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TYO - Canada

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TYO - Canada To work towards the enhancement of the Tamil Nation and to provide an avenue for the betterment of Tamil youth in canada

TYO

History Youth Canada World Youth Youth Reflection Get Involved

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The brave die never, though they sleep in dust: Their courage nerves a thousand living men.

Introduction

– Minot J. Savage What is it? What happened? For those who weren’t directly influenced by it, it definitely makes you wonder. It was a time in history that was recorded, and for what purpose? We look around only to find people of the Tamil community become frantic, but invigorated. To be remembered annually, a very defining state of affairs must have taken place. We begin to wonder and inquire. And then we’re left with more questions than answers. For how could this ever be justified? No amount of answers or reasons could validate the killings of these people. I try to picture some of the events that took place, and I can’t help but cringe at the thought.You live your life, and you suddenly hear that trouble is coming.You wonder, what is trouble? But at the time, it doesn’t even matter. The point is that trouble is coming, and that you need to take cover. Where would you run if you were afraid? Home... Home sweet home... That’s what our Tamil brothers and sisters did. They tried to find shelter in the one place that they felt safe. Unfortunately, the Sinhala mobs specifically traced out Tamil homes. They raided and burnt these homes. They burnt and hacked these people. What did the Tamils do wrong? This was the land that they were brought up in. They were born here. They learned how to walk and how to talk, on this very land. This land, that taught them how to live, laugh, play, learn, and dream. What did they do wrong? Oh... That’s right. Behind all of that, behind their aspirations, they were above all, Tamil beings. Tamil people’s homes were raided. Priceless possessions and gifts were stolen. Tamils were slaughtered. A lot of these homes were handmade by the Tamil residents. Imagine witnessing your life’s

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savings all taken right in front of your eyes. And of course, savings and material possessions could be bought again, but what if the people you loved were also taken? Stolen. Our Tamil people walked out onto the streets only to find Sinhala mobs enraged, with knives and sticks in their hands. Who were they out to kill? Tamil people. In fear of losing their lives, Tamil people had to flee their homes and seek refuge elsewhere. They went on minibuses and were heading to refugee camps. Many of these buses were burnt. The mobs invaded a lot of these buses and vehicles, forcibly dragged Tamil individuals out, and killed them. Where were the government officials? Where were the people who were supposed to ensure that their citizens were safe? Or, maybe, the more appropriate question would be, why were they consciously ignoring what was taking place? How could a government let its own citizens get ambushed, and just sit aside and become bystanders? The thought of mobs carrying gasoline tanks and weapons, enraged with fury, trying to find and kill Tamil people, is immensely disturbing. Today, Tamil people worldwide are remembering this horrific time in our history. Not only does this remembrance let us mourn those who lost their lives, but it also reinvigorates us as a Tamil community, and keeps us growing stronger. – Tharch.V

In Solidarity, TYO - Canada

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Tamil History: Black July Tamil student community had experienced the brunt of hatred by the majority Sinhalese student community and also experienced the unexpected of the University authorities, intellectuals, and the country’s ruling authorities who did absolutely very little to stop the violence against the Tamil Students for three days.

Contrary to this belief, the Black July pogrom against Tamils was a series of deliberate acts, executed in accordance with a well-crafted plan in a systematic manner by the Sri Lankan government and ultranationalists in organized manner with full blessing of the law enforcing agencies of Sri Lanka and other state institutions of Sri Lanka. The gap between Sinhalese and Tamils widened well before the July 83 riots due to the unprovoked attack on the Tamil students by the Sinhalese students in Peradeniya University on May 11th, 1983. The May 1983 attack on the Tamils students in the University had a greater damaging effect on the Tamils and their sense of belonging to Sri Lanka as it targeted the Tamil student community. These uncivilized acts by the Sinhalese students against their fellow Tamil students brought dreadful feeling of shock and numbness to the entire Tamil student community in Sri Lanka.

In 23 1983 July in Colombo, the capital of Sri Lanka alone, thousands of Tamils were killed and hundreds of them burnt to death by the Sinhalese mobs, which were well aided by the state forces and the government of Sri Lanka.

History

July 23rd 1983 was a sad, unforgettable and black day for the Tamils. This day was a turning point for the Tamils in Sri Lanka. Many people including local and international historians still believe that the killing of 13 Sri Lankan soldiers by the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE) was the main reason for the 1983 July riots and pogrom against Tamils in Sri Lanka.

Weapons like steel rods, cycle chains, and wooden rods from broken chairs, tables, knives, ropes, and burning tires were used extensively used to attack the Tamil students. Almost similar weapons were used by the Sinhalese mops to massacre innocent Tamil men, women, children and infants in the July 1983 pogrom in Colombo.

The riots, which began in Colombo, spread to Kandy, Matale, Nuwara Eliya, Kalutara and Trincomalee where Tamils were concentrated. Many hundreds of Tamils lost their hard earned properties and over 100,000 Tamils were displaced and were made refugees overnight in their own country by their fellow citizens and sent back to North and East. The Sinhalese government and its law enforcing agencies did very little or nothing to prevent this pogrom against the un-armed and innocent Tamils. In fact, sections of the Sri Lankan state aided by senior government officials and the institutions of the country aided in the violence against Tamils. The military and police force watched as thousands of Tamils were brutally and inhumanely murdered in cold blood.

The Tamil student community recalling the horrific events today says the attacks on them were shocking and horrifying to experience. Witnessing their fellow Sinhalese students being involved with violence against Tamils were disgusting to say the least for Tamil youth. “Mobs of Sinhala youth rampaged through the streets, ransacking homes, shops and offices, looting them and setting them ablaze, as they sought out members of the Tamil ethnic minority.�- London Daily Telegraph 26 July 1983

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TYO - Canada The Intelligence apparatus of the Sri Lankan state further played a key role in fueling the riots and senior government officials and ministers offered voters lists of Tamils to Sinhalese mobs, who went on a rampage. Furthermore, 58 imprisoned political Tamil prisoners were massacred by the Sinhalese jail guards with the help of Sinhalese inmates in Sri Lanka on July 25, 1983 and July 27, 1983 with stones, knives and swords in the Welikade Prison. The Tamils’ perception of being proud citizens of Sri Lanka changed forever. Tamils arrived to the stark

reality and realization that no matter what, if Tamils are not prepared to stand up to the Sinhalese hegemony then Tamils in Sri Lanka would face many riots and pogrom against them like July 1983. By remembering the Tamils’ holocaust on black July of 1983, the Tamils are continue to remind themselves, they need to be united and strong wherever they live, they need to stand up against the Sri Lankan state oppression, they need to fight for their freedom to live with dignity and self-rule in their homeland.

Vallipuram Vasanthan (Captain Miller) History

History

Captain Miller was born on 1 January 1966 in a village of Thunnalai, which is near the lagoon called Thondaman Aru and is also in close proximity to Point Pedro and Vallipuram. He was the second of three sons and his Father was a local bank manager. He was a student of Hartley College in Point Pedro from 1976 to 1983 and completed Advanced Level there. Anti-Tamil pogrom of 1983, in which more than 3000 Tamils were slaughtered, had affected him profoundly. This event prompted him to drop out of school and to join the Liberation Tigers of Tamileelam (LTTE).

Vallipuram Vasanthan (January 01, 1966 - 5 July 1987) was better known by his nom de guerre Captain Miller was the first LTTE Black Tiger, driving a small truck laden with explosives into a Sri Lanka Army camp in Nelliady Madhya Maha Vidyalayam, Jaffna peninsula, on 5 July 1987, sacrificing himself while killing over one hundred Sri Lankan soldiers. He achieved posthumous fame as the first Black Tiger. The day of his death commemorated annually as “Black Tigers Day”. A statue was erected in his honour, at the site of his attack in the Nelliady Central College, in 2002, which was later destroyed by armed men working with Sri Lanka Army. A total of 322 Black Tigers have been killed in action from Captain Miller´s death in 1987 until 30th June 2007, according to the Tamileelam Heroes Secretariat in Vanni.

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Miller had participated in several encounters with Sri Lanka Army prior to the suicide attack. In each encounter, Miller had demonstrated his bravery and earned the respect and reverence of many cadres. He also participated in many counter-offensives against Sri Lanka Army. At the time, Sri Lanka Army was waging an offensive called “Operation Liberation” to gain control of Vadamaraatchi region of Jaffna peninsula. After more than a month of battle, Sri Lanka Army invaded and occupied Vadamaraatchi in June 1987 while suffering heavy casualties. However, this victory gave a morale boost to Sri Lanka army. Then-President of Sri Lanka, J.R. Jayawardene, declared that Sri Lanka Army would win the war in few more months, encouraged by the capture of Vadamaraatchi. LTTE had been analyzing various military tactics and strategies that could be used to halt the military offensive. At this critical moment, Miller, who was keen on regaining the control

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Miller sought permission from the National Leader, Hon.V.Prabhakaran, for his daring attack. The permission was given after a lengthy consideration. He and another cadre called Prabha drafted plans for the attack immediately after the permission and necessary explosives were granted. Kamal, another cadre of LTTE was given the job of clearing the barricades constructed in front of the garrison. Miller himself loaded his truck with explosives and installed the wiring. Subsequently, he brought the truck near the camp on the day of the attack, crossing Sri Lanka Army controlled area. Another group of cadres were also brought in to assist Miller in achieving the task. As soon as it was night, everyone started to move towards the camp. A group of cadres initiated firing at the camp once the order was given to start the attack. Kamal and his team were clearing the barricades amid intense firing from both sides. Miller was patiently waiting in his truck for the order to come from commander. Even at that moment, Miller showed no sign of fear. In fact, he was joking and laughing with another cadre. After

several minutes passed, a green light was given to Miller. “Barricades are cleared”, Kamal announced through the walkie-talkie. Miller started the truck courageously and was awaiting further instructions from his commanders. A go-ahead order was given to him from the command centre. Another cadre who was in the truck with Miller activated the explosive system and left the truck. The truck started to move slowly towards the camp. A cadre who was running along with truck pleaded Miller to “please come back”. Miller chuckled to himself as he accelerated the truck. Everyone was gazing at the truck as Miller drove it closer to the camp. In seconds, the truck exploded with a thunderous blast and the surrounding area was covered with smoke. The camp was entirely destroyed and more than one hundred Sri Lankan Army personnel were killed. The attack put an end to Sri Lanka Army`s offensive and brought the Sri Lankan government to negotiation table. Unfortunately, Captain Miller never returned to witness the success of his attack. Even his body was never found. Nevertheless, he still lives and will continue to live in the hearts and minds of Tamils living all over the world and he remains apart of Tamil history and identity.

USA Declares Independence

World History

of Vadamaraatchi from Sri Lanka Army, volunteered to perform the most daring military manoeuvre in contemporary warfare: suicide attack.

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In Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the Continental Congress adopts the Declaration of Independence, which proclaims the independence of the United States of America from Great Britain and its king. The declaration came 442 days after the first volleys of the American Revolution were fired at Lexington and Concord in Massachusetts and marked an ideological expansion of the conflict that would eventually encourage France’s intervention on behalf of the Patriots. The first major American opposition to British policy came in 1765 after Parliament passed the Stamp Act, a taxation measure to raise revenues for a standing British army in America. Under the banner of “no taxation without representation,” colonists convened the Stamp Act Congress in October 1765 to vocalize their opposition to the tax. With its enactment in November, most colonists called for a boycott of

British goods, and some organized attacks on the customhouses and homes of tax collectors. After months of protest in the colonies, Parliament voted to repeal the Stamp Act in March 1766. Most colonists continued to quietly accept British rule until Parliament’s enactment of the Tea Act in

“Motorists were dragged from their cars to be stoned and beaten with sticks... Others were cut down with knives and axes.” - London Daily Telegraph 26 July 1983

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TYO - Canada 1773, a bill designed to save the faltering East India Company by greatly lowering its tea tax and granting it a monopoly on the American tea trade. The low tax allowed the East India Company to undercut even tea smuggled into America by Dutch traders, and many colonists viewed the act as another example of taxation tyranny. In response, militant Patriots in Massachusetts organized the “Boston Tea Party,” which saw British tea valued at some 18,000 pounds dumped into Boston Harbor.

World History

Parliament, outraged by the Boston Tea Party and other blatant acts of destruction of British property, enacted the Coercive Acts, also known as the Intolerable Acts, in 1774. The Coercive Acts closed Boston to

merchant shipping, established formal British military rule in Massachusetts, made British officials immune to criminal prosecution in America, and required colonists to quarter British troops. The colonists subsequently called the first Continental Congress to consider a united American resistance to the British. With the other colonies watching intently, Massachusetts led the resistance to the British, forming a shadow revolutionary government and establishing militias to resist the increasing British military presence across the colony. In April 1775, Thomas Gage, the British governor of Massachusetts, ordered British troops to march to Concord, Massachusetts, where a Patriot arsenal was known to be located. On April 19, 1775, the British regulars encountered a group of American militiamen at Lexington, and the first shots of the American Revolution were fired. Initially, both the Americans and the British saw the conflict as a kind of civil war within the British Empire: To King George III it was a colonial rebellion, and to the Americans it was a struggle for their rights as

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JULY 2010 British citizens. However, Parliament remained unwilling to negotiate with the American rebels and instead purchased German mercenaries to help the British army crush the rebellion. In response to Britain’s continued opposition to reform, the Continental Congress began to pass measures abolishing British authority in the colonies. In January 1776, Thomas Paine published Common Sense, an influential political pamphlet that convincingly argued for American independence and sold more than 500,000 copies in a few months. In the spring of 1776, support for independence swept the colonies, the Continental Congress called for states to form their own governments, and a five-man committee was assigned to draft a declaration. The Declaration of Independence was largely the work of Virginian Thomas Jefferson. In justifying American independence, Jefferson drew generously from the political philosophy of John Locke, an advocate of natural rights, and from the work of other English theorists. The first section features the famous lines, “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.” The second part presents a long list of grievances that provided the rationale for rebellion. On July 2, 1776, the Continental Congress voted to approve a Virginia motion calling for separation from Britain. The dramatic words of this resolution were added to the closing of the Declaration of Independence. Two days later, on July 4, the declaration was formally adopted by 12 colonies after minor revision. New York approved it on July 19. On August 2, the declaration was signed. The American War for Independence would last for five more years.Yet to come were the Patriot triumphs at Saratoga, the bitter winter at Valley Forge, the intervention of the French, and the final victory at Yorktown in 1781. In 1783, with the signing of the Treaty of Paris with Britain, the United States formally became a free and independent nation.

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Youth Canada

I Remember - Black July 2010

On Wednesday, July 21st, 2010, Tamil Students’ Associations (TSA) in various universities in Ontario united to remember the brutality committed by state sponsored mobs against the Tamil minority in Sri Lanka in July of 1983. Dressed in black from head to toe, a room full of youth mourned the loss of thousands of blameless Tamils. The entrance to the event at Ryerson University was recreated into a pathway displaying the past and guests walked through the horrid history of July 1983. Each TSA took on a day from the week of atrociousness and creatively showcased it to educate everyone who came out to the event. Later, the audience was taken through the week in July 1983 as the TSAs staged skits that clearly depicted the horror, grief, and distraught felt by the Tamil civilians during that time. Also, throughout the event, videos created by the TSAs were also shown. Each TSA had made a video in relation to Black July as an attempt to educate the larger community about what had happened on the tiny island 27 years ago. Further, the day also

consisted of the showing of a documentary on Black July. Afterward, guests and participants both partook in an interactive component to the campaign, which was called Four Corners. Each corner of the room was set up with a table and the necessary utensils for painting, writing, poetry, or a video montage. The purpose of these corners were help individuals express what they had learned or felt through the day after watching and absorbing all the information about Black July in a medium that was familiar to them. Whether it was expressing their feelings in a story, showing their emotions in an illuminating poem, using paint to help visualize their thoughts, or speaking from their hearts into a video camera, many communicated in a way that was easiest for them. Finally, the day ended with closing remarks from an individual from every TSA. All of them stated that exhibiting history was the best way to enlighten our youth, the future of tomorrow. –TYO Canada

“Tamil owned businesses account for between 50 and 60 percent of the commercial life of the capital and they have been destroyed - scientifically extracted from among their neighbors and burned.”- London Times, 2 August 1983

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Youth Canada

NCCT & TGTE - Black July

The National Council of Canadian Tamils (NCCT) and the Transnational Government of Tamileelam (TGTE) jointly organized an event on July 25th to mark the 27th anniversary of Black July. Thousands of Tamils gathered at the site of Ontario’s Provincial Parliament, Queens Park, to pay their respects to innocent Tamil victims of 1983. Tamil Canadians urged the International Community, including Canada, to pressure the Sri Lankan government to stop the continuous human rights violations of Tamils and demand justice for the victims of countless atrocities committed by the Sri Lankan state. The highlight of the event was the candle light vigil.

“The rioters seeking out Tamil homes and burning them had a particularly detailed knowledge of who lived where and who owned what.’’ - London Times, 8 August 1983

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TYO - Canada

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Youth Canada / World Youth

UTSC - TSA Talent Show

On Friday July 30th , 2010, UTSC TSA presented a talent show called Nivarana Alaikal “Waves of relief�. This event took place at the Chinese cultural center located at Progress ave and Sheppard road. It was a huge success, where it was a great turn out. This talent show is a charity event which began after the Tsunami in 2004. There were a variety of talents that were show cased at this event. Many young adults within the Tamil community came out and showed their support as well as presented their talents. The event ranged from various different types of shows, from skits to plays, dances to singing.

Germany - Black July

Black july 83 awareness campaign have been held in cities of Germany by youths on july 23 2010

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I can still hear the sounds of tears Its been 27 years- so long BUT still Its seems like yesterday Time goes so fast like a wind-But The memories of our lost are still in our heart Its a lifelong threading memory that can not be wiped off that easily It does have its own name called: BLACK JULY Why did this July come into Tamils lives? Well, it came quietly and took all our shadows away Everything fades away before even open the eyes of the sun Too many things to forget in those seconds BLACK as a colour that given to our people by Singhalese ALIENS Why would these ALIENS do such a thing to our innocent people? Why did they locked our blood into the car and burn them alive? Its not our fate, this world should be shame on themselves for watching There is no armed gathered to get our people out of the bloody river Rioters loot and fired our property, the one our fathers spend their whole life

Youth Reflection

So many lost of live, so many pain gained in shorten period of time

earning them Thousands of our families are made refugees overnights Whatever the colour put on black, it remains as black We are TAMIL, WE HAVE ALL THE POWER TO DESTROY OUR ENEMIES IDEAS WE FACED SO MANY BUT WE WILL NEVER GIVE UP This is the beginning of the lost back in 1983 still continuing to the present BUT IT WILL NOT BE CONTNUE TO THE FUTURE – Tharany.K

‘’The shells of (Tamil owned) businesses line Galle Road, the main waterfront thoroughfare advertising the names that marked them for destruction. Lakshmi Mahal, pawnbroker, or Ram Gram stores and florist... Damage estimates are uncertain and incomplete, but the total economic loss has been placed at $300 million.’’- New York Times, August 1983

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Youth Reflection

“Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter.” – Martin Luther King, Jr.

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July, a hot summer month, which is normally filled with excitement and joy, a time when nature’s beauty could be witnessed at it’s fullest has become a sorrowful and devastating period of time for the Tamils. This memorable month has been engraved in both our hearts and history as a permanent scar which symbolizes the suffering, dehumanization, and extermination of our brothers and sisters in the hands of the dictatorial regime of Sri Lanka. Twenty seven years ago, the lives, hopes, and dreams of the Tamils were shattered into pieces by the racist and terror government of Sri Lanka. Black July (July 24th-30th, 1983) bursted upon Sri Lanka with the sudden ferocity of a flash flood. In a period of seven days, Tamils were systematically targeted with violence in Colombo and many other parts of Sri Lanka. Countless number of innocent Tamil civilians were wounded, many were left stranded in the midst of no where without any possessions, innumerable lives were jailed and viciously tortured, hundreds of thousands more were displaced after Singhalese mobs burned down their homes and vandalized their

businesses, countless number of Tamils were burnt alive, slaughtered on the streets, and were gruesomely left to die like animals, all due to the reason for being born as Tamils. The 1983 anti-Tamil pogrom produced an exodus of Tamils who fled to all parts of the world. However, the patriotic fire burns with fiery and we will never forget the past. In order to remember the blackest days of our lives, on Sunday July 25th, 2010, hundreds of Canadian Tamils commemorated the tragic and horrendous events of Black July and the alleged genocide which took place last year against the Tamil population in Sri Lanka. The commemoration ceremony took place at Queens Park in Downtown Toronto. Everyone was in black attire to mourn for the lost lives, many people shared inspiring speeches in solidarity, and powerful patriotic performances were staged to express the emotions and determination of the Tamils. The memorable night ended with a candle light vigil in which hundreds of candles lit the sky bright in memory of all the perished lives.

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On July 21st, an event called the “I Remember Black July Campaign” was conducted at the University of Ryerson by all of the Tamil Students’ Associations. The purpose of the event was to educate youths about their roots, identity, and crisis in a very creative manner. The campaign was presented innovatively in which many youths participated in expressing the history of Tamils artistically through the form of drama, visual arts, poetry, and many more. The course of events during Black July illustrates the Sri Lankan government’s undeniable involvement in the genocidal acts against Tamils. The execution of such atrocious criminal behaviour continued to haunt the Tamils. This was clearly portrayed in the alleged genocide of Tamils in the year of 2009. Our screams reached the skies but it didn’t touch the hearts of powerful people who could have prevented the death of thousands of innocent civilians.

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We will stand united and work with determination towards our goals. The past will never be forgotten. The future of Tamils is to be paved by our own will and determination. The plight of the silenced can only be alleviated when enough are listening. Those suffering in Sri Lanka are stifled from speaking. We will voice for the freedom of our people and nation. We as youths have taken authority in our hands. We will never give up till the day we breathe freedom! – Anojini.K

Youth Reflection

TYO - Canada

The events of July 1983, and the calamitous months of the final stages of war which lead to the ethnic cleansing of the Tamils in 2009 are poignant yet created a whole new sense of determination for the entire Tamil population around the world.

“The evidence points clearly to the conclusion that the violence of the Sinhala rioters on the Tamils amounted to Acts of Genocide.” - The Review, International Commission of Jurists, December 1983

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Get Involved

TYO - Canada

Join TYO

Speak Out

Our doors are always open to new members that are looking to make a difference for Tamils around the world.

As Tamil youth in Canada, we have the ultimate duty of educating others, as well as ourselves of the suffering of the Tamil people. Understanding is crucial. And with understanding comes awareness, the most essential step in the path to progress.

As an organization with the interests of Tamil youth at heart, TYO provides opportunities for Canadian Tamil youth to network, contribute, and develop their skills in various areas as well. Interested in getting involved? Please contact us at contact@canadatyo.org Or visit us at www.canadatyo.org

Ignorance is not a bliss. • Stay updated with recent news • Write to your local politicians • Attend rallies • Enlighten non-Tamil peers • Write a poem, articles, essay • Research, understand and recite

Reach Editor - Arul.M Reach Designer - Shiyamdev.S

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WRITE

For our next month’s issue: Submit your written work based on

‘what’s on your mind?’

Get Involved

For the beautiful moments For the tragic times With your heart and no regrets

Please follow the guidelines below. Don’t forget to add reach@canadatyo.org to your e-mail safe list. We appreciate all of your time and effort.

Guidelines:

TYO - Canada

o All submissions must be in English o You may create your own title for your work o Written work should be within 750 words (or 2 pages letter sized), 12 pt font (Times) o Can be written in any form (article, research essay, poem, story, etc.) o Include your name, contact info, and University/ College/ High School (If applicable) o Submit before AUGUST 25th, 2010 o Must be e-mailed to reach@canadatyo.org with the subject ‘Reach-AUGUST 2010’ o Please attach a word file or copy and paste your work in your e-mail

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26-JULY-2010 REACH  

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