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Gaiety Theatre Dublin

D ire cto rs: E s m o n n A n d rew s, L orc an P o u rk e . F red O 'D o n o v a n , D e r m o d C afferky

THE

RATHMINES AND RATHGAR MUSICAL SOCIETY

MY FAIR LADY Opening 11 March, 1969

&


w A GAIETY EVENING FIRST ACT Meet in the Gaiety. Have a drink in com fort before the show. Bars open 7.30 p.m. Order and pay for drinks for the interval.

INTERVAL Your drinks are ready and waiting for you at your table. You’re saved time and trouble.

ENCORE Relax after the show. Have a drink. The bars are always open for half an hour after curtain fafi.

^i Im^ I fAl UL uE

trust you e n i ° Y e c l Yo u r G aietv evenin9

come again!

Licenced Bars on all Floors.


Telegrams “GAIETY DUBLIN”

Telephone 771717

Resident Manager : Jo e Kearns NIGHTLY 8 p.m. MATINEES 3 p.m.

OPENING TUESDAY, 11th MARCH, 1969 THE RATHMINES AND RATHGAR MUSICAL SOCIETY presents

MY FAIR LADY Adapted from Bernard Shaw’s “Pygmalion” Book and Lyrics by

Music by

ALAN JAY LERNER

FREDERICK LOEWE

by arrangement with N.O.D.A. Ltd. and S tage Musicals Ltd., New York Musical Director TERRY O’CONNOR, L.R.A.M. Choreographer ALICE DALGARNO Settings designed & executed by ROBERT HEADE Costumes created by BABS DE MONTE of STUDIO ROYALE Production by

JAMES BELCHAMBER

For Ralhmlnes and Rathgar Musical Society

Stage Director ............................................... SEAMUS O'NEILL Assistant Stage Directors ANN KING, URSULA MURPHY, NORA O’ROURKE, MARY O'MALLEY Chorus Master ................................................... ROBERT DALY Honorary Secretary ........................................... CLEM P. RYAN Honorary T reasurer.................................... THOMAS MURTAGH Wardrobe M aste r.....................................................PAT LAWLOR Wardrobe Mistress ........................................... MARY McCANN


Cork gin fits in Call for a Cork D ry G in and enjoy the unique and pleasurable taste of one of the finest gins in the w orld . . whichever way you ask for i t . . whatever the occasion . . Cork G in fits in.


MY FAIR LADY When G eorge Bernard Shaw wrote PYGMALION away back in 1912 he probably did not forsee, astute gentleman though he was, that his rom antic story would some day be m agically transform ed into a stage and film presentation which, in its musical form, would create an all-time high rating in audience appeal. It appears that it was fifteen years earlier that Shaw got the first germ of an idea for the play. He wrote to Ellen T e rry : “ Caesar and Cleopatra has been driven clean out of my head by a play I want to write for them (Forbes-Robertson and Mrs. Patrick C am pbell), in w hich he shall be a west-end gentleman and she an east-end dona in an apron and three orange and red feathers” . The first production of PYGMALION was in Vienna— in German— in 1913, and London audiences saw it for the first tim e in His M ajesty's Theatre on April 11, 1914. Mrs. Pat was Eliza and S ir Herbert Tree played Higgins. When the play was revived in 1947, Shaw chose Alec Clunes to play the Professor. Ann Rogers, Stanley Holloway, Zena Dare and Robert Cooke were in the other main parts. The appealing story of the pretty flow er girl with the out­ rageous accent was first presented to the New York stage in March 1956 under its new title of MY FAIR LADY. W ith its light-hearted, immensely clever lyrics and wonderful musical score by Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe it became a star show overnight. It ran for six and a half years (2,717 perform ances) achieving a record before it closed in Septem­ ber 1962. The W arner Brothers’ film has since become a classic. The genius of Lerner and Loewe is always evident in the twenty-odd songs which have become so fam iliar in the last thirteen years, and the eighteen scenes of the com bined two acts give m agnificent scope for the transform ation from Covent Garden vegetable market to the comfortable bachelor quarters of Professor Higgins, the exciting Ascot scene and the Embassy Ball. G.B.S. in his epilogue to the play holds that the history of Eliza Doolittle, though called a romance because the transfiguration it records seems exceedingly improbable, is common enough. However his audiences may take leave to differ with him, and find themselves firm ly held by the unusual story of the flow er girl who turns into a lady and the Professor who becomes ‘an ordinary m an’. MY FAIR LADY opened at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, on 30th A pril, 1958, and closed on 19th October, 1963, the occasion of its 2,281st perform ance, having been seen by 4,325,000 people. It was the longest run on record at this famous playhouse which recently celebrated its tercentenary. The London run of MY FAIR LADY has been exceeded by only one other musical, ‘‘Salad Days” , which played fo r 3 more performances, but at a theatre— the Vaudeville— which has a capacity of only 669 compared with Drury Lane’s 2,341. The RATHMINES AND RATHGAR MUSICAL SOCIETY is proud that it is giving the first presentation of the show in the Republic. Lighting Equipment by STRAND ELECTRIC LTD. For the Gaiety Theatre J. POTTER Director P. JONES Stage Manager S. BURKE . C hief Electrician The public may leave at the end o f the performance by all Exit doors. Persons shall not be perm itted to stand or sit in any of the gangways intersecting the seating, or to sit in any of the other gangways. (Copy of bye-laws). The taking of photographs in the auditorium is strictly prohibited.


IVIY F A I R

LADY

CAST (in order of appearance)

B uskers

MAURA BOURKE D E R M O T DALY F E R G U S O ’NEILL

M rs. Eynsford-Hill

D O D O O ’HAGAN

Eliza Doolittle

LOUISE STUDLEY

F r e d d y Eynsford-Hill

BRYAN HOEY

C o lo n e l P ic k e rin g

MAURICE O ’SULLIVAN

A D ru n k Lady

EVA STAVELEY

A B ystander

ALAN CRA W FO RD

H e n ry H iggins

BRENDAN McSHANE

S e f s e y Man

RO N EVANS

H o x to n Man

J O E BEVAN

A n o t h e r B y s ta n d e r

TOMMY O ’DWYER

Iris h m a n

J O H N O ’CONNELL

First C o c k n e y

JO H N DILLON

S e c o n d Cockney

JO H N DOLAN

T h ird C o c k n e y

NOEL BYRNE

B a r te n d e r

RO N EVANS

H arry

PADRAIG O ’ROURKE

Ja m ie

TO N Y SW EENY

A lfred P. D o o little

R. J . TIERNEY

Mrs. P e a r c e

HEATHER H EW SO N

Mrs. H o p k in s

KATHLEEN O ’BRIEN

F o o tm e n

DONAL KENNY J O H N DILLON

Lord B o x in g to n

NOEL BYRNE

L a d y B o x in g to n

ENA BOYLAN

M erry W idow

GRAINNE M cM ANUS

C o n s ta b le

MAURICE CRONIN

F lo w e r Girl

DYMPNA CUMMINS

Z o lta n K a rp a th y

JO H N CONROY

M ajor D o m o

PAT LAWLOR

Q u e e n of T ra n s y lv a n ia

KAY FORDE

A m bassador

PA SCAL WALSHE

B a r te n d e r

NIAL DUNGAN

Mrs. H ig g in s ’ M aid

B u tle r

FR E D TAYLOR

V alet

NOEL M cG E E

S erv an ts

CATHERINE McAULIFFE EITHNE MAGUIRE CARM EL SHAW SHIRLEY SW EENEY MARY DONNELLY

Mrs. H ig g in s

MOLLY HICKEY

C h a u ffe u r

S T E P H E N BYRNE

..

BRONAH CRAW FORD

SIN G IN G ENSEMBLE Misses A. Crossan, E. Boylan, M. Creed, D. Cummins, B. Crawford, M. Doyle, N. Kealy, A. McBrien, M. McCann, D. Egar, M. Neville, D. Sheridan, E. Staveley, I. Tobin, M. Walsh, A. W alsh, K. O’Brien. Messrs. N. Byrne, S. Byrne, J. Bevan, M. Cronin, A. Crawford, N. Dungan, J. Dillon, J. Dolan, R. Evans, S. Hogan, D. Kenny, P. Lawlor, J. O'Connell, T . O ’Dwyer, P. Walsh. DA N C IN G ENSEM BLE Misses G. M cM anus, P. Dowling, P. McGrath, C. Pallor, M. Bourke. Messrs. A. Cullen, F. O’Neill, G. Brady, D. Daly, P. O ’Donovan.

C re d its : Mr. M cS hane’s w ardrobe by LOUIS COPELAND , Dam e Street. Cardigan worn by M r. McShane by GLEN ABBEY. Hairstyles for Misses Studley, Hewson, Hickey and O ’Hagan by M ILO RDS AND M ILADIES HAIR SALON, Central Hotel Cham bers. Cigars by PLAYER-WILLS. Pipes by KAPP & PETERSON LTD. Recording M achine by FRANK RAFTER, 96 Lr. G ardiner St. Silverware, Decanters and Lamps by T. M UR TA G H (Dawson B outique). Recordings by G ERRY FITZGERALD, Rathfarnham. G lobe by ED U C A TIO N A L CO O F IRELAND, Talbot St. Artificial flowers by FLORENTAL, 10 Mountjoy Square.


If you haven't dined tonight in the Dolphin Inn before the show, nip around for a theatre supper after it.

The night is still young (an d w e ’re fully licensed until 12 p.m.)

BOUHIK IKK Essex Street, Dublin 2. Ring 778283 at the interval for a table.

Are you about to be a bride, ora parent of a bride, or a friend of a bride, ora friend of a parent of a bride, or both? If you are, here’s some information you’ll find very useful. The Country Club Hotel, Portmarnock, is a wonderful place for a wedding breakfast. Phone or write for details: Banqueting Manager,

Couijtry Club cHotel Pormamock, Co. Dublin. Tel. 350611.


SYNOPSIS OF SCENES AND MUSICAL NUMBERS The place is London.

Scene 1

Scene 2

Scene 3 Scene 4

The tim e, 1912.

ACT I Outside the Opera House, Covent Garden — A cold March night S tre e t E n te rta in e rs T he T hree Buskers “ W h y Can’ t th e E n g lis h ? ” Higgins “ W o u ld n ’t i t Be L o v e rly ? Eliza an d C ockneys A tenement section, Tottenham Court Road — Immediately following “ W it h a L i t t le B i t o f L u c k ’’ Doolittle, H arry and Jamie Higgins' Study— The (oliowing morning “ I ’m an O r d in a r y M a n ” Higgins A tenement sectfon, Tottenham Court Road — Three days later R eprise : “ W ith a L i t t l e B it o f L u c k ”

Scene 5

D oolittle an d Ensem ble Higgins’ Study— Later that day “ Ju st Y o u W a it” Eliza “ T h e R a in i n S pain” H iggins, Eliza and Pickering “ I C o u ld H a v e D a n c e d A l l N ig h t ”

Scene 6 Scene 7 Scene 8 Scene 9 Scene 10 Scene 11

Eliza, M rs. Pearce an d Maids Near the Race Meeting, Ascot— A July afternoon Inside a Club Tent, Ascot— Immediately following “ A s c o t G a vo tte ” F u ll Ensem ble Outside Higgins’ House, Wimpole Street — Later that afternoon “ O n T h e S tre e t W h e re Y o u L iv e ” Freddy Higgins’ Study— Six weeks later The promenade of the Embassy— Later that night The ballroom of the Embassy — Immediately following “ T h e Em bassy W a ltz ”

Higgins, Eliza, Karpathy an d Full Ensem ble ACT II Scene 1

Scene 2

Scene 3

Higgins’ Study—three o’clock the following morning “ Y o u D id I t ” Higgins, Pickering, M rs. Pearce an d Servants R e p ris e : “ Just Y o u W a it” Eliza Outside Higgins’ House, Wimpole Street — immediately following R e p rise : “ O n th e S tre e t W h e re Y o u L iv e F red dy “ Show M e ” Eliza an d Freddy Flower Garden at Covent Garden — 5 o’clock that morning R e p rise : “ W o u ld n ’t I t Be L o v e r ly ? "

Eliza an d C ockneys “ G e t M e T o T he C h u rc h O n T im e ”

Scene 4 Scene 5 Scene 6 Scene 7

D oolittle, H arry, Jamie and Ensemble Upstairs Hail of Higgins’ House — 11 o’clock that morning “A H y m n t o H i m ” Higgins The conservatory of Mrs. Higgins’ House — Later that day “ W it h o u t Y o u ” Eliza a n d Higgins Outside Higgins’ House, Wimpole Street — Immediately following “ I ’ve g ro w n a ccustom ed to h e r face” Higgins Higgins’ Study— Immediately following


Seeyou dow nstairs a t Jonathan’s o f co u rse !

In Dublin the place to go is Jonathan's. The menu is fu ll o f unique dishes. No wonder it ’s where you find Dublin people enjoying life by day. .. and night-time too: pre or after Theatre, dinner in the exciting and unusual atmosphere o f Downstairs Jonathans is something to remember. N ight-tim e Downstairs savour the superior cuisine, wine and dance to the early hours in the Discotheque.

JONATHANS

OF GRAFTON STREET “A N E W EXPERIENCE IN EATING OUT" PHONE 111 HO or 112548 FOR RESERVATIONS.


Does Carling give you more for your money?

Yes and no. T h e a m o u n t of beer in a b o ttle o f C a rlin g B lack Label is the s a m e as in a n y o t h e r bottle. B u t there is a d ifference. C arling has fuller flavour. S o i t ’s really satisfying. A n d th a t makes it b e t te r value for your m o n ey than an y o th e r lager. H a v e a bottle o f C a rlin g soon. T h e r e ’s : n o m ore i n it. B u t there’s a l o t m o r e to k .


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The finest quality dairy ice cream . . . the unbeatable treat!

Look for the HB sign . . .

P rinted by the Elo Press Ltd., Dublin S.


1969 my fair lady vol1  
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