDay and follow the hashtag for goings on

Some revellers from last year’s World FM Day.

from around the globe. Tweet your celebrations and pictures of your FM day. Follow @WorldFMDay for the latest updates.

Social support - twibbon Add a WorldFMDay twibbon to your social media profiles www.bifm.org.uk/wfmd LIVE BLOG - 13 JULY

FM World’s World FM Day Chain of Events Every 15 minutes on World FM Day, the FM World editorial team will be publishing a fresh interview with participating FMs. If you’d like to explain what particular function of the FM role you’re doing on the day, get in touch to sign up. editorial@fm-world.co.uk fm-world.co.uk/WorldFMDay2016

COMPLIANCE DEADLINES AUGUST 2016

PUBLICATIONS & WEBINARS BIFM Operational Readiness Guide to ensuring long-term effectiveness in the design and construction process

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To deliver long-term effectiveness and relevance for end-user FM professionals need to be engaged from the start and learnings and insights from operators applied to close the gap between building design and performance. This process supports the achievement of not only sustainable and energy efficient building operations, but also of providing work environments that maximise the productivity of the occupants. This guidance provides practical insight of the roles and responsibilities of the FM discipline at each stage of the RIBA Plan of Work process. For the publication and webinars: tinyurl.com/FMW0716-OpRead

Insurance Act 2015 Reforms in insurance contract law mean changes in current policies for business owners (“the biggest reform to insurance contract law in more than a century). It

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13-15 Understanding FM [Foundation] 13-16 IOSH Managing Safely 14 BS11000 Collaborative Business Relationships 14 Energy Management 14-15 The Essentials of Property Management 15 Energy Compliance 20 The Tender Process 20-22 Professional FM 1Edinburgh 20-21 Introduction to Sustainability 21 Contract Management 21-22 Security Management 21-22 IOSH Risk Assessment in Practice www.bifm-training.com

introduces substantial changes to the laws governing disclosure in non-consumer insurance contracts; warranties and other contractual terms; and insurers’ remedies for fraudulent claims. tinyurl.com/insuranceact2015 APR I L 2017

Water Act 2014 All non-households will be able to choose who supplies their water and wastewater retail services, meaning businesses will have more scope to negotiate the best package for their business needs. tinyurl.com/wateract2014 OC TOB E R 2016

Equality Act 2010 (Gender Pay Gap Information Regulations 2016) All private and voluntary sector employers employing 250 or more people must publish the results of a gender pay gap analysis on their website before 30 April 2018. tinyurl.com/paygapregulations2016

July 2016

30/06/2016 11:19


V I E W P O I NT DIARY

+

EVENTS

KEY Site Visit Conference / Seminar Workshop / Presentation Social / Networking World FM day events

INDUSTRY-WIDE 1 3 J ULY

BIFM AGM 2016 For BIFM members. Registration from 09.45am, closes 12:30pm. BT Centre Auditorium, 81 Newgate Street London EC1A 7AJ events@bifm.org.uk tinyurl.com/jhxgv5b 1 3 J ULY

BIFM Achievement Ceremony For BIFM Qualification achievers to celebrate their accomplishment. 1pm-6pm, BT Auditorium, London communications@bifm.org.uk tinyurl.com/bifmachieve 1 3 - 1 4 J ULY

Partner event: World FM Day Conference & Exhibition 2016: Maintaining Asset Value across the Caribbean & Latin America Savannah Beach Hotel, Hastings, Oistins, Christ Church, Barbados conferences@aceproject solutions.com tinyurl.com/jsdyx6x 1 4 JULY

#WorldFMDay: The Facilities Management Career Development Pathway communications@bifm.org.uk tinyurl.com/h94nr3w 1 4 SE P TE MB E R

for anyone in facilities management. Attracting over 1,200 professionals, the black-tie event is a highlight of the FM calendar. Alongside acknowledging the best in the FM industry, the event also encompasses networking, celebration and fun. awards@bifm.org.uk www.bifmawards.org 18 -20 OC TOB E R

Partner event: UK Construction Week Taking place at the NEC, this unites 1,000 exhibitors with a trade audience of more than 24,000 visitors. UK Construction Week consists of nine shows: Timber Expo, Build Show, Civils Expo, Plant & Machinery Live, Energy 2016, Smart Buildings 2016, Surface & Materials Show and HVAC 2016 info@ukconstructionweek.com www.ukconstructionweek.com

CHANNEL ISLANDS Site visit and networking. Island of Herm, Guernsey – 10am. tinyurl.com/zbjwgzy katherine.torode@collascrill.com

HOME COUNTIES

1 0 OC TO B E R

The awards are a must-attend event

8 SE PT E M B E R

Late Summer Social – Murder Mystery

Summer networking event. Sponsored by Office Concierge and COMXO. RIBA, 66 Portland Place, London cathy.hayward@magenta

INTERNATIONAL SIG 13 J ULY

Outsourcing across borders: the FM leaders’ perspective Polycom’s London office and online - 8:30am. Claire Sellick – sellickc@aol.com tinyurl.com/jxypb47 13 J ULY

Referendum result: the reality of our decision Polycom’s London office and online 12:30pm. Claire Sellick – sellickc@aol.com tinyurl.com/zl9xyvj 13 J ULY

Thistle Kingsley Hotel, London Chandra Hughes — ch@helixproperty.co.uk

Empowerment & Productivity: Celebrating all that’s good about FM

SCOTLAND

Polycom’s London office and online - 5:30pm. Claire Sellick – sellickc@aol.com tinyurl.com/h8a4wo4

23 S E PT E M B E R

Quarterly training day 3

SOUTH 27 J ULY

Death by water CPD training programme focused on Legionnaires disease from a medical and a legal compliance perspective Sandford Springs Golf Club, Kingsclere RG26 5RT Ian Fielder — ian.r.fielder@gmail.com tinyurl.com/zosyhtw

SOUTH WEST

14 JULY

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BAE Systems, Warton mark.a.whittaker@integral.co.uk

LONDON Summer Party

Woodlands Lane, Bradley Stoke, Bristol, BS32 4JF Richard.Garland@property.nhs.uk bifmswseptqtd.eventbrite.co.uk

8 SE PT E M B E R

Risk management: Joint learning event with the Institute of Asset Management

15 JULY

To celebrate this year’s World FM day, BIFM Home Counties and South Region will be hosting an all-day training event at Slough. The theme is technology in FM and how it can aid organisational productivity. Speakers include Autodesk, Condeco, Iconics, Service Works Group and Spacelab. tinyurl.com/Tech-IN-FM DarrenASMiller@gmail.com

BIFM Awards ceremony 2016

NORTH

Hilton Strathclyde, Phoenix Crescent, ML4 3JQ Isabel Brown — isabel.brown@ glasgowlife.org.uk

Central London. Programme details to be announced shortly. alexandra.edwards@bifm.org.uk bifm-cme-sep16.eventbrite.co.uk

Women are almost four times more likely than men to think they have fewer opportunities to advance because of their gender. St Paul’s 200, Aldersgate, London EC1A 4HD info@quoraconsulting.com tinyurl.com/j3x5vzn to book

How we are motivated, and how we create and collaborate in this new landscape of work. Herman Miller, 61 Aldwych, London WC2B 4AE sellickc@aol.com

13 JULY

World FM Training Day

Partner event: Quora Smart Working Summit: Unlocking the full potential of women at work

18 OC TOB E R

The case for a living office – what did the occupiers say?

Herm Island Visit

BIFM Corporate Members Event

5 O C TO B E R

associates.co.uk tinyurl.com/z9crub8

16 SE PT E M B E R

Quarterly Training Day: legislation and compliance The programme is being finalised. Hilton Bristol Hotel,

33

PEOPLE MANAGEMENT SIG 12 J ULY

Breakfast Workshop – Getting Your Message Across Training on making an impact when talking to an audience National Theatre, London cmontes@nationaltheatre.org.uk tinyurl.com/jhgg8qd

SUSTAINABILITY SIG 13 J ULY

Clean, Green & Cherished: Sustainability SIG’s celebration for World FM Day Join Orangebox at its smart working space for advice on green credentials from Ecolabel and how to make furniture go further with Premier Workplace Services. Orangebox, 38 Northampton Rd, London EC1R 0HU Laura Bennett — lejjordan@gmail.com tinyurl.com/zp8z7da

July 2016

30/06/2016 11:19


CIS HPH.indd 1

24/06/2016 16:59

Cleaning London’s Businesess since 1969

Aldworth House 1 Aldworth Grove SE13 6HJ 020 8690 4488 regularcleaning.com enquiries@regularcleaning.com

fm-world.co.uk

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July 2016

27/06/2016 12:28


INSIDE 36 38 39 42 44

Using LinkedIn to develop your career Avoiding false alarms on your site Eyes on the ground: Project Griffin Five point plan: pre-treating waste at the NEC Modern Slavery Act 2015: taking action

KNOW HOW THE L ATE ST L E A RN I N G A N D BE ST P RAC TI C E

DE S I G N

HEART OF GLASS

T

here are many ways for companies to communicate visually – PowerPoint presentations, whiteboards, projectors et al. But few tools can double as works of art. Pictured here are the products of Clarus Glassboards, an American company citing Google, Facebook, Whole Foods, American Express, Twitter and Under Armour among its customers. These dry-erase glass systems are designed to foster creative, forward-thinking workspaces – but they can also turn the act of communication into an art installation. (There’s also a sanitised glassboard option for hospital rooms and nurses stations.) From entire wall systems at tech start-ups to custom table-tops at training centres, Clarus has seen some innovative uses of its products. The boards, which start at around $250 and can be shipped to the UK, offer ‘clean and clear communication’ for the workplace. It’s certainly one way of showing your workings to the wider world. WWW.CLARUSGLASSBOARDS.COM

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July 2016

30/06/2016 10:03


“IT’S INVALUABLE AS OUR FM NETWORKS BECOME MORE GLOBAL – I’M NOW CONNECTED WITH 20 INTERESTING PEOPLE I MET AT THE EURO FM CONFERENCE IN MILAN”

K N OW H OW C AREER DE VELOPMENT

ANNE LENNOX-MARTIN

LINKE DIN

GETTING THE MOST FROM LINKEDIN LinkedIn has become the de facto social media site for professionals, with more than 15 million users in the UK, and ambitious facilities management professionals are taking full advantage of all the opportunities it offers

L

inkedIn is far more than an online CV — the so-called “Facebook for business” enables you to make valuable connections, keep up with industry news, learn from others, and recruit the best staff. In short, it can help you do your job better. But LinkedIn is also a powerful career-building tool, helping you to grasp new opportunities and build your reputation in a fast-moving and highly competitive world. Here’s how to get the most out of LinkedIn:

1

Make sure you can be found

LINKEDIN ETIQUETTE DO:

The first thing people do after meeting a new business contact is to check them out on LinkedIn. If they can’t find you, they may not take the professional relationship any further – you’ve just made it too hard for them. They may even be wondering whether you are a bona fide professional. Your LinkedIn profile has to work hard – make sure it is compelling, up-to-date and has a professional picture. If you run your own consultancy, you can

Introduce connections to each other; Disable notifications when you are making lots of changes to your profile page – otherwise your connections will get a bunch of annoying updates; Nurture your contacts by replying to messages promptly and responding to their updates; and Write recommendations for people that you rate.

DON’T:

TO P T IP S

Make your connection requests look like spam with a one-size-fits-all approach – come up with a personal message every time;

HOW I USE LINKEDIN It is great for debate, blogging and opinions, although the majority of users fear joining in with the conversations – too many facilities managers are inward-focused.

Ask new contacts or strangers to endorse you; Talk about your social life. LinkedIn is not Twitter or Facebook — no one wants to hear about what you had for lunch or what you did last night;

WILL EASTON is owner and workplace consultant at Workplace 33 I know it’s got its critics, but I find LinkedIn presents a good all-round view of our sector. I can find people, companies, ideas and industry news. It can also be a useful platform for self-promotion, which if used sparingly, can be an asset.

Post too much. It can be annoying.

IAN WRIGHT is soft services manager at University College London

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also set up a company page and highlight examples of your work on showcase pages.

2

Get networking

3

Join professional FM discussion groups

4

See how you rank against your peers

Building a following on LinkedIn takes time and discipline. Keep in touch by responding to their posts and sharing useful content with them. It’s best to be helpful rather than sales-y. LinkedIn’s advanced search function allows you to search for new contacts using keywords and you can also find people using their email addresses. If you want to connect with someone you haven’t officially met, it’s worth asking a mutual contact to introduce you.

LinkedIn groups allow you to become part of the wider facilities management conversation and to find out what’s going on in your area. Being a part of these industry groups can raise your profile, but they are places to share, not to show off. It’s worth taking your time before you make any comments so you can gauge the culture of the group. Once you get involved you’ll need to keep checking in with the group on a regular basis. You can also set up your own groups if you want to position yourself as a thought leader in a particular area.

Premium members of LinkedIn can use the ‘Professionals Like You’ function – as well as the ‘How You Rank’ feature – to see how they stack up against their sector peers and to find the cream of the crop. Check out the

July 2016

29/06/2016 17:59


+

K N OW H OW C AREER DE VELOPMENT

For more in-depth insight into the state of the facilities management jobs market, turn to Facilitate (page 47)

CV W R I TI N G

best profiles to get inspiration for your own and start making valuable new connections.

5

Use content and endorsements to build a following

One of the best ways to establish your credentials – beyond your CV – is to post and share useful content. Respected users respond to questions within a group discussion and share useful information on a particular subject. It’s also worth encouraging your network to endorse you for your skills – the best way to do this is to endorse others. You can also ask contacts for testimonials and recommendations.

6

Find the best new recruits — or a new role

LinkedIn is often the first place you will find out about new job opportunities and specialist recruiters post details of facilities jobs on the site. But getting a new job is not just about checking out LinkedIn’s job tab. You’ll need to be getting everything else right on LinkedIn too – your profile, recommendations, contacts and discussion groups – to maximise your chances.

7

Get ideas from workplace bloggers

LinkedIn’s Pulse is essentially a hub for microbloggers – it is here where you will find short snippets from business leaders, academics and consultants. While most cover broad topics (see Unique Habits of Ridiculously Likeable People by Dr Travis Bradberry), these quick-reads will often give the reader food for thought in a professional setting.

What do employers look for in a CV? Today’s recruitment market is more competitive than ever. FM recruitment firm Maxwell Stephens outlines what sets great CVs apart from the rest The job search is increasingly simple. Online search engines such as Google, social media engines such as LinkedIn and jobs boards such as Reed.co.uk and Monster have left candidates with an array of jobs to choose from like which they have never seen before. The CV stage is somewhat harder. The CV is one of the most important documents of your career. It can make or break it. You should take the time to invest in it and perfect it, but to do that, it is important to know what ‘good’ looks like. What is it that that recruiter and potential employer are really looking for from their next employee? What makes a good CV? Be clear, concise and proofread. Ensure that your document is relevant, easy on the eye and does not include mistakes. The CV should include enough details to provide a taster of the candidate with tangible evidence, but without too much detail. Avoid contradictions, arrogance and

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irrelevant statements. Creative layouts? Consider your audience. If the role is creative, then embrace it. If the role is more formal consider a more traditional approach. Review the company’s website and tone and tailor your CV to match. A client is happy to receive a CV in any layout, as long as the content doesn’t suffer. Ensure that your CV includes your contact details, career summary, references and qualifications. Ensure that your CV is two pages long. How do you highlight transferable skills in a CV? If you are applying for a role in a different industry or sector, consider your audience and remove industry-specific jargon. Focus on tangibles such as time, quality and cost. These are understood by every reader, regardless of background. Ask for feedback Often, recruiters receive hundreds of CVs for a particular job and it may be that you only receive generic, automatically generated emails in response to your CV, both to acknowledge receipt and to confirm you have been unsuccessful. Don’t be afraid to pick up the phone and

ask for feedback on your CV. Don’t take ‘no’ for an answer; be polite and constructive and you will be remembered for the next time. The key is to get into the recruiters’ ‘inner pool’ of candidates. The issue may be something specific, or it might be a coincidence; either way, constructive dialogue will help. The ‘No’ pile: We asked a number of employers what they find immediately off-putting in a CV: 1. Spelling mistakes, too small a font, unconcise conclusions. 2. Unfocused and wordy without referencing relevant achievements. 3. Too much irrelevant information on previous jobs. 4. Someone who has moved jobs too much or has unexplained employment gaps. 5. An unprofessional email address. 6. Too long. 7. A mismatch between experience of the candidate and the role and evidence of a candidate jumping from role to role every year or so without clear reasons. 8. Contradictions in the document. 9. Anything that is wordy or disorganised. 10. Spelling mistakes, arrogance and poor layout.

This information was extracted from The Perfect CV, by facilities management recruitment company Maxwell Stephens. The full guide can be downloaded at: www.perfectcvforfm.com

July 2016

29/06/2016 17:59


£1 billion

K N OW H OW TECH EXPL AINER

the cost to the UK in of production and disruption to businesses and increased insurance premiums

ALARM S

FILTERING THE PARTICLES TO FORCE DOWN FALSE ALARMS PHOTOGRAPHY: ISTOCK

Lee James, general manager, sales & marketing at Nittan Europe, explains how to avoid erroneous emergency callouts

F

alse alarms – those generated by fire detection systems but not in response to actual fires – cost the UK in excess of £1 billion annually in loss of production and disruption to businesses and increased insurance premiums.

And some fire & rescue services will no longer attend a fire alarm unless the incident is verified. Automated fire detection systems include mechanisms that filter signals at the control panel. Panels can be configured to deactivate certain zones at The London Fire Brigade can charge £326 +VAT for attending persistent false alarm calls

times when false alarms are most likely, or set delays before an alarm is sounded to allow for investigation. But it is still preferable to prevent false alarms. In its briefing paper, Live Investigations Of False Fire Alarms, the Building Research Establishment cited the main causes of false alarms as, in decreasing order of occurrence: unknown, fault, dust, cooking, weekly testing, accidental activations, steam, aerosol and water. Buildings with en suite facilities such as hotels and student accommodation see false alarms from steam higher up the list.

Hotel conundrums Best practice dictates that smoke detectors should not be fitted in kitchens or bathrooms – environments that generate vapours that can be misread as smoke by detectors. In a kitchen, you would use a heat alarm instead. In a bathroom you would not use one at all. This becomes problematic in a hotel. You must have an alarm in each bedroom, but the en suite bathroom is typically close by. A guest who has a shower lets steam into the bedroom as soon as they open the bathroom door. And in many cases the alarm needs to be close to the main door/lobby to protect the occupants’ escape route – near the bathroom door.

False alarms from steam Infrared scattered light technology currently used for commercial smoke detectors is typically unable to distinguish between the larger particles like steam or dust – the main causes of false alarms – and particles generated by combustion. One solution is to move the detector farther away from the bathroom. A smoke detector

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may be 7.5 metres away from a potential alarm source and still meet the British Standard. But this is also farther away from the escape route. And there’s still no guarantee that steam wouldn’t affect these devices in their new location. You could adjust the detector performance, usually at the control panel, for given periods. This might involve switching a smoke/heat detector to heatonly mode or reducing the sensitivity of the detector. Both approaches compromise safety.

Multi-sensor option Another option is a multi-sensor. Unlike single-sensor detectors, multi-sensor alarms combine two sensing elements, typically optical and heat. The sensor interprets signals from the sensors to better understand what’s happening. There’s a quicker response to slow smouldering and fast-flaming fires, yet greater immunity to false alarms. Still, ‘greater immunity’ may not suffice; multi-sensors are susceptible to false alarms from dust and steam.

Dual optical alarms Dual optical alarms use a single optical sensor that ‘looks’ for smoke using a scattered light beam in the sensing chamber. Dual optical alarms also employ blue LEDs to provide a more accurate measurement of particles within the chamber. By calculating the ratio of these light sources, which operate at different wavelengths, the detector can determine the particle size and thus distinguish between smoke and non-combustion products such as steam, aerosols and dust. tinyurl.com/BREbriefingpaper tinyurl.com/BS5839-alarmsystems

July 2016

30/06/2016 11:23


K N OW H OW EXPL AINER

provide terror-related security training to our cleaning teams. Meanwhile, in the retail space we now have operatives who are being trained not just to identify potential threats, but to actively support security teams and police in the case of an attack.

Transport systems in the UK have seen tightening security in recent years, but the two fatal bomb attacks in Brussels on 22 March show the need for ever greater vigilance

E X P LAINE R

PROJECT GRIFFIN Facilities personnel, with their understanding of the assets they are responsible for and the users they serve, are uniquely positioned to help organisations to be vigilant against the threat of terrorism. As the counter-terrorism scheme Project Griffin is being extended, Terry Hanley, director of security at Interserve, looks at the role FM can play in keeping Britain, its people and its businesses safe

PHOTOGRAPHY: ALAMY

What is Project Griffin? Project Griffin was developed by the City of London Police, and introduced in central London in 2014 as a joint venture between the City and Metropolitan Police forces. It has since been adopted by police forces across the UK and overseas. Its aim is to advise and familiarise managers, security officers and employees of public and private sector organisations on counter-terrorism issues, through raising awareness.

and busiest buildings and public spaces. FM professionals have a unique overview and understanding of the assets they manage and come into direct regular contact with members of the public and other stakeholder groups. Part of their day-to-day role is to identify anything out of the ordinary and troubleshoot problems as they arise; it is not a significant leap for these teams to remain vigilant for potential security issues as well.

So what does this mean for FM and security providers

What does Project Griffin involve?

Facilities management teams are often the ones walking the floors of our nation’s biggest

The police are looking to partner with major organisations, especially

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those with large publicfacing workforces, to provide employees with the training they need to be able to identify possible terror threats. This is normally delivered in the form of a half-day awareness session that educates employees about the reality of counter-terrorism, key warning signs to look out for, and the protocols to follow when sharing information with law enforcement agencies if and when a threat is identified. At Interserve, we have been strong advocates of the Project Griffin programme for some time. Most recently, in our transport division we have been working with the British Transport Police to

39

Does it cost anything to take part? To date, the training itself has often been provided by the police so there hasn’t been a direct cost associated with Project Griffin, but there is the soft cost of employees taking time out of their day-to-day roles to be considered. We have sought to streamline this process by bringing Project Griffin training in-house, supported by guidance provided by the National Counter Terrorism Security Office (NaCTSO) Product Familiarisation programme. You need to be registered as a partner with NaCTSO to do so, but being able to self-deliver the training enables you to form closer working relationships with policing partners across the UK – and realise significant cost efficiencies by integrating the training into ongoing skills development programmes. Much also depends on how FM providers are structured. The process of cross-skilling frontline operatives works best when non-security personnel directly collaborate with the provider’s own security teams, as well as with the police. At a time when the FM industry is striving to push itself up the value chain in the eyes of its customers and the public, this is an opportunity to achieve just that while making our country a safer place to live and work. tinyurl.com/FMW0716-ProjectGriffin tinyurl.com/BIFMGPG-guarding

July 2016

29/06/2016 18:00


2016 7

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READ BY 33,315 FM PROFESSIONALS The 2017 Buyers’ Guide provides a new range of advertising opportunities which is a simple and effective way to get your company in front of potential clients who are actively seeking suppliers. The FM World Buyers’ Guide will be distributed to over 15,000 key industry personnel throughout the year. In addition to this, all entries will be automatically hosted online at www.fm-world.co.uk

Out January 2017 Endorsed by the British Institute of Facilities Management

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FMW.JULY16.040.indd 2

30/06/2016 09:57


K N OW H OW EXPL AINER The number of on-site industrial AD plants at breweries, distilleries, dairies and food factories has doubled in the past five years

A

nalyst Visiongain estimates that the global anaerobic digestion market will see a total expenditure of $6,425 million (£4.325 billion) in 2016.

What is anaerobic digestion? Anaerobic digestion (AD) is the process in which food waste is broken down to produce biogas and biofertiliser. This happens in a sealed, oxygen-free tank called an anaerobic digester. The biogas naturally created in the sealed tanks is used as a fuel in a CHP (combined heat and power) unit to generate renewable energy i.e. electricity and heat. What is left is a nutrient rich biofertiliser that can then be used as an alternative to fossil fuelderived fertilisers.

What are businesses currently using to dispose of food waste? Despite cost of landfill continuing to rise, 35 per cent of food waste is still disposed of in this way. The majority of businesses today are still using macerators to break up and destroy their food waste. A commercial food waste disposal unit macerates the food waste and disposes of it to the sewer. These machines can be incredibly damaging to the environment, consuming around 15 litres of water a

minute, using energy all day and disposing of the food waste into our sewer system. They can be incredibly expensive to run, costing on average around £6,000 a year in just water and energy, but because the costs are absorbed into a company’s overall energy bills, many businesses do not realise just how much money they are spending on disposing of their food waste in this way.

Sector development The AD sector is still a fledgling, but it has grown significantly since 2010. The number of on-site industrial AD plants at breweries, distilleries, dairies and food factories has doubled in the past five years. The growth of AD has been supported mainly by the government’s renewable energy policies – the Feed-in Tariff for electricity and the Renewable Heat Incentive for green gas and heat. One of the great benefits of AD is that it produces ‘baseload’ (i.e. constantly generated) energy in the form of a gas. This flexible fuel source has proved enticing to businesses that are using it to replace natural gas used to provide their heating or electricity.

ANAEROBICS CLASS Food waste has huge financial, environmental and ethical implications and often it’s the cost of food waste that gets people listening. Mike Hanson surveys the state of play of the anaerobic digestion market in 2016

What’s the future for AD? Incentives for new projects have been heavily constrained, but the government has now agreed a new budget for the Renewable Heat Incentive that will provide bonuses to businesses and consumers who install renewable heating in place of fossil fuels. This could have a big impact on the growth of the AD sector, increasing operators’ incentives, and

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FOOD WA STE

supporting an increase in on-site AD as the government is keen to prioritise waste management. The Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) is currently consulting on the Feed-in Tariff for AD, proposing restrictions to plant sizes and feedstocks which commentators argue will make

41

it harder to deploy viable AD plants using waste, crops or agricultural residues. Ultimately, the more waste that goes to AD, the more the AD sector grows and the more opportunities there are to recycle food waste. tinyurl.com/FMW0716-AD-WRAP tinyurl.com/BIFMGPG-waste

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30/06/2016 10:58


+

K N OW H OW FIVE POINT PLAN

1

4

“We would send a tonne of cardboard in the skip and stamp it down,” explained Steve Cartmell, the man in charge of cleaning and waste contracts at the NEC.  “We came up with the idea for an on-site waste pretreatment centre on a Post-it note over a bacon sandwich. I still have that Post-it note.” The pre-treatment centre is in place to collect all waste from exhibitions, separate and bundle the materials to be transported to anaerobic digestion plants, where the energy generated from the waste powers a sewage treatment works.

The NEC employs as many as 12 people to work at the centre at any one time. A baler in the centre has helped increase a single truck-load of cardboard from one tonne to 22 compacted tonnes, which is then taken out to further processing plants. The waste trucks are based on site, in order to further reduce the organisation’s carbon footprint by reducing the number of empty loads. By centralising the sorting system, the NEC has been able to achieve more than £700,000 in landfill tax savings so far. It has diverted more than 10,000 tonnes from landfill so far, and the number continues to rise.

What’s the idea?

2

How do you implement this? First, the whole organisation must be aware of your new strategy and the reasons behind it. The waste and recycling management teams meet with each exhibition organiser every year to identify where and how they can prevent, reduce, reuse, recycle or recover waste. The NEC has capped the waste organisers can leave behind, and it has frozen its waste management fees for the past three years.

3

What was the immediate impact? When the pre-treatment centre opened, combined with further waste processing partnerships, the site transformed from nearly 100 per cent of waste going to landfill, to zero to landfill, overnight. “For the first few weeks, I was working in the centre,” explains Cartmell. The material is separated, and each stream has a different onward journey. Spare wooden pallets are sold on or given away to local causes, while bins have been placed by loading bays purely for waste paint.

This is where we highlight specific technological solutions to typical facilities management problems. Email explanations you’d like to see to editorial@fm-world.co.uk

How does it work?

5

What else can be considered? The team at the NEC is considering anaerobic digestions on site to cut down the transportation costs even further.  Food waste is collected from kitchens, retail outlets and exhibitions, and sent to a local anaerobic digestion plant, just three miles away, where the energy generated from the waste powers a sewage treatment works. The previous plant that the NEC used was in Staffordshire, but once word of a new plant in construction reached the NEC, no time was wasted in setting up a partnership. The reduction in travel from 27 miles to three further cut the centre’s carbon footprint. tinyurl.com/FMW0716-NEC tinyurl.com/BIFMGPG-waste

WASTE TREATMENT

STAMPING OUT YOUR FOOTPRINT The problem An exhibition centre of the scale of the NEC, spanning 182,000 square metres of indoor space, is home to 140 conferences and exhibitions each year. As such, the centre produces large amounts of cardboard waste, as well as discarded brochures. Lorry-loads of cardboard and other waste were being sent off for further processing.

This solution To make the process more efficient a waste pre-treatment centre was opened on site to give team NEC the ability to sort materials into its various streams, before material is baled and sent for further processing. The centre helps to both pre-sort and package waste materials, as well as cut down on transportation costs to processing sites, such as the nearby anaerobic digestion centre.

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K N OW H OW L EG I S L AT I O N E X P L A I N ER

LE GAL

MODERN SLAVERY ACT 2015 Large businesses that do not take appropriate measures to preclude the risk of slavery and human trafficking within their supply chains can expect to suffer adverse publicity and reputational risk, says Daniel Wilde, partner & head of employment at Harding Evans LLP

T

he Modern Slavery Act came into law on 26th March 2015. As recently as 24th May, a family that ran a tarmacking business and farm in South Wales was convicted of requiring people to perform forced or compulsory labour. Reputable businesses would not act in this way, so why is the act relevant to facilities management companies? Section 54 of the act requires commercial organisations with a global turnover above £36 million to publish an annual ‘Slavery and Human Trafficking Statement’ for each financial year ending after 31st March 2016. This requirement aims to promote transparency in the supply chain and ensure that large businesses have effective policies and due diligence procedures in place so that slavery or human trafficking do not take place within their supply chains. The statement must be approved by the board and signed by a director, and should also be published on the company’s website. Although there are no penalties or sanctions for failing to comply with this obligation, large businesses that fail to comply can expect to suffer adverse publicity and reputational risk if they do not take appropriate measures to

preclude the risk of slavery and human trafficking within their supply chains.

What should large businesses do now? As outlined, large businesses need to publish a ‘Slavery and Human Trafficking Statement’ for each financial year. The statement should disclose: The steps the business has taken during the financial year to ensure that slavery and human trafficking are not taking place either in its own operations or that of its supply chains; Whether no steps have been taken by the business. Clearly, if a business publishes that no measures are in place, there is a risk that the business may suffer adverse publicity or key stakeholders whom the business may supply may be reluctant to deal with the business.

When should action be taken? All businesses with a financial year ending on or after 31st March 2016 need to publish this statement, and it should be published as soon as reasonably practicable after the end of the financial year. Although no specific deadline is set, it would be reasonable to assume that businesses should publish their statements within six

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“LARGE BUSINESSES NEED TO PUBLISH A ‘SLAVERY AND HUMAN TRAFFICKING STATEMENT’ FOR EACH FINANCIAL YEAR” months of their financial year end. Logically, the statement would be published at the same time as the business’s annual statement and accounts.

What should be included in the statement? Although there is no prescribed content, the act does cover six areas that you should consider including in your statement: A summary of the business’s structure, a summary of its

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operations, and supply chains to provide context; Any policies in place which are relevant to slavery and human trafficking; The steps taken to ensure that slavery and human trafficking do not take place in the business and supply chains, to include demonstrating an understanding of who a business’s suppliers actually are; Whether a business has identified within its supply chain that there is a risk of slavery and human trafficking and the steps taken to assess and manage that risk; The effectiveness of approaches in ensuring slavery and human trafficking do not take place in a business’s supply chain; and Whether any training is provided by a business dealing with slavery and human trafficking issues to key employees and suppliers. Even if a business is not a large employer, it may still need to respond to queries from customers that are required to comply with the requirements of the legislation, and may even be asked by these companies to demonstrate that there are no issues in its supply chain. Being aware of the legislation and its implications will guard against any adverse impacts. The government has published comprehensive guidance on the transparency provisions required by Section 54. tinyurl.com/gov-modernslaveryact tinyurl.com/actsection54

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K N OW H OW

+

CASE IN POINT

Want to be featured? Do you have a case study to showcase your products and services? Get in touch by email – sales@fm-world.co.uk or call 020 7880 7632

CASE IN POINT FE AT U RE C ASE STUDY

Filter flies – an increasing problem Problem

Solution

Many office blocks in London have restaurants and shops on the ground floor which can present additional challenges to FMs if tenants do not take steps to keep their areas hygienic and pest-free. This was the case with an upmarket Italian restaurant in central London, where a serious fly infestation was spreading through a void into the toilets and then into the eating areas. They were identified as filter flies, commonly found at sewage farms.

Many ground-floor premises in London that are close to the water table have sump pits where excess water can be drained away. If these areas are not regularly cleaned sludge can build up and provide the perfect breeding ground for filter flies. Cleankill staff found a mass of filter fly larvae in the vault that were ready to hatch. Cleankill recommended that specialist cleaners should be brought in to clean out the vault before any pest control measures were taken.

Outcome The vault has been cleaned and the restaurant has arranged for it to be cleaned regularly. The restaurant has also now changed from having an ad hoc arrangement for pest control services to a preventative contract with regular checks. Call 0333 331 7042 or visit www.cleankill.co.uk

33 GLASSHOUSE STREET USES AET FLEXIBLE SPACE

MIKROFILL SUPPLIES PLANT UPGRADE AT HIGH SCHOOL

TOP MARKS FOR PAT TEST AT OXFORD COLLEGE

Problem

Problem

Problem

Creating self-contained, fully air conditioned, Cat-A office accommodation as part of a major structural refurbishment of a 52,000 square foot building with an unusual floorplate, a grade II listed façade and limited space for plant equipment.

Following a dilapidation survey at Leasowes High School in Halesowen by Dudley Metropolitan Borough Council, it was concluded that the existing inefficient LPHW and HWS equipment needed upgrading.

The in-house FM team at Pembroke College needs to carry out around 3,000 appliance tests used by students and visitors each year to meet its health and safety responsibilities.

Solution

Solution

A direct expansion, fully underfloor, supply and return air conditioning system was specified for the 23,500 sq ft office areas on floors three to seven. The system will be integrated with Daikin Heat Pumps instead of a rooftop chiller and use slimline TUS-EC floor terminals to save additional space and maximise energy efficiency.

Outcome

The installation carried out by TDR Mechanical included 6No Ethos 130kW condensing boilers with a total modulation of 60 > 1 (780 > 13kW) that ensures the buildings heat load is accurately achieved at all times. In addition the HWS requirement for the kitchen/main block is catered for by an unvented Extreme 500 litre loading cylinder capable of producing in excess of 2500 l/hr.

A floor to ceiling height of 3.3m will be achieved on floors three, four and five with the adoption of underfloor air conditioning; enabling the elimination of the ceiling void and subsequently maximising the available space.

“The upgrade of the heating system is an integral part of the continuing improvements being made here at Leasowes High School.”

www.flexiblespace.com/aet-manufacturing

Solution

Outcome

www.mikrofill.com

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The college is using a Seaward Apollo 600 multifunction portable appliance tester to carry out the testing, with all results and equipment details being stored in the complementary PATGuard 3 test management software to enable formal records, test certificates and reports to be maintained.

Outcome Specialist product training has allowed nonelectrical maintenance team members to carry out testing as part of a preventative programme that comes with the ability to track and identify equipment to ensure that everything is regularly tested. www.seaward.co.uk

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ENABLING PRODUC TIVE ENVIRONMENTS FOR PEOPLE AND BUSINESS

Show us what you’ve got From salary to benefits packages and beyond – how the FM profession is evolving

STANDARDS Skills framework is making FM a better trained and more attractive profession

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DEMOGRAPHICS FMs are becoming younger and more female

EXPERIENCE FM is increasingly about interpersonal and not just technical effectiveness

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FAC I LITATE PAY A N D P R O S P E C T S

In an increasingly fluid jobs market, FMs are obliged to develop a portfolio career, presenting themselves as comprehensively trained, communications-savvy individuals able to take on any task, as our 2016 Pay & Prospects survey reveals

Show us what you’ve got

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E

and, says Hewlett, “the ability to mentor, motivate and lead a team, through an in-house or outsourced model, is vital”. “I think qualifications are used as a sifting process for HR but the person who gets the job is the individual with the personal traits. Many organisations are now, for instance, placing NEBOSH as a prerequisite, and BIFM Level 4 is also becoming more prevalent as it shows employers that the candidate is serious about their profession.” Whatever their pay grade, our Pay & Prospects survey paints a picture of a profession whose practitioners are increasingly displaying their credentials to others in their own sector and beyond. Over the next few pages we ask both FMs and other professionals to tell us how they see things changing.

FM’s changing gender demographics If you had walked into any FM networking event just a few years ago you’d have struggled to find a woman among a sea of men in suits. Is the influx of women changing the nature of FM? “Yes”, says Louise Kiely, associate director of facilities, Birmingham Children’s Hospital NHS Foundation Trust – and one of BIFM’s youngest fellows. “I see FM becoming more consultative. Where previously an engineer would dictate what you could do, now we’re working more collaboratively to make the building work.” Jasmine Rosten-Edwards, an FM at Cineworld Cinemas, echoes this thought. “Overall, FM is more accessible, and there’s also the recent consensus that FM is about an ability to manage human relationships successfully within the working environment – though cultural and support systems need to be in place to help facilitate this.” Fiona Bowman has worked in FM for 30 years. The change? “I don’t think a lot has changed actually, but women themselves are taking the initiative, more empowered, more confident and ready to rise in their careers.” Tanya Horscroft, FM with Capita Property & Infrastructure and BIFM Women in FM SIG chair, is also the second recipient of the BIFM’s Rising Talent award. “When I’m networking it’s especially great to meet colleagues of a similar age, and we form a sort of mini-network which helps us navigate our way through.” But more needs to be done to encourage women to climb the ladder. “Some larger outsourced companies are addressing the issue,” says Horscroft, “but not a lot is being done elsewhere to make sure women are getting into leadership positions… sometimes I don’t think we get the respect we are due.”

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Barbara O’Sullivan, senior manager, EMEA real estate and project management at EMC, welcomes her own organisation’s efforts. “Sixty-nine per cent of our EMEA FM team are female and 33 per cent of senior management are female; and they are at the forefront of our communications, creativity, innovation and service delivery.” She believes the global push for young women to be more involved in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) topics will encourage more women to enter FM via engineering. Not that women are necessarily being stymied by their tendency to enter FM via a soft service (catering, administration, hospitality) rather than engineering background. Indeed, Cheryl Anne Sanderson, regional manager at G4S and winner of a Rising Star ‘WeAreTheCity’ Award, thinks an understanding of the basics of customer service is the new bedrock upon which further FM skills can be added, with building service engineering as an ‘extra’. Sanderson thinks schools should do more to sell FM to younger women as a principally customer service-related discipline, while Rosten-Edwards says there are now “a myriad opportunities for younger women. Whether they are leaving formal and/or higher education or are currently employed. Their career choice can be carefully targeted towards entering FM irrespective of whether they specialise in soft or hard services”. But, says O’Sullivan: “Gender equality is a lot to do with the leadership and if employers are more progressive regarding the ability of a person to do the job, it will ensure success is reliant on the person, not their gender.”

PHOTOGRAPHY: RICHARD GLEED

ach year since 2004 the BIFM has surveyed the profession to assess how levels of pay and prospects are shifting. And for 2016, in terms of raw salary data, it’s primarily good news. The number of FMs reporting earnings in the £46,000 to £60,000 pay bracket is up 5 percentage points on this time last year, with smaller yet still notable increases in higher pay bands. And all too slowly, but surely, the balance of men to women in these brackets is also changing (towards the latter). But while money remains important – more people are also taking home bonuses compared with 2015 – FMs are less concerned about pay than in previous years. Up to 70 per cent of respondents cited salary as the most important reason for choosing a job in past surveys; that figure is just 59 per cent this year. Year on year, the picture is of gradual change. Slightly fewer FMs report transferring across from building engineering into the FM profession, while slightly more report FM as their first job out of full-time education. In many regards, the picture is one of steady, positive progress. There’s a slight increase in those who expect to leave their current employer over the next year, some 21 per cent of those who responded, although a further 17 per cent are planning for the long term and expect to remain with their current organisation over the next seven years or more. (up 3 per cent on last year). Why do they leave? Concerns about pay, benefits and career prospects in the main. Fourteen per cent of respondents are staying with their organisations because of prospects of an internal promotion (up 3 per cent on last year). The other good news for ‘remainers’ is that more are opting to stay because they enjoy their role, up 9 percentage points on 2015. More people are moving to secure more senior positions or to take on fresh challenges than was the case in 2015. Those leaving their employers (more will leave service providers than in-house positions) are likely to do it because of a lack of career opportunities, again suggestive of a sector benefiting from an injection of dynamism. What does all this say about the facilities management professional of 2016? That word ‘dynamism’ is often overused, yet seems perfectly appropriate here. FMs are increasingly dynamic; educated in their chosen profession, younger, more adept at workplace relationships and hungrier for personal professional development. What’s happening, as confirmed by recruitment industry professionals such as Michael Hewlett of The Management Recruitment Group, is that FMs must have a track record in leading change and transformation in their current posts, or evidence the ability to ‘make a difference’, if they’re to progress. Strong stakeholder engagement skills are of increasing relevance

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FAC I LITATE PAY A N D P R O S P E C T S

The highly technical skills framework that has been built up in recent years means that FM is no longer a sector that people just ‘fall into’. Young entrants are now able to leapfrog into careers in FM – if they also possess the right personal attributes

Learning

T

he establishment of a comprehensive qualifications structure is starting to make its impact on the facilities management profession. A once highly technical discipline now demands greater soft skills around relationship building and customer service, and this in turn is affecting the type of people attracted to the sector. “If someone is an engineer they will have gone through a very formal programme of learning to become a qualified engineer,” says Linda Hausmanis, director of professional development at BIFM. “However it’s a different skillset to manage the multi-faceted disciple that FM is, in its breadth, depth and scope whilst being heavily reliant on exceptional people, management and leadership skills.” The qualifications framework constructed over the past eight years has at its heart the need to reflect the changing nature of the industry, and is now starting to have an impact on how organisations view FM. “There has always been a dichotomy with people

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FAC I LITATE PAY A N D P R O S P E C T S

saying companies don’t take FM seriously and they can’t get the attention of the C-suite; yet the attitude of developing people and putting them through formal programmes of learning and development has been secondary,” says Hausmanis. “Now it doesn’t matter what level you are working at within the industry – there is a qualification for you, whether that’s a BIFM qualification, a university programme or an apprenticeship.” The new full-time degree, at Liverpool John Moores University, starts this September, she adds, complementing other options at Sheffield Hallam, University College London (UCL), and Leeds Beckett University, among others. David Sanderson, assistant director of estates at Keele University, says the qualifications framework now provides more of a structured career route. “It gives people something to aim at with the various levels, and also creates an air of professionalism that was previously lacking,” he says. “The current qualification levels provide you with a route to gain a professional standard that is equal to the old engineering standards.” There is now a growing expectation from employers that people entering middle or senior positions have achieved at least BIFM level 4, says Andrew Hulbert, managing director of Pareto Facilities Management. “The trouble without the qualification was that it was really difficult to try and compare different candidates with each other from a training perspective,” he says. The MSc and level 6 qualifications also give senior managers the opportunity to stand out, he adds, as there are still relatively few people who have achieved these. Hulbert is a good example of the new breed of FM professional, having achieved his MSc in FM from UCL at 25 while seeking to move into a middle-management post. “I was trying to get to director level, and it really helped me get recognised and looked at against some people who had 15 years’ more experience,” he says. Hulbert says the qualifications framework allows managers to be taken more seriously by the board. “If you wanted to have a great conversation with a finance director and you’ve completed a financial module, you might be able to do a better budget and talk about things like building life cycle costs,” he says. Sanderson has also gained, having achieved his Level 6 qualification after initially entering the industry as an electrical apprentice. “It’s opened doors for me

It gives people something to aim at with the various levels, and also creates an air of professionalism that was lacking that weren’t open previously, and I’m now assistant director,” he says. “It’s enabled me to speak to the organisation in a completely different way, and sell the values of what FM can provide for them.” The development of the various qualifications almost a decade ago is slowly starting to change the way FM is viewed, he adds. “It’s going to become an accepted vocation in life, similar to what you would associate with an engineer,” he says. “I always refer back to when you had to get a professional person to sign the picture on your passport or driving licence, and I think the FM industry is becoming that profession.” For those entering the industry, Hulbert’s advice is to get as much advanced training as early as possible. “If you’re 22 or 23 and you can get on and complete BIFM level 5, it gives you a great opportunity to say to your employer that you want to take that next step,” he says. Duncan Short, HR director at G4S Facilities Management, says the development of degree courses in particular will help FM professionals cope with different requirements that come from working in different roles and sectors within FM, offering the potential of a more varied career. “Increasingly we will see people go across the different elements and market sectors,” he says. “There will be some things which will be very specific but increasingly we will look at how we can use expertise from one area in another place.” But those entering FM still need the right attributes and attitudes, as well as the skills and qualifications. “The people who thrive in FM enjoy its complexity, variety and daily challenges,” says Carl Johnson, director of talent and learning at Interserve. “What we need is someone who’s part Brunel, part Genghis Khan, part Mother Theresa…”

Online www.fm-world. co.uk The Qualifications Framework More commentary on the value of qualifications

potential fm-world.co.uk

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FAC I LITATE PAY A N D P R O S P E C T S 2 0 1 6 – S TAT I S T I C S

PAY AND PROSPECTS IN NUMBERS

Background before FM Office manager/ administration

36% Female

Pay rises received 3%

1% 1%

1%

2% 3%

18%

5%

4%

20%

No change Increase of 1-2% Increase of 3-4% Increase of 5-6% Increase of 7-10% Increase of 11% or more Decrease

16%

21%

Building services/ Engineering

21%

52%

Male

52% Supply side FMs

In-house FMs

Armed forces

11%

Years with current employer In-house FMs

ǮրȖȠǤȾ֘՟= 12%

10%

16%

17%

11%

20%

6% 8%

Supply side FMs

ǸȪʄǤǮǮ֢֘= 13%

18%

27%

11%

12%

Male 1 year or less 1-2 years 2-4 years 4-6 years 6-9 years 9-14 years 14-20 years 20 years+

Value of last bonuses

2015

2016

In-house FMs

12% 6% 1%

50%

Reasons for seeking to leave in the next 2 years

45% None

17%

11% Up to £999

21% 28% 12% 9% Unhappy with pay

Lack of career opportunity

Lack of management support

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25%

21%

Level of workload

£1,000-£4,999

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Main reasons for joining current employer

14%

17%

18%

39%

19%

19%

10%

6%

Senior position

Better salary

Better long-term prospects

Fresh challenge

Reputable company

Was unemployed

Better location

Company merger

Most important factor in looking for a job

BIFM membership level

1%

Job security

2%

9%

Challenging work

12%

29%

34%

11%

2015

Supply side FMs

2016

15%

37% None

9% Up to £999

37%

25% £1,000-£4,999

In-house FMs

19%

20%

17%

ɺȂȠȌǤր֢֘=

3% 3% 12%

1% 6% 10% 11%

17% 14%

26%

1 year or less 1-2 years 2-4 years 4-6 years 6-9 years 9-14 years 14-20 years 20 years+

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41%

Reasons for staying with current employer

45%

I enjoy where I work

15%

Supply side FMs

ȠȾȴȌǤǮ֤֤=

Small enterprise corporate member Large enterprise corporate member Not a member

11%

Salary

31%

Years working in FM

49%

47%

Career prospects

58% 41%

Value of last bonuses

2016

49%

1%

Affiliate Associate Member Certified member Fellow

2015

56%

15%

11%

2014

19% 22%

Location

Job security

14%

Salary

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FM CALENDAR JULY 19-21 Understanding FM [Foundation] 20-21 Fire Safety Law & Risk Assessment 20-21 Agile Working & Modern Workplaces

YOUR CAREER OUR COURSES

AUGUST 16-18 Understanding FM [Foundation]

SEPTEMBER 13-15 13-16 14 14 14-15 15 20 20-22 20-21 21 21-22 21-22 21-22

TRAINING FMs FOR OVER 20 YEARS

Telephone

+44 (0)20 7248 5942

facebook.com/bifmtraining

Understanding FM [Foundation] IOSH Managing Safely BS11000 Collaborative Business Relationships Energy Management The Essentials of Property Management Energy Compliance The Tender Process Professional FM 1- Edinburgh Introduction to Sustainability Contract Management Security Management IOSH Risk Assessment in Practice Introducing & Leading Change [Executive]

info@bifm-training.co.uk | www.bifm-training.com

twitter.com/bifmtraining

linkedin.com/company/bifm-training

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FAC I LITATE PAY A N D P R O S P E C T S 2 0 1 6 – S TAT I S T I C S

Response to survey

Salary increase at last review

Central government Charity/voluntary sector Communications and media Education Electricity, gas, water Engineering, construction, manufacturing Finance, banking, insurance, law Healthcare IT Leisure, hotels, catering Local government Management consultancy Property Oil, chemicals, mining Services Transport and storage Wholesale and retail trade Other

In-house FMs

2015

2016

52% 44%

20% 19%

No change

19% 19%

Increase of 1-2%

Increase of 3-4%

6% 4%

6% 3%

Increase of 5-6%

Increase of 7-10%

3% 2%

2% 1%

Increase Decrease of 11% or more

Expected salary increase at next review

2015

2016

BIFM qualifications

19%

35%

21%

Holding a BIFM qualification

Studying for a BIFM qualification

19%

46%

No change

56%

19%

Increase of 1-2%

20%

Increase of 3-4%

Current Salary Brackets

1%

1%

8%

5% Do you agree with the statement?

2%

9%

My employer offers good career progression

51% agree

25%

49%

25%

disagree

24%

My employer offers a competitive salary

54% agree

Overall

46%

1% 4% 10%

agree

11%

8%

1%

2% 3% 2%

18%

6% 28% 24%

29%

29%

30%

21% In-house FMs

disagree

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2%

disagree

My employer offers flexible working

71%

Up to £25,000 £26,000-£35,000 £36,000-£45,000 £46,000-£60,000 £61,000-£75,000 £76,000-£90,000 £91,000-£100,000 £101,000-£150,000 £151,000+

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Supply side FMs

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FAC I LITATE PAY A N D P R O S P E C T S

You will not deliver as an FM if you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fill in your knowledge gaps fm-world.co.uk

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FAC I LITATE PAY A N D P R O S P E C T S

Transforming expectations FM is very much a practical discipline, which is why a typical FM once measured their worth more in experience than qualifications, but new breed of facilities management professional is coming to the fore – possessed of strong life skills and with recourse to a wider range of experiences

T

he typical FM used to measure their worth more through experience than qualifications. But that is changing; a new form of facilities manager is emerging – one with powerful interpersonal skills and a wider range of experiences to call upon. Peter Forshaw, managing director of recruiter Maxwell Stephens, has been in the recruitment industry for 15 years and is now seeing more employers stipulating that they will only consider individuals with higher qualifications. It’s the reason why increasing numbers of candidates have gone to university to complete an FM degree. He says: “They may have started with practical experience, but then they go into training and complete Level 4/5 and some of the good ones actually go on to doing Level 6 too.” Beth Goodyear of FMHS Consulting confirms this new drive for learning. “FMs are looking at all levels, not just Level 4 or 5, but Level 3 and the lower levels as people realise that for your CV to stand out and to be seen as an FM professional you need more than experience, and employers are looking for that.” But Lucy Jeynes of Larch Consulting believes that by 2020 universities won’t be the only places where FMs can increase their learning. “You can get on really well in FM based on your ability to get things done,” says Jeynes, “so I think it’s a career that will continue to lend itself very well to vocational apprenticeships as well as graduate entry.”

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Aside from specific job-related training, FMs are increasingly expected to demonstrate behavioural competencies and it’s now vitally important for FMs to hone their interpersonal skills. “It’s all about communications and people skills,” says Forshaw. “If you’ve got them, you can manage anything. Service providers recruiting for senior level roles prioritise communication, presentation and an ability to stand up and communicate in the room.” The FM job itself has always covered a myriad of tasks, and this is increasingly reflected in the sorts of FM positions on offer. According to Richard Gelder, UK sector director, property & built environment at Hays Recruitment, there’s now far greater demarcation and specialisation than 20 years ago. He’s seeing quite specific job titles, whether it is soft services manager, moves manager, facilities manager or engineering manager. “Some of this is because the sector has evolved, and by definition people have become more ‘niche’. But much is technologically driven. If you look at BMS [building management systems] now, it’s getting increasingly complicated; as the tech has changed, some of those roles have changed.”

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A P P O I NTM E NT S

Quality Healthcare Environments

FM Service Delivery Managers 5 posts Full time Post 1:

East covering Lincolnshire, Leicestershire and Cambridgeshire Post 2: North West covering Manchester Post 3 & 4: Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire covering Yorkshire Post 5: South East covering East Sussex and Kent Salary: £40,028 - £48,034 pa This is an exciting time to join NHS Property Services. We are creating an exciting new property and facilities management company model which is delivering added value for our customers and the wider NHS. At a time of major change for the NHS, the company is reducing costs, unlocking value and reinvesting directly in the future estate to improve frontline patient care. We are on a journey, and we are looking for talented people to join a team that is developing and transforming the business and the way the NHS manages facilities.

The role We have five FM Service Delivery Manager positions, covering the areas detailed above. The role will form a key part of our FM Senior Management Team and will have responsibility for every aspect of facilities management delivery in over 400 sites in the respective area. The FM Service Delivery Manager will have responsibility for client engagement ensuring services are delivered to the required standard and efficiency improvements are identified and delivered. Facility Management is delivered through a combination of in-house provision and sub-contracted arrangements and the post-holder will be the senior contract lead and responsible for all internal delivery teams.

The Person To succeed in this role you will need to possess excellent skills in stakeholder management, managing large outsourced contracts and managing internal delivery teams. You will be a motivational and inspiring leader who is capable of delivering results through others and managing in a changing environment with competing priorities. You will have experience of managing a geographically dispersed team and have strong strategic, analytical, investigative and problem solving skills.

of leading self-delivery teams or contract management with demonstrable evidence of cost control with compliance management experience. Post 2 - North West – You will have Hard/Soft & Compliance experience and extensive experience in FM service transformation. Posts 3&4 - Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire – Soft and hard FM experience required with particular focus on hard FM and compliance - You will have a relevant engineering or building qualification and a proven track record of leading teams or managing FM contracts providing best value for customers. Post 5 - South East – You will be customer focussed and have Hard/Soft FM & Compliance experience, together with experience in service transformation and demonstrable evidence of contract management and cost control processes.

About the Company NHS Property Services is one of the largest property owners in the UK, with a £3 billion asset portfolio, some 4,000 properties, 3,000 employees and an annual income of over £700 million. Established in April 2013, the company provides professional property and facilities management advice and services to the NHS. In its first three years, the company has managed over 200 new developments so that patients are treated in better, modern facilities. The company has also achieved substantial savings for the NHS through the application of professional expertise to its estate. Since launch, we have driven down running costs by over £115 million. In the same period, we disposed of 223 surplus sites deemed surplus by the NHS, releasing £152 million back to the NHS front line. Rationalisation of facilities management contracts from 2,300 to just 12 saves the NHS £15 million annually.

The Rewards As well as a challenging and exciting role the company offers a comprehensive benefits package, which includes: Lease car / Car allowance, 27 days’ annual leave and a Group personal pension scheme. For further information about the post and to apply for [OPZWVZ[WSLHZL]PZP[^^^QVIZUOZ\R\ZPUN[OLMVSSV^PUN references: Post 1: 979-00688, Post 2: 979-00687, Post 3 & 4: 979-00686, Post 5: 979-00685. Closing date: 24 July 2016

:WLJPÄJQVIYVSLYLX\PYLTLU[Z! Post 1 - East – You will be customer focused with Mechanical & Electrical or Building fabric competency. You will have experience

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FAC F FA AC I L LI LITATE I TA AT TE E PAY A N D P R O S P E C T S

From catering to client dining, reception to security to CCTV, the list of things an FM manages has only grown Indeed, buildings are increasingly complex, and sustainability and energy management also have to be considered. This is why, says Lucy Jeynes, today’s facilities managers still need some understanding of the technical side: “You will not deliver as an FM if you don’t fill in your knowledge gaps.” There’s also an interesting demographic dynamic at play. Gelder believes FMs in their twenties and early thirties are not rooted to the same career patterns of those who started out in the 1980s and 90s. Back then, FMs tended to stay in the same firm for longer; but Gelder believes younger people have a mindset of doing two or three things during their career and having multiple jobs. This is why, he says, the sector must drive home the fact that when you come and work in FM there are many ways you can progress. “FM offers such flexibility and you can go a million different ways,” says Gelder. “As the BIFM says, ‘you come in the front door of FM and you can do anything’.” And Beth Goodyear agrees: “From catering to client dining, reception to security to CCTV, the list of things an FM manages has only grown; nothing has dropped off the bottom.” Younger FMs are likely to continue developing a portfolio career, and FMs of all ages and gender will think more about their personal work/life balance. But 21st century FMs can, however, still learn a lot from the FMs who helped build the sector in the first place. “Mature FMs are tough, experienced, and entrepreneurial and have managed FM services in both a rising market and a recession,” says Jeynes. “Younger FMs have a lot to learn from them.” But there are words of warning from Duncan Carter, director, Macallam Executive Recruitment. He, too, sees a steady flow of requirements for experienced FMs with strong communication, commercial, customer skills and often technical service line knowledge. However, “the changing demands of

As a result of completing qualifications: BIFM Qualification Holders Have you experienced a pay increase?

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60%

Online www.fm-world.co.uk Recruiters on what firms are demanding of FMs

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many client environments are driving the need for greater skill sets. In some cases we see more emphasis on senior skills in commercial and change management than the need for technically driven people who understand a specific client sector”, he says. Some organisations bring people into the FM sector at general manager or account level from other industries. “There’s a view that FM can be quickly learnt, and the sector has become over-inflated with high-salaried, often average people. “In sectors such as manufacturing, it’s possible to find well-qualified, graduate-calibre managers with sophisticated management, large team management, process and Six Sigma skills for much lower salaries. These people can also bring new ideas into a maturing market. As contractors come under increasing cost pressure, these are attractive options.” He adds: “There is still a significant need for FM experience by contractors who feel they need to present people to their clients who have knowledge in FM and experience in that sector. It’s a case of can they influence their client to recruit someone from outside? In the main, qualifications are less important than a proven ability to deliver results.”

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Choosing between in-house and outsourced service provider can put FMs on significantly different career trajectories. What should inform this decision-making process – and how do such choices affect employability?

Schoolsof thought T

ony Jay is deputy director, business operations, at Wales Millennium Centre, having moved to an in-house role from a service provider when the contract finished. His experience has been that the in-house position offers a greater variety of day-to-day experiences, including the opportunity to get more involved in areas outside of FM. “When we moved over under TUPE,” says Jay, “we had the traditional model of cleaning and security, hard and soft services, and that was about it. But now we’re responsible for the health and safety and environment of the site and the estates; customer care delivery (frontof-house), the stage door, and the projects and asset management – as well as the original remit.” Jay has concluded that more opportunities come the way of somebody developing in-house, although he

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The challenge with an in-house role is that there’s a ceiling in terms of where you can go… working for a service provider gives people access to a vast amount of areas

admits that this knowledge is not necessarily as deep as it would be in a service provider, where people might specialise in a particular area. And service providers do indeed stress that they provide both breadth and depth. Duncan Short, HR director at G4S Facilities Management, explains: “Cleaning might sound simple, but in our business we have had people conduct very specialised cleaning around the Ebola scare in the NHS – not something you would ordinarily get in an in-house post. And at the other end of the spectrum you have pharmaceutical companies or large corporate HQs where the requirements will be quite different. You get that wide breadth of experience across different contracts.” And being tied to a particular sector in-house can in fact be quite restrictive, believes CJ Green, group HR director at Servest. “In-house FMs get to live and breathe their sector, day in, day out, and with that dedication comes a high level of expertise,” she accepts. “But the challenge with an in-house role is that there’s a ceiling in terms of where you can go. By contrast, working for a service provider gives people access to a vast amount of areas. They can get a taste of catering, security and building management, and how these service lines work in practice across various sectors. The fact that these sort of roles tend to be broader than job functions within in-house departments can help people on the service provider side develop a more diverse skill set.” Service providers are also more likely to invest in training and development for staff because FM is their core business, says Carl Johnson, director of talent and learning at Interserve. “When you join a business like ours and your role is in FM, you are our number one priority,” he says. “You’re the centre of our world, so developing that team is a priority. If you’re in-house that’s not necessarily the case.” There are also different skills required to work in the two environments, which may help to shape people’s preference for one or the other. Short points out that contract management skills are essential to both positions but also emphasises the need for a more commercial mindset in a service provider environment. “When I was in-house and someone wanted something, I could do it because there wasn’t the same cost constraint. But when you’re delivering a service to a set of KPIs and trying to make a profit, giving away activities is a big no-no, but you still have to keep the client happy. It’s a very different skill set and some people struggle with that.”

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There are also differences in in-house positions between the public and private sectors. “If you like the cut and thrust of quick decision-making and that real commerciality, that’s the private sector,” says Bill Hancox, director of facilities at Edge Hill University. “If you come into the public sector it’s a bit slower, and perhaps a bit more people-focused and touchy-feely. It can be difficult for a lot of people to adjust from one to the other.” But Hancox also points out that the public sector is becoming more commercial. These two fundamentally different career choices offer the potential to develop careers at different rates. “Where an in-house provider has some advantage is that there might be fewer people within their field,” says Short, “so I can see some progression that could happen fairly quickly. If you can demonstrate you’re doing a good job you can progress up the ladder quite quickly but it would be quite narrow and you’d hit a ceiling relatively quickly, whereas within a service provider there are more opportunities to progress.” But working in-house also offers the potential to move into other areas outside of FM, says Jay. “We give individuals more opportunities to totally jump skills from FM to something like telesales whereas if you’re in a traditional service provider you might go into contract management or commercial.”

If you come into the public sector it’s a bit slower, and perhaps a bit more people-focused and touchy-feely

Online www.fm-world.co.uk Recruiters expand on what firms are demanding of FMs

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He gives the example of an agency cleaner who went on to take a degree and join the HR team. There are benefits to both having a wide range of experience and deep sector knowledge, says Johnson, adding that some clients like to see people with experience of particular sectors brought in to help shake things up a bit. Ultimately, it’s a combination of skills, experience and attitude that will help people progress. “When we’re looking to promote people we’re looking for capability, willingness to be mobile and to take on more responsibility,” says Johnson. “Just having a broad portfolio wouldn’t necessarily put you in prime position for a job.”

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A P P O I NTM E NT S

Quality Healthcare Environments

FM Service Support Managers 2 posts Full time Post 1: East covering Hertfordshire, Bedfordshire and Northamptonshire 7VZ[! ,HZ[JV]LYPUN5VYMVSRHUK:\ɈVSR Base: Victoria House, Cambridge, CB21 5XB Salary: £31,383 - £41,373 pa This is an exciting time to join NHS Property Services. We are creating an exciting new property and facilities management company model which is delivering added value for our customers and the wider NHS. At a time of major change for the NHS, the company is reducing costs, unlocking value and reinvesting directly in the future estate to improve frontline patient care. We are on a journey, and we are looking for talented people to join a team that is developing and transforming the business and the way the NHS manages facilities.

The role We have two FM Service Support Manager positions covering the areas detailed above. The role will form a key part of our FM Senior Management Team and will have responsibility for every aspect of facilities management delivery in over 400 sites in the respective area. The FM Service Support Manager will have responsibility for client engagement ensuring services are delivered to the required standard and efficiency improvements are identified and delivered. Facility Management is delivered through a combination of in-house provision and subcontracted arrangements and the post-holder will be the senior contract lead and responsible for all internal delivery teams.

The Person To succeed in this role you will need to possess excellent skills in stakeholder management, managing large outsourced contracts and managing internal delivery teams. You will be a motivational and inspiring leader who is capable of delivering results through others and managing in a changing environment with competing

priorities. You will have experience of managing a geographically dispersed team and have strong strategic, analytical, investigative and problem solving skills. You will be customer focused with Mechanical & Electrical or Building fabric competency. You will have experience of leading self-delivery teams or contract management with demonstrable evidence of cost control with compliance management experience.

About the Company NHS Property Services is one of the largest property owners in the UK, with a £3 billion asset portfolio, some 4,000 properties, 3,000 employees and an annual income of over £700 million. Established in April 2013, the company provides professional property and facilities management advice and services to the NHS. In its first three years, the company has managed over 200 new developments so that patients are treated in better, modern facilities. The company has also achieved substantial savings for the NHS through the application of professional expertise to its estate. Since launch, we have driven down running costs by over £115 million. In the same period, we disposed of 223 surplus sites deemed surplus by the NHS, releasing £152 million back to the NHS front line. Rationalisation of facilities management contracts from 2,300 to just 12 saves the NHS £15 million annually.

The Rewards As well as a challenging and exciting role the company offers a comprehensive benefits package, which includes: lease car/car allowance, 27 days’ annual leave and a group personal pension scheme. For further information about the post, please contact Chris Palmer Senior FM Business Manager on 07983345504. To apply for this post please apply on-line via www.jobs.nhs.uk using job reference: 979-00684. Closing date: 24 July 2016

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Facilities Manager, South West London £40,000 to £50,000 plus benefits Capstone are recruiting on behalf of a Development, Investment and Property Management organisation in South West London. They have developed and regenerated properties for over 40 years and require a Facilities Manager to oversee the portfolio comprising of office space, residential and retail units.

About the role: This is a new opportunity, which will require you to be the Facilities Manager to oversee a team of Building Managers, improve the delivery of FM and implement new processes. The role will allow you to work within an innovative organisation who pride themselves on quality.

Key Responsibilities: t t t t t

Overseeing a team of seven Building Managers Set up of health and safety compliance procedures and oversee ongoing implementation processes Management of hard and soft service contracts (internal and external) Identify the scope of FM services for the portfolio and ensure the delivery meets customer needs Identify cost saving processes and other revenue streams

About you: You will hold a BIFM membership and have either an IOSH or NEBOSH qualification. You will have managed teams, worked within a development or construction sector and have implemented full FM services.

Apply: If you think you can succeed in this position, please contact Nicole Buckland at Capstone Recruitment on 020 3757 5000 or n.buckland@capstone-recruitment.com for a confidential discussion.

Property Managers Yorkshire and Salford Community Solutions, part of Morgan Sindall Investments, is an established asset manager focused on social infrastructure throughout the UK. We pride ourselves on developing our staff and provide a professional service across a portfolio of circa £1bn public sector estate, the majority of which we have developed ourselves. As part of our continued business expansion we are seeking to appoint two highly motivated, results-focused individuals to work in an established team of property managers with particular focus on the management of a portfolio of healthcare and education facilities. One of the posts will be based in our South Yorkshire office and will initially look after our Bradford healthcare portfolio. The second post will be based in our Salford office which manages healthcare and education facilities across the North West.

Applicants will need to be have property/facilities management experience, with a recognised appropriate qualification or working towards. Duties will include contract management of supply chains, liaison with clients/occupiers and partners through to the active management of lifecycle repairs and funds. To apply, interested applicants should forward details including an up to date CV to msilrecruitment@morgansindall.co.uk Closing date for receipt of applications: 18 July 2016 No recruitment Agencies please

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London Opportunities Facilities Manager – Trophy Building West-End • £45,000 - £55,000

Data Centre Engineer London • £30,000 - £32,000

Cobalt Recruitment is seeking a standout Facilities Manager to oversee a major new mixed-use development in the West-End. You will leave your stamp on this prime property by implementing processes and procedures to ensure the building is maintained to the highest standards. Key to your success will be strong total FM experience, ideally within a residential background, and a proactive approach to facilities management. You will be rewarded with a trophy building and a place within a leading managing agent with an enviable reputation for its commitment to clients and employees alike.

An established global service provider is seeking a Data Centre Engineer to work in a critical data facility. The role will include routine tests, checks and record keeping for all of the buildings systems. You’ll manage, rectify and record defects through the helpdesk to ensure all issues are rectified within SLA timeframes. You will monitor and adjust as necessary the building management systems to control the building’s HVAC. You will be qualified to at least NVQ 3 as an Engineer, have a good knowledge of building services and experience in a data centre. Preferably you will have a working knowledge of HV. Ref: DTa1268649

Ref: CS1266863

Offices globally www.cobaltrecruitment.com Please apply for either of the above roles by emailing apply@cobaltrecruitment.com or call 020 7478 2500 to speak with Chris Sycamore or Dan Taylor quoting the relevant reference number.

The power of people

“Learn more about our league table success and discover why our students, staff & alumni are proud to be part of the University of Surrey” Head of Maintenance Services £50,000-£55,000 per annum

Head of Customer & Business Services c.£50,000 per annum

Responsible for championing the planning and delivery of estates hard services maintenance including planned preventative maintenance, environmental, energy, utilities in addition to reactive maintenance. Team of 33 direct reports, £12m budget including £34m in outsourced services.

Responsible for taking a strategic lead in developing customer service interface for all aspects of estates and facilities management. Line manage the E&FM Customer Service Team to ensure customer satisfaction and increased student experience. Team of 5.

The competitive benefits include: • 25 days holiday, + 7 closure days, + bank holidays. • USS pension scheme has 18% employer contributions.

THE TIMES AND THE SUNDAY TIMES 2016

To apply, contact: michael.hewlett@mrgpeople.co.uk 020 8892 0115

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University of the Year

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BAC K PAG E

FMWORLD

EPHFMERA

FM World is the publication of the BIFM, the professional body for facilities management. For more information on membership, qualifications and training contact us:

The facilities management stories that just don’t fit anywhere else. (Email us: editorial@fm-world.co.uk)

British Institute of Facilities Management Number One Building, The Causeway, Bishop’s Stortford, Hertfordshire CM23 2ER, UK

ROLL OF DISHONOUR It has been encouraging to note the gradual uptick in facilities management professionals recognised in the honours system over recent years, and last month saw No.10 Downing Street’s Alfred Smith given an OBE. Cue the predictable, with Independent columnist Kirstie Major dubbing Smith’s honour “downright silly”. All you need to do these days for an honour, suggested Major, “is to keep the loo roll topped up in David Cameron’s bathroom”. Major then suggested that less politically wellplaced FMs haven’t been recognised, which only goes to show that she hasn’t been paying attention to the other people with the job title ‘facilities manager’ recognised in recent years. It’s also disappointing to see that loo roll jibe, one often deployed by those ignorant of the importance of FM and its sheer range and scope yet looking out for a cheap laugh. Frustrating, isn’t it? Just when you think the sector has turned a corner (5 per cent of GDP, crucial to the nation’s productivity aspirations, that sort of thing) this story crops up to remind us just how we much we all still have to do in explaining FM’s rather more nuanced role to the wider world.

Roll Call

PHOTOGRAPHY: SHUTTERSTOCK

Rolling in the Deep erPerhaps it’s a function of the evern faster movement of information n these days, but FM seems to burn through its fair share of curious pt phrases. The latest is the concept of a ‘deep dive’, which appears to describe opi a more forensic analysis of whatever topic n is under discussion in a conference session. ralded as ‘deep dives’ Hence presentations heralded hing from healthy into the subject of anything he National Living and safety legislation, the Wage, worker wellbeing,, etc. Trouble is, sappear just as these phrases tend to disappear o them. soon as we’ve got used to However, what ‘deep dive’ does suggest is an appetite forr greater analysis to sit alongside short-and-sweet content. It’s an appetite that we at FM World will be looking to respond to.

Finally Fina this month, we’d very much like your feedback on FM World’s lik new n look and feel. TheJuly 2016 e edition represents just the start of a three-month process that will see the monthly print title f further changing and marrying u with our day-to-day activity up online. We’re also looking for new members of our online ThinkTank feedback group. So, for whatever purpose you get in touch, our thanks in d advance for doing so. Please email us at editorial@fm-world.co.uk

Deep dives are fine, but you can have productive paddles around tthe topics in question as well, you know

Tel: +44 (0)1279 712 620 Email: admin@bifm.org.uk Web: www.bifm.org.uk

Redactive Publishing Ltd 17-18 Britton Street London EC1M 5TP www.fm-world.co.uk EDITOR Martin Read 020 7880 7664 martin.read@fm-world.co.uk FEATURES EDITOR Jamie Harris 020 7880 6229 jamie.harris@fm-world.co.uk NEWS EDITOR Herpreet Grewal 020 7880 8544 newsdesk@fm-world.co.uk SUB-EDITOR Deborah Shrewsbury 020 7880 6223 deborah.shrewsbury@fm-world.co.uk ART EDITOR David Twardawa 020 7324 2704 david.twardawa@redactive.co.uk PICTURE EDITOR Claire Echavarry 020 7324 2701 claire.echavarry@redactive.co.uk SALES MANAGER Darren Hale 020 7880 6206 darren.hale@redactive.co.uk SENIOR SALES EXECUTIVE Jemma Denn TBA 020 7880 7632 jemma.denn@redactive.co.uk SALES EXECUTIVE Jack Shuard 020 7880 8543 jack.shuard@fm-world.co.uk RECRUITMENT SALES Sabmitar Bal 020 7880 7665 sab.bal@redactive.co.uk SENIOR PRODUCTION EXECUTIVE Aysha Miah-Edwards 020 7880 6241 aysha.miah@redactive.co.uk PUBLISHING DIRECTOR Joanna Marsh 020 7880 8542 joanna.marsh@redactive.co.uk

Subscriptions BIFM members with FM World subscription or delivery queries should call the BIFM’s membership department on +44 (0)1279 712650. FM World is sent to all members of the British Institute of Facilities Management and is available on subscription to non-members. Annual subscription rates are UK £110, Europe £120 and rest of world £130. To subscribe call 020 8950 9117 or email subscriptions@fm-world.co.uk – alternatively, you can subscribe online at www.fm-world.co.uk/about-us/subscribe/

Editorial Advisory Board Simon Ball, business development director, Mitie Martin G Bell, global FM development manager, Unilever Peter Brogan, Research & Information Manager, BIFM Georgina Emery, Marketing & Communications Manager, BIFM Lucy Jeynes, Larch Consulting Nick Cook, managing director, Avison Young Rob Greenfield, director, Assured Safety & Risk Management Ian Jones, director of facilities, ITV Liz Kentish, managing director, Kentish and Co. Chris Morris, director, Xenon Group Anne Lennox Martin, FM consultant Geoff Prudence, chair, CIBSE FM Group Jeremy Waud, chairman, Incentive FM group Jane Wiggins, FM tutor and author

Average net circulation 13,326 (Jul 14 – Jun 15)

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G E T Q U A L I F I E D I N FA C I L I T I E S M A N A G E M E N T

STUDY ONLINE ANYWHERE ANYTIME GET QUALIFIED

Study for a BIFM qualification in facilities management with the BIFM online learning platform which can be accessed from anywhere, on any device. Study for Level 2 – new entrants Level 3 – first line management Level 4 – operational management

Call us to find out how BIFM can support you to progress your career, the alternative study and delivery models that are available and for guidance about identifying the right qualification level for you.

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FM World July 2016