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CONTENTS

112

THE G REENWICH I SSUE 82

THE GRASS IS GREENER

John Badman IV, Lauren Brown, Jennifer Cuminale,

Courtney and Sabrina Forsythe, and Peter Hansen gather at 747 Riversville Road in Greenwich, Connecticut, wearing the season’s best and brightest. PRODUCED BY

92

E LIZABETH QUINN B ROWN,

PREP SCHOOLS

PHOTOGRAPHED BY

The Brunswick School and Greenwich Academy have led the way in

educating Greenwich’s youth for over a century.

96

CONNECTICUT CLASSICS

BY

ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

Dinyar Wadia is celebrated for his exquisite traditional

design, which shines through in two Greenwich properties.

102

BEN FINK SHAPIRO

BY

D ANIEL CAPPELLO

GREENWICH AVENUE The strip between West Putnam Avenue and Railroad Avenue hosts stores like J.Crew, Ralph Lauren, and Tiffany & Co.—a destination for both

afternoon errands and excursions. BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN WITH MEGAN MALLOY

106

IN A LEAGUE OF ITS OWN A colorful review of The Ivy League, by Quest’s fashion director, Daniel Cappello, provides a glimpse inside the eight storied institutions

that have come to define the epitome of American education. BY DARRELL HARTMAN

112

POLO JOURNAL

Our annual review of the greatest players and play-offs in polo.

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76

CONTENTS 62

C OLUMNS 16

SOCIAL DIARY

56

SOCIAL CALENDAR

58

HARRY BENSON

Our columnist recalls Dominick Dunne, comparing him to a modern Truman Capote.

60

OBSERVATIONS

A romanticized remembrance of New York City.

62

FRESH FINDS

68

FOOD This month, The Plaza Food Hall opens in its complete form, with Todd English’s mainstay restaurant plus freestanding gastronomic shops from the likes of David Burke, François Payard, La Maison du Chocolat, Luke’s Lobster, No. 7 Sub, Kusmi Tea, and more.

70

ARTS

76

OPEN HOUSE

122

APPEARANCES

124

YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST

128

SNAPSHOT

Chronicles of the social scene as Manhattan welcomes June. BY DAVID PATRICK COLUMBIA Our monthly guide to the happenings around the city and in the Hamptons.

Preppy picks for a perfect summer.

BY

BY

T AKI T HEODORACOPULOS

D ANIEL C APPELLO

AND

E LIZABETH M EIGHER

How ARIS Title Insurance Corporation can guarantee the authenticity of your art transactions. Old Mill Farm, in Greenwich, Connecticut, offers 75 acres of abounding beauty. Our society editor is off to the races at the Kentucky Derby. Our intrepid reporter makes the stops.

BY

BY

H ILARY G EARY

ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

Illustrator Rollin McGrail has fun horsing around with upper-crust foibles. BY GEORGINA SCHAEFFER


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questmag.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

DAVID PATRICK COLUMBIA C R E AT I V E D I R EC TO R

JAMES STOFFEL EXECUTIVE EDITOR

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EDITOR’S LETTER

Above: Walt Whitman, whose seminal work of poetry, Leaves of Grass, includes “Song of the Open Road.” Right: Quest fashion director Daniel Cappello’s new book The Ivy League, recently published by Assouline.

“AFOOT AND LIGHT-HEARTED, I

take to the open road. Healthy, free, the world before me. The long brown path before me, leading wherever I choose.” —Walt Whitman The above verse is the beginning of “Song of the Open Road,” from Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass. My mom wrote it to me in the back of my St. Mark’s yearbook (in one of those advertisements parents take out in the back), accompanied with a picture of me leading a pony named Brigit walking on, what else but, a brown path. I’ve been thinking of it lately because our annual Greenwich Issue always has a graduation vibe that comes with both the territory and the time of year. This issue Darrell Hartman profiles Daniel Cappello’s fantastic new book, The Ivy League, published by Assouline. (If you haven’t already got a copy, run—don’t walk—to the bookstore! It’s filled with all of the distinct details that set these elite schools apart from one another and it makes a perfect graduation gift.) Greenwich native Lizzie Brown (who pens a total of three features this month as our resident expert) writes a brief his14 QUEST

tory of two noteworthy local schools, Greenwich Academy (which she herself attended) and Brunswick School. Greenwich remains at the heart of the issue with Lizzie’s shoot, “The Grass is Greener.” Photographed by Ben Fink Shapiro at a house on Riversville Road, a group of young twenty-somethings gathered for some pre-summer fun, each with their own personal connection to this unique enclave. John Badman IV and Jennifer Cuminale are both Greenwichborn (John even grew up on Riversville Road!). Peter Hansen is now working in Greenwich and is becoming an active participant in the local community, while sisters Courtney and Nicole Fischer currently live in Greenwich. All in all, I think you’ll agree that it a free-spirited nature that comes through these pages, along with the leafy countryside for which Greenwich is known. Also in the pages this month, you will find our annual Greenwich Avenue shopping guide and a profile on the esteemed architecture firm Wadia Associates. Finally, we also present our annual polo guide section, which takes us to Millbrook for the annual Mashomack Polo Challenge, where this year Quest is a team sponsor. By way of announcement, this will be my last issue with Quest magazine. As I head into my next chapter, I feel quite a bit like I am graduating myself. Looking back over the issues, I realize how many amazing people and organizations we have profiled, hopefully bringing some attention to their good works and endeavors. Quest has always been about New York, and, as a native New Yorker, I will always look through its pages. When someone once asked me what the best part of working here was, my answer was quick: the team. I will miss the Quest team more than I can say. But now is not the time for my sentimental nostalgia (as everyone knows, I’m a sucker at heart), but a time for more Whitman: “Henceforth, I whimper no more, postpone no more…” I hope you enjoy this issue, as I will enjoy the issues that are yet to come. u

Georgina Schaeffer ON THE COVER: Peter Hansen with sisters Courtney and Nicole Fischer, both in Ralph Lauren, at 747 Riversville Road (Brad Hvolbeck Real Estate; 203.661.5505). Cover, and story on page 82, produced by Elizabeth Quinn Brown and photographed by Ben Fink Shapiro.


New York • Hamptons • Palm Beach


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A

David Patrick Columbia

NEW YORK SO CIAL DIARY THE SOCIAL SWIM in the merry month of May. This is the Last Hurrah before the charity circuit grinds down and the denizens are off to the summer haunts (and their social seasons). It’s probably my imagination but it seemed like there were more parties and events lining up daily

than ever before. The first week. On a Monday night the annual Breast Cancer Research Foundation dinner, this year called “The Hot Pink Party Celebrates My Fair Evelyn’s Dream,” was held at the Waldorf. Evelyn Lauder, its founder, departed this world last November.

Evelyn wore her privilege and positioning in a way that sets a good example. What she did for breast cancer research was phenomenal, but what she did for her friends and neighbors and fellow humans on a daily basis was the bigger personal message. The first BCRF dinner they

had about 20 years ago took in $165,000. Since then, they’ve raised more than $350 million for breast cancer research. Evelyn did that with a lot of help, all acknowledged from a dedicated staff starting with the BCRF president, Myra Biblowit. Elizabeth Hurley, who has long been

T H E MO D E R N B A L L AT “ S F MOM A” I N S A N F R A N C I S C O

Gil Cueto, Wanda McDaniel and Rod Manley 16 QUEST

Katie Traina and Bradley James

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D R E W A LT I Z E R

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A a spokesperson for BCRF, was there. Sir Elton John entertained at the piano, as he’s done year after year for BCRF. Sir Elton is so at home at the keyboard that you feel like he’s doing it all for you, as a gift. And it is. He recalled Evelyn in much the same way I have on these pages, and he knew her well. It was a great night and Evelyn would have been very pleased at what she had wrought. A good thing. She was Somethin’. The following night was the PEN Literary gala held at the American Museum of Natural History. This is one of the snazzier annual literary events in the city—black-tie

and the tables are hosted by a stellar roster of literary names and associations. This year’s included: Margaret Atwood, Ken Auletta, Christopher Buckley, Alan Furst, Jodi Kantor, David Henry Hwang, Robert K. Massie, E. L. Doctorow, Amanda Foreman, Robert Caro, Gay Talese, Francine Prose, Walter Mosley, Edmund White, Kiran Desai, Ron Chernow, Roz Chast, Hendrik Hertzberg, Roger Rosenblatt, Judith Thurman, Calvin Trillin, Sylvia Nasar, Peter Carey, Peter Godwin, Amitav Ghosh, Chad Harbach, Elizabeth Hawes, Jeffrey Eugenides, K. Anthony Appiah, Isabel Wilkerson, Robert Pinsky, Brian Selznick,

Gay Shteeyngart, Deborah Treisman, Beth Gutcheon, and Jhumpa Lahiri. Some of the trustee hosts were: Hannah Pakula, Rose Styron, Annette Tapert, Jacob Weisberg, Morgan Entrekin, and Danielle Truscott. This is PEN’s 90th year. It is the world’s oldest ongoing human rights organization. Its mission is “to advance literature, to defend free expression, and to foster international literary fellowship.” One of its main activities is securing the safety and liberty of imprisoned and persecuted writers. Why are these writers imprisoned? Because the governing parties wherever

these journalists and writers live and work “don’t like” what these writers write. Differences of opinion are annoying to those who hold all the power and prefer its daily delusions to the historical overview of man’s ways and the history of the future of political oppression. The night’s master of ceremonies was Charlayne Hunter-Gault, journalist and author very popular in America for her years of on-camera reporting for the McNeil-Lehrer hour on PBS. She introduced Tony Kushner, the playwright who was to introduce the evening’s honoree, Edward Albee. Mr. Kushner is a natural

A RECEPTION FOR HIS EMINENCE TIMOTHY CARDINAL DOLAN AT T H E PA L M B E AC H H OM E O F M A R I A N N E A N D J O H N K . C A ST L E

Richard and Priscilla Schmeelk 18 QUEST

Beverly Fox and Bob Leidy

Helen Lowe and Regina King

John K. Castle and Ethel Kennedy

Barbara and Alfred Marulli

Marianne Castle and Timothy Cardinal Dolan

LU C I E N C A P E H A RT

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E A M E R I C A N C A N C E R S O C I E T Y S A L U T E D G EO F F R E Y B R A D F I E L D AT T H E ST . R EG I S

Justin Concannon and Roric Tobin

heir in reputation to Mr. Albee. Although Mr. Albee is not verbose. Nevertheless, Kushner loves words and sentences and, in his way, takes you on an adventurous ride. Up, down, bumpy, smooth, highs, lows, thoughtful, and deftly superficial—and all directly or circuitously about Albee, as told by Kushner. It was a long introduction for a man who is one of the most famous American writers living today. Finally someone from the audience yelled out, “It’s too long, Tony.” The audience laughed, relieved, but Tony remained committed to his point. Mr. Albee told us how he became a playwright (a process of elimination: first a poet, then a novelist, then a playwright, which took hold on his consciousness). He 20 QUEST

Katie Lee and Nate Berkus

Donald and Barbara Tober

has been involved with PEN for the past 50 years because they work to protect freedom of expression and, therefore, writers. Of the past 37 writers and journalists whom PEN has worked to free from prison, 33 have been released. PEN and its work was responsible for that. The next day, Wednesday, May 2, 2012. Gray, rainy, chilly, and damp and the 30th Frederick Law Olmsted Awards Luncheon in the Conservatory Garden of Central Park, known to all as the “Hat Lunch” because it has become tradition to wear a hat. With the guest list now exceeding 1,000 it is a veritable sea of hats. The spirit of it makes me laugh. It’s funny and fun and all meant in the best of

Sue Chalom with Chappy and Melissa Morris

Alexandra Lind Rose and Mark Gilbertson

ways. There’s a pride in it all; and everyone wins. The FLO luncheon is a fundraiser created by the Women’s Committee of the Central Park Conservancy. This committee raises millions every year to help maintain Central Park which is, after all of the committee’s efforts over the decades, the jewel in the crown of New York City. This year, Anne Harrison, the current president of the Women’s Committee, honored Gillian Miniter and J.P. Morgan (the bank) for their ardent and longtime support of the Conservancy. Gillian has been working for the park in several capacities: president of the Women’s Committee, chairman of Playground Partners, and co-chair of two FLO luncheons. During

Gillian’s term as president (2009-2011), she helped raise more than $13 million for Central Park. J.P. Morgan has also been an active supporter since the Conservancy’s inception. Already one of the Conservancy’s largest corporate donors, J.P. Morgan donated $1 million in 2009 for the restoration of areas devastated by a severe storm, enabling the treating of 300 acres. The rest of the time was devoted to The Hats and The Lunch. Tiffany & Co. sponsored so you could see that blue around and about, including on the tote bag that was the goodie bag, as well as on the umbrellas that everyone needed. The event took in $3.5 million for the cause.

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A Also that week at Juilliard School’s Peter Jay Sharp Theater, they honored its longtime trustee and patron of the arts as well as former chair of the Juilliard School board Mary Rodgers Guettel at a gala black-tie evening. Mary is Broadway royalty. The daughter of a great Broadway composer, she grew up in the magical world of the theatre, and took the mantle for her own as she came of age. Bred on all of it—a veritable Broadway baby—the result is an extremely charming and interesting woman with her still gamine personality and sunny “disposish.” The evening included performances by Jamie

Bernstein, Boyd Gaines, Helen Hunt, Laura Linney, Donna Murphy, Faith Prince, and Mary Louise Wilson, led by music director and pianist Eric Stern and associate music director Lee Musiker and directed by Stephen Wadsworth. There were also performances by Juilliard’s actors, dancers, and musicians and the Juilliard Orchestra. Chairs for the evening were trustee Kitty Patterson and Tom Kempner, Jr., Beth Kojima, and trustee Christopher Kojima. Co-chairs were Ida Cole, composer Adam Guettel (the honoree’s son), Alec and Christy Guettel, and Roger Horchow. Honorary chairs included

Alan and Arlene Alda, Barbara Cook, John Kander and Albert Stephenson, Laura Linney and Marc Schauer, Patti LuPone, Sarah Jessica Parker, Hal and Judy Prince, and Stephen Sondheim. May 5. I went to a wedding over the weekend. I’m not fond of going anywhere on any Saturday, my only day without deadlines. Nor am I fond of weddings, although I concede they’re often really great fun if you’re young and in your twenties or thirties or very young (e.g., kids). Women like weddings more than men. I don’t know why that is although the reason is probably obvious to all women.

However, things being what they are, I have now been to two weddings in less than a year—some kind of record! And, aside from bah-humbug me, I can honestly say I had a very good time at this one when Allegra Ford married Josh Thomas at the Church of St. Vincent Ferrer on 66th and Lex. Early that evening there was a dinner dance reception at 583 Park Avenue. I know the bride as her mother, Anne Ford, and her aunt, Charlotte Ford, are friends of mine. The Fords are an old-fashioned family in certain ways that are contemporary yet endearing, as well as exemplary. The parents I know of my generation of

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NIKKI FIELD Senior Vice President, Associate Broker | 212.606.7669 nikki.field@sothebyshomes.com | www.nikkifield.com SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY | EAST SIDE MANHATTAN BROKERAGE 38 EAST 61ST STREET, NEW YORK, NY 10065 | sothebyshomes.com/nyc Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a registered trademark.

$3,999,000


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A T H E B OYS ’ C L U B O F N E W YO R K ’ S J U N I O R C OM M I T T E E AT T H E G R A M E R C Y PA R K H OT E L

Katie Williams and Billy Cooling

this family have ongoing, involved relationships with their children. This is also true of the sisters’ brother Edsel and his wife Cynthia who are devoted to their sons. You can see when you’re in their company how warmly they relate to each other. Allegra has an older brother, Al Uzielli, who walked his sister down the aisle. (They’re both are the children of the late Gianni Uzielli.) There were several bridesmaids and several flower girls and two boys who served as ring bearers. The priest marrying them was jolly and tender in imparting his wisdom to the couple. The bridesmaids wore navy blue silk dresses with white sashes, the flower girls wore pink with floral tiaras, and 24 QUEST

Cricket Whitton, Monique Thofte, Barkley Hickox and Panda Ebling

Everett Cook and Stephen Sherrill

the two little boys wore blue blazers, gray flannel shorts, and gray knee socks. It still makes me laugh to think of them walking down the aisle with all the sweet innocence and adorability of their age. You could see that it was an especially exciting day for them, sharing the excitement of the bride and groom. They were the beacons. Bronson van Wyck and his merry band of Mother and Sister were the designers and planners of the reception. The van Wycks hail from Arkansas but they are one of those American families who seem to have social connections all over the country and the world. Their signature seems to be something grand and spectacular yet beautiful and

Jackie Valls, Chris Lentz and Alexandra Papanicolaou

Silas Anthony and Tory Grauer

with the appropriate restraint. There were a lot of old friends and family members on both the bride’s side and the groom’s side. Bob Hardwick and his orchestra provided the music. Once people were seated, and the bride and groom had danced, and the toasts had been made, and the dinner served, everyone was up and dancing. The evening was a good mixture of ages of about three and a half generations, and so there was that unifying experience of “family” that filled the room. After the main course was served and completed, and the bride’s bouquet was tossed (and caught by her bridesmaid), the evening turned into a dance party with everyone on the dance floor including

Zaneta Clark and Nell van Amerongen

the flower girls and the ring bearers. A very special night, celebrated by all present in honor of Allegra and Josh Thomas, who are embarking on their life adventure. It flew by. I was amazed that it was 11 when I first looked at my watch. No bah humbug there! May 8. Down on 425 East 61st Street, Iris Cantor was dedicating the first Iris Cantor Men’s Health Center at New York Hospital. Iris donated $20 million to establish what they are calling a “comprehensive, one-stop-shopping center for Men’s Health.” Ten years ago, she funded the startup of the Iris Cantor Women’s Health Center at New York Hospital. Today, 40 percent of patients treated there are men, most often

STEPHANIE BADINI

Charles Buaron and Calypso Lawrence


Featured Greenwich Properties

Oldfield Farm offers remarkable estate living and an extraordinary equestrian property on 18 acres in Back-Country. The 33-room Palladianinspired villa affords the luxuries for grand scale entertaining and comfortable family living. $26,000,000. WEB: 0066118. Lyn Stevens

Impeccable Colonial. 11+ acres. Equestrian farm with 2 barns. Step down living room, formal dining room, paneled library, family room, gourmet kitchen. 5 luxurious suites. Dutch barns include 5 stalls, dance floor, saloon. Pool. One bedroom carriage house. $17,500,000. WEB: 0066126. BK Bates

31.6 gated acres with vistas extending to Long Island Sound. Arboretum-like setting contiguous to 135-acre Audubon Preserve. 4 approved lots, one with residence. Great opportunity to create compound or separate estates.Approvals to build 20,000 sq. ft. house. $17,900,000.WEB: 0065849. Joseph Barbieri

English country manor overlooking Rockwood Lake on 13.5 picturesque acres. 6-bedroom, 12,000+ sq. ft. Back-Country estate offers a private park with sweeping vistas of meticulously designed formal gardens, pool and pool house. $15,995,000. WEB: 0065450. Joseph Barbieri & Carol Zuckert

Park-like tranquility sets the stage for this old world stone manor amidst 12+ acres. This richly detailed residence exudes warm magnificence with 7 bedrooms and 8 fireplaces. Wine cellar, heated pool and tennis court. $15,750,000. WEB: 0065193. Joseph Barbieri

Custom European country estate on one of four Conyers Farm lakefront properties within the gate on 10± acres. 6 bedrooms, 8 full 2-half baths, indoor winter garden with pool/spa. Tiered terraces capitalize on the southwesterly lake vistas. $13,995,000. WEB: 0065618. Joseph Barbieri

GREENWICH BROKERAGE I sothebyshomes.com/greenwich ONE PICKWICK PLAZA, GREENWICH, CT 06830 | 203.869.4343

Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a registered trademark.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A M O N T B L A N C C E L E B R AT E D T H E O P E N I N G O F I T S B O U T I Q U E I N B E V E R LY H I L L S

Kim Prezioso and John Claflin

brought in by the women in their lives. Iris is the biggest female philanthropist in America today. When you meet her, she’s a friendly lady who, with a dry but witty sense of humor, loves a good laugh. There are not two ways about her; she’s always Iris. She’s also a very generous donor to the Metropolitan Museum of Art which houses a significant portion of the Cantor collection by Rodin. The same night was also the Met’s Costume Institute Gala. The event was launched during the later era of Diana Vreeland, who became the director after she was 26 QUEST

Billy and Stacy Ray

Luke Pontifell and Stephanie Gale

unceremoniously dumped from Vogue and replaced by Grace Mirabella. It was said that a couple of women here in New York (Babe Paley was one) got together and funded Vreeland’s annual salary at the Costume Institute, to give her some income and a deserved place. With it came life. Vreeland life. For those who neither happened up against it nor had the opportunity just to “see” it—it being Vreeland herself, living/breathing/ watching/talking—her life was like no other. You can see it in her eyes in all those famous photographs of her. They gazed with the amused

Jeff Nordhaus and Paul Balson

Paula Dirks and Amy Artalejo

curiosity that flashes wisdom. With Vreeland came all the fashionable New York women of the day—two or three generations of them. Jackie, Babe, Pat Buckley, Nan, Chessy, and on and on down through the Ninas and Carolynes and Gayfrids. Those were Vreeland’s stars. They represented a kind of New York that is mainly memory now, though many of the younger set are still around and about. The Met’s Costume Institute Gala now belongs to another Vogue editor—one who has outlasted them all in tenure except for Edna Woolman Chase, the founding editor

George Blodwell and Amanda Eliasch

Michel Perrin and Camille Natta

who served 38 years—Anna Wintour. Wintour has, over the past decade, turned the evening into a major fashion event for pop culture. It’s not about society anymore. It’s about the celebrities, the 15-minute-ers with bared flesh and the dudes dressing up. It is the best annual advertising for the fashion industry, bar none. Evidently, it grosses a lot of money for the Costume Institute. Moreover, it is fantastic P.R. for Condé Nast and Vogue, a media sales director’s dream. Compared to the house that Vreeland (and the ladies) built, it may be just another McMansion.

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Caroline Cagney and Teresa Eyre


Featured Greenwich Properties

Extraordinary private estate considered one of the showplaces of Greenwich. 1930’s English Manor borders 100 acres of conservation. 6 room guest cottage, pool, pool house, court, collector quality garaging, garage apartment, and greenhouse. $12,900,000. WEB: 0066062. Bill Andruss

Stately English Manor on 1.5+ acres in the Belle Haven vicinity offering scenic estate grounds complete with heated pool, spa, and bluestone terraces with fireplace. 6-bedroom, 8½-bath home includes a gym, wine loft, and 6-car garage. $7,995,000.WEB: 0065521. Pat Barry & Jim Lacerenza

Completely renovated and expanded on 3.81 park-like acres, this home evokes classic Greenwich. Finely detailed formal rooms, gourmet kitchen. Master suite with sitting room, 2 dressing rooms and baths. Guest/pool house. Grand terrace enhances fabulous flow for entertaining. $6,695,000.WEB: 0066078. Fran Ehrlich

Handsome 5-bedroom stone and shingle home. 6.3 acres. Pool, tennis court, paddock, barn. Complete renovation by architect Sam Mitchell. Stunning double height living room, exquisite dining room, paneled library with fireplaces. Luxurious master suite with fireplace, office. $5,695,000.WEB: 0065583. BK Bates

New construction 6-bedroom Kaali Nagy designed home on park-like grounds. Living room and library with fireplaces. Gourmet kitchen, family room with fireplace, office. Lower level includes a playroom, theatre, wetbar, and exercise room. $4,495,000. WEB: 0065493. John Bates Jr.

Custom designed brick and shingle-style home on 4 acres bordered by conservation. Beautiful landscaping with stunning pool and spa. Formal living room, banquet-size dining room, oak library and generous master suite. 5 additional bedroom suites. 5 fireplaces. $3,995,000.WEB: 0066046. Fran Ehrlich

GREENWICH BROKERAGE I sothebyshomes.com/greenwich ONE PICKWICK PLAZA, GREENWICH, CT 06830 | 203.869.4343

Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a registered trademark.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A But then, that is the American culture of this era. Tuesday, May 15. Very rainy day, with temperatures in the high 60s. Down at the Park Avenue Armory, the PPA and Creative Time hosted the opening preview of the new Tom Sachs art installation: “Tom Sachs Space Program Mars.” Tom is a major contemporary artist in the world today and, according to Angela Westwater, who is one of his dealers, the exhibition is “the ultimate art installation.” You walk in and you see a strong child-like innocence and fascination to the view. You know if you were a kid you’d want to own it. But it’s not a toy. It’s a piece of art.

It’s a commentary running on several levels, and so you’re in the child’s state of wonder and fascination, but within an adult’s Art Business. The Art Business is major in New York today. (I know, all over the world.) It’s a scene, a sociological explanation of the culture and where it’s at and maybe where it’s going. It’s geniuses, mavens, connoisseurs, collectors, hustlers, and gloriousness, elusive or otherwise. The details in the artist’s constructions, and in his style, require a lot of bodies doing specific creative and constructive work. Up close, you see the underpinnings of the artist’s signature

expression: the wit, the humor, and the funky irony. We’re all fossils now, the artist is saying, or so his art has rendered. And it will make you smile, even laugh. I was told that on this night there were many major collectors and dealers in the vast room, as well as media, friends, and family. It was obviously an important night. Tom Sachs’ work is full of the child within, and so it is easy for the little ones to see. Of course, a lot of the bigger ones are still little ones too. A good time. Even the drinks were named with references to space travel. I was in Boston on July 20, 1969, when the first men

landed on the moon in the Apollo spacecraft. It’s difficult, even in retrospect, to conjure up the utter amazement of the event because over time it has become commonplace (albeit uniquely). I happened to be staying with my then wife at her grandmother’s house where we watched the landing on TV. Her grandmother, then in her eighties, had grown up in South Bend, Indiana, in the late 19th century. She watched the moon landing spellbound in amazement. She was reminded of how, as a young girl, her world was “dark at night, and it was silent—except for the wind and the animals.” There were no planes, no telephones, a few cars, but mainly horses

G R YP H O N ’ S “ O N E F R I C K I N ’ C O AT ” E V E N T I N G R E E N W I C H V I L L A G E

Meredith Melling Burke with Eloise 28 QUEST

Allison Aston, Alvin Valley and Melanie Lazenby

Ferebee Taube

Aimee Cho and Elettra Wiedemann

Daisy Prince and Rory Hermelee

Bonnie Morrison and Veronica Beard

B I LLY FA R R E LL

Asia Baker and Christian Leone


Local Experts Worldwide

MANHATTAN PROPERTIES

THE MANDARIN ORIENTAL: Extremely rare,

110 CENTRAL PARK SOUTH: Magnificent 10 room prewar condop with breathtaking Park views. $18,995,000. WEB:Q0017654. Eva Mohr, 212.606.7736, Serena Boardman, 212.606.7611

79 EAST 79TH STREET: Light-flooded, full floor

GLAMOROUS E RIVER RESIDENCE: Dramatic prewar, designer apartment featuring living room with fireplace, double master with huge dressing room. $10,500,000. WEB: Q0018062. Lois Nasser, 212.606.7706

149 E 38TH ST: Behind the flamboyant Dutch Revival

730 PARK AVENUE: Highly desirable, prewar 8

style façade is a brilliant 3 story space suitable for a residence, art gallery, event space, etc. $10,200,000. WEB: Q0017803. Louise Beit, 212.606.7703

room with open loft on Park, 2 bedrooms plus maids room, 3½ baths, 2 fireplaces. $9,000,000. WEB: Q0017886. Valerie Sherman, 212.606.7684

1125 FIFTH AVENUE: Elegant 12 into 10 room pre-

23 N. MOORE STREET: Stunning 4,050± sq ft loft

CARNEGIE HILL 4 BEDROOMS: Spectacular

war co-op distinguished by grandly scaled rooms and lovely leafy tree-lined Central Park views. $8,950,000. WEB: Q0018132. Serena Boardman, 212.606.7611

in Tribeca’s premier full service boutique condo. Unparalleled views, 4 bedrooms, 31⁄2 baths. $8,895,000. WEB: Q0018119. Cortnee Glasser, 212.606.7648

2,750± sq ft, 9½ room, 4 bedroom, 4½ bath with 1,650± sq ft garden oasis. $4,675,000. WEB: Q0018109. Austin Schuster, 212.606.7797

1000 PARK AVE: Beautifully renovated 3 bedroom,

BRIGHT FULL FLOOR LOFT EAST 57TH STREET:

2½ baths prewar co-op with 10’ ceilings and versatile layout. $2,995,000. WEB: Q0018020. Roberta Golubock, 212.606.7704, Chris Rounick, 212.606.7643

Spacious 3 bedroom, 2½ bath condo with 2,000± sq ft, 6 oversized windows. $2,225,000. WEB: Q0018135. Eric Malley, 212.606.7625

THE SAVANNAH: Upper Westside cond-op. Rare 1,200± sq ft, 2 bedroom, 2 bath apartment with a private terrace and 3 exposures. $1,395,000. WEB: Q0018111. Michael Pellegrino, 212.400.8731

penthouse with 4,825± sq ft, 4 bedrooms, 5½ baths. $42,500,000. WEB: Q0017969. Elizabeth Lee Sample, 212.606.7685, Brenda S Powers, 212.606.7653

12 room prewar co-op with open vistas of the Park. $11,500,000. WEB: Q0017104. Serena Boardman, 212.606.7611, Roberta Golubock, 212.606.7704

MANHATTAN BROKERAGES I sothebyshomes.com/nyc EAST SIDE 38 EAST 61ST STREET, NEW YORK, NY 10065 T 212.606.7660 F 212.606.7661 DOWNTOWN 379 WEST BROADWAY, NEW YORK, NY 10012 T 212.431.2440 F 212.431.2441 Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a registered trademark. Spanish Balconies – Walter, used with permission.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A A PA R T Y FO R G I V I N G B AC K BY M E E R A G A N D H I I N I STA N B U L

Dunya Taskin

Ellen Argawal and Mary McKane

and wagons. And now she had lived to see this. A man on the moon. Forty-three years later, Tom Sachs, who was not quite three years old on that historic day for mankind, has grown up in a world where it was always thus, identifying the new context, the evolving into the ordinary as it moves on its way to antiquity. Thursday, May 17. A sunny and mild day yesterday in New York with a blast of heat and humidity. At noontime, City Harvest hosted its annual “On Your Plate” luncheon at the Metropolitan Club. Susan Fales-Hill was the guest speaker. 30 QUEST

Meera Gandhi

Serap and Murat Tibuk

Esra Ustunkaya and Sebnem Dincgor with Ferruh and Sibel Karakasli

City Harvest was started 30 years ago. It was a simple idea that grew out of some people’s observations and sensitivities to what was going on in the community we know as New York. The city was still coming out of it slump and doldrums of the 70s and there was a sizeable number of citizens who didn’t get enough to eat on a daily basis. Others noticed that the restaurants that were doing good business were throwing away a lot of the leftover food every night. The question was: Why not redistribute it? It was common sense. Today City Harvest delivers more than 100,000 pounds of food daily throughout the

Nilgun Colak and Emre Erturk

Guntu Menteseoglu, Gokay Ozdemir and Alin Tasçi

city, which equals 33 million pounds of food a year. I was introduced to it almost 20 years ago by Joy Ingham who, with Topsy Taylor and Emilia Saint-Amand, was very involved in fundraising for City Harvest. These women were dedicated and worked hard for the cause. Now, while still involved, they’ve stepped back to the newer generation of women who have taken the reins. They have taken a good idea and a good foundation and have made a marked difference in growth and progress. The organization has also progressed and prospered under Jilly Stephens, the

executive director who started eight years ago as the senior director of program development. She and Patricia Barrick, vice president of external relations and the woman behind the fundraising and marketing, have presided over the growth of City Harvest with a strong executive staff, 18 trucks, four bikes, and a corps of drivers who are as involved in the process of giving as every donor is. The drivers who deliver the food daily know their clients, often by name. They understand the issues in the community and know that hunger is at the top of the list. These men really understand the community,


William Greenberg

L A DY M Todd English

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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A far better than many of us, including our politicians. Their involvement in this job is also empowering. All of this is a natural response to a growing issue in our community: hunger. It’s not far from any door anymore, even your own. Susan Fales-Hill is a volunteer at City Harvest but she was asked to speak at the luncheon because she’s a lifelong New Yorker with an interesting career and a distinct sensitivity to city life. Her mother was the Brooklyn-born Haitian girl who emigrated to Broadway and became a star, Josephine Premice. Susan’s father, Timothy Fales, was the son of a banker. Their marriage in 1960 made headlines and the tabloids marked it by reporting that the groom had been ostracized by his family as well as by the

Social Register. This apparently wasn’t true, but it reflected the accepted prejudices that were ordinary and unquestioned by most if not by all. The couple had a son named Enrico and a daughter (Susan). Susan went to the Lycée Français and then Harvard. She’s multi-lingual, fluent in French, Italian, and Spanish. After college, she went to work in Hollywood as a TV writer with Bill Cosby and eventually as a TV writer-producer. She is now a biographer of her mother (Always Wear Joy) and in two novels named One Flight Up and the soon-to-bepublished Imperfect Bliss. Today Susan remains a New Yorker, married to a banker, Aaron Hill, and mother of a young daughter. My readers recognize her as very much a part of the social and cultural scene of the city, active in

several charities. She is also a woman who has a lot of friends, all the way from her school days at the Lycée to new acquaintances. You can see just from her résumé that she’s a very smart woman, well-educated and also the recipient of a somewhat unusual family combination. Bi-racial marriages and relationships are commonplace today, even ordinary. Susan’s generation, reflecting its upbringing and education and its progression, marked the transition. One result of the world she was born into and grew up in is characterized by a sophisticated and very funny wit. Sunday, May 20. Down at the Four Seasons Restaurant, the Cancer Research Institute held its 30th annual “Through the Kitchen” benefit. This is the only event for which the

restaurant makes an exception by closing itself to the public and inviting the guests into its famous kitchen. The event was sold out. It draws a big crowd of wellknown and prominent New Yorkers. It’s probably the only event of its kind that can get this crowd to go out on a Sunday night. The reason: a good cause and an incredible meal with seconds and thirds if you can handle it, not to mention a massive dessert table. Unlike a lot of fundraisers with a minimum of “talk,” etc., there were no honorees, no tributes (and more “talk”), and no acceptance speeches. Just “through the kitchen” with your plate in hand and on to a table where the place cards were matchbooks—and all of this in a room full of people who know each other by one

ROLEX HOSTED A RECEPTION TO OPEN WEMPE’S NEW ROLEX STORE ON FIFTH AVENUE

Terry Waldan 32 QUEST

Kim Wempe and Jerry Lauren

Peter Nicholson and Grace Meigher

Petra Nemcova

Chuck Berthiaun, Norma Buchanan and Michael Elms

Rudy Albers with his daughters Jenn, Kate and Jill

E L I Z A B E T H Q U I N N B RO W N ; PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Renée Fleming and Stewart Wicht


190 YEARS AGO

A MAN BET ON HORSES AND CHANGED WATCHMAKING FOREVER .

In 1821, at a horse race in Paris, Nicolas Rieussec successfully tested his revolutionary invention that allowed time to be recorded to an accuracy of a fifth of a second. The chronograph was born. A tribute to a visionary man, the Montblanc Nicolas Rieussec Chronograph Automatic is centred on the essence of his invention, the rotating disc technique. Monopusher chronograph, self-winding manufacture movement, second time zone, 30 min. and 60 sec. rotating disc counters.Crafted in the Montblanc Manufacture in Le Locle, Switzerland.

madison avenue •

VISIT AND SHOP MONTBLANC . COM


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A or two degrees of separation. So it is a clubby affair. Tables this year were named after New York nightclubs of yore and sundry attractions, such as the Playboy Club, Birdland, Plato’s Retreat, Studio 54, and the Copacabana. Mine was Trader Vic’s. All tables were elaborately and cleverly decorated by DeJuan Stroud. Perri Peltz, daughter of founder Lauren Veronis, reminded the guests of the evening’s inception, 30 years ago. The Four Seasons was, at that time—and still is— the ne plus ultra restaurant for the high mucky-mucks/ corporate/power corridor clientele at lunch and dinner. Its interior remains the

original—a collaboration of Mies, Philip Johnson, and William Pahlmann—and what was once pace-setting in design is now reassuringly classic: a modern stately, elegant self. They raised more than $600,000 on this night and over the last 30 years, this dinner has raised more than $7 million for cancer research. Among those attending were Mayor Michael Bloomberg with Diana Taylor, New York Police Department commissioner Ray Kelly and with Mrs. Kelly, who was one of the evening’s co-chairs, Christine and John Fitzgibbons, Denise and Michael Kellen, Jamie Niven, Margaret and

Andrew Paul, Perri Peltz and Eric Ruttenberg, Betsy and Paul Shiverick, Jeanne Sorensen Siegel, and Lauren and John Veronis. Also there were David and Lisa Schiff, Dalia and Larry Leeds, Herb and Jeanne Siegel, Hilary and Joe Califano, Joanie Schnitzer and Irwin Levy, Marlene Hess and Jim Zirin, Jeff and Liz Peek, Nancy Silverman, Alfred and Judy Taubman, Lally Weymouth with Joe Cowen, Tiffany Dubin with Bill Manger, Steve Kroft and Jenny Conant, Rochelle and David Hirsch, Barbara Walters, Cece Cord, Maurice Sonnenberg, Tory Burch and Lyor Cohen, Nina Rosenwald,

David Margolick and Linda Wells, Cy Vance, Jr., and Debbie Bancroft. Monday, May 21. Over to Jazz at Lincoln Center where Literacy Partners hosted their gala evening—the 29th annual. Black-tie. Liz Smith, Arnold Scaasi, Parker Ladd, and more from a group of founding supporters started this 39 years ago. It’s for reading. Teaching people to read. A simple matter that is not so simple anymore in this complicated society of ours. It’s one of those evenings that could only happen in New York. Liz is the emcee. She’s a master at it and very funny with her comments. The program starts in the theater. It draws

T H E A N I M A L M E D I C A L C E N T E R H O S T E D I T S L I V I N G L E G E N D S L U N C H E O N AT T H E H A R M O N I E C L U B

Eli Hoffman and Nancy Kissinger 34 QUEST

Chad West and Barbara Hoffman

Ellen Marcus

Wendy Lehman Lash and Libby McCarthy

Robert Liberman and Alex Goelet

LY N H U G H E S

Jeanne Siegel and Marilyn Sorenson


GR EEN W ICH

33 Acres Conyers Farm

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© 2012. An independently owned and operated member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc.

• 203.661.5505

Prudential is a service mark of The Prudential Insurance Company of America. Equal Housing Opportunity.


D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A C I T Y H A R V E ST ’ S O N YO U R P L AT E L U N C H EO N H O N O R I N G S U S A N FA L E S - H I L L AT T H E M E T R O P O L I TA N C L U B

Joy Ingham and Betsy Bartlett

a stellar cast of supporters. On this night they raised about $1 million and, during the dinner, Hugh Hildesley of Sotheby’s raised an additional $100,000 in donations that was then matched by a grant from the Wall Street Journal. The money all goes to the teaching program, which has helped many thousands of students over the past almost 40 years. There are guest readers. That night it was Bill Maher, Jeffrey Toobin, and Sally Bedell Smith. Maher has a new book out: The New New Rules. Maybe you know about the first one. He read several pages (jokes) from the book. Wednesday, May 23. Media 36 QUEST

Valerie Boster and Jan Fletcher-Slifka

Norma Dana and Topsy Taylor

Kate Debold, Denise Morgenthaler and Saranda Anderson

madhouse at Michael’s. The decibel level was almost like a rock concert. The effect is not dissimilar. Juices get going. Early in the lunchtime, the Glad Girls—Joan Jakobson, Barbara Ascher, Jeanette Watson, Helen Houghton, Barbara Sargent, and Ann Wazzelle—gave the patrons an impromptu concert of their version of “Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy.” A cappella. Up and at ’em. Suddenly the roar of the crowd halted and you could hear a pin drop. Or at least a concrete block. He was a famous trumpet man from old Chicago way / He had a boogie style that no one else could play / He was the

top man at his craft / But then his number came up and he was gone with the draft / He’s in the army now, a-blowin’ reveille / He’s the boogie-woogie bugle boy of Company B… They brought down the house. That’s vintage Michael’s Wednesdays. I don’t know, do they do that sort of thing back home in Indiana? Meanwhile, back at the madhouse, moving around the room: Matt Rich with Ava Roosevelt, who has a new book—a novel—The Racing Heart. At the corner table, Linda Wachner and Mica Ertegun and next door Joe Armstrong with Cynthia Brill and Sarah Simms

Karen LeFrak

Gillian Miniter and Susan Fales-Hill

Rosenthal. Keep moving— Barry Frey, Gerry Imber wit da boyz, Jerry Della Femina, Michael Kramer, and Andrew Bergman; nearby, Freddi Friedman; Cindy Lewis with Mickey Ateyeh, Fran Weissler, and Marcia Levine; Michael Lynne and Bob Shaye (founders of Newline Cinema); Deborah Norville and Susan Magrino; Nancy Murray; Euan Rellie; Judy Slotkin; Andrew Stein; Nick Verbitsky; Stan Shuman; Jay Fielden and Don Lalonde; Michael J. Wolf; Fern Mallis with Tom Florio, Gil Schwartz, Diane Clehane, and Debi Wisch; Vin Cipolla; Catherine

PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

Dixie de Koning, Susan Braddock and Ann Jeffrey


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D AV I D PAT R I C K C O L U M B I A Saxton and Marianne Strong; Hugh Freund with Jack Kliger of Alpha Media; Anderson Cooper and Orin Snyder; John Jakobson and Patrick Murphy; and Bob Guccione, Jr. with Mark Leavitt. And, scores more just like ’em. Finally, after the tumult and the shouting died down to a dull roar, Michael himself sat down for lunch with his wife Kim, his son, and his son’s friend. I was lunching with Cornelia Guest. Horsewoman, crueltyfree activist, event planner and caterer, chocolate chip cookie—betcha can’t eat just one!—baker and distributor, designer of handbags (crueltyfree materials in the making).

Cornelia has a new book coming out called Cornelia Guest’s Simple Pleasures: Healthy Seasonal Cooking and Easy Entertaining. Cornelia is busy. She divides her days between an apartment here in the city and at Templeton, the Guest family house in Long Island. There’s a thread that runs through everything Cornelia does in her life and in business: animals. A percentage of earnings from her cookies, for example, go to the Humane Society where she is on the board and participates in many programs to help raise funds for them. The handbags are “crueltyfree accessories.” She was

carrying one of her handbags— a day bag—yesterday. A woven soft faux leather. Black. Beautiful. Tailor-made for Cornelia and active women like her, it also contains a clutch that “makes it easy to go from desk to dinner” or to “travel confidently with a simple, chic wallet, pouch, handbag, and tote.” The one-time debutante of the year is as practical as she is industrious, combined with an eye for beauty and a love of nature and its creatures. Her new book is full of vegan recipes. The word doesn’t draw me in immediately (although, I do eat a lot of vegetables and not much red meat) but after looking through the book, I was thinking that this summer,

when there’s a little more time, would be a good time to try them out. Everything looked delicious. I was also thinking: Wouldn’t it be wonderful to have your own vegetable garden? Vegetable gardens were popular all over America during World War II when they were known as “victory gardens” and they remained prevalent into the mid-1950s when everyone went the way of the supermarket. The book is also a look at Cornelia’s life, her house, her surroundings, her resident animal friends (dogs, cats, and horses), and her gardens. It’s beautiful, inspirational, and practical, like the author. u

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Barbara Schumacher and Tom Shiah 44 QUEST

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Russell Grant and Barbara de Portago

Gillian Fuller, the Earl of Wessex and Gundel Dorrance

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Elizabeth Meigher and Jackie Giusti Seaman

Claiborne Swanson Frank and Genevieve Bahrenburg 48 QUEST

Blair Husain and Karen Klopp

Caroline Berthet, Dani Stahl, Emily Smith and Dori Cooperman

Alexandra Lebenthal

Alexis Maybank, Jane Weitzman and Alexandra Wilkis Wilson

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PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

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Mario Buatta and Yanna Avis

Alex Hitz, Gayle Atkins and Brad Collins

Naeem Khan and Iris Apfel 50 QUEST

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Jonathan Farkas and John Catsimatidis

Sharon Handler and Robert Couturier

Mark Locks, Kris Kardashian and Jaime Jimer

Arlene Dahl and Marc Rosen

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PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N

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landmark high above the Hudson River. This luxurious 2 floor, 2 bedroom unit offers breathGARRISON, NY - Enjoy the ultimate in condo living in THE CASTLE, a well-known taking views from Bear Mountain Bridge to Newburgh Bay. It has huge open rooms, 12 to 15 landmark high above the Hudson River. This luxurious 2 floor, 2 bedroom unit offers breathfoot ceilings, 4 fireplaces, gourmet kitchen, and sumptuous baths. It also offers outdoor spaces, taking views from Bear Mountain Bridge to Newburgh Bay. It has huge open rooms, 12 to 15 central air conditioning, and garaging for 2 cars. Offered at $2,999,999 foot ceilings, 4 fireplaces, gourmet kitchen, and sumptuous baths. It also offers outdoor spaces, central air conditioning, and garaging for 2 cars. Offered at $2,999,999

EAST FISHKILL, Dutchess County, NY - Wiccopee House. Circa 1894, this beautiful estate on 17.6 acres, includes the 7000 square foot Georgian style main house featuring EAST FISHKILL, Dutchess County, NY - Wiccopee House. Circa 1894, this beau6 bedrooms, gleaming wood floors, multiple fireplaces, period details and a gourmet tiful estate on 17.6 acres, includes the 7000 square foot Georgian style main house featuring kitchen. Additional features include a 100’ x 30’ barn with a 2 bedroom apartment, pad6 bedrooms, gleaming wood floors, multiple fireplaces, period details and a gourmet dock, pool, and tennis court. Offered at $2,495,000 kitchen. Additional features include a 100’ x 30’ barn with a 2 bedroom apartment, paddock, pool, and tennis court. Offered at $2,495,000

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PUTNAM VALLEY Classic Nantucket shingled lakefront home on Roaring Brook Lake. The architect-designed home features a large living room with fireplace wall, custom designed kitchen and spacious master suite. Over an acre of private, carefully landscaped property country retreat on almost 5offers acres. ThisaC.shed, 1935 homenew offers Putnam Valley, NY - Lovely 4356 square feet, 5 bedrooms, boathouse, 4 ½ baths, 2 working new fireplaces,docks hardwoodand floors, and numerous a sandy home offers Putnam Valley, NY - Lovely country retreat on almost 5 acres. This C. 1935 window seats, nooks and crannies for added character. The glorious backyard features an in4356 square feet, 5 bedrooms, 4 ½ baths, 2 working fireplaces, hardwood floors, and numerous ground pool with spa and sizeable barbequeOffered and patio area.atThe property also includes a forbeach. $1,125,000 window seats, nooks and crannies for added character. The glorious backyard features an in-

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Jean Shafiroff, Margo Langenberg and Gale Hayman

Matthieu Kraut and Bob Daughton

Whitney Childs, Laura Baker and Patricia Fitzpatrick 52 QUEST

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Wilbur Ross and Si Anthony

Ellie Berlin and Amanda Meigher

E L I Z A B E T H Q U I N N B RO W N

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Reva and Bill Tooley

Heather Cohane, Ashley McAdams and Dani Levy 54 QUEST

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Tessa Benson and Tucker Tooley

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Harry Benson and Wendy Landes

Michael Landes and John Loring

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CALENDAR

JUNE

On June 30, swimmers of all levels will participate in Swim Across America’s Greenwich-Stamford Swim to benefit cancer research, prevention, and treatment. The event, in its sixth year, has raised $1 million for the Alliance for Cancer Gene Therapy and others. For more information, call 888.SWIM.USA.

1

RAISE YOUR SPIRITS

The Stamford Museum and Nature Center’s annual wine tasting will take place at 7 p.m. at 39 Scofieldtown Road in Stamford, Connecticut. The event will honor June Rosenthal. For more information, call 203.977.6511.

4

SILVER LINING

annual Workshop Performance Benefit will feature ballets by George Balanchine, Sean Lavery, and Peter Martins at 5:30 p.m. at the Peter Jay Sharp Theater. For more information, call 212.769.6600.

Modern Art. The event’s presenters will include Christopher Dodd, John Legend, and Paul Roth. For more information, call 914.238.2619.

works. For more information, call 858.361.0484.

6

HONOR IN HARLEM

UNDER THE SEA WALK IN THE PARK

The Gordon Parks Foundation will honor Alicia Keys, Annie Leibovitz, and Richard Pepler at the organization’s centennial at the Museum of

Stanley Meltzoff’s “Ocean’s and Other Worlds” exhibition will open at the Society of Illustrators. The show will include 90 pieces, from sketches to finished art-

The annual Chefs’ Tribute to Citymeals-on-Wheels, titled “Knives! Camera! Action! Star Chefs Salute the Silver Screen” will take place at 7:30 p.m. at the Rockefeller Center Plaza. The event will be chaired by Ninah and Michael Lynne, Laura and John Pomerantz, Randi and Dennis Riese, and Lizzie and Jonathan Tisch. For more information, call 212.687.1290.

5

GOOD COMPANY

The School of American Ballet’s 56 QUEST

7

The Boys and Girls Harbor will celebrate 75 years in Harlem by honoring Vikram Pandit at 6:30 p.m. at 1 East 104th Street. For more information, call 212.427.2244. FAMILY TREE

Brooklyn Family Defense Project’s party benefiting the Young Parents’ Empowerment Project will take place at 7 p.m. at 237 West 4th Street. For more information, call 347.592.2550. SPARKLE AND SHINE

On June 5, the Gordon Parks Foundation will celebrate its centennial by honoring Alicia Keys and others. For more information, call 914.238.2619.

Virgin Atlantic will host its Diamond Jubilee bash to benefit St. George’s Society at 7 p.m. at the Edison Ballroom. Sponsors include HSBC and the British International School. For more information, call 212.682.6110.


CALENDAR

Newport, Rhode Island. The event, titled “Salsa: A Celebration of Latin Cultures,” will include tango and tapas as part of its theme. For more information, call 401.847.1000. FIT FOR A KING

On June 16, God’s Love We Deliver will hold its annual Midsummer Night Drinks event at 6 p.m. at Woodhouse Park in East Hampton, New York— a great way to kick off the season! For more information, call 212.294.8162.

10

VROOM VROOM

A car show will take place from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Maryknoll Mission Center in Ossining, New York. The display will include an Ossining PBA SWAT vehicle as well as cars like a Ford Mustang and a Dodge Challenger. For more information, call 914.944.3612.

11

HOLE IN ONE

Ross School will offer an opportunity to golf with members of the New York Knicks at 9 a.m. at The Bridge in Long Island, New York. For more information, call 631.907.5214.

Central Park Zoo. For more information, call 973.233.1150.

16

EAST OF EDEN

The annual Midsummer Night Drinks event will benefit God’s Love We Deliver at 6 p.m. at Woodhouse Park in East Hampton, New York. For more information, call 212.294.8162.

22

ROSE-COLORED GLASSES

The Newport Flower Show will open at 6 p.m. at Rosecliff in

Nassau County Museum of Art’s Museum Ball will take place at 7 p.m. at Oheka Castle in Huntington, New York. The event will be chaired by Angela Anton and Lisa Eastman. For more information, call 516.484.9338.

30

HAVE A BALL

The Pilobolus Dance Theatre’s annual ball will take place at 6:30 p.m. at Quatre Vents in Washington, Connecticut. The event will feature a series of performances. For more information, call 646.450.4709. MAKE A SPLASH

Swim Across America’s Greenwich-Stamford Swim invites swimmers of all levels to participate in the event, beginning at 7 a.m. at the Alliance for Cancer Gene Therapy in Stamford, Connecticut. For more information, call 888.SWIM.USA.

JULY 1

THERE IS NO TRY

The annual Stamford Kids in Crisis IT triathalon will take place at 6:30 a.m. at Cummings Park Beach in Stamford, Connecticut, featuring a .9-mile swim, a 24.8-mile bike, and a 6.2-mile run. For more information, call 203.327.KIDS.

6

IT’S A FINE LIFE

The Amagansett Fine Arts Festival featuring artists from Canada and the U.S. will be held from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. throughout Fourth of July weekend at the American Legion at 15 Montauk Highway in Amagansett, New York. For more information, call 610.486.6393.

6

FIGHT FOR YOUR RIGHT

The Alexander Soros Foundation’s Global Witness Gala will take place at 6:30 p.m. at the Fairview Farm in Bridgehampton, New York. The organization, founded by Alexander Soros, promotes social justice and human rights. For more information, email inquiries@alexandersorosfoundation.org.

PUPPY LOVE

Bideawee, one of the country’s oldest and most respected animal welfare organizations, will host its annual gala at 6:30 a.m. at Gotham Hall. For more information, call 866.262.8133.

12

FULL BLOOM

Brooklyn Botanical Garden’s Spring Gala will take place at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 212.254.6677.

13

HOME RUN

The Franciscan Sisters of the Poor Foundation will host “A Celebration of Shining Moments in Yankee History” at 6 p.m. at Yankee Stadium. For more information, call 212.818.1987.

14

IN THE JUNGLE

“Coasts of Patagonia” is the Wildlife Conservation Society’s annual benefit at 6:30 p.m. at the

On June 14, the Wildlife Conservation Society will host “Coasts of Patagonia,” an event supporting the mission to save wildlife and wild places, at 6:30 p.m. at the Central Park Zoo. Proceeds will benefit the organization’s parks, as well as its education and global conservation programs. For more information, call 973.233.1150. JUNE 2012 57


H A R RY B E N S O N

IT SEEMS LIKE YESTERDAY “YOU KNOW, DOMINICK, you remind me more and more of

Truman Capote,” I said to Dominick Dunne while walking home on 57th Street between Fifth and Madison avenues. Dominick replied, “That is the most wonderful compliment I have ever had, Harry. If I live a hundred years, I could never accomplish what Truman accomplished. I think he was the greatest American writer.” I mentioned to Dominick that I thought he was doing a wonderful job on the O.J. case. He told me he was taking a few days off, saying, “I had to get away from it for a while. We’ll have to have dinner when the trial is over.” We talked a bit longer before we each walked off in different directions. Dominick was a man of substance. Many of his friends called him Nick, though I never did. His career spanned decades, each chapter more interesting than the last. The photograph shown here was taken in 1990, while he was researching a story, long before the Internet changed our way of life. It was always interesting to work with Dominick, but when I heard he won a medal for courage in WWII, I came to admire him even more. u 58 QUEST


Dominick Dunne, 1990.


TA K I

HELLUVA TOWN SEEING MANHATTAN rising from the distance is always a treat. I am not sure it’s possible for anyone brought up around these parts to appreciate entirely what New York—the idea of New York— meant to those of us who came from the old continent. I was 11 years old

This page: Grand Central Terminal. Opposite page, clockwise from top left: “Early Sunday Morning” by Edward Hopper; Woody Allen’s film Manhattan; a view of the Chrysler Building, 1932; the movie poster for Under the Biltmore Clock by F. Scott Fitzgerald; Robert de Niro in Taxi Driver.

and had seen only war and devastation. Dead, stinking bodies in the city parks, bullet-scarred buildings, people starving on sidewalks, too weak to die in the privacy of their hovels. I was suddenly whisked from home and into a TWA Stratocruiser stopping in Rome, Paris,

London, Shannon, Gander, Boston, and, finally, New York. I had fallen madly in love with the stewardess, but quickly forgot all about her upon seeing the sites: the Empire State Building, the Chrysler Building, Grand Central Station, Fifth and Madison Avenues, high fashion on


Park Avenue, money on Wall Street... This was no mere city but a romantic notion—a dream come true. To this day, when seeing the place from afar, the frisson is still there. Unlike Paris, New York has not emerged on canvas. Edward Hopper is the only man to have captured the city’s moods and shadows, its loneliness and loveliness, its red-brick housing lined up like soldiers on parade, the fire escapes standing out like rifles. Paintings of the city are depictions of the real place, and no one except for Hopper has come close. That’s because New York is a novel or a movie, not a painting. New York is Henry James, Edith Wharton, and F. Scott Fitzgerald—an imaginary mystical place rather than an Impressionist painting like the City of Light. New York, the movie, is a black-andwhite film. People rush about in a hurry. Time is money. Newspaper editors talk fast and from the sides of their mouths. They bark orders and hacks wear hats and smoke. Women are beautiful and play up to their men. Mothers are worried and fathers are angry. Priests are nice and understanding, soldiers are honorable, cops are kind, and hookers kindhearted. Everyone is always in love in New York, especially those college kids under the big clock in the Biltmore lobby next to Grand Central. The clock was the meeting place for college kids from 1900 onwards, until some real estate shark knocked the place

down during the late ’60s and with it went a great city tradition. Joe College would breeze into the Big City and head for the Biltmore. The first time I tried it, I was still Joe Prep, wearing a Harris Tweed jacket, gray flannel pants, and a striped tie around a blue button-down shirt. This was the uniform, the passport to acceptance from one’s peers and the password to the campus queen. Preppies from the right prep schools were tolerated by college boys and girls. Just about. There was more snobbery under the clock than in any Wharton or James novel. One had to be in the right fraternity, play the right sport, wear the right thing, and sound the right vowels—or one didn’t get the right girl. The snobbery was American, not English; Hemingway, not Waugh. It had to do with what an individual made of himself or herself, not what his or her parents had done. Hemingway admired toughies, but also surrounded himself with the Old Guard like Winston and Raymond Guest and Billy Hitchcock. Waugh was a closet gay who fell in love with people’s backgrounds until he married into society. Therein lies the difference. I wonder what he would have been like under the clock at the Biltmore. His looks and lack of sporting prowess would have worked against him. New York is still restless and dynamic, ideal for the constantly moving images that make a movie. It’s certainly a place

of action, but for a film like Taxi Driver, where Technicolor accentuated the city’s grubbiness of the ’70s, the old black-andwhite classics were poetry in motion. The city is still well-paced, but I worry for how long? No one talks any more, except to a contraption. Obama’s people have made sure that New York City and the United States will become a new people—people from Africa, Mexico, the subcontinent, and the Far East. The gates to mass immigration are open and will stay open for another four years once Obama is reelected. Coming through immigration I was welcomed in Greek by an officer who was the only white man in the booths, a burly Greek of southern appearance. Recently I went over to Michael Mailer’s house in Brooklyn Heights. The driver was Eastern European. For a moment I was back watching Manhattan Melodrama, or Manhattan or, better yet, A Tree Grows in Brooklyn... Pick Up on South Street, Miracle on 34th Street, Slaughter on Tenth Avenue. As I said, Noo Yawk is a movie, and Brooklyn still has parts of that blackand-white movie that made the city larger than life. A place that defines glamour, danger, adventure, and romance. More than 60 years after I first laid eyes on the place, I am still in awe. But of the past, not of the present. “Remember the Biltmore!” is my rallying cry. u For more Taki, visit takimag.com. JUNE 2012 61


QUEST

Fresh Finds BY DA N I E L C A P P E L LO AND ELIZABETH MEIGHER

Wempe’s BY

WITH SUMMER’S START, June offers the perfect way to kick-off the laid-back season—but that doesn’t mean you have to keep it totally casual. Why not dress up in a cool but sophisticated dress from J.Crew, Zac Posen, or Dennis Basso? New jewels always delight, and Diptyque offers some summer scents. With hotels like The Plaza and resorts like Casa de Campo offering special packages and things to do, there’s no reason not to plan a perfect summer getaway either.

KIM Helioro pendant, limited edition of 100 pieces, with 78 brilliant-cut and cinnamon-colored diamonds. $6,525. Wempe: 700 Fifth Ave., 212.397.9000.

Look like a lady in J.Crew’s Attaché dress in linen canvas ($158), Viv patent flats ($188), and Edie attaché bag ($288). J.Crew boutiques nationwide, including 1035 Madison Ave., 212.249.3869. Montblanc’s StarWalker red gold-plated fountain pen is hand-crafted with a 14-kt. red gold nib and red gold-plated matte black lacquered cap and barrel with diamond-cut lines. $1,160. Montblanc: 800.995.4810 or montblanc.com.

Your feet will be pretty in pink in Stuart Weitzman’s pink leather tassel sandals. $298. Stuart Weitzman: 625 Madison Ave., 212.750.2555.

62 QUEST


Eric Javtis’s lightweight and durable Paradis clutch is made of structured Squishee® with a signature starfish and detachable shoulder strap. $345. Eric Javits: ericjavits.com.

Be sure to ring in summer the right way with Tiffany & Co.’s luminous diamond flower ring set in platinum. $875,000. Tiffany & Co.: Fifth Ave. at 57th St., 212.755.8000, or tiffany.com.

Sorab & Roshi’s 18-kt. yellow gold, silver, amethyst, champagne diamond, and jade flower pin ($10,800) and green aventurine, amethyst, and pavé diamond leaf earrings ($8,600). Sorab & Roshi: 30 West Putnam Ave., Greenwich, 203.869.5800, or info@sorabandroshi.com. This summer, give the kids the royal treatment with a “Knights of The Plaza” package, in which young lords and ladies staying in the Tower Suite will have a closet full of dress-up outfits and toys, and receive a gift card to FAO Schwarz for toys to take home. The Plaza’s Family Ambassador: 212.546.5219.

She walks in beauty like the night in C A R LTO N DAV I S F O R T I F FA NY & CO .

Zac Posen’s midnight organza floral print dress Cornelia Guest’s Simple Pleasures (Weinstein Books) reveals Cornelia Guest’s secrets of understated elegance, effortless entertaining, and the comforts of simple, delicious, cruelty-free

in silk. $2,690. Zac Posen: Available at Bloomingdale’s and shopbop.com.

food. $32.50. Available at corneliaguest.com. JUNE 2012 63


Fresh Finds

Designed by Gregory James, the Gentlemen’s 12-Gauge Shotgun Shell cufflinks are handsomely handmade in 18-kt. yellow,

Head to the Altos de

white, and rose gold with diamonds. Price upon request. Gregory

Chavón School of

James Jewelry: gregoryjamesjewelry.com or 561.351.9835.

Art and Design at Casa de Campo and enroll in its “Veran0 2012” courses in fashion, interior, graphic, and digital design: 809.523.8172.

Preppy cool: J.McLaughlin’s slim-fit shirt in Eamon check ($115), Kevin linen pant in white ($220), and flat leather belt with partial weave in natural ($98). J.McLaughlin: 1311 Madison Ave., 1004 Lexington Ave., or jmclaughlin.com.

Be sure to visit legendary stationer Start your mornings right with the perfect

Mrs. John L. Strong for your next order of

froth for your cappuccino or latte.

bespoke stationery. Price upon request.

Nespresso’s Aeroccino Plus will

Please call 212.838.3775 to make

revolutionize the start of your day.

an appointment or for more information.

$99. Nespresso: nespresso.com.

A soft suede for any season: The Mr. Casual in brown suede with black trim from Belgian Shoes. $375. Belgian Shoes: 212.755.7372 or belgianshoes.com.

Add some oomph to your home with Oomph’s sleek backgammon table, which comes in 16 high-lacquer colors, Get your team spirit on in Ralph Lauren’s 2012 U.S. Open side-striped polo. $125. Ralph Lauren: Available at ralphlauren.com and usgashop.com. 64 QUEST

like navy. $3,495. Oomph: Available at oomphonline.com.


When the occasion calls for pearls (and diamonds), reach for Mikimoto’s white South Sea cultured pearl and diamond earrings set in platinum. $62,000. Mikimoto: 888.701.2323 or mikimotoamerica.com. Everything’s coming up roses with Diptyque’s Eau Rose, a delightfully floral scent for summer. $98. Diptyque: diptyqueparis.com.

California style-setter Kendall Conrad has done it again, this time with the Pacha Franja cross-body bag in fringed napa leather, which converts into a clutch. Natural beauty: Asprey’s Woodland Oak Leaf bracelet. $1,250. Asprey:

Kendall Conrad: 310.399.1333 or kendallconraddesign.com.

853 Madison Ave., 212.688.1811, or asprey.com.

The Rolex Oyster Perpetual Datejust Special Edition 34-mm., 18-kt. yellow gold, domed bezel, Pearlmaster bracelet with 10 diamonds set on a mother-ofpearl dial. $31,450. Rolex: 800.36.ROLEX or rolex.com.

Roberto Coin’s Art Nouveau ring in 18-kt. rose gold with pink sapphires and diamonds. $4,180. Roberto Coin: Available at Saks Fifth Avenue, 611 Fifth Ave.

You’ll be cool as ice on a summer night in Dennis Basso’s ice blue organza dress. $8,500. Dennis Basso: 765 Madison Ave. or dennisbasso.com.

JUNE 2012 65


OPEN HOUSE

THE VERY BEST OF WESTCHESTER GINNEL REAL ESTATE has been serving the community of

Northern Westchester for over 60 years. The company prides itself on being a boutique real estate firm with exceptional service to a limited number of listings. Similarly, agents at Ginnel are known for their knowledge, integrity, experience, and dedication. Among the firm’s current listings are five distinctive properties that truly stand out. One of these properties is a sophisticated brick country estate in Bedford. The refined interior’s formal rooms encompass an elegant entrance hall, a gracious living room, a music room, a library, and a formal dining room. This five-bedroom home is situated on seven acres with beautiful gardens, a shoreline swimming pool, and a Japanese tea house. Over in Pound Ridge, “Horsefeather Farm” is perhaps the town’s finest estate property. The house was designed by Shope, Reno & Wharton. With over 8,000 square feet, the main house has two master bedroom suites and three additional bedrooms. The 12-acre property features a three-car garage, a guesthouse, a pool, a tennis court, and two restored barns. Also in Pound Ridge is “The Ivy Barn.” The converted barn, which now houses five bedrooms, dates back to the 1800s but has been renovated 66 QUEST

with modern amenities. The formal rooms have been designed for entertaining with a great room, a formal dining room, and a chef’s kitchen (not to mention the 300-bottle wine room!). Abutting a 150-acre nature preserve, the three acres have charming grounds with a vegetable garden and a large pond. In North Salem, Ginnel represents a 1940s landmark estate, formerly the John June Mansion. Rich in architectural detail, the colonial building has a wraparound porch with fluted columns among the many period details in the 6,160 feet of living space. On the 13-acre property, which has fantastic grounds, is a rushing stream, a two-bedroom guest house, a pool with spa, and an artist’s studio. Finally, over in Katonah is Buckbee Farm. The perfect organic farm, the barn from 1780 has been renovated with five bedrooms. It includes seven beautifully landscaped acres which feature a swimming pool, firepit, chicken coop, root cellar, tea house, garden shed, and corn crib office with a sleeping loft for a charming oasis. u For more information on Ginnel Real Estate, please call 914.234.9234 or visit ginnel.com.


This page, clockwise from top left: The Ivy Barn, 245 Upper Shad Road, Pound Ridge, New York. Listed by Benjamin Ginnel at $2,475,000; Buckbee Farm, 41 Harris Road, Katonah, New York. Listed by Cindy Swank at $1,425,000; Horsefeather Farm, 212-214 Trinity Pass, Pound Ridge, New York. Listed by Christine Byrne at $5,999,000; an 1840’s landmark estate in North Salem, New York. Listed by Muffin Dowdle at $4,250,000. Opposite: a 1930 brick estate, 144-148 McLain Street, Bedford Corners, New York. Listed by Muffin Dowdle at $3,695,000.


FOOD

AT THE PLAZA 68 QUEST

ELOISE AND HER “RAWTHER” British nanny (not to mention Skipperdee and Weenie) would be pleased as punch about the news at The Plaza this month. Two years ago, The Plaza Food Hall by Todd English opened and became a destination for hungry midtown residents, workers, and tourists. This month, The Plaza Food Hall will open in its complete form. Todd English’s restaurant remains the central pillar of the concourse level, but with new carefully curated food concepts added into the mix inspired by European food halls and markets. Among these freestanding shops are such notable gastronomic delights as Billy’s Bakery, Burke in a Box by David Burke, FP Patisserie by François Payard, Kusmi Tea, La Maison du Chocolat, and Lady M. (Think of the raisins, Skipperdee!) Additional shops include Luke’s Lobster, No. 7 Sub, Pain D’Avignon, Tartinery, Three Tarts, Sushi of Gari, William


The Plaza Food Hall, elegantly designed by Jeffrey Beers, opens this month at The Plaza, with a total of more than 40,000 square feet.

Greenberg Desserts, and YoArt. Worthy of special attention are the many outposts that have created exclusive menu items that will rotate seasonally and are inspired by The Plaza’s iconic history. Such additions include “The No. 7 Club” with turkey, Canadian bacon, jalapeno mayo, pico de lettuce and BBQ potato chips from No. 7 Sub, an “Eloise” strawberry flavored frozen yogurt from YoArt, a Central Park summer picnic bundle from Pain D’Avignon, and a chocolate banana Mille Crêpes Cake from Lady M (“These items don’t sound boring now do they, Nanny?”). “The exceptional response to The Plaza Food Hall has been tremendously gratifying and has served to reinforce our original vision of a food-themed concept that would encompass the concourse level,” said Kristin Franzese, Executive Vice President, at The Plaza. “The final piece of this exciting

venture is the diverse array of new brands that are featured in The Plaza Food Hall and which provide our guests with an even more diverse range of quality food offerings presented in a dynamic and convenient setting.” Non-food venues include Town and Country Living tabletop items and gifts, Travelex currency exchange, and Gramercy Flowers (the oldest flower shop in New York City), as well as the new Plaza Boutique. u The Plaza Food Hall: The Plaza, 1 West 59th Street, Concourse Level. Hours: The Plaza Food Hall: 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily; 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Sundays. For more information, please call 212.546.5499. Todd English Food Hall: 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday to Thursday; 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Friday and Saturday. For more information, please call 212.986.9260. JUNE 2012 69


ARTS

FAKES, FORGERIES, AND OWNERSHIP BY JUDITH L. PEARSON

KNOEDLER & COMPANY, known for

having helped to create the American art market, closed its doors in December 2011 under the weight of numerous simultaneously filed lawsuits alleging that the gallery regularly sold fake works of art that it represented to be authentic by such Modern masters as Mark Rothko, Jackson Pollock, Franz Kline, Willem de Kooning, Richard Diebenkorn, and others. This was a stunning event, especially since the gallery had operated continuously for 165 years with a stellar reputation. The paintings all possessed a similar but erroneous provenance to Glafira Rosales, a Long Island dealer who was unknown in the mainstream art world. According to the lawsuits, Glafira Rosales claimed that she sold the works to or through Knoedler & Company, representing an anonymous collector who had owned the paintings since the 1950s. Supposedly, the paintings were traced directly from the artists, but Glafira Rosales lacked any records confirming the ownership history. Consequently, Knoedler & Company also lacked any records, suggesting that it performed little to no due diligence on the seller and collector when it acquired and sold the works. Collectors struggle today more than ever with how to avoid purchasing fake or forged works. In the past, the estates and foundations of artists created authentication boards to help the market navigate the issue. However, the eventual burden—financial and otherwise—of litigation on boards from claims by owners who argued that boards were


CO U RTE S Y O F A R I S ( P E A R S O N )

economically motivated to control market inventory and, in turn, values forced many authentication boards to disband, such as those associated with the Andy Warhol, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Jackson Pollock, and Roy Lichtenstein foundations. Scholars, under fear or threat of similar litigation against them, have also become reluctant to render public or even private opinions about the authenticity of works. How, then, can collectors navigate the thorny landscape of fakes and forgeries? Provenance research has long been a central tenet of authentication. Most art experts agree that authentic paintings tend to have a “correct” provenance, including literary references in the artist’s catalogue raisonné, scholarly publications, exhibition records, or auction catalogs. On the other hand, if a work by an important artist has no documented history, then it may be a fake or forgery, though that is not always the case. Additionally, a fake or forged artwork almost always has a fake or forged provenance. One common misconception in the art market is that a good provenance means that the legal title to or ownership of the work is clear. These two concepts are not identical. Provenance is the history of physical possession of a work from the date the artist created it to the present day, and thus it is only a subset of legal title. Legal title is the full right, interest, and ownership of the work, which may or may not overlap with physical possession of the art. Because the art market does not record and track both sides of a sale-purchase transaction, every

This page: Title insurance for any piece of art should always accompany all art transactions. Opposite page: Judith L. Pearson, President of ARIS Title Insurance Corporation.

provenance carries the inherent risk of being inaccurate or incomplete, including the provenance information stated in catalogues raisonnés and auction catalogs. In addition, where a purchase sale is recorded, such as in an auction catalog, it is generally recorded in a generic fashion (e.g., “Private Collection”) because most collectors do not wish to disclose information about their ownership. Even those who have nothing to hide are reluctant to have their names published as the owner of a work for fear of becoming the victim of theft, facing public speculation about their financial position, or facing solicitations from the marketplace. These market challenges on clear legal title are compounded by the prevalence of transactions involving multiple layers of undisclosed consignors or dealer-agents. Because legal title and authenticity are regarded as first cousins of each other, the process that a title insurance company undertakes to guarantee clear legal title serves as an additional lens through which to study authenticity, as well as understand valuation. Standard title-

insurance-underwriting protocols involve confirming the legal basis under which a current seller possesses a work. This process always includes disclosing to the title insurer the identity of the current owner, even if this information is confidential in the marketplace (and will not be disclosed to parties on the opposite side of the transaction), and inherently brings to the forefront information that might suggest whether the provenance circulated in the market is, in fact, fake itself. A title insurance company’s underwriting process indirectly helps the market by adding an additional level of connoisseurship to the investigation of authenticity. In order to protect collectors’ art assets, title insurance should accompany all art transactions just as it is an integral element of all real estate transactions. No one would buy a home without title insurance; why would a collector purchase art without the same protections? u For more information on ARIS Title Insurance Corporation, call 212.563.3600 or visit aristitle.com. JUNE 2012 71


V E S T M E N T S . . . F I N A N C E . . . R E T I R E M E N T. . . C U R R E N T E V E N T S . . . I N S U R A N C E . . . S T O C K S . . . I N V E S T M E N T S . . . F I N A N C E . . . R E T

SCOTT KONRAD Executive Director Frank Crystal & Company

PRESERVING THE AURA OF GOODNESS: NONPROFITS AND RISK MANAGEMENT IT’S NO SECRET that nonprofit organiza-

tions in almost every sector have struggled to make ends meet during the last several years of government funding cuts, tepid corporate and private giving, diminished investment returns, and creeping expenses. But these direct, short-term funding pressures pale by comparison to the fallout from reputational damage, as such household names as United Way Worldwide, the Roman Catholic Church, American Red Cross, ACORN, and the Susan G. Komen Foundation can attest. The damage can impair an organization’s relations with donors, patrons, volunteers, and business partners, threatening its revenue stream and even its very survival. As reputational risk becomes a hot topic, the insurance marketplace has responded with products and services. Although most, such as Chartis’s ReputationGuard Insurance, are designed to cover crisis communications and other post-event damage-control costs, the ever-creative market at Lloyd’s of London has structured policies that also address revenue loss in the wake of a damaging event. Warren Buffet said, “It takes 20 years to build a reputation and five minutes to destroy it.” With that in mind, today’s 72 QUEST

nonprofits can take steps to safeguard their good names and financial lifelines: Sweat the details. Most corporate scandals result from operating-level failures: embezzlements (inadequate internal controls), sexual misconduct (lapses in screening, training, supervision, and boundaries), management improprieties (absence of clear conflictof-interest policies and lax expense oversight), employment actions (unclear human resources policies or inadequate performance management and documentation), and data breaches (IT infrastructure, human error). Almost all are preventable by building and enforcing clear internal policies for operational and personal conduct. Engage leadership. An organization’s leadership sets the value system and cultural tone—attributes that can promote public trust. A progressive board of directors also takes an interest in enterprise-wide risk management and empowers the C-suite to develop the policies, procedures, and insurance infrastructure to avoid, reduce, retain, and transfer risk. Know what others are saying. The rise of nonprofit rating organizations and watchdog groups such as Charity Navigator, GiveWell, and Guidestar, cou-

pled with the explosion of online media such as Yelp! and other blogs, demands that any nonprofit actively monitor the multimedia landscape for potentially detrimental content, and act swiftly to address complaints and counter inaccuracies. A proactive organization regularly invites feedback—from donors, clients, employees, business partners, and the general public—and vigorously communicates with these constituencies openly and with humility. Be prepared. Despite the best-laid plans, calamities do occur—from product recalls to workplace violence, from medical mishaps to international hostage-taking. When the worst happens, an organization must respond quickly and convincingly. Even the smallest nonprofit should have a formal crisis-management plan, including mechanisms for communicating with employees, stakeholders, and the media; near-term actions to resolve the crisis; and steps to resume normal operations. The 24-7 news cycle and the lightning speed—and permanence—of Internet content underscores the importance of a tactful, surefooted spokesperson as the linchpin of media communications. Though these recommendations seem obvious, many nonprofits suffer “analysis paralysis” and don’t know where to start. One answer is to engage a qualified strategic risk advisor—a good listener with a big-picture perspective on governance, business resiliency, and communications. No risk advisor can guarantee immunity from the hard knocks of today’s no-nonsense business environment, but he or she may be an organization’s best ally to keep its halo untarnished. For more information, please call 212.344.2444 or visit frankcrystal.com

L I B R A RY O F CO N G R E S S

MONEY MATTERS


T I R E M E N T. . . C U R R E N T E V E N T S . . . I N S U R A N C E . . . S T O C K S . . . I N V E S T M E N T S . . . F I N A N C E . . . R E T I R E M E N T. . . C U R R E N T E V E N T S

Picture stars receive their Red Cross pins, 1938.


V E S T M E N T S . . . F I N A N C E . . . R E T I R E M E N T. . . C U R R E N T E V E N T S . . . I N S U R A N C E . . . S T O C K S . . . I N V E S T M E N T S . . . F I N A N C E . . . R E T

MONEY MATTERS IN QUEST’S LASt FINANCIAL forum, I discussed some of the ancillary services I’ve been asked to obtain for clients during my career in the wealth management industry. these “soft” or “life” issues transcend the services you might expect a wealthy client to need, such as investment management or estate planning. One area that raises the need for both traditional and non-traditional assistance is real estate. Some examples of the services we provide that are more financial in nature—tax issues, titling, fees, planning, and mortgage lending—include: • Secured professional appraiser for client as well as trusted attorney for property The Roosevelt Building, elevation façade, 1873. closing. Negotiated commissions to reduce fees for properties over $10 million. • Structured transfer of ancestral property under current advantageous tax laws that • Secured household help for property, including caretaker, nanny, cook, chauffeur, are set to expire at year-end. • Worked with insurance brokers to help gardener, and security specialist. As that last item indicates, I often find ensure property was adequately covered. • Provided titling investigation and advice myself dealing in matters that are more personal in nature for my clients, like on potential properties. • Advised client on tax residency health care. When you develop long-term,

Some of the most frequent services I’ve secured over the years to help clients with their health-care issues include: • Identified alternative and specialized medical doctors and clinics globally, and secured hard-to-get appointments. • Compiled a list of reputable plastic surgeons and located specialized plastic surgeon to assist client following a bad motorcycle accident. • Secured client admission to global hospital specializing in experimental cures and research. • Located educational consultant to help work with expelled drug- and alcoholaddicted child. • Provided recommendations of leading institutions for the treatment of alcohol, drug, and gambling issues, and shopaholoics anonymous. • Identified reputable in-home nursing and physical therapy, as well as hospice. • Recommended leading pain-management clinic. • Secured priest, minister, or rabbi to perform funeral services and provided funeral home recommendations. • Arranged for transport of deceased client PETER E. “TONY” GUERNSEY, JR. from foreign country back to the U.S. Chief Client Advocate Not wanting to end on a morbid note, Wilmington Trust, N.A. I’d like to share one of my favorite opportunities to assist a valued client with her health-care concerns, which involved an 89-year-old grandmother who had broken her hip and had not healed as well as she would have liked to heal. Her goal was to dance with her grandson at his upcoming wedding, but she wanted to do so in top form. So she asked me to locate a private, in-home ballroom dance instructor who would be able to help her implications of buying real estate in trusted relationships with your clients, they overcome her injury with grace. I’m glad see you as their ultimate resource for even to say she danced beautifully with her foreign countries. • Structured transfer of properties to the most private circumstances. Wealthy grandson on his—and her—big day. Whether I’m helping a client develop people today are spending a considerable Forever Wild Status. In addition, I’ve also helped clients with amount of money when it comes to their a multi-generational wealth-transfer plan, other aspects of real estate negotiation health—particularly when they or a or helping her dance at her grandson’s family member is ill with a serious disease. wedding, my job offers many fulfilling and management such as: • Located private office space for out- With the resources behind them, these opportunities to help clients achieve their placed executive and assisted clients find individuals are putting much effort into life dreams and goals. accelerating research to hopefully find a occupants for newly vacant office space. • Negotiated purchase of two co-op suite cure. I am often asked to help clients with For more information, call 212.415.0510 or email tguernsey@wilmingtontrust.com. these efforts. on luxury cruise yacht.

PART II: THE SOFTER ISSUES OF WEALTH MANAGEMENT

74 Q U E S T


T I R E M E N T. . . C U R R E N T E V E N T S . . . I N S U R A N C E . . . S T O C K S . . . I N V E S T M E N T S . . . F I N A N C E . . . R E T I R E M E N T. . . C U R R E N T E V E N T S

IN THE SUMMER, the focus for many pri-

DOMINICK LOMBARDI vate-wealth individuals traditionally shifts Director, Investment Management & Trust to planning social events and vacations. IDB Bank However, we believe this period should also be used to evaluate investment objectives and advisors. As a result of recent lackluster performance and fears over the European Contagion, many clients are nervous about today’s high-risk, lowreturn environment. Private-wealth clients should therefore use this time to evaluate the individuals and institutions that are managing their assets. When evaluating your advisor, take note of several key scoring points. A few ents tell us their former advisors didn’t structure, including those that come from years ago, the Institute for Chartered speak directly with them—that often proprietary products. Financial Analysts surveyed hundreds of communication was via email or mail. Performance measurement is also key. private-wealth clients to see what were Client communication and education are Instead of using performance evaluation the most important factors used in select- vital for aligning client-advisor expecta- as a final step, clients should see it as an ing and evaluating an investment advisor. tions and for evaluating risks. opportunity to provide feedback during As the private-wealth business has the evolving process of their investment the findings indicated that communication, service, fees, and investment perfor- evolved under a more competitive fee strategy, and should ask: Is my advisor structure, there has been a growing need producing results in line with my longmance were at the top of the list. At IDB Bank®, we recognize that com- for advisors to produce more value-added term goals? How much risk is being taken munication is at the core of a successful services. Clients want personalized treat- to achieve these results? ment. Online banking and cash-manAt the heart of knowing whether your private-wealth client relationship. Since the wealth management business has agement services have become standard, long-term strategy is on track is a detailed become more commoditized over time, while specialized concierge banking and performance report that shows your portcommunication has become an important custom statement-rendering have grown folio performance compared to a riskmore popular. Under this umbrella, cli- based benchmark. these returns should distinguishing factor. Investors should ask themselves: Do I speak to my advisor ents should be fully aware of where fees be presented both gross and net of fees. Globalization has produced increased regularly to ensure I have the appropri- are coming from, with a clearly stated rate. ate investment policy and optimal asset Fees should be reviewed annually and cli- volatility and opportunities. We would allocation? Is my advisor in tune with my ents should expect to receive something urge our readers this summer to spend evolving tax needs and lifestyle? Do they in writing explaining their specific fee some time evaluating their investment advisory service. Your advisor has a encourage a two-way diafiduciary duty to act on your behalf, but logue? Does my advisor ultimately it is you who should ensure keep me aware of any Vacation Days, Belle Isle Park, circa 1910. that your assets are positioned to meet proprietary products in your life’s needs. the investment plan? This information is intended to assist this last item has investors. The information does not concome into the spotlight stitute investment advice or an offer to recently as firms look invest or to provide management services. for ways to develop Prior to making any investment, a proincome sources. While spective investor should consult with its our investment advisory own investment, accounting, legal, and group does not utilize tax advisers to evaluate independently the proprietary product, this risks, consequences, and suitability of that is an important item to investment. be aware of—for potential hidden fee structures For more information call 212.551.8534 and potential conflicts of or email dlombardi@idbny.com. interest. Many of our cli-

L I B R A RY O F CO N G R E S S

SUMMER INVESTMENT STRATEGIES FOR PRIVATE WEALTH

JUNE 2012 75


OPEN HOUSE

THE GREAT ESTATE OLD MILL FARM SET AMONG THE VERDANT rolling hills and polo grounds that adorn the elegant backcountry of Greenwich, Connecticut, Old Mill Farm, with it’s 75 acres, is one of the last remaining great estates in New England. Long considered one of the crowning achievements of New York architect Charles Lewis Bowman, this landmark home was built for financier and avid equestrian George Lewis Ohrstrom in 1926. Throughout its nearly 100year history, Old Mill Farm has been carefully preserved and respectfully restored. Today, the property boasts a stunning 16,000-square-foot Tudor manor house with every modern amenity as well as an ivy-covered guest cottage, a staff residence, stables, a terraced pool, a tennis court, a putting green, a riverfed pond, scenic recreational trails, a limestone temple rotunda, and breathtaking formal and informal gardens. Though Old Mill Farm offers a seemingly endless array of enchantments, perhaps none is more dazzling than its spectacular Great Hall. This two-story space with its 40-foothigh beamed cathedral ceiling features 16th century English linenfold oak paneling, a heavily carved frieze, quarter-sawn 76 QUEST

pegged oak flooring, and a walk-in fireplace—all framed by magnificent leaded and stained glass windows. Completing this magical environment are leaded glass doors that lead to the south terrace where there’s nothing to behold but nature at her best as far as the eye can see. Its exceptional beauty notwithstanding, Old Mill Farm is just one of many extraordinary homes in Greenwich, a wonderful community widely recognized for its exceptional schools, extensive cultural resources, and stunning beaches. From gracious waterfront residences along the Long Island Sound to in-town condominiums just steps away from some of the country’s finest shops and eateries, Greenwich offers a staggering breadth of architectural choices in virtually all price categories. Just 35 miles from New York City, Greenwich has more than earned its reputation for having it all. u For more information on Old Mill Farm in Greenwich, Connecticut, please call Joseph Barbieri at 203.618.3112 or email joseph.barbieri@sothebyshomes.com.


This page, clockwise from top: The great hall at Old Mill Farm; luscious gardens; an oversize chess set in front of trimmed hedging; Robert Bland, Sotheby’s International Realty’s Greenwich Brokerage Manager, surveys the expansive grounds of the 75-plus acres from outside of the great hall; an aerial view of Old Mill Farm. Opposite page: Old Mill Farm in Greenwich, Connecticut, is currently listed at $32,995,000.


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Pound Ridge Privacy - Long, gated drive to serene setting. Sophisticated Clapboard Colonial. Gracious Two-Story Entrance Hall. Stunning Living Room with Fireplace. Formal Dining Room. Family Room with Fireplace. Screened Porch. Immaculate Country Kitchen with Breakfast Area. Recreation Room. Four Bedrooms. Gorgeous Pool with Pool House and built-in barbecue. Three spectacularly landscaped acres. $1,599,000

The Ultimate Lifestyle - Stunning, Sophisticated Katonah Colonial on absolutely gorgeous property. Fabulous location on private lane yet just moments to shops, trains and schools. Dream home with wonderful open floor plan. Four Bedrooms. Enormous terrace for fabulous outdoor parties. Huge open flat meadow for baseball, relay races and flag football. Award winning John Jay Schools. The perfect combination! $999,000

Victorian Grandeur - Turn-of-the-Century impeccably renovated. Wood shingle façade, period windows, rocking-chair porch, high ceilings, pocket doors, wide moldings and rich oak millwork. Center Entrance Hall. Formal Living and Dining Rooms with Fireplaces. Cherry Kitchen with granite. Sun-filled Family Room. Six Bedrooms.Two beautiful acres with ageold trees and Antique Barn. Pool. Walk to Katonah and train! $1,599,000

Impressive Georgian -

Stunning Country Estate- Majestically sited to take in the distant view. Nearly seven acres abutting sanctuary. Incredible Stone and custom Clapboard Country House designed by noted architect David Easton. Classic and timeless style. 12,000 square feet of living space meticulously appointed. Oak and Limestone flooring, six fireplaces, Waterworks fittings and state-of-the-art systems. Separate Studio Cottage. Beautiful stone terrace overlooking the salt water pool and spa. On the riding lanes. $8,950,000

Maple Ridge Farm -

(914) 234-9234

Long gated drive to Sophisticated Country House, circa 1940. Warm stucco exterior rich in architectural embellishment. 4600 square feet with wonderful light and ceiling height. 29’x 20’ Living Room with Fireplace. Mahogany Greenhouse. Four Bedrooms. Four estate area acres with exquisite gardens and specimen trees. Heated Pool. Deerfencing. Sprinkler System. Generator. $2,750,000

Wonderful Country Estate in the heart of Bedford. Circa 1790 Colonial with hardwood floors, original glass windows, two fireplaces and antique paneling. Five Bedrooms. Over six acres with ancient Sugar Maple, Black Chestnut, Cryptomeria, Weeping Copper Beech, Apple, Pear and Peach trees. Pool with Pool House. On the Bedford Riding Lanes. Three-stall Barn. Additional land available. A fabulous opportunity! $1,495,000

493 BEDFORD CENTER RD, BEDFORD HILLS, NY SPECIALIZING IN THE UNUSUAL FOR OVER 60 YEARS

WWW.GINNEL.COM


SPECTACULAR GREENWICH COVE SETTING

BINNEY LANE

$6,750,000 · Please visit: www.36WestWay.com Exclusive Agent: Scott Elwell

$4,795,000

MID-COUNTRY SANCTUARY $3,950,000

SECLUSION IN DEER PARK

· Please visit: www.59Dingletown.com Exclusive Agent: Gila Lewis

$3,550,000

OLD GREENWICH PERFECTION $3,200,000 · Please visit: www.ClarkStOG.com Exclusive Agent: Julie Church

G R E E N W IC H

· Please visit: www.BinneyLaneClassic.com Exclusive Agent: Ellen Mosher

· Please visit: www.DeerParkClassic.com Exclusive Agent: Ellen Mosher

WILLOWMERE CIRCLE $2,950,000

F I N E

· Please visit: www.68WillowmereCircle.com Exclusive Agent: Ellen Mosher

P R OP E RT I E S

Exclusive Greenwich Affiliate of Classic Properties International

80 MASON STREET . GREENWICH, CONNECTICUT 06830 GREENWICHFINEPROPERTIES.COM . 2 0 3 . 6 6 1 . 9 2 0 0 KATHY ADAMS . JILL BARILE . JENNIFER BENEDICT . LISA BILHUBER . BERDIE BRADY . ANN BRESNAN . BONNIE CAIE . LESLIE CARLOTTI . LINDA CASTRIOTA . JULIE CHURCH . BARBARA CIOFFARI JOSIANE COLLAZO . PATRICIA COUGHLIN . JEFFREY CRUMBINE . MAUREEN CRUMBINE . EVANGELA DALI . BLAKE DELANY . CANDY DURNIAK . JACKIE EKHOLM . SCOTT ELWELL . LEE FLEISCHMAN JOYCE FOWLER . JANIE GALBREATH . KATHERINE GEORGAS . JANE GOSDEN . MARY ANN GRABEL . SARA HOLDCROFT . JEANNE HOWELL . MADELINE KEARNS . SHARON KINNEY ELIZABETH KOLDYKE-BOOLBOL . GILA LEWIS . SALLY MALONEY . VILMA MATTEIS . DEBBIE MCGARRITY . CINDY MEEKER . JIM MEEKER . ELLEN MOSHER . LAUREN MUSE . LIZ OBERNESSER MARGARET RYDZIK . MARIANNE SCIPIONE . FIFI SHERIDAN . LAURIE SMITH . DOUGLAS STEVENS . TORY THORMAN . TYLER TINSWORTH . BEVERLEY TOEPKE . JOE WILLIAMS . MIHA ZAJEC


LUCAS POINT WATERFRONT

EUROSTYLE CONTEMPORARY ON ROUND HILL

$4,500,000 · Please visit: www.41WestWay.com Exclusive Agent: Scott Elwell

$4,100,000

· Please visit: www.EuroStyleLuxury.com Exclusive Agent: Gila Lewis

LAKEFRONT BRICK GEORGIAN

STATELY MID-COUNTRY FEDERAL

$3,395,000 · Please visit: www.LakeAveGeorgian.com Exclusive Agents: Kathy Adams / Jill Barile

$3,235,000 · Please visit: www.NorthStFederal.com Exclusive Agents: Kathy Adams / Jill Barile

ELEGANT IN-TOWN LIVING $2,375, 000

· Please visit: www.InTownClassic.com Exclusive Agent: Gila Lewis

G R E E N W IC H

BAILIWICK COLONIAL $1,850,000 · Please visit: www.DuncanDr.com Exclusive Agents: Maureen Crumbine / Jeffrey Crumbine

F I N E

P R OP E RT I E S

Exclusive Greenwich Affiliate of Classic Properties International

80 MASON STREET . GREENWICH, CONNECTICUT 06830 GREENWICHFINEPROPERTIES.COM . 2 0 3 . 6 6 1 . 9 2 0 0 KATHY ADAMS . JILL BARILE . JENNIFER BENEDICT . LISA BILHUBER . BERDIE BRADY . ANN BRESNAN . BONNIE CAIE . LESLIE CARLOTTI . LINDA CASTRIOTA . JULIE CHURCH . BARBARA CIOFFARI JOSIANE COLLAZO . PATRICIA COUGHLIN . JEFFREY CRUMBINE . MAUREEN CRUMBINE . EVANGELA DALI . BLAKE DELANY . CANDY DURNIAK . JACKIE EKHOLM . SCOTT ELWELL . LEE FLEISCHMAN JOYCE FOWLER . JANIE GALBREATH . KATHERINE GEORGAS . JANE GOSDEN . MARY ANN GRABEL . SARA HOLDCROFT . JEANNE HOWELL . MADELINE KEARNS . SHARON KINNEY ELIZABETH KOLDYKE-BOOLBOL . GILA LEWIS . SALLY MALONEY . VILMA MATTEIS . DEBBIE MCGARRITY . CINDY MEEKER . JIM MEEKER . ELLEN MOSHER . LAUREN MUSE . LIZ OBERNESSER MARGARET RYDZIK . MARIANNE SCIPIONE . FIFI SHERIDAN . LAURIE SMITH . DOUGLAS STEVENS . TORY THORMAN . TYLER TINSWORTH . BEVERLEY TOEPKE . JOE WILLIAMS . MIHA ZAJEC


THE GRASS IS GREENER PRODUCED BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN PHOTOGRAPHED BY BEN FINK SHAPIRO


John Badman IV, outfitted in Ralph Lauren, walks with Lauren Brown, wearing a dress by Vineyard Vines and shoes by Delman Shoes. JUNE 2012 83


A couple of horses at 747 Riversville Road (above); Jennifer Cuminale, in a Ralph Lauren dress, treads through the muck in boots while Lauren, in a Ralph Lauren top and Lilly Pulitzer pants, ventures barefoot (below). Opposite page: Peter Hansen feeds a horse in a Vineyard Vines shirt and J.McLaughlin shorts while Nicole Fischer, wearing a Lilly Pulitzer top, Tibi pants, and Tory Burch shoes, and Courtney Fischer, wearing a J.McLaughlin top, Vineyard Vines shorts, and Milly for Sperry Top-Sider shoes, look on.

GREENWICH —an enclave characterized by “manicuredbucolic wildernessless-woodsy rolling hills and arboreal dells,” according to Tom Wolfe. More than a suburb, a commingling of country clubs and metropolitanism. Substance is emphasized, and exemplified by the town’s twentysomethings: John Badman IV, Lauren Brown, Jennifer Cuminale, Courtney and Nicole Fischer, and Peter Hansen. With educations at Greenwich Academy and the Convent of the Sacred Heart—or the Kent School and Phillips Academy Andover—futures were forged. Lauren commuted to the School of American Ballet before a career as a dancer; Jennifer works at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Talent in bloom, like the daffodils that paint Greenwich in spring. —EQB


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Dressed in J.McLaughlin, Peter beckons down to Courtney, wearing a Ralph Lauren dress, a J.McLaughlin belt, and Milly for Sperry Top-Sider shoes, and Nicole, wearing a top and pants by Ralph Lauren with Stuart Weitzman shoes. Also featured, a 1938 Jaguar courtesy of Malcolm Pray of Pray Body Shop.

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Jennifer, wearing a dress by Milly and shoes by Delman Shoes, is pushed on a swing by John, outfitted in J.McLaughlin. Opposite page: In a shirt by Ralph Lauren and shorts by Vineyard Vines, Peter plays football with Lauren, wearing Tibi.


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Jennifer is dressed in a Tibi top, J.McLaughlin pants, and Milly for Sperry Top-Sider shoes. Opposite page: Nicole wears a dress and belt by J.McLaughlin while her sister, Courtney, wears a dress by Lilly Pulitzer with shoes by Delman Shoes. Assistant: Stefan Doyno. Styling by Warren Tricomi in Greenwich (203.863.9300). Ten-acre property at 747 Riversville Road listed for $4.15 million by Prudential Brad Hvolbeck Real Estate (203.661.5505). JUNE 2012 91


PREP SCHOOLS BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN


T H E B RU N SW I C K S C H O O L

CO U RT E S Y O F G R E E N W I C H AC A D E MY;

GREENWICH ACADEMY’S MOTTO—“Toward the Building

of Character”—demonstrates a commitment to educating students in a variety of areas, academically and otherwise. Subscribing similarly, the Brunswick School endeavors to groom the “whole boy” into a person with purpose. Its motto? “Courage, Honor, Truth.” The Brunswick School and Greenwich Academy—two singlesex schools located in Greenwich, Connecticut, with students from pre-kindergarten to 12th grade—teach boys and girls, respectively, emphasizing the benefits of a holistic education. Excellence is more than academic achievement. Serving their community by cultivating the interests of its

children, both schools enjoy a responsibility that is rooted in the history of the town. In 1827, Greenwich Academy was founded by members of the Congregational Church to educate boys and girls. It wasn’t until 1900 that George Carmichael, a teacher at Greenwich Academy, started the Brunswick School, “ably and generously preparing boys for life.” By 1913, Greenwich Academy had reconceived itself as a single-sex institution, establishing its role as a “sister school” to the Brunswick School. This page: The lower, middle, and upper schools of the Brunswick School in the Smith Garden, circa 1960. Opposite page: Katherine Zierleyn, a head of Greenwich Academy, with her dog and students, circa 1965. JUNE 2012 93


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percent of whom receive financial aid. Nearby, the Brunswick School rests on three campuses, spanning 118 acres, where students participate in sixteen varsity and eighteen sub-varsity sports (Go Bears!). 929 boys are enrolled, 16.7 percent of whom receive financial aid. Residents of Greenwich, Connecticut, commute into the city for many reasons, like work. But with Brunswick School and Greenwich Academy, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no need to travel for schooling.

CO U RT E S Y O F G R E E N W I C H AC A D E MY

Today the relationship between the schools, flourishing from a shared curriculum from 9th grade to 12th grade, serves to further enrich the academic, arts, and athletic programs offered at the institutions. At Greenwich Academy, a 39-acre campus is furnished with facilities like the Raether Athletic Center with five squash courts (Go Gators!) and the Wallace Performing Arts Center with the 400-seat Massey Theater. 802 girls are encrolled, 20


CO U RT E S Y O F T H E B RU N SW I C K S C H O O L

Both institutions encourage boys and girls to become men and women of substance through rigorous programs and a moral grounding that, together, successfully build character. u

This page, clockwise from top: Middle-school students participate in class at the Brunswick School; a group of Brunswick boys; students gather beneath the words: “With All Thy Getting, Get Understanding”; the Brunswick insignia features the school’s motto, “Courage, Honor, Truth.” Opposite page, clock-

For more information on the Brunswick School at 100 Maher Avenue, call 203.625.5800 or visit brunswickschool.org. For more information on Greenwich Academy at 200 North Maple Avenue, call 203.625.8900 or visit www.greenwichacademy.org.

wise from top left: A teacher interacts with lower-school students at Greenwich Academy, circa 1960; middle-school students learn how to use computers; G.A. girls playing basketball, circa 1960; a class picture, circa 1970; G.A. plays against another team in lacrosse, circa 1980.


CONNECTICUT CLASSICS BY DANIEL CAPPELLO SINCE THE ESTABLISHMENT of Wadia Associates over thirty years ago, Dinyar Wadia and his dedicated team of designers, based in New Canaan, Connecticut, have earned a reputation for designing and building high-end homes, gardens, and interiors. While loyal to the classical language of architecture, Wadia’s finely detailed residences display a remarkable versatility and adaptability. As such, Wadia has been recognized as a New Classicist who’s known for exacting detailing, use of fine materials, and exceptional workmanship. While Wadia eschews the notion of a signature style, choosing instead to tailor his projects to the individual settings at hand and to the preferences of his clients, his design philosophy nevertheless manages to emphasize the A Queen Anne-style home in Greenwich. This page: The house’s front façade, which is typical of the Queen Anne style; the master bedroom features a threearched opening, reminiscent of those found in Venice, and inspired by the owner’s visit to the Doge’s Palace in Venice. Opposite page: A wonderfully intimate circular reading room is located on the landing of the entrance tower.

D U R S TA N S AY LO R

as seen from Long Island Sound, features a variety of architectural elements,


The scenic beauty of Greenwichâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mid-country sets the stage for the formal grandeur of a magnificent brick-and-limestone Georgian country estate. Above: The garden loggia was fabricated from limestone and includes Doric columns that complement the Georgian architecture of the house. 98 QUEST


J O N AT H A N WA LLE N

The interior of this Georgian country estate in Greenwich, Connecticut is equally as grand as its majestic exterior. The ample dimensions and luxurious details of the principal rooms bestow an enviable elegance everywhere. Above: An axial view from the living room through to the dining room. JUNE 2012 99


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limestone Georgian country estate inspired by the owners’ preference for something tasteful and conservative on the one hand, yet grand enough on the other to accommodate the largescale entertaining needs for the philanthropic and fund-raising work that the family is associated with. In keeping with traditional Georgian style, the front façade is elegant yet restrained, boasting relatively little ornamentation with the exception of limestone accents for the quoins, window surrounds, and entrance portico. The rear portico is harmoniously proportioned and given further emphasis by limestone pilasters and columns. A freestanding pool house connects visually with the main house in material and design. Meanwhile, the interior of the house is equally grand, offering ample dimensions, mahogany balusters, and other details like antique stone fireplaces procured from England—all of which relate to the exterior’s period and grandeur and prove that, once again, whether large or small, inside or out, the beauty of a Wadia design is in every last well-thought-out detail. u

J O N AT H A N WA LLE N

relationship between the home and its surrounding landscape. Nowhere is this philosophy better exemplified than in two large-scale projects that Wadia completed in the naturally beautiful surroundings of Greenwich, Connecticut. In one, a Queen Anne-style home framed between huge oak trees on the Long Island Sound, Wadia and his team took advantage of the extraordinary axial vista that is on display through oversized windows that grace each of the rooms facing the water. The home, built in the late 19th century and completely gutted and renovated by Wadia over a decade ago, has the great fortune of being nestled on a peninsula that juts out into the surrounding water. The house was designed to be deliberately asymmetrical: Anchoring one end of the front of the house is a circular tower enclosing the main entrance and an intimate reading room; the other end of the front façade features a projecting gable with oriel windows. And windows play a key role throughout, taking advantage of the stunning water views at every turn. In another project, Wadia managed to design a brick-and-


This page: The formal dining room features an Adam-esque ceiling, faux-painted marble pilasters, and an antique marble fireplace. Opposite page: Featuring the same materials and details as the rest of the estate, the pool house visually connects to the main house.


GREENWICH AVENUE Over the years, Greenwich Avenue in Greenwich, Connecticut, has evolved. Once lined with mom-and-pop stores, the strip plays host to everything from Apple to Saks Fifth Avenue. Still, the mile or so maintains its character by serving as a place where residents stroll on weekends, browsing the stores and lunching on crĂŞpes at Meli-Melo. BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN WITH MEGAN MALLOY

Clockwise from top: Woolworthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, circa 1960; Greenwich refuses to install stoplights on the Avenue, so policemen direct traffic at intersections; a strip of storefronts near the bottom of the Avenue, circa 1950.

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RALPH LAUREN 265 Greenwich Avenue 203.869.2054 Ralph Lauren reopened on Greenwich Avenue in November 2009, relieving shoppers of the back-and-forth between Richard’s of Greenwich and Saks Fifth Avenue when buying the brand. The store is an impressive addition to the strip, featuring a façade that is reminiscent of the Ralph Lauren flagship located at 888 Madison Avenue in New York. From Blue Label to Black Label, the brand speaks to American style, from its prairie-inspired runways to its cotton polo shirts. Looking for something a little younger? Venture to Rugby at 195 Greenwich Avenue (203.861.7053) for Ralph Lauren’s prep school-inspired brand.

J.CREW 126 Greenwich Avenue 203.661.5181 With the mailing of a catalog in 1983, J.Crew started offering comfortable, classic clothing. The brand has expanded ever since, incorporating accessories and more through collaborations with brands like Alden, Lulu Frost, and Timex. Known for its luxurious basics, J.Crew has outfitted icons from Olivia Wilde to Reese Witherspoon—and even Michelle Obama, who is lionized for embodying J.Crew’s aesthetic of elegance and quality chic. Throughout the year, residents flock to the store for everything from back-to-school to swimsuit season. Looking for something a little hipper? Venture to Madewell at 256 Greenwich Avenue (203.661.1591), a J.Crewowned brand that was originally founded in 1937.

TIFFANY & CO.

CO U RT E S Y O F T H E G R E E N W I C H H I S TO R I C A L S O C I E T Y

140 Greenwich Avenue 203.661.7847 Whatever the clock above the storefront says, it’s time for breakfast—or lunch, or dinner—at Tiffany’s. Since 1837, Tiffany & Co. has been recognized as the gold standard in jewelry and fine gifts. Tiffany & Co. has fueled the imaginations of American literary giants and Hollywood icons, with a name that’s synonymous with luxury, elegance, and old-world sophistication. A piece from Tiffany & Co. is less decoration and more a symbol of keeping company with society. Don’t pass on the immaculate silverware, glimmering crystal, and tantalizing fragrances, lest the world-renowned diamonds shine too brightly.


BETTERIDGE JEWELERS 117 Greenwich Avenue 203.869.0124 In 1897, A.E. Betteridge started Betteridge Jewelers, saying, “If you sell the best and do what’s best for your customers, people will want to buy jewelry from you.” A century and five generations of leadership later, the company continues to subscribe to the words of its founder. Offering fine estate and designer jewelry, new and pre-owned watches, and engagement rings, Betteridge Jewelers sells pieces that serve to mark the occasions of a lifetime—with a bit sparkle, of course!

LILLY PULITZER 92 Greenwich Avenue 203.661.3136 When Lilly Pulitzer opened a juice stand in Palm Beach, she constructed colorful shift dresses from curtain material with the idea of concealing the stains from citrus fruits. But when Jackie Kennedy—a classmate of Lilly Pulitzer’s at the Chapin School—was photographed on vacation wearing one of the designs, the brand soared in popularity and became a must-have. Today, the sun-splashed, vibrant prints are a mainstay from the shores of Palm Beach to the lawns of Greenwich. Whether you’re dressed in a bubble hem with hot-pink zebras or a whimsical pair of capris, it’s easy to see why Lilly Pulitzer is the “unofficial uniform of the affluent at play.”

STUART WEITZMAN 120 Greenwich Avenue 203.622.5036 After 30 years of designing shoes, Stuart Weitzman is welcomed on Greenwich Avenue. From flats to pumps to wedges, the brand is known for breathing new life into classic looks. A one-stop shop for footwear, Stuart Weitzman showcases shoes that always look stunning, whatever the occasion. Shoppers would be remiss to forgo an opportunity to indulge in some of the other items from the brand, like its collection of handbags. Whether it’s a clutch or a carryall, don’t forget to match with your shoes!


VINEYARD VINES 145 Greenwich Avenue 203.661.1803 Shep and Ian Murray, founders of Vineyard Vines, said, “You can still make a living doing something you love with people you like. You just have to give two weeks notice.” The rest is history, and Vineyard Vines ties remain firmly situated as the coolest, most personal styles for guys to wear. The collection has since expanded to include casual wear for both men and women, as well as their incredibly popular line of tote bags, a must-have on college campuses and beaches alike. The brothers returned to their roots and founded their Greenwich Avenue store in 2005 to overwhelming success, expanding ever since to locations wherever other blue-blooded shoppers reside.

J. MCLAUGHLIN 45 East Putnam Avenue 203.862.9777 In 1977, J.McLaughlin was founded on the Upper East Side, building a repution on its fine tailoring. Prints inspired by American themes like architecture and sailing lend the classic looks an extra layer of polish and panache. J.McLaughlin variates wonderfully on the preppy theme—their playful embroidered chino shorts and patterned swim trunks for men are a summer staple in any gentleman’s closet; equestrian-style halter dresses and sleek skirts are sure to be this summer’s standard attire. You won’t be able to leave the East Putnam location without picking up a new outfit to wear while strolling down Greenwich Avenue.

SORAB & ROSHI 30 West Putnam Avenue 203.869.5800 Sorab Bouzarjomehri and Roshi Ameri founded their eponymous jewelry company, Sorab & Roshi, in 1988. The brand has earned its illustrious reputation due the individual attention and detail paid to each of their pieces. This year’s collection features a number of stunning pieces, including a gold and carved coral necklace that just begs to be worn out after a day on the beach. With their idiosyncratic style and materials of the highest quality, Sorab & Roshi will be serving up statement pieces to Greenwich denizens for generations to come.


IN A LEAGUE OF ITS OWN

BY DARRELL HARTMAN

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A LL I M A G E S CO U RTE S Y O F A S S O U L I N E

Sylvia Morris, photographed exiting Pyne Hall dormitory by Alfred Eisenstaedt (Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images), was one of the first 101 female students admitted to Princeton when it went co-ed in 1969. Opposite: Iconic Blair Hall, Princeton’s first collegiate Gothic dormitory, photographed by Lee Snider (Corbis).

WITH SCHOOL OUT FOR SUMMER, perhaps it’s an even better moment to consider the elite consortium of universities known as the Ivy League. So named more than half a century ago because they’d been around long enough for the vines to proliferate around the walls, these hallowed Northeast institutions have opened their gates over the years to a select few only—which has only served to magnify them in American mythology. Quest’s own Daniel Cappello takes this prestige seriously, but he’s also been inside the gates. In his sumptuous new book for Assouline, The Ivy League, Cappello embraces the romance of these bastions of academic excellence and, yes, to an extent still, of privilege. At the same time, he resists the tendency people sometimes have to lump them into the same big category. As a Harvard grad, he knows better. As much as alums of these schools think of themselves—or, perhaps JUNE 2012 107


Clockwise, from top left: An aerial view of Dartmouth College in autumn (Randy Wells/Getty); tennis team members from Yale’s residential Jonathan Edwards College, circa 1940 (Manuscripts & Archives, Yale University); the residential area of Harvard University with views of Eliot House, Lowell House, and Adams House (and their towers), circa 1989 (Phil Schermeister/Corbis); a 1936 image of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Jr., as an undergraduate at Harvard College (GammaKeystone/Getty Images); Yale undergraduates playing pool, circa 1962 (Manuscripts & Archives, Yale University); Cornell University’s McGraw Tower and Uris Library in the springtime, 2001 (Cornell University, University Photography); four undergraduates hanging out in a dormitory room at Dartmouth College, circa 1950, embody the midcentury notion of the Ivy League as a place for “drinking whisky and pondering higher questions,” as a British observer once characterized it.


Above: John F. Kennedy, Jr., chats with a classmate at his June 6, 1983, graduation ceremony at Brown University, where he received a Bachelor of Arts in History (Bettmann/Corbis). Kennedy is often cited as part of Brown’s explosive popularity as a “hip” Ivy in the 1980s—a reputation that continues through today. “They will say that John wasn’t responsible for it—that he was part of the trend toward Brown’s growing popularity—but he really put it on the map,” says a faculty member from the 1980s. Below: The cover jacket of The Ivy League, by Daniel Cappello, published by Assouline. Opposite: A graduate pauses for a moment of reflection during the June 1, 1960, commencement exercises at Columbia University, which Cappello dubs “The Urbane Ivy” in his book (Bettmann/Corbis).

more often, are thought of—as “Ivy Leaguers,” society and selfdefinition at the Elite Eight, as at most colleges, are played out on smaller turf. Like the students of tender age within them, the schools have largely become what they are through rivalry and minute points of distinction: hence the hierarchy of eating clubs at Princeton, the web of “secret” societies at Yale, and (slightly less buttoned-up) the Greek traditions at Dartmouth that were unforgettably lampooned in Animal House. These are, in the end, specific places, and Cappello relates arcane traditions and bits of campus lore from each to assemble the pieces (which are great fun to read) into compelling profiles. He labels Brown “The Hip Ivy,” Yale “The Classic Ivy,” and notes that Cornell is, significantly, the only one of the eight to have been co-ed from the beginning. Film, like history and literature and famous grads, plays a large part in shaping what you might call the persona of each school. Just as there is no Animal House about Harvard, there is (to the school’s chagrin, surely) no Love Story set at the University of Pennsylvania. And it’s safe to say that part of Princeton will be tinged forever with the lyrical glow in which F. Scott Fitzgerald enveloped it in This Side of Paradise. Cappello has done the required reading and viewing; page through his book and you’re on your way to the same place. u Darrell Hartman, Yale Class of 2003, is a New York-based freelance writer. The Ivy League is available at assouline.com. 110 QUEST


“Collectively, the Ivy League might be seen as one of the most successful and singularly American brands, representing a shared standard of excellence.” —DANIEL CAPPELLO


POLO JOURNAL 2012 SEASON

Quest presents its fifth annual Polo Journal, and this year, we look at this ancient combat training game developed in Persia in its current form as it exists today, alive and well on the East Coast.

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This page: Female polo players in April 1924. Opposite page: The famous polo player R.L. Agassiz, mounted

LIB RA RY O F CO N GR ESS

and ready to play, circa 1913.

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POLO CLUBS

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BRIDGEHAMPTON

CASA DE CAMPO

This year, the Bridgehampton Polo Club will host its 16th annual season of high-goal polo at Two Trees Farm. Running for six consecutive Saturdays, from July 21 to August 25, each match promises to be thrilling, with some of the greatest horsemen in the world competing in the coveted challenge. From the sidelines, tastemakers will be watching the exhilarating sport and the international polo star and Ralph Lauren model Nacho Figueras, who is now a partner in Bridgehampton Polo Club with cofounder and owner Peter Brant. Last season, the club made some changes and promises to be more understated than in years past, with a more family-oriented environment.

With three playing fields, one practice field, and the largest string of polo ponies under a single brand, Casa de Campoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s polo facilities are among the best in the world. Equipment, group instruction, and personalized training are available for players of all levels. Guests can hire ponies for stick-and-ball sessions, practice games, and tournaments. Groups of friends and family members compete against one another in matches held each week. The main polo season with tournaments is held between December and April, although polo is played year-round. National and international tournaments are organized throughout the year and all rated teams and players are encouraged to enter.

For more information, visit bhpolo.com.

For more information, visit casadecampo.com.do.

LI BR ARY O F CO N GR ESS (ILLUSTR AT I ON S) / CO URTE SY O F B R ID GE H AM PTO N P O LO CLU B, C A SA D E C AMPO

Q U E S T P O L O J O U R N A L 2 012


POLO CLUBS

CO URTESY O F GR EE N WI CH PO LO CLUB , I N TERN AT I ON A L P OLO C LUB

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GREENWICH

WELLINGTON

Established in 1981, the prestigous Greenwich Polo Club is nestled in the beautiful backcountry of Greenwich, Connecticut. Internationally recognized for its legendary teams and roster of notable high-goal players, Greenwich Polo Club hosts public USPA high-goal polo matches on Sundays in June, July, and September. Peter Brant’s White Birch is the club’s home team and one of the most successful in U.S. polo history. Victories for the franchise include capturing its first U.S. Open Polo Championship in 2005, which was the team’s 31st title at the 26-goal level or higher. White Birch has won more high-goal polo tournaments than any other single U.S. team in the past 25 years.

Located in the heart of South Florida’s legendary horse country, the International Polo Club is a world-class polo club designed by and for polo players. The 16-week season brought in an estimated 80,000 spectators and some of the world’s top polo players, including Aldolfo Cambiaso and Facundo Pieres, as well as throngs of special guests. The Nespresso 108th U.S. Open Polo Championship took place on April 22. At a sold-out Piaget Field, spectators watched a match between defending champions La Lechuza Caracas and Zacara. The final score was 10-8, with Sapo Caset of Zacara scoring five goals. Mike Azzaro was named MVP and Lydon Lea’s Lelani was named best playing pony.

For more information, visit greenwichpoloclub.com.

For information, visit internationalpoloclub.com.

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TEAM PROFILE Q U E S T P O L O J O U R N A L 2 012

TEAM QUEST

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Clockwise from top left: Team Quest raises their mallets; action on the field between Team Quest and Assouline's team; Team Quest victory; in hot pursuit; the Ambassador's Cup trophy held by John Klopp.

Assouline, and Quest took to the fields in a tournament that is played in part as an effort to revive this most genteel sport and foster relationships between players and the worldwide community of polo. (More than perhaps, to “win.” But winning has its privileges, and one of them is getting to gloat a bit. The Quest team won their bracket in a hard-fought match.) The weekend also featured plenty of off-field socializing, as is tradition in the hospitable community of Millbrook, with cocktail parties and organized dinners as well as clay pigeon shooting and other outdoor sporting activities. This year, Quest will take part in the 15th annual Mashomack International Polo Challenge as a team sponsor. We can’t predict who will end victorious this coming June, but we can say that “Team Quest” will be rooting for those on the field! u

CO U RTESY O F T H E M A SH O MACK P OLO C LUB

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“Team Quest” is a term affectionately used to describe the group of editors, designers, administrators, and managers who inhabit the offices of the 16th floor at 420 Madison Avenue. The phrase “Team Quest,” often seen on interoffice memos from the publisher to the staff, has become a nickname of sorts, fostering camaraderie and friendship. But back in September of 2010, a different “Team Quest” emerged on the bucolic polo fields in Pine Plains, New York. The event was the 71st annual Federation of International Polo’s Ambassador’s Cup that was played at the Mashomack Polo Club, near Rhinebeck, in Duchess County, New York. Vying for the trophy were eight teams, each comprised of two international players (hailing from Argentina, Costa Rica, Ecuador, France, Germany, Hungary, Peru, Italy, and Switzerland) and two local players, who generously provided the horses for the visiting players for the duration of the tournament. Over three crisp September days, teams from Berluti shoes, Hunter Boot, Hermès, Beretta, The Carlyle Hotel, Moncler,


PLAYER PROFILE Q U E S T P O L O J O U R N A L 2 012

CO URTESY O F T H E M A SH OM AC K P O LO CLU B

A PASSION FOR POLO Bruce Colley began playing polo at age 12. Today, he serves as an ambassador to the Federation of International Polo (FIP), the governing body of international polo with over 20,000 polo players worldwide and he was a past president of the Mashomack Polo Club in Pine Planes, New York. As an ambassador for the United States, Colley has played in over 20 countries including India, Iran, Morocco, the Philippines, Malaysia, Thailand, Dubai, Brazil, Uruguay, Ecuador, Mexico, Guatemala, Chile, Spain, France, Ireland, the U.K., Italy, and Canada (one of his personal goals is to play in every country in the world that has the sport). “Winston Churchill once said polo is the passport to the world,’ and so it has been for me,” begins Colley. “I have played with princes, sultans, and maharajas around the world. But no matter who they are, when you are on a horse, charging down a field, enjoying the thrill of the game, you all become equal. It is this momentary bond that builds strong friendships, despite different customs, languages, and lands. The bond you share becomes an ongoing camaraderie

From left: Bruce Colley aboard his favorite mare Teresa, named for his wife Teresa Colley; Colley, a U.S. ambassador for the United States to the Federation of International Polo, takes a break between chukkas.

that, no matter who the winner or loser of any match is, you enjoy each other’s company and regale the near misses and mighty accomplishments of the game.” Colley has ambitions for polo, including bringing the sport back to the Olympics (the last games were Berlin, 1936). Most recently, Colley has been asked to chair International Junior Polo, with players aged 10-17. “Personally it’s exciting because my 12year-old son Davis, has just returned from his first international competition in Guatemala. One of my first challenges is to select a Junior Team U.S.A. to represent us in China in 2012.” But it is the strength of character that a sport like polo demands that keeps Colley so invigorated. “A man’s demeanor and sportsmanship on the field help to define their being. Because it can’t be disguised, the true person comes through.” u

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POLO CHALLENGE

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On June 16, over 500 polo enthusiasts will gather on the pastoral hilltop of the Mashomack Polo Club for the 15th annual Mashomack International Polo Challenge, sponsored by Nespresso. The day begins with a Moët & Chandon champagne reception sponsored by La Martina and followed by a tented fieldside luncheon chaired by Teresa and Bruce Colley, Karen and John Klopp, and Parker Thorne. The luncheon has come to mark the beginning of the social season for the Millbrook community. Children who attend will find their own activities, including the International Parade of Flags and a petting zoo, promising a

wonderful country day for families. But the real action will take place on the field with teams representing India, Italy, and the U.S. battling for the coveted cup and accompanying country pride. “We have the great honor of hosting His Highness The Maharaja Sawai Padmanabh Singh and welcoming the royal family,” says John Klopp. “Maharaj Narendra Singh will play for the dashing Team India, sponsored by Vikram Chatwal Hotels.” The American Teams are sponsored by The Carlyle, A Rosewood Hotel and Quest. Sponsored by Castello di Vicarello, the Italian team will be defending their title as cup

champions. Heather Croner Real Estate Sotheby’s International Realty will give the award for Best Playing Pony, while Catherine Malandrino will present the Mathias Guerrand Hermès MVP Award. Other sponsors include Casa Dragones, One Moon, and What2WearWhere.com. A portion of the proceeds will support local charities, including the Foundation for the Pine Plains Community and Center and Library, Inc. and the Pine Plains Fire Hose & Rescue Company. u For more information, please visit mashomackpolo.com or contact Lindsay Baldwin at lindsaybaldwin@aol.com.

CO U RTESY O F MA SH O M AC K P O LO CLUB

The Mashomack Polo Club hosts its 15th annual International Polo Challenge


This page, clockwise from top left: Bruce Colley takes the ball down the field; the Hunter Boot team, 2010; the Maharaja of Jaipur will play this year; Carlo Baccheschi Berti with the Castello di Vicarello team; before the throw-in with the referees; teams of the Mashomack International Challenge; Agucho Zavaleta celebrating a goal. Opposite page: the royal family of Jaipur will attend this year.

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APPEARANCES

RACING DREAMS

BY HILARY GEARY

LOVE IS THE AIR in Palm Beach because,

a few weeks ago, the beautiful Katherine Bryan quietly married Damon Mezzcappa. We are all so very happy for them both! Spring fever is in the air, too. It is contagious, really—an epidemic—and everyone has it in New York City! Come May, 122 QUEST

the city generates energy like no other place in the world. The pace is ferocious! It seems like the whole world descends upon the Big Apple to enjoy the beauty and take part in all kinds of activities, auctions, dinners, benefits, parties, and more. If you need any convincing, which

I doubt you do, take a stroll in Central Park as it is truly in its prime, filled with flowers, families, tourists, and more. One of the rites of spring is the Central Park Frederick Law Olmstead awards luncheon (a.k.a. the “hats” luncheon). This sold-out event celebrates the park and all

C H U R C H I LL D O W N S ( R AC E )

This page, from left: John Hendrickson and Marylou Whitney at the Derby; the running of the 138th Kentucky Derby at Churchill Downs.


of its supporters, and, it is truly a fashion show. You will see ladies wearing chapeauxs by Suzanne, Eric Javits, and other designers. Ever chic, best-dressed writer Amy Fine Collins was a stand-out in a hat by Aaron Keppel inspired by a René Magritte painting. Speaking of Amy, her pal Francie Whittenberg toasted Amy’s birthday at a luncheon at La Grenouille in the private dining room upstairs. The dining room is the exquisite double-height sun-flooded former studio of the artist Bernard LaMotte with a fireplace and bookcases. This fabled setting was adorned by all the fabulous flowers that you will only find in this grand dame of a restaurant. The room was filled with Amy’s fans and we were treated to famed pianist Peter Duchin on the piano, while we

of 75 acres filled with all kinds of wildlife such as beautiful scarlet ibises, pink flamingos, and more. It is dotted with heavenly “cottages” to stay in and a big fabulous staff to take care of you. (As you know, the main building is being rebuilt because it was struck by lightning last winter.) There are numerous beautiful beaches; a freshwater, rock-edged, swimming pool that is free-form like a lagoon with bridges; and a jacuzzi right on the beach. There are also two floodlit tennis courts and windsurfing and kite-surfing, as well as sailing, fishing, kayaks, water skiing, snorkeling, and paddle boarding. We spent the days playing tennis, sailing, and more, while at night we dined by a bonfire on the beach. Pure heaven! Back to New York City to head right

her life at the fund-raiser. One of her greatest fans, Elton John, sang praises of Evelyn and also captivated the audience with his beautiful voice and wonderful songs. Among the fans were Leonard Lauder and his family plus Amy and John Griffin, Michael Kors, Erin Lauder, Joanne Stewart, Myra Biblowit, Delphine and Reed Krakoff, Joanne and Roberto de Guardiola, Jackie and Ken Duberstein, Aliyya Stude, Jamie Niven, Gail and Alfred Engelberg, Marianna and George Kaufman, Bill Bernard, and more. The next weekend, it was off to the races with Karen and Richard LeFrak. Well, hey, not just any old race, the one and only Kentucky Derby, as guests of Marylou Whitney and John Hendrickson. It was a thrill to watch and, of course, to bet on the races, sip

This page, from left: Harriet Weintraub, Lee Robinson, and Prince Dimitri of Yugoslavia; Sir Richard Branson.

dined on risotto, sole with vegetables, and birthday cake—heaven! In between all the action we popped down for the weekend to Necker Island in the British Virgin Islands as guest of Sir Richard Branson and his wife, Joan. This glorious private island is an oasis

to a glowing pink ballroom at the Waldorf for the Breast Cancer Research Foundation dinner honoring the late, beloved Evelyn Lauder. The world adored Evelyn, a woman who was everything you would want to be: kind, intelligent, beautiful, generous, and wise. They celebrated

mint juleps, and take in the colorful crowd. I spotted such pals as Blaine Trump, Steve Simon, Alexandra Kotur, Jonathan Becker, Peter Lyden, Prince Dimitri of Yugoslavia, Whitney Tower, Harriet Weintraub, Becca Thrash, and about 150,000 other fans! u JUNE 2012 123


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THE YOUNG & THE GUEST LIST As flowers—and floral dresses—bloom, so does our columnist’s calendar! This month, she raised a glass of champagne for causes like the Adeona Foundation at the Roseland Ballroom and the Boys’ Club of New York at the Gramercy Park Hotel. BY ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN

A group of girls at the Adeona Foundation’s White Party at the Roseland Ballroom on May 11.

A


ANA Nora Zehetner and Alexa Chung after the Cinema Society screening of Virginia on May 15.

Alex Polkinghorn celebrated her birthday with Michael Carl at Grotto.

Jennifer Connelly stars in Virginia, which was screened at the Crosby Street Hotel.

Our columnist and Caroline Smith partied

BILLY FARRELL; PATRICK MCMULLAN

with Alex Polkinghorn on May 10.

Jean-Christophe, His Imperial Highness the Prince

Alixe Laughlin and David Chines supported

Napoleon, and Lotte Verbeek at the French Consulate.

the American Friends of the Louvre.

THE STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS are, really, the event of the season. Seriously, what tops the game when the Rangers tied the Capitals with 6.6 seconds to go, winning in overtime? Madison Square Garden exploded in red, white, and blue amazing-ness. And proceeds benefit a good cause—the New York Rangers. Henrik, Henrik, Henrik! On April 20, the Boys’ Club of New York hosted its “Spring Dance” event atop the Gramercy Park Hotel, with Silas Anthony, Zaneta Clark, Everett Cook, Billy Cooling, Lizzie Edelman, Barkley Hickox, Chris Lentz, Amelia Osborne, Alexandra Papanicolaou, and Stephen Sherill acting as chairs. Founded in 1876, the Boys’ Club of New York supports underprivileged children through programming, like summer camp. Guests including Sam Dangremond, Kate Elkin, Meggie Kempner, Sebastian Pinto-Thomaz, and Re-

becca Regan mixed and mingled over cocktails to the music of DJ Chelsea Leyland. On the 29th, Bent on Learning—an organization offering yoga to underprivileged children endorsed by Madonna, Gwyneth Paltrow, and Christy Turlington Burns—partied at Indochine. You know, everything was so balanced with a glass of Estancia in my right hand and French-Vietnamese hors d’oeuvres in my left hand. Totally, totally om. On May 3, I fêted Quest’s Daniel Cappello and The Ivy League (Assouline) at Gant Rugger at 25 Prince Street with Jeff Caldwell, Kristian Laliberte, Tripp Potter, Allie Schwartz, and Ben Fink Shapiro. The scene of pastels and plaid was pleasurable, and Instagrammable. Like! Later, the Cinema Society hosted a screening of Hick with Rory Culkin and Chloë Grace Moretz at the Crosby Street JUNE 2012 125


Hotel. The after-party, at Ken & Cook—a restaurant by Jean-Georges-ers—featured Emma Roberts, Amy Sacco, and Shaun White sipping Woodbridge sparkling wine. Maybe even a spritzer? On May 15, I celebrated Alex Polkinghorn’s twenty-sixth birthday at Grotto with Jack DeLigter, Mark Guiducci, Kate Pastorek, Amanda Meigher, and Christine Miranda. After an appetizer of wine and a main of wine—maybe a scallop or two, a chocolate confection from Magnolia Bakery was the icing on the, well, cake. Happy (belated) Birthday, Polky! Meanwhile, the Young Patrons Circle of the American Friends of the Louvre—an organization formalizing the relationship between Americans and the Musée du Louvre—held a gala at the French Consulate, raising $35,000 for the museum. (After the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Musée du Louvre is the museum that Americans visit most!) And the

through The Ivy League (Assouline); Trevor Cook and Douglas Brundage at Gant Rugger.

Cinema Society hosted a screening of Virginia with Grey Goose and Shiseido, attracting Lindsay Ellingson, Juliette Lewis, and Olivia Palermo to the Crosby Street Hotel. On the 11th, the Adeona Foundation’s White Party benefited the Reading Team at the Roseland Ballroom. Organizers included Griffin Bealle, Chad Burdette, Grant Hewit, Nolan Matthews, Chris Quick, Peter Smith, and Phil Theboult, all of whom assist disadvantaged children by supporting New York charities. What’s next? Oh, everything. From the Gordon Parks gala at MoMA on June 5 to an evening at the Central Park Zoo with the Wildlife Conservation Society on June 14, summer is anything but slow. Of course, I’ll be tweeting! For updates like who’s see-and-be-seen or what’s in the gift bag, follow me: @ElizabethQBrown. u

B I LLY FA R R E LL ; CO N N I E G LE D H I LL ; PAT R I C K M C M U LL A N ; S T E P H A N I E B A D I N I

YGL

Daniel Cappello and Alexandre Assouline, flipping


Justin de La Chapelle and Katie Boudria at the Boys’ Club of New York’s event at the Gramercy Park Hotel.

James Clarke, Andy DeWitt, and Dan Sullivan at the Boys’ Club of New York’s event at the Gramercy Park Hotel on April 20.

Annabel Tollman, Lilly Kwong, and Annelise Peterson at an event sponsored by Estancia.

Henley Vazquez, Alex Erdman, Monique Brendel, Amelia Osborne, and Brooke Pearson supported the Boys’ Club of New York on April 20.

Emma Roberts and Chloë Grace Moretz after the Cinema Society screening of Hick on May 3.

Greg Cohen, Colleen Conover, and Matt Cohen at the Gramercy Park Hotel on April 20.

Anne Mauldin, Alexandra Segalas, and Joan Payson

Jack Fornaciari and Jennifer Cuminale at

supported the Boys’ Club of New York on April 20.

the Gramercy Park Hotel on April 20. JUNE 2012 127


SNAPSHOT

The charming illustrations of Rollin McGrail. Clockwise from top: “Westchester Cup U.S.A. vs. England;” “Delusions;” “Hang

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IN THE SAME SPIRIT of humorist P.G.Wodehouse, the illustrations by Rollin McGrail rib upper-class foibles in a jocular fashion. A contemporary artist, her work has graced gallery walls from Paris to New York and has been featured in countless publications, including weekly columns in the New York Times and Washington Post. Tally-ho! — G.S.

For more information, please contact Chisholm Gallery at 845.505.1147 or visit chisholmgallery.com.

CO U RT E S Y O F C H I S H O L M G A LLE RY, LLC .

Tight;” Ladies Polo.”


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Quest June 2012