Page 1

Flag for display, A-3

Inside:

Vary your summer reading B-1 Wednesday, July 3, 2019

SEQUIM GAZETTE www

Sequim’s Hometown Newspaper

com

$1.00

Vol. 46, Number 27

History finds a new home Sequim Museum & Arts sets opening for 6,500-square-foot facility BY MICHAEL DASHIELL Sequim Gazette

It’s less than 10 days before the grand opening of Sequim Museum & Arts’ new facility, and Judy Reandeau Stipe is a flurry of activity inside more like a big band director than an executive director. “We’re working fifty hours

a week — we Sequim Museum & Arts grand opening d id n’t e ven do that when When: 11 a.m. Saturday, July 6 we were really Where: 544 N. Sequim Ave. working,” she More info: www.sequimmuseum.com, jokes. SequimMuseum@olypen.com, 360-683-8110 “It’s been a STIPE labor of love.” More than volunteers are on the cusp the Cowan Complex Center six years after joining the of finishing a long dreamt-of board, Stipe and a hoard of reception to officially open See MUSEUM, A-8

First

The new, 6,500-square-foot Sequim Museum & Arts building at 544 N. Sequim Ave. has a number of new features in addition to some of the artifacts on display at the building on West Cedar Street. Sequim Gazette photo by Michael Dashiell

Woodcock Road roundabout slated for 2021

cut of the season

Medsker Road striping likely for this summer BY MATTHEW NASH Sequim Gazette

A roundabout at Woodcock Road and Sequim-Dungeness Way seems likely for 2021, according to Clallam County leaders. Clallam County engineer Ross Tyler said the project is taking shape as part of the county’s six-year Transportation Improvement Program. “We’ve been kicking it around for a few years,” he said. Tyler said at this juncture Clallam County commissioners would need to be the ones to stop the project, but his indicators from them say to “get it done.” “There’s certainly those who would prefer stop lights,” Tyler said. “They were shocked to learn that it would cost $4 million (but) that’s the reality. It’s why Clallam County doesn’t have stop lights.” Family members work together to cut the first lavender of the year on June 26 at the B&B Family Farm. Sequim Gazette photos by Matthew Nash

Lavender harvest begins in Sequim

Abraham Torres carries an armful of bundles on June 26 at the B&B Family Farm where he and his family members harvest lavender and hang it in the farm’s barn.

SMS administrator to share principal position at Greywolf

BY MATTHEW NASH farm’s co-owner, said Sequim Gazette they’ll work together to harvest the lavender Lavender season is species for two to three upon us as local lav- days and hang it in ender farms begin to the farm’s barn. Hilharvest the first plants liker said he anticipates of the year. progressively harvestAt the B&B Fam- ing more species after ily Farm, 5883 Old the Sequim Lavender Olympic Highway, the Weekend at July 19-21. Torres family works toThis is the fourth gether to cut the farm’s year the Torres family first bundles of Fol- has worked together to gate lavender on June help harvest the farm’s 26. Zion Hilliker, the lavender.

BY CONOR DOWLEY Sequim Gazette

Sequim Middle School principal Vince Riccobene has been moved into a coprincipal role at Greywolf Elementary School alongside current Greywolf principal Donna Hudson for the 2019-2020

See ROADS, A-15

Signs of construction to continue in Sequim

Fir Street, Events Center and more tabbed for 2020 finish BY MATTHEW NASH Sequim Gazette

For 900-plus days, Sequim has been under construction — and that trend doesn’t look to change in 2020. City of Sequim staff recently revealed several big projects slated for 2020, ranging from the completion of the Guy Cole Events Center’s final remodel to continued road work on West Fir Street. The construction timeline follows the city’s current 6-year Capital Improvement Program, says City Engineer

school year. In an email sent to staff announcing the move on June 25, outgoing superintendent Gary Neal indicated that he was “excited” about the move. He also mentioned that the district anticipates the vacancy at the middle school being filled before staff return from their summer break.

See PROJECTS, A-9 Details of how exactly the district intends to have the co-principal situation at the elementary school work were not made available, and district officials declined to

See RICCOBENE, A-11

RICCOBENE

Arts & Entertainment B-1 • Business B-5 • Opinion A-12 • Obituaries A-14 • Schools B-7 • Sports A-7 • Classifieds C-1 • Crossword Section C

weather outlook: THURSDAY, JULY 4

▲70 ▼54 FRIDAY, JULY 5

▲72 ▼54 SATURDAY, JULY 6

▲75 ▼54

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A2 • Wednesday, July 3, 2019

SEQUIM GAZETTE

Sequim’s Patterson takes lead with Fire District 2 BY JESSE MAJOR

east of Port Angeles, not including the city itself. It has four active stations, including ones in Gales Addition, the Dry Creek area, the Black Diamond area and the Deer Park area. It has a fifth station near Lake Sutherland that has closed due to lack of volunteers in the area and is used for storage, he said. Another challenge Patterson expects to contend with is the shortage of volunteers that fire departments across the country face. In recent years the district added six career firefighters and typically has between 40 and 45 volunteer firefighters, but the number of calls the district faces continues to grow. Patterson said that ideally the district would have 60 volunteers. Fire and medical response calls grew from 979 in 2011 to 1,774 in 2018, climbing 81 percent. “It’s difficult to recruit and retain volunteers,” Patterson said. “Life gets in the way and the department is getting busier. Demand has been steadily increasing and it’s several times a day that they are getting called out.” Patterson said he is thankful for Phillips’ support and that his retirement is “well-deserved.” “I appreciate the opportunity Chief Phillips gave me a couple years ago,” Patterson said. “He has been supportive of me moving into this position.”

Olympic Peninsula News Group

Jake Patterson, who has spent most of his firefighting career in Clallam County, is taking charge of Clallam County Fire District 2 this week following the retirement of Chief Sam Phillips. “Jake is an extraordinary fire officer and I have the fullest confidence in his ability to take us to new levels in the fire district,” Phillips said on June 30. “I think he is going to serve the district well and I couldn’t have been happier to have someone working with me as I transition out.” Patterson, a Sequim resident, has been fighting fires since he started as a volunteer at the Port Angeles Fire Department in 1992. In 1994, the city of Richland hired him as a firefighter/EMT and he returned to Port Angeles as a career firefighter in 2000. In 2008 he was promoted to lieutenant. Clallam Fire District 2 hired Patterson in 2017 to serve as its deputy chief. Phillips said Patterson has earned a master’s degree in public administration and is in the final stages of the four-year Executive Fire Officer program at the National Fire Academy. Patterson, a former Marine, is looking forward to facing a number of challenges as he begins his tenure

Jake Patterson starts today as fire chief for Clallam County Fire District 2, succeeding Chief Sam Phillips after his retirement. Jesse Major/Olympic Peninsula News Group

as the district’s fire chief. “The fire district has done really well with managing its budget … but there are some big issues that no matter how well we prepare for and no matter how frugal we are with the public’s money, we’re going to need some help from the public,” Patterson said. He said the fire district needs to look at replacing its aging stations

and its aging vehicles, a multi-million dollar effort he said the district will likely ask voters to approve next year in the form of a bond. Exactly how much the district will ask for and exactly what the money would be used for is still in the works, he said. “Our fire stations were constructed over 60 years ago and with the expansion of our [advanced life

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support] program and addition of career staff, we have outgrown our facilities,” he said. “We’re in the early stages of planning and information gathering so that we have the complete package to present that the voters are comfortable with supporting.” The fire district covers 85 square miles, from East Beach Road at Lake Crescent to Deer Park Road

Date High Low Date June 25 June 26 June 27 June 28 June 29 June 30 July 1

70 67 61 68 68 75 73

MOON

Rainfall for June 25-July 1, 2019

July 9 July 16 July 24

1.06 inches of precipitation recorded. Rainfall recorded and reported at www.weather.com.

SUNRISE/SUNSET

WEATHER 45 48 54 53 51 51 54

July 3 July 4 July 5 July 6 July 7 July 8 July 9

Sunrise Sunset 5:17 a.m. 5:18 a.m. 5:19 a.m. 5:20 a.m. 5:20 a.m. 5:21 a.m. 5:22 a.m.

9:15 p.m. 9:14 p.m. 9:14 p.m. 9:13 p.m. 9:13 p.m. 9:12 p.m. 9:12 p.m.

TIDE CHARTS

First quarter Full moon Third quarter

These tides are corrected for Dungeness Bay.

Lavender andLace

July 3

2:39 a.m. 7.4

10:20 a.m. -2.8

6:27 p.m. 8.1

11:01 p.m. 6.0

July 4

3:29 a.m. 7.0

11:10 a.m. -2.8

7:06 p.m. 8.2

11:59 p.m. 5.8

July 5

4:26 a.m. 7.0

11:57 a.m. -2.5

7:46 p.m. 8.3

NA

July 6

NA

1:04 a.m. 5.3

5:31 a.m. 6.6

12:45 p.m. -1.7

July 7

NA

2:16 a.m. 4.7

6:43 a.m. 5.9

1:36 p.m. -0.7

July 8

NA

3:28 a.m. 3.8

8:07 a.m. 5.4

2:29 p.m. 0.5

July 9

NA

4:36 a.m. 2.8

9:47 a.m. 4.9

3:26 p.m. 1.9

Begin your celebration early & join us for our

Get home delivery.

Anniversary

Call 360-683-3311 •

THE LODGE

www.sequimgazette.com

Sequim Gazette

July 11th from 2 to 4 pm Grand Olympic Chorus performing 3-4 pm The Messengers performing 2-3 pm Resident’s Art will be on display 2-4 pm Gourmet desserts and lavender lemonade!

Imagine a World Where Mobility & Vitality are the Rule, not the Exception.

Visit our in-house businesses: The Hair Loft, Lodge Chiropractic, The Nail Cottage, and The Bistro!

ALLOW OUR TRAINED STAFF TO HELP YOU!

CHOOSE WHERE TO TAKE YOUR REFERRAL! CHOOSE FYZICAL! • Manual Therapy • State-of-the-Art Balance Training • Individualized Exercise • Juvent Therapy for Bone Health Prescription (Sequim Clinic) • Professional Grade Electrical • Massage Therapy also offered at Stimulation/TENS both locations

660 Evergreen Farm Way, Sequim, WA 98382

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IN PORT TOWNSEND: 1215 Lawrence Street, Suite 101 Phone: 360-385-1035 Fax: 360-385-4395 info@FYZICAL-PortTownsend.com

IN SEQUIM: 500 W. Fir Street, Suite A Phone: 360-683-0632 Fax: 360-681-5483 info@FYZICAL-Sequim.com

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SEQUIM GAZETTE

Wednesday, July 3, 2019 • A3

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PROPER DISPLAY OF THE U.S. FLAG

A4 • Wednesday, July 3, 2019 SEQUIM GAZETTE

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Wednesday, July 3, 2019 • A5

SEQUIM GAZETTE

COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFS County burn ban on through Oct. 1

Crane looms large over hotel expansion It may be temporary, but Blyn has its own kind of skyscraper. A 115-foot-tall tower crane via Idahobased Rocky Mountain Crane & Equipment Rental arrived last week, one the larger tools put to use in the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe’s $40 million hotel expansion at 7 Cedars Casino. Tim Cummings of the Sequim-based T&D Cont ract ing said his company is operating the crane, one that has a 148foot boom and almost 5,000 pounds in counter-weights. See a live web cam of the construction at www.7cedarsresort. com/hotel. Sequim Gazette photo by Michael Dashiell

cludes homemade pulled pork with brioche buns and barbecue sauce, baked beans, salad and cookies; a programonly fee is $5. RSVP by noon on Friday, July 5, at www.olympic newcomers.org or warren. newcomers@gmail.com, or by calling 630-992-5613.

Cost of the dance, hosted hosts an ice cream social were added to the program by a local nonprofit empow- from 5-7 p.m. Sunday, July after deadline for this week’s ering people with special 14, at 290 Macleay Road, Se- Art Wal preview (“First needs, is $8. Accompanying quim. Admittance is $6; cost Friday Art Walk awash in caregivers may attend for pays for either a banana split purple,” page B-1). free, though donations are or sundae. There are chocoForage Gifts & Northwest accepted to defray the costs. late, vanilla and strawberry Treasures, 121 W. WashingA light meal features hot swirl ice creams. Toppings ton St., will feature framed dogs, potato salad, fruit, include chocolate and caraprints and notecards by sugar free cookies and other mel sauce along with strawKeith Ross of Keith’s Frame desserts. Coffee, tea and wa- berries, pineapple, whipped Young Eagles topping, nuts and a cherry to of Mind during the Art ter will be available. to take flight The next dance is sched- top it off. Funds raised go to Walk. Come by to chat and EAA Chapter 430 hosts a uled for Aug. 10. the James Bischoff Family. see the beautiful eaglet Young Eagles program from For more information, visit For more information, call portraits. Evil Roy’s Elixirs Distill10 a.m.-2 p.m. on Saturday, www.clallammosaic.org. 360-582-0100. ery, 209 S. Sequim Ave., July 6, at the Sequim Valley Art Walk additions Airport, 468 Dorothy Hunt Serving up an hosts painter Tami Wall and ice cream social Lane. Two venues for the First Zorina Wolf with Village The event is open to youths The Sequim Prairie Grange Friday Art Walk Sequim Heartbeat Drummers. seeking to learn and experience flight from local, certificated pilots on 15- to 20-minute flights. Register at youngeagles day.org/?yedetail&event= 7TTY8TOVN. Call 877-322All Bedding Annuals are Buy One, Get One Free 0430, ext. 9, for more inforThe Farm Store will be open until mation.

Happy Independence Day! –JULY 4TH ONLY– 4pm on the 4th of July

Mosaic’s monthly dance set for July 13 An all-American celebration of red, white and blue is on tap at Clallam Mosaic’s monthly dance, set for noon2 p.m. on Saturday, July 13, at St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 510 E. Park Ave., Port Angeles.

23 $

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Clallam County Burn Restrictions are in effect and run through Oct. 1, 2018, unless conditions warrant an earlier closure, county fire marshal Annette Warren said last week. The restriction applies to all outdoor burning except recreational fires used for pleasure, religious, ceremonial, warmth, cooking or similar purposes. Recreational fires are permitted unless further banned by extreme weather conditions. Note: Recreational fires are limited to 3 feet in diameter, 2 feet in height. Fires for debris disposal are not legal under any circumstances and are not considered recreational, fire officials said. Warren said that if conditions arise the restrictions may be upgraded to a “high fire danger” that would prohibit all outdoor burning — including recreational fires. The exception is within the Olympic National Park and other controlled campgrounds. For more information, call All species are closed to Clallam County Fire District harvesting in Sequim Bay, 3 (Sequim) at 360-683-4242 however, and Discovery Bay or see www.clallam.net. is closed to butter and vanish clams. Thrift shop is All species means clams open Saturday (including geoduck), oysters, The Sequim Dungeness mussels and other inverHospital Guild’s Thrift shop tebrates such as the moon at 204 W. Bell St. is open 11 snail. All areas are closed for a.m.-3 p.m. on Saturday, July the sport harvest of scallops. 6. Featured will be a large These closures do not apply vehicle cargo pet barrier, to shrimp. 95-piece set of Wedgewood For more information China with ”wild flower” pat- about the closure, call the tern and a large oak dining Shellfish Safety Hotline at table with six chairs and four 800-562-5632, or visit the leaves. Summer fashions Department of Health’s for all, unusual jewelry, de- Shellfish Safety Website at signer handbags and more www.doh.wa.gov/shellfish round out the inventory. All safety. white-tagged items are halfprice. Call 360-683-7044 for Newcomers to meet information. The Olympic Newcomers’ Club members meet for the County closes some club’s monthly luncheon at shellfish harvesting noon on Tuesday, July 9, at Recreational shellfish The Cedars at Dungeness’ harvesting is closed from Legends Room, 1965 WoodDungeness westward to Low cock Road. Point/Lyre River, the ClalThe guest speaker is Chris lam County Department of Fidler, Executive Director of Health and Human Services the Port Angeles Waterfront announced last week. Center. He will present plans There is no closure to and describe the impact on harvesting from the Strait of the arts and local economy Juan de Fuca from Cape Flat- created by the venture. tery to Lyre River/Low Point, Socializing starts at 11:30 and no closure in Dungeness a.m. Bay. Lunch costs $21 and in-

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A6 • Wednesday, July 3, 2019

SEQUIM GAZETTE

July 2019 City Web site: www.sequimwa.gov

Meeting dates & locations

SEQUIM NEWS Office Hours: Monday - Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Sanitary Sewer Smoke Testing to Take Place

City Council Regular Meeting

Council Chambers 2nd & 4th Monday • 6:00 p.m.

City Council Work Session

Council Chambers (when required) 2nd & 4th Monday • 5:00 p.m.

Planning Commission

Parks, Arbor & Recreation Board

Community Conference Room 3rd Monday • 5:00 p.m. No Meeting in July

Lodging Tax Advisory Committee

Community Conference Room Quarterly - Next meeting August 23 • 10:00 a.m.

Arts Advisory Commission Community Conference Room 3rd Monday • 3:00 p.m.

Welcome New Employees! Andrew Wagner Police Officer, June 17 William Langevin, Management Intern, June 17 Jacob Carlson, Stormwater Project GIS Intern, June 21 Katie Cole, Associate Engineer, June 24

THE ANNUAL WATER QUALITY REPORT IS COMPLETE.

The City of Sequim will be testing the sanitary sewers with smoke to find defects, breaks, leaks, and faulty connections in the sewer system. The tests will occur July 8-12 on South 3rd Avenue, Norman, Eunice and Reservoir Streets as well as South 7th Avenue from Cherry Blossom to Jara Way. Residents will be notified by door hanger prior to testing in their neighborhood. The smoke has no odor, is non-toxic, non-staining, does not create a fire hazard, and will dissipate in a few minutes. To learn more about the sanitary sewer smoke testing program visit https://www.sequimwa.gov.

Coffee with the Mayor Meet Mayor Dennis Smith at Coffee with the Mayor on Thursday, July 25 at 8:30 a.m. at the Black Bear Diner, 1471 East Washington St. Communications and Marketing Director Barbara Hanna will join the Mayor. Each month the Mayor will be availMayor able at a published location to Comm & Mktng Dennis Smith Director Barbara meet with anyone who wants to Hanna chat, ask questions, express a concern, or make a comment about the City or the community.

Congratulations to Assistant City Manager Charisse Deschenes

To read the report, please visit www.sequimwa.gov

Wildfire Season is Approaching

During the summer months, the Olympic Peninsula air quality can be affected by wildfires in the Northwest. The Washington State Department of Health has valuable information on how to protect yourself and your family from harmful conditions when the air quality is poor. Visit their website at www.doh. wa.gov for more information.

Asst. City Manager Charisse Deschenes

Charisse graduated from the inaugural Northwest Women’s Leadership Academy on June 7 along with 31 other women throughout the state. The academy is conducted by the Washington City/County Management Association with the purpose of preparing and promoting more women into leadership roles in local government. Additionally, Charisse completed a weeklong Senior Executive Institute Training on June 8.

Thank You Sequim Police Department for Participating in the May 29 Torch Run to Benefit Special Olympics!

To learn more about the drought, please visit the City of Sequim website at www.sequimwa.gov.

WATER SAVING TIP OF THE MONTH In the Garden: TIME TO GO BROWN.

Don’t fret over your dry lawn in the summer. Much like the autumn leaves turn color and trees and shrubs go dormant each fall, grass goes dormant each summer. The grass will come back to life with the fall rains just like the trees and shrubs do each spring. The taller the turf, the deeper the roots. And the deeper the roots the healthier the plant. Remember: Deep, infrequent water encourages deeper roots. Frequent, shallow watering encourages shallow roots.

Upcoming Public Hearings July 8: 1) Approving Mid-Year 2019 Budget Amendments 2) Burrowes Properties Boundary Line Adjustment and Rezone 3) Littlejohn Employee Housing Major Binding Site Plan July 22: 1) 6-Year Transportation Improvement Plan 2) 6-Year Capital Improvement Program 3) Legacy Ridge Major Preliminary Subdivision

The meetings are held at the Civic Center located at 152 W. Cedar Street.

Council Chambers 1st & 3rd Tuesday 6:00 p.m.

Telephone: 360-683-4139

Back: Officer Carolee Edwards, Sergeant Sean Madison, Chief Sheri Crain, Officer Paul Dailidenas with K-9 Officer Mamba. Front: Executive Assistant Tiffany Banning and Officer Stephanie Benes. Not pictured: Officer Kindryn Leiter.

IN THE GALLERY “THE BEACH” EXHIBIT JULY 5 - SEPT. 30

Please join us for the opening reception on Friday, July 5 from 5:00 to 8:00 p.m. Art Talk on the Art Walk Join the City Arts Advisory Commission for the popular Art Talk on the Art Walk lecture series at the opening reception.

Please contact Arts Coordinator Cyndi Hueth at chueth@sequimwa.gov or 360-582-2477 with questions. Gallery Hours: Monday-Friday 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

CITY OFFICES WILL BE CLOSED ON THURSDAY, JULY 4 In observance of Independance Day

Discharge of Fireworks Banned in the City of Sequim City of Sequim residents are reminded that the discharge of fireworks is banned within the Sequim city limits. The Sequim City Council voted to ban the discharge of fireworks based on an advisory vote of Sequim citizens in November 2016, where 65.2% of citizens were in favor of the ban. The ban came into effect in 2018.

Lavender Festival Street Fair at the Park

The Sequim Lavender Festival Street Fair will take place at Carrie Blake Park on July 19-21, 2019. Residents should be aware of increased pedestrian and vehicle traffic in the neighborhood over the three day event. Please visit http://visitsunnysequim.com for the official event map and listings for Sequim Lavender Weekend.

Join us for Music in the Park

Join us each Tuesday from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. throughout the summer to hear new groups and old favorites. Bring your chair or a blanket, and a picnic, and enjoy an evening of music at the James Center for the Performing Arts at Carrie Blake Park, 500 North Blake Avenue. A food truck will be there each week. Coyote BBQ Pub weekly except for August 13 when food will be provided by Alder Wood Bistro • July 2: Ranger and the “Re-Arrangers” (Swing & Gypsy Jazz) • July 9: John Hoover and the Mighty Quinns (Music of John Denver) • July 16: Stardust Big Band (18-piece Big Band Music) • July 23: Bread & Gravy (Blues, Classic Rock, Contemporary & more) • July 30: Max Hatt & Edda Glass (Contemporary, Jazz, Bossa Nova & Brazilian) • August 6: Black Diamond Junction (Classic Rock, Pop & Country Hits) • August 13: Blue Rhinos (Blues & Rock) • August 20: Farmstrong (Folk, Country & Bluegrass) • August 27: Joy in Mudville (Americana/Roots Rock)

READ THE CITY MANAGER WEEKLY UPDATES AT WWW.SEQUIMWA.GOV

This page is a public service on behalf of the City of Sequim and does not reflect the views or opinions of the editorial staff of the Sequim Gazette or Sound Publishing.


Sports

Wednesday, July 3, 2019 • A7

SEQUIM GAZETTE

SPORTS BRIEFS Annual Bob Cup golf tourney set for July 27 The fourth-annual Bob Cup Golf Tournament is set for Saturday, July 27, at The Cedars at Dungeness golf course, 1965 Woodcock Road. Created in memory of longtime Sequim resident Bob Duncan, proceeds from the tourney benefit Clallam Mosaic, an organization serving individuals with developmental disabilities since 1998. Cost is $120 for golf and lunch; $20 for barbecue only with pre-registration or $25 at the door. The event includes closest-to-pin and long drive awards, a Putt for Wine contest and “ball in the boat” challenge. Mulligans are $20. Event check-in is 7:30-8:30 a.m. and the tourney begins with a shotgun start at 9 a.m. Register at www.clallammosaic.org/ bob-cup. For more information, call Mary Jane Duncan at 360-775-1197 or Clallam Mosaic at 360-681-8642, or email to bobcup@clallammosaic.org.

SEQUIM GAZETTE

R acing

for a cure

State sets regs, guidelines for 2019-2020 fishing SEQUIM GAZETTE STAFF

Each year, Lincoln Park BMX hosts a Race For Life, with funds raised going to the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (www.lls.org). On June 29, a core group of participants (pictured) raised $1,580 and the track contributed $1,350 for a total of $2,930. Pictured are, from left, Thomas Dalgardno, Andy Goldsbary, Cash Coleman, Zebastian Ferrier-Dixon, Mason Beal and Jackson Beal; not pictured are Evan Hernandez and George Williams. Submitted photo

Register now for ‘row’ portion of 2019 Reach and Row event SEQUIM GAZETTE STAFF Rowers and paddlers can now register for Reach and Row for Hospice, Sequim Bay Yacht Club’s annual fundraiser for Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County set for Sept. 28-29. Established more than a quarter century ago as a sailboat race, Reach and Row last year was expanded to include a competition for anyone with an oar or paddle, including rowers, kayakers, canoers, paddle boarders and the like. More than 55 participated last year in the new, 5-mile open water race on Sequim Bay. This year, sailors race on Saturday, Sept. 28, with other craft competing on Sunday, Sept. 29.

Anyone of high school age and older from anywhere in the greater Puget Sound area is welcome to compete individually or as a team. Registration information for rowers and paddlers is on the yacht club website at sequimbayyacht. club/reach-for-hospice. More information about the sailboat race registration will be available soon at sequimbayyacht. club/hospice-sailing. All funds from registration fees go to the 501(3)(c) nonprofit hospice organization. The 2018 Reach and Row raised more than $31,000 for respite care for VHOCC patients throughout the county, bringing the yacht club’s total contribution to the Last year Reach and Row for Hospice featured nine sailboats along hospice organization’s respite care with 21 rowers throughout Waterfront Day at John Wayne Marina program to more than $360,000. and Sequim Bay. Sequim Gazette file photo by Matthew Nash

It’s time start planning your next fishing trip, following the release of the 2019-2020 Washington Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet, available now from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. The new pamphlet is effective through June 30, 2020, and features rules and regulations for hundreds of lakes, rivers and marine areas around the state, as well as species including trout, salmon, shellfish, sturgeon and more, state officials said last week. Regulations are available online now at wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations, and at hundreds of license dealers and WDFW offices throughout Washington state. Find a nearby WDFW license dealer at wdfw.wa.gov/licenses/dealers. The Legislature this year approved new boating regulations meant to protect endangered Southern Resident Killer Whales. All boaters must stay 400 yards away when in front of or behind orcas, and 300 yards away at all other times. Any boat within a half-mile of the whales must also reduce speed to 7 knots or less. Learn more about WDFW’s orca conservation efforts at wdfw.wa.gov/species-habitats/ at-risk/species-recovery/orca. State officials issue updates and corrections to the pamphlet as needed. Review these changes by visiting wdfw.wa.gov/ fishing/regulations and selecting “20192020 sport fishing rules.” Anglers can also stay up to date with regulations by downloading the Fish Washington mobile app on their smartphone. More information can be found at wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/app.

COMMUNITY SCOREBOARD Golf

The Cedars at Dungeness • CADWGA, Bronze tees, June 25 First division — 1. Lisa Ballantyne 32; 2. Witta Priester 33 Second division — 1. Linda Beatty, 32; 2. Judy Reno, 32.5 KPs: Linda Hash 2, Beatty, Reno Putts: Ballantyne 32, Reno, Cathy Grant, Lisa Chon 34 Birdies: Ballantyne 2, Hash, Priester, Reno, Emily Cook, Rohani Higgins. • Men’s Club, Senior Championship, June 24/26 First flight — Gross: 1. Ron Grant, 150 (79-71); 2. Mark Hash, 150 (73-77). Net: 1. Harry Phillips, 133 (69-64); 2. Richard Clendening, 134 (64-70); 3. Brian Anderson, 137 (68-69) Second flight — Gross: 1. Bob Gunn, 170 (88-82); 2. Tom Flackm 174 (88=86). Net: 1. Wally Jenkins, 138 (74-64); 2. Ray Ballantyne, 140 (69-71); 3. Graham Bunney, 142 (68-74) KPs: Jeff Jones, Grant Ritter • Men’s Club, Super Senior Tournament, June 24/26 First flight — Gross: 1. Mike Clayton, 146 (72-74); 2. Arni Fredrickson, 162 (82-80) Net: 1. Jac Osborn, 137 (67-70); 2. Everett Thometz, 138 (71-67); 3. Bill Berry, 141 (73-68) Second flight — Gross: 1. Warren Cortez, 177 (91-86); 2. Mike Sutton, 181 (86-95). Net: 1. Robert Nute, 136 (68-68); 2. (tie) Morris Fosse (76-68) and George Switzer (74-70), 144

KPs: Clayton, Fred Harrison, 12 Novice — 1. Austin Fortman, Leonard Hirschfeld. 2. Jackson Beal, 3. Ryan Albin, 4. Kodiak Adkins Sunland Golf & Country Club 14 Novice — 1. Dawson Dewey, 2. • Men’s Club, Net Skins, June 26 Piper Williams, 3. Gabriel Granum 1. Dennis Powell, 3; 2. Tom Cau6 Intermediate — 1. Evan field, 2; 3. (tie) Dennis Cook, Larry “Mongo” Hernandez, 2. Dominic St. John and Jay Tomlin, 1. Casebolt, 3. Thomas Dalgardno, 4. Zebastian Ferrier-Dixon BMX 9 Intermediate — 1. Graysen Pinell, 2. Makaylie Albin, 3. Benjamin Lincoln Park BMX Clemens • PA Power Series, June 25 14 Intermediate — 1. Colby 4 Balance Bike — 1. Layla Stamper, 2. Dennis Tisdale, 3. Ben- Groves, 2. Zade Wirth, 3. Anthony Brigandi, 4. Mason Beal nett Gray 12 Expert — 1. Ca$h “Money” 21-30 Women Cruiser — 1. Harper Mcguire, 2. Iris Winslow, 3. Coleman, 2. Brian Belbin, 3. Anthony “A-Train” Jones Shellie Belbin 14 Expert — 1. Andy “Sandy” 12 Cruiser — 1. Brian Belbin, 2. Ca$h “Money” Coleman, 3. An- Goldsbary, 2. Grant Zipay, 3. Zachary Pinell thony “A-Train” Jones 15 Expert — 1. Joseph Pinell, 2. 26-30 Cruiser — 1. Anthony Brigandi, 2. Anthony Hernandez, Bruce Johnson, 3. Josh Garrett. • Race For Life Double, June 29 3. Isaiah Muckley 13-14 Girls Cruiser — 1. Hidi 46-50 Cruiser — 1. Michael “Patch Kit” Mcguire, 2. Wayne Cramer, 2. Sydney Fye, 3. Kaylee “Shipwreck” Goldsbary, 3. Jason “Total Chaos” Case, 4. Veta Cramer, 5. Iris Winslow Forsmann 10 Cruiser — 1. Rhett Smith, 5 & Under Novice — 1. Kayden Beck, 2. Bradan Gray, 3. Wyatt 2. Hudson McClure, 3. Thomas Dalgardno Sweetser 12 Cruiser — 1. Brian Belbin, 6 Novice — 1. Levi Hull, 2. Tony Cargo, 3. Woody Cargo, 4. Calianne 2. Ca$h “Money” Coleman, 3. Anthony “A-Train” Jones Collins 14 Cruiser — 1. Paxtyn Hermes, 8 Novice — 1. Ben Keeler, 2. Sonny Horejsi, 3. Cameron Collins, 2. Coleton Johnston, 3. Joseph 4. Wyatt Stamper, 5. Grady Pinell, Ritchie 31-35 Cruiser — 1. Adam Finch, 6. Maverick Williams 10 Novice — 1. Wesley Schroeder, 2. Casey Cramer, 3. Chad Calhoun 46-50 Cruiser — 1. Jre Sullivan, 2. Sky Wasankari, 3. Anna Cook

2. Stephen Fye, 3. Danny “Bionic Man” Bushnell 5 & Under Novice — 1. Atticus Reed, 2. Taylor Sherman, 3. Kayden Beck 6 Novice — 1. Beau Browning, 2. Tony Cargo, 3. Otis Connor, 4. Woody Cargo 8 Novice — 1. Ben Keeler, 2. Sonny Horejsi, 3. Grady Pinell 10 Novice — 1. Sky Wasankari, 2. Anna Cook, 3. Cady “Lady Bug” Johnston 13 Novice — 1. Russell Gaither, 2. Dawson Dewey, 3. Austin Fortman 15 Novice — 1. Chase Schweitzer, 2. Nathan Siler, 3. Caden De Los Angeles, 4. William Hutchings, 5. Easton Merritt 26-35 Novice — 1. Kyley Glenn, 2. Tyson Drew, 3. Tierra Hopkins 41-45 Novice — 1. Tracy Smith, 2. Brock Miller, 3. Joseph Bader 6 Intermediate — 1. Dominic Casebolt, 2. Thomas Dalgardno, 3. Sawyer Roberts, 4. Zebastian Ferrier-Dixon, 5. Brody Miller 8 Intermediate — 1. Alison Gallagher, 2. Cooper Stearns, 3. Graysen Pinell 9 Intermediate — 1. Kellan Miller, 2. John Draglund, 3. Colton Crenna, 4. John De Shazo 11 Intermediate — 1. Vaunn Zimmerman, 2. Talen Gierth, 3. Alex Bader, 4. Parker Sherman, 5. Riley Sanders 13 Intermediate — 1. Kaylee “Total Chaos” Case, 2. Jefrey Nelson, 3. Carson Cramer, 4. Evan Bader, 5.

Zade Wirth 14 Intermediate — 1. Christian Marshall, 2. Bryce Olson, 3. James Hampton, 4. Anthony Brigandi, 5. Mason Beal 51 & Over Intermediate — 1. Brad Working, 2. Chad Calhoun, 3. Danny “Bionic Man” Bushnell 8 Girls — 1. Bailey McCrea, 2. Peighton McGinley, 3. Kaydian McClure 11 Girls — 1. Tess Bailey, 2. Mia “Meerkat” Molzan, 3. Shaine Draglund 9 Expert — 1. Damien Comeau, 2. Hunter Collet, 3. Rhett Smith 11 Expert — 1. Mad Max Gosciniak, 2. Josiah Ringstad, 3. Anthony “A-Train” Jones 12 Expert — 1. True Bailey, 2. Brian Belbin, 3. Dylan Downing, 4. Finn “Machine Gun” Thompson, 5. Ca$h “Money” Coleman 13 Expert — 1. Garrett Johnson, 2. Joseph Ritchie, 3. Zachary Pinell 14 Expert — 1. Duke Hutchinson, 2. Paxtyn Hermes, 3. Andy “Sandy” Goldsbary 15 Expert — 1. Nathan “The Cheetah” Wells, 2. Quinn Zimmerman, 3. Andrew Bender, 4. Bruce Johnson, 5. Joseph Pinell, 6. Isaac Pennington, 7. Colby Groves, 8. Judah Kiourkas 21-25 Expert — 1. Jake Shepherd, 2. Matt Groves, 3. Cory Cooke. • State Qualifier Races, June 28-30 See full results online at www. sequimgazette.com.


A8 • Wednesday, July 3, 2019

SEQUIM GAZETTE

Friends, family honor longtime community advocate Museum dedicates gallery to Judith McInnes Tozzer BY MICHAEL DASHIELL Sequim Gazette

Years ago a school-aged Jeff Tozzer noticed one of his classmates had clothes very similar to his. In fact, they were his clothes. As it turns out, his mother decided to donate some of her son’s apparel to a less fortunate youth. “He needed them more,” Jeff Tozzer said Saturday to friends and family, gathered to celebrate the life of his mother Judy Tozzer. “That’s how she taught our family about giving.” Dozens of community members shared stories, snacks and more at the dedication of the Judith McInnes Tozzer Art Gallery on June 29, the first official event in the Sequim Museum & Arts’s new, not-quite-open facility on North Sequim Avenue. “She believed this community had helped her,” Jeff Tozzer said. “Dad joked she would have given to the Kennedys.” A fifth generation Sequim native, Judith McInnes Tozzer died on July 25, 2018, in Port Angeles, leaving behind a legacy of advocating for needy children throughout the Sequim area as well as numerous civic projects. She served as a Sequim School

Museum From page A-1

6,500-square-foot building to house the museum’s array of local artifacts, art, displays, interactive exhibits and more. “I’m really proud of how this is coming out,” Stipe said last week, standing amidst a half-dozen projects with painters, carpenters and other volunteers buzzed by. Museum volunteers welcome the public to a grand reception on Saturday, July 6, an event to include special guest Matt Dryke, gold medalist from the 1984 Olympic Games. Other special guests include photographer Ross Hamilton, “Strait Press” author Bill Lindstrom with Brown Maloney, and the museum’s board of trustees. Thereafter, the facility will be open 11 a.m.-4 p.m., Tuesday-Saturday, with private tours by appointment. Admission rates are still being figured out, Stipe said, but the staff will be accepting donations. Stipe listed dozens of individuals and businesses who have either donated money, time, in-kind services or all three: Dan Smith and the Nolan family for wood donations, Larry Somerville and her husband Bob Stipe for various woodworking projects, Bob Lampert for photo donations, and contributions and discounts from a multitude of business, including Lakeside Industricts, Hartnagel Buidling Supply, Clear

Board director starting in 1988 and was part of the board that promoted the successful bond vote to construct Greywolf Elementary School. Tozzer also volunteered with Guardian Ad Litem, a program that sought to give voice to every child in the Clallam the legal system. She sought more education later in life and at age 50 she earned a bachelor of arts degree, then was hired to supervise the Guardian Ad Litem program. She managed 45 volunteers and oversaw the needs of hundreds of area youths. At the time of her retirement, Clallam County as the only jurisdiction in the state that saw every child in Child Protective Services had an advocate. Tozzer was active with the Sequim Alumni Association and planned several reunions, including the first Sequim all-school reunion. “She was in on the beginning of everything: the (Sequim pioneer family histories) books, the museum, pioneer dinners … she never stopped performing for her community,” Judy Reandeau Stipe, executive director of Sequim Museum & Arts said Saturday. “She was in love with her family and that branched out to the community.” Several items from Tozzer’s per-

Image, Doghouse Powder Coating and Clallam Co-op Farm and Garden, among others. A big thanks, Stipe noted in months past, were workers who allowed the museum to take several loads of wood from the former Sequim Elementary School — and most recently the Sequim Community School, which was deconstructed last year. The 20-foot-long, 16-inchwide, 2 3/4-inch thick pieces of old growth timber — 30 in all — line the new museum “‘How did we do this?’ It’s easy. It’s all these people standing behind us,” Stipe said.

Making the move The origins of Sequim Museum & Arts dates back more than 40 years. Stipe note in the spring edition of “The Prairie Review,” the museum’s quarterly newsletter, that “farm artifacts, old bones or logging stuff were dropped off with the town clerk when locals paid utility bills” at the Sequim Town Hall, where Gladys Holmes and Ruby Trotter stacked relics on desks, shelves, in a utility closet — and later opened the jail cell for historical display (prisoners where no longer kept in town, Stipe notes). In the mid-1970s when a group of community members on a bicentennial committee developed the idea of starting a community museum. After a couple of years of exhibiting in several locations around town, the community cut the ribbon

Jeff Tozzer talks about the generous, giving spirit of his mother Judith McInnes Tozzer at the June 29 art gallery dedication at the new Sequim Museum & Arts facility.

sonal art collection line the walls of a portion of the new museum — the majority of them scenes of her family’s homestead in Dungeness. “She didn’t paint herself, but she supported local artists,” Stipe said. Tozzer (then McInnes) married Sequim local Larrie “Red” Tozzer in 1966 and, in 1975 moved to a 20-acre cattle farm ion Atterberry Road. She and Red later divorced but remained close friends and business partners, family members note. In 1993, Tozzer renovated her family farmhouse on Jamestown Road and moved there. In 2014, soon after being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease,

Some of Judith McInnes Tozzer’s family members gather for a photo inside the new Sequim Museum & Arts facility at Tozzer’s art gallery dedication on June 29. Sequim Gazette photos by Michael Dashiell

Tozzer wrote a note to friends and family. She wrote, “Everybody has something. My ‘something’ has provided me the opportunity to get things in order and I am thankful for that.” Tozzer also recorded an interview for the museum that family members shared Saturday (you can see the interview online at www.youtube.com/ watch?v=0RYTnhkp1FE). Always seeking to make things a bit better, family members note

“‘How did we do this?’ It’s easy. It’s all these people standing behind us.” Judy Reandeau Stipe executive director, Sequim Museum & Arts’ new facility

for the Sequim-Dungeness Museum on May 10, 1979, at 175 W. Cedar St. — on the site of the former Sequim post office. In 1992, the museum merged with the Peninsula Cultural Arts Center to become the Museum & Arts Center in the SequimDungeness Valley. Three years later the organization grew once again, acquiring the historical, two-story Dungeness Schoolhouse on Towne Road. The schoolhouse is a rentable venue for community use. Thanks to various groups using the building for reunions, musicals and plays, weddings and birthdays, yoga, table tennis, homeschool lessons and more, Stipe said the organization is able to pay for its four facilities (the schoolhouse itself, plus the Cedar Street exhibit center, museum administration building and the new Cowan complex). Stipe joined the museum board about six-and-a-half years ago and along with others began the groundwork for the new facility. Albert Haller, a longtime Sequim logger, land developer and later an education advocate before his death in 1992, purchased the land on North Sequim Avenue to someday house a museum. In March of 2016, the

museum got a big boost toward the new facility when they received and sold three properties courtesy of land endowments from West End pioneer John Cowan and his wife Inez — including two timber properties on Lake Ozette Road and off Highway 112, and a home in Port Angeles. Despite some proverbial bumps along the way, Stipe credited a number of local government officials with helping with the process — in particular City of Sequim operations manager Ty Brown, utilities manager Pete Tjemsland, Community Development Director Barry Berezowsky and former assistant city manager Joe Irvin, among others. “I’m over the moon,” Stipe said. “The biggest thing for me is it’s (done) the Sequim way. It makes me cry sometimes.”

Exhibits and features Museum officials bring plenty something old (from the previous exhibit center) along with some things new to the Cowan facility. A section of the museum heralds former Sequim resident Joe Rantz and fellow members of the Olympic Games gold medal-winning member of the 1936 University of Washington crew team. Judy Willman, one of

Tozzer used to pick up garbage in her neighborhood when she walked a 3.6-mile loop in the Jamestown neighborhood — a practice she kept for 10 years. “We should use her as an example of what we should do for our community,” she said. Tozzer was is survived by Larrie Tozzer, children Jana Grasser (Steven Grasser) of Sequim and Jeff Tozzer (Doug Miner) of Seattle, and grandchildren Alisha and Joe Grasser, both of Sequim.

Rantz’s daughers, donated larger-than-life photo boards of the team members. Complimenting the section is the George Pocock rowing shell gifted to the Sequim museum by the Olympic Peninsula Rowing Association in 2015; previously supported near ground level, the shell hangs from the new facility’s rafters. A new feature to the museum’s traditional offering of artist space is the Judith McInnes Tozzer art gallery featuring her own art with others from Joy McCarter’s piece on the grain elevator to Dale Faulstich’s Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe-inspired artwork. Each month the gallery will be open for community artists to display their work (a fee applies), Stipe said. A section of the museum will be labeled the Albert Haller Library. Named after Haller, an lifelong advocate of education whose foundation Stipe says was a tremendous support in getting the facility built, the section of the museum will also house a “children’s corner.” Two murals from the originally installed on the Lehman’s grocery storefront from 1995-2000 make their way into the museum exhibits as well. Visitors will get a chance to peer into the area’s logging history with an exhibit that showcases antique logging equipment and a wall-sized photo of the Dungeness Logging Company’s haul via the railway. A milk “parlor” spotlights artifacts from Sequim’s long

history as a dairy area — including a life-sized cow replica. A large, garage-style sliding door allows museum volunteers access to bring in antique tractors, cars and the like, such as the museum’s 1907 REO Runabout. Other features include restored theater chairs from the Sequim Opera House and signs from businesses come and gone, such as “Southwoods Mall” and “Sofie’s Grill,” along with signs declaring “We’re Rollin’ to Nolan’s, Best Ice Cream in the Valley” and “Welcome to Flipper Drive In.” A section not expected to be completed by the grand opening will feature tribal artifacts and more from the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe, Stipe said. Returning is the ever-popular Manis mastodon exhibit, the showcase of Emanuel (“Manny”) and Clare Manis’ archaeological dig that rewrote human history in North America. The museum will have mastodon-inspired shirts for sale, Stipe said. Community groups and school children Chimacum, Whidbey Island, Shelton and other communities visit the Sequim museum, Stipe said, and most of the come for the mastodon display. “We are asking everyone to overlook some unfinished items because construction is ongoing,” Stipe said. “Opening the new museum was the focus. Our volunteers are working feverishly to get the place ready for visitors and the budget is still tight.”

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Wednesday, July 3, 2019 • A9

SEQUIM GAZETTE

Civic Center to feature 150 solar panels Humanitarian fund going strong through police effort BY MATTHEW NASH Sequim Gazette

In the last month, Sequim city council has discussed an array of issues ranging from solar energy projects to waste management to humanitarian efforts. Here is a summary of some of the upcoming discussions and efforts in Sequim:

Sunny roofs ahead The Sequim Civic Center, 152 W. Cedar St., will soon feature about 150 solar panels on one portion of its roof. City Councilors unanimously agreed on June 24 to match a Department of Commerce grant worth $75,000 towards the approximate $285,000 project to install 50 kilowatt panels. David Garlington, public works director, said city staff budgeted $105,000 for a solar project this year, and have $25,000 available in the city’s Real Estate Excise Tax fund. However, he said the city has an $85,000 shortfall that will need to come from the city’s general fund. Garlington said the solar panels will save the city about $3,700 a year in electricity and for the city’s investment it would take about 56-plus years to pay for itself. “I wouldn’t say we’re doing this for the economic opportunity,” he said, as the city council looks to reduce its carbon footprint. “It’s putting our money where our mouth is.”

and installing signage and equipment. The city will also own the equipment and pay for electricity and determine user fees. Ann Soule, the city’s resource manager, said on June 10 the fees will be determined this fall for the chargers. City councilor Jennifer States said the price for the chargers seems reasonable (at about $3,000 each) and the city should consider installing more at the site and across the city. The interlocal agreement does allow for more, said David Garlington, Sequim public works director. Mayor Dennis Smith said there are two signs by the Clallam Transit Center for EV EV charger charging but no equipment, coming to PUD site so he suggested partnering Both Clallam County PUD with that service for future commissioners and City chargers. of Sequim city councilors agreed to cost share the City of Sequim staffing installation of two electric suggestions made Residents can share their vehicle chargers at the PUD’s former building at the corner opinion at 6 p.m. Monday, of Govan and East Washing- July 8 at a public hearing on proposed budget amendton Street. Sometime this year, a Lev- ments for this year, including el 2 Electric Vehicle charg- adding two new full-time ing station will be installed positions. City Attorney Kristina Nelat the site with universal adapters with two plug-ins son Gross seeks a full-time legal assistant/paralegal to for vehicles. PUD officials plan to pay for assist in various capacities the Level 2 Electric Vehicle ranging from code enforcecharging station’s equip- ment to risk management ment at an estimated $6,000 to researching case law to and connect it to electricity much more. City staff list the pay range while the City of Sequim will pay for trenching, painting as $52,418-$67,205 per year, With the panels in place, Garlington said it’d prevent about 22 carbon tons of waste each year Solar energy will be used in the building and can be used if the power goes out in the area, he said. With the placement of the panels, Garlington said the building essentially receives full coverage of the sun throughout the day. City Councilor Jennifer States suggested city staff look into cost for a small storage system for the electricity produced. Garlington said the city has applied for a second private grant but is unsure if or when it will come through for this project.

Projects

From page A-1 Matt Klontz, which he and city councilors plan to update this month. As part of a proposed updated sixyear plan, Klontz said 2020 will likely keep construction going all of next year as well. “We know with a lot of certainty, the projects (scheduled) will move forward in 2020,” Klontz said. Tentative Capital Improvement Program projects for parks, streets, buildings and more could be approved by city councilors on July 22 as a plan, with next year’s projects approved for the 2019-2020 budget later in the year.

Building projects The city budgeted $100,000 to finish the breakout rooms of the Guy Cole Event Center. Klontz said the city plans to advertise construction this year and will close the facility down late December-early February for construction. This would complete the third phase of the remodel, Klontz said, one that started with the main hall and the kitchen. Additionally, the city plans next year to permanently install Emergency Operations Center equipment in the Sequim Transit Center for a

cost of $50,000. Klontz said this moves equipment from tubs and speeds up efficiency. “The process (for setup) can take up to 30 minutes so that’s a significant savings (in an emergency),” City Manager Charlie Bush said. Also, city staff will install a fuel station in the city shop in 2020; the tentative cost estimate is $817,000. Over the six-year plan, there are about $1 million in planned improvements and expansion to the city shop. In 2024, city staff plan tabbed $300,000 for installing citywide broadband. Each year of the plan, the city’s new Peoples’ Project! will continue at $150,000 annually. This year, councilors plan to follow residents’ recommendation from a community voting effort to fund water bottle refilling/drinking fountain stations in Sequim parks, and add solar powered compact trash and recycling cans.

Streets Construction along Fir Street by Sequim schools will cost more than $3.8 million in 2020 through various funds for road, sidewalk and water/ sewer needs, Klontz said. “We’ll still be under construction in 2020, but hopefully be physically complete this (late June) time next year,” he said. Klontz said the irrigation main

H ap p y

which will be adjusted for the remainder of the year. Garlington and Barry Berezowksy, director of Community Development, seek a fulltime Development Review Engineer ($52,418-$67,205) to help keep up with development review workload and increase on-site inspection of utility and infrastructure installations. Berezowksy said in the next five years the city anticipates about 827 new lots coming in from current proposals. City staff said the position would split time between the city’s engineering and community development departments. If approved for 2019, city councilors will discuss during budget discussions later this year whether or not the positions continue into 2020. City councilor Ted Miller Smart-meters said adding the paralegal and utilities position is overdue. A group of residents across “We needed this position Clallam County advocated to last year,” he said. city councilors on June 10 to not pursue 5G infrastructure Humanitarian fund upgrades for utilities in the going strong future for city utilities. They The Sequim Human Ser- were concerned about potenvices Fund remains healthy tial and unstudied risks to and continues to help a num- residents’ health from signals ber of people in Sequim, said emitted from new meters. Staff Sgt. Sean Madison with City Manager Charlie Bush Sequim Police Department. told the group that city staff Madison reported in June looked at smart-meters but that the account on average “it’s not something that’s on has more than $6,000 avail- our front burner.” able to help individuals and Clallam PUD is launching families its installation of smart-meLast year, police provided ters this year in Dungeness assistance 123 times for 98 area and Neah Bay.

along the road has been difficult and flooded work areas a few times. “It’s great we’re replacing it,” he said. “It is a problem.” Next year, the city plans to continue its efforts to rehabilitate pavement at an estimate $229,000 in subdivisions seeing utility trenches settling creating large uneven areas. City staff plan to begin preliminary work on reaching out to community members about completing streets like Prairie Street with new sidewalks and lighting as they look for new ways to create east-west throughways south of Washington Street by new potential commercial areas. From 2020-2023, about $3.5 million is scheduled for planning and construction. Sequim also received about $1.1 million with a Safe Routes to School grant to build a sidewalk on the west side of Sequim Avenue from Hendrickson Road to Old Olympic Highway and improve the roundabout. Next year, city staff say they anticipate designing and purchasing right-of-way for up to $350,000 and spending more than $1.1

million in 2021 for construction.

Sewer, Water, Stormwater and Parks City staff budged nearly $1.1 million to increase capacity for handling solid waste at the Water Reclamation Facility. Klontz said they haven’t secured funding yet but that they plan to pursue more grant and loan opportunities. The facility will tentatively see $335,000 go toward odor control after being put on hold due to staff backlog, Klontz said. Grants help pay for more than $300,000 in stormwater upgrades with $190,000 going to infiltration facilities at the southwest corner of Seventh Avenue and Washington Street. Additionally, $113,000 supports creating a discharge system to place roadway water on Brown Road into Bell Creek.

Public works director David Garlington said that their water meter readers use a Bluetooth device directly over meters, located typically apart from the homes. He said the hand-held wand requests information from the meter, which sends it through blue tooth and that’s the end of the signal. “We’re not pursuing it with any vigor at this point,” Garlington said. “I want to be convinced these things are going to act in a safe and healthy way … and I have not had it proven to me it makes economic sense. It’s a big cost to (install smart meters) … From Public Works’ point-of-view, we’re not anywhere close to making a recommendation.” Garlington said he plans to post more information about the signals the city’s current meters emit on the city’s website. Additionally, Bush said city councilors sent a letter to the FCC a few years ago requesting more local control when it comes to electromagnetic radiation signals. There aren’t plans to send another letter, Bush said, because he’s uncertain how effective it would be.

Solid waste discussions ongoing City staff plans to reenter negotiations with Waste Connections, the city’s trash, recycling and lawn waste provider. David Garlington, public works director, said they have options to send out a

See SOLAR, A-14

Inadequately-sized piping will be removed near Bell Street and Hemlock Street in 2020, too. City staff plan to spend up to $100,000 for a water and sewer utility rate study to be conducted leading to discussions on future rates in 2020. Another $50,000 is slated for a study of the city’s parks impact fee and master plan. City staff look to pave/overlay parking lots in Carrie Blake Community Park and the Water Reuse Demonstration Site for nearly $800,000 in 2021. They also look to upgrade Kirner Park playground equipment in 2022 ($318,000). For more information about Sequim’s proposed Capital Improvement Program, visit www.sequimwa. gov or call 360-683-4908. Reach Matthew Nash at mnash@ sequimgazette.com.

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individuals and 25 families (26 children and 39 adults) in a variety of roles. Since the program began, it’s helped more than 350 people with food, gas, gift cards for various needs, lodging and more. “Historically, cops were doing it out of their own pockets,” Madison said. A few examples include providing busing for a woman seeking drug treatment, and providing lodging for a family seeking respite from the poor air quality during the summer’s forest fires. In 2018, police provided 70 Safeway food gift cards; six Visa cards for diapers, clothes and toiletries; 42 transportation vouchers; 27 lodging vouchers, and 11 food assistance requests. For more information about the fund and/or to donate, call the police department at 360-683-7227.

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A10 • Wednesday, July 3, 2019

SEQUIM GAZETTE

De-toured

A tour bus awaits a tow truck on June 26 after it became stuck for about two hours in the driveway and in Old Olympic Highway entering the B&B Family Farm. Despite the hiccup, many passengers said they enjoyed their stay in Sequim. Sequim Gazette photo by Matthew Nash

Tourist bus ‘stuck’ at lavender farm BY MATTHEW NASH

Several of the 18 passengers made the most of the two-hour stay by touring the farm and enjoying the fields. At about 5 p.m., the bus was freed by a tow truck from All City Autobody of Port Townsend. As passengers readied to board the bus, many said they enjoyed their time in Sequim/Dungeness area that day after visits to the Olympic Game Farm, Black Bear Diner and the lavender farm.

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A tourist group got an extended stay at the B&B Family Farm, 5883 Old Olympic Highway, on June 26 when their Freedom Tours NW, Inc. bus got stuck halfway in the driveway and Old Olympic Highway after taking a sharp turn. The highway was partially blocked as farm owners and the bus driver attempted to free the vehicle.

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Wednesday, July 3, 2019 • A11

SEQUIM GAZETTE

Warming center recruiting volunteers for winter SEQUIM GAZETTE STAFF While Sequim enters its warmest part of the year, advocates for the Sequim Community Warming Center are gearing up to help residents make it through the next cold spell. The two-year-old warming center provides a secure, indoor environment on the coldest nights

from October through March to homeless individuals and others. It also provides meals and snacks on site and take-away items, including blankets, warm clothing, sleeping bags, raincoats, personal hygiene items and water bottles. The warming center is staffed in two shifts, each with a paid supervisor and several volunteers. Center director Jean Pratschner is recruit-

ing new volunteers now because fundraising for next winter’s operations kicks off soon and she hopes to show prospective donors that the center is prepared to meet its new goals, center advocates noted in a press release last week. Pratschner said she hopes to keep the facility open every night for those five months; at a minimum, she is seeking to open the center any

night with a predicted temperature of 40 degrees or less. The center’s budget has restricted the operations to nights when the expected low temperature is 36 degrees or lower. She noted that even with a largely volunteer staff the center’s proposed additional nights of operation will substantially increase expenses.

In the 2018-2019 fall/winter season, the center was open for 82 nights, and during an extended snowy period in February 2019 it was also open for six days. To learn more about volunteering at the Sequim Community Warming Center, contact Pratschner at 505-264-0278 or lpratschner@ gmail.com.

FAITH NEWS Movie, supper set at Agnew church “Human Zoos: America’s Forgotten History of Scientific Racism,” an award-winning Discovery Institute documentary, will be featured Wednesday, July 10, at Peninsula Evangelical Friends Church’s free monthly Movie and a Meal program, now at the Friends Agnew Hall, 1241 N. Barr Road. This 2017 film explores the story of thousands of indigenous people being put on public display, harassed demeaned and often touted as “missing links” between man and apes, in early 20th century America, and how this history is affecting society today. A brief Living Waters commentary will follow the featured film. A supper of homemade soups and salads with bread or rolls and home-baked cookies, will be served at 6 p.m. The movie will start as soon as people are served. Find more information about Peninsula Evangelical Friends Church at www. pef cpa.com, or call Diane Hanes at 360-417-0422.

Sequim’s got hay fever Contributor Bob Lampert captures this hay-harvesting early this week in Sequim. Submitted photo

Sequim schools, interim superintendent agree to contract BY CONOR DOWLEY Sequim Gazette

At a special Sequim School District Board of Directors meeting on June 26, the board came to an agreement on the contract for interim superintenCLARK dent Dr. Rob Clark. Clark, who was in attendance for the meeting, starts his lead administrator role in Sequim July 8 after finishing duties at the Milton-Freewater (Ore.) School District, though he will be in town for several days to start meeting key district staff and catching up on the current state of the district.

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The contract, which runs through June 30, 2020, was agreed to unanimously by the three board members present, with directors Heather Short and Robin Henrikson absent. Clark’s base salary will be $155,000. In addition to his pay, Clark will receive 30 vacation days, 10 of which he can cash out if he’s unable to utilize them. The district will also provide $800 per month for the duration of Clark’s contract to a taxdeffered retirement plan. Other benefits include a $600-per-month travel reimbursement to help cover costs of commuting from Port Ludlow and various meetings and functions across the region, and a $50-per-month cell phone reimbursement.

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Riccobene was one of three middle school staff named in the 2018 federal lawsuit filed From page A-1 by August St. George against comment further on the the district for discrimination and retaliation. That change. Please make checks payable to SAR & reference “Level the Field” Project. Riccobene declined to lawsuit was settled in March Contact Stephanie Sweet at 360-460-8439 or Michael McAleer at 360-460-2839 with any questons. for $850,000. comment on the announcement. The lead administrator at the middle school since 2014, TEST DRIVE A NEW ELECTRIC Riccobene first joined the OR HYBRID VEHICLE AT district in 2003 at principal at Helen Haller Elementary School. In July 2010, Riccobene became the director of instruction, and that position changed to his current role as executive director of teaching and learning. The question of what would happen next with Riccobene has been a frequent topic of discussion in public comYou Can Count On Us! ments at several school board 800-927-9395 • 360-452-3888 meetings in recent months, 133 Jetta Way, Port Angeles with comments by teachers and parents both in support Available only in the state of Washington. No payments for 90 days on any new and unregistered Honda model purchased between May 24, 2019 and July 8, 2019. Offer only available through Honda Financial Services and Wilder Honda. Offer does not apply to leases. Interest will accrue during the deferment. Subject to credit approval. A dealer documentary fee of $150 may be applied. See Wilder Honda for details. Offer expires July 08, 2019. of and against the staffer.

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A12 • Wednesday, July 3, 2019

State’s next House speaker to make history This month’s selection of a new speaker for the state House of Representatives may be the year’s most important contest for Democrats in Washington. Seattle Democrat Frank Chopp, one of the most dominant forces in Washington state politics, has relinquished the seat of power in which he sat since the turn of the century. His tenure, unprecedented in length, ended in early May. Four women lawmakers are vying to succeed him — and become the first woman in this position in state history. It’s a quartet of talent: Monica Guest Stonier of Vancouver, the majority Opinion floor leader and current member of caucus leadership; Laurie Jinkins Jerry Cornfield of Tacoma, chairwoman of the Civil Rights and Judiciary Committee; June Robinson of Everett, vice chairwoman of the Appropriations Committee, and Gael Tarleton of Seattle, chairwoman of the Finance Committee. Each enjoys support among the 57 members of the House Democratic Caucus, which will meet July 31 to make a decision. A couple rounds of balloting are likely before any of them garners the required majority. This is a critical vote. Whoever wins will lead the caucus in the 2020 session. Then they will be tasked with doing whatever’s needed to retain every one of those 57 seats in next year’s elections. Recruiting candidates, raising money and crafting campaign messages are among the requisite skills for this part of the job. This change of power coincides with a transformation of the caucus itself. Its membership is its most ethnically diverse. Women hold a majority of its seats. And its progressive bent is as dominant as ever. Big questions loom for each individual member. Will they want someone with a progressive soul and pragmatic political temperament like Chopp, which seemed to work well the past two decades? Or will they want a person willing to push a progressive agenda more aggressively, even if it might earn a periodic rebuke from editorial boards and cost a seat or two in a future election? How important is it for the next speaker to get along with Republicans and build alliances with Senate Democrats? In the 2019 session, Democrats used strong legislative majorities and partnership with Democratic Gov. Jay Inslee to enthusiastically expand most areas of state government and to increase a raft of taxes to cover the tab. However, not everything got done in the view of some House Democrats. They are drawing up an ambitious to-do list for next year that they’ll want the next speaker to embrace. Thus far it’s been a pretty quiet race. These women respect each other so there’s no badmouthing, overtly or in the shadows. They insist there won’t be, and are committed to assuring the caucus will be united once the outcome is known. Ahead of the vote, each woman is contacting all of her colleagues, by phone or in person, or both. They’re getting asked about their vision for caucus leadership and strategy for winning elections. There’s talk about specific policies, and internal matters as well. In the meantime, the Members of Color Caucus and the Black Caucus conducted sit-down interviews with each candidate earlier this month. On July 14, the two plan to host a forum at which they hope all four candidates will be together to answer questions from members who show up. “We are absolutely not making any endorsement. We are looking to provide avenues for our members to get information,” said Rep. Javier Valdez, D-Seattle, a leader of the 16-person Members of Color Caucus. “This is a very historic decision we’re making.” Contact The Herald (Everett) columnist Jerry Cornfield at 360-352-8623, jcornfield@herald net.com or on Twitter, @dospueblos.

SEQUIM GAZETTE

To submit a letter 147 W. Washington St., Sequim, WA 98382 Phone: 360-683-3311 • Fax: 360-683-6670 E-mail: editor@sequimgazette.com Deadline noon the Friday before publication

Opinion SEQUIM GAZETTE

SEQUIM GAZETTE Published every Wednesday 147 W. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382 Phone: 360-683-3311 Fax: 360-683-6670 www.sequimgazette.com Sound Publishing Inc. Vol. 46, Number 27 USPS 685-630 • ISSN: 1538-585X

The cosmic garage sale Like it or not, people die. At some point, we may even get the chance to consider our own deaths. In the case of my quirky friend, Barry, I believe he sees his death as a final act of fractious behavior, a flipping of the bird at the rest of us old folks at home. “Deal with it. I’m outta here.” He is currently From the planning his final B ack Nine garage sale. Sifting through the Linda B. Myers debris of his past, he is picking out pay-dirt that others will surely desire: the wolf-head neckerchief holder he wore as a boy scout back in the Dark Ages, his collection of ‘lovable loser’ baseball cards from the 1977 Chicago Cubs, swell things like that. We got to talking about the other kind of stuff you leave between, the less material stuff. When you die, who is the invisible YOU that will stick in the minds of the people who knew you? What will they be, the items in your Cosmic Garage Sale? Is there a personality trait you’d like people to recall when someone mentions your name? My sister would like to be remembered as ‘open to possibilities.’ I hope to be remembered as ‘generous.’ What would please you the most? It might be nice to have your personage be remembered for a particular act. Like The

Man who Shot Liberty Valance (although I think that requires having a good lyricist close at hand). Or maybe you’d like something more personal: to be the name-inthe-blank when people recall, “Remember what a great time it was when ol’ ____ ... ” Of course, you can sweep a lot of debris into your Cosmic Garage Sale, as well. Your feelings of guilt or shame or embarrassment or failure. Stick that garbage in the to-go pile today. No one else will want it either since they already have plenty of their own. But how freeing to dump your emotional trash before you yourself are recycled. Okay, back to attractive attributes. Humorous, kind, compassionate, instructive. My advice is to start acting on your desired quality now if you have a hope in hell of this ethereal trait outlasting your corporeal crate in the minds of others. It’s never too soon to start filling your Cosmic Garage Sale. Note: I’m speaking to decent folk here with normal aspirations. I realize a few of you might be budding Hannibal Lectors or Mr. Hydes. If so, keep your crazy crap to yourself. Meanwhile, the rest of us will start a GoFundMe to buy you a ticket off the Olympic Peninsula to anywhere but here. See? That’s me, being generous. Linda B. Myers is a founding member of Olympic Peninsula Authors and author of the new historical novel Fog Coast Runaway, available on amazon.com, at lindab myers.com, or at local retailers. Contact her at myerslindab@gmail.com or Facebook. com/lindabmyers.author.

PUBLISHER Terry Ward publisher@sequimgazette.com 360-683-3311, x15050 EDITOR Michael Dashiell editor@sequimgazette.com 360-683-3311, x55049 NEWS & PRESS RELEASES news@sequimgazette.com REPORTERS Matthew Nash mnash@sequimgazette.com 360-683-3311, x55649 Erin Hawkins ehawkins@sequimgazette.com 360-683-3311, x55249 DISPLAY ADVERTISING Advertising Director Eran Kennedy ekennedy@soundpublishing.com 360-683-3311, x15049 Advertising Representatives Harmony Liebert hliebert@sequimgazette.com 360-683-3311, x35049 PRODUCTION production@sequimgazette.com Ad Designer, production Mary Field 360-683-3311, x45049 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 360-683-3311, 15549 Linda Clenard lclenard@soundpublishing.com CIRCULATION circulation@sequimgazette.com 6 months, $26 1 year, $36 2 years, $66 circulation@sequimgazette.com POSTMASTER: Send changes of address to: Sequim Gazette 147 W. Washington St., Sequim, WA 98382

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Disparate approaches to viewpoints Regarding “Letters to the Editor” (“Consider the bias,” and “Democrat leaders responsible for border mess,” Sequim Gazette, June 26): Two very divergent letters were printed.

One of the letters seemed reasonable, the other a fanatical rant. It definitely exploits the very sad differences. I believe a true sampling of the news (instead of sound bites) would show a more accurate picture. Donna MacLean Sequim

Restoring tuition affordability vital to America When my parents Today, it is much differgraduated from high ent story. Student loans school in 1936, a colare the norm rather than lege education was too the exception. As a result expensive for the son of the student-loan debt a copper miner and the has shot past $1.56 trildaughter of a plumber. lion spread out among Eighty years ago, 45 million borrowers. In our country was in the 2018, nearly 70 percent middle of the Great of college graduates took Depression and teens out student loans and took odd jobs to help put face their careers with an Guest food on the table and pay average of $30,000 in debt. Opinion the family bills. In those Growing student loan Don C. Brunell days no bank would debt is a concern among lend money to college Americans. “Spurring students. the free-college moveFollowing World War II, there was ment is the anxiety over the cost of new hope for veterans, The GI bill paid tuition, which has risen at than double for veterans to complete their college the inflation rate since 1990, while stuor trade school education. My father, dent debt has tripled since 2006,” The for example, graduated from trade Wall Street Journal recently reported. schools in Seattle and Chicago and Free-college for all would cost a became a journeyman electrician minimum of $75 billion each year if thanks to Uncle Sam. tuition was $4,400 per year, Quillette, In the 1960s, the federal govern- an online think tank, estimated last ment introduced the work-study pro- September. gram allowing students from middle “That doesn’t pay the bills even for and low income families to work their in-state students at many public flagway through college. I found jobs and ships. The University of Michigan, for fortunately didn’t have to borrow example, costs over $15,000 per year money to complete my degree. for Michigan residents, and about

$50,000 for out-of-state students,” Quillette noted. There are a variety of other approaches which can make higher education more affordable. For example, in Kalamazoo, Michigan, wealthy anonymous donors pooled their money and started a free-college tuition program. It is one of more than 300 cities and states around the country offering a variety of tuition assistance programs. WSJ reports since 2006, the donors contributed $124 million in tuition subsidies for nearly 5,400 students. The Upjohn Institute, which has been tracking Kalamazoo Promise, found that tuition assistance needs to be augmented with additional student career counseling in the K-12 system and other living costs for students. Many small business owners in Washington state offer college scholarships and combined them with work and other benefits. Hopefully, the up-front funding offsets the need for loans and make it possible for students to complete their college education or technical skill training. For example, in Seattle, Dick’s Drive-Ins offers employees who work 20 hours a week for at least six months

and continue to work at least 20 hours a week while going to school to have access to a $25,000 scholarship over four years. In addition Dick’s pays higher than minimum wage, provides an employer paid health plan, and pays up to $9,000 in child-care expenses. Other donors are stepping forward. Billionaire Robert Smith, founder and CEO of Vista Equity Partners, surprised Morehouse College’s 400 graduating seniors announcing his family is paying off their student loans. The estimated value of the gift was $40 million. He also challenged other donors to do the same. Making higher education affordable is a national priority. The focus needs to be on approaches which are affordable and effective for students and their families. The issue is large than just having the federal government provide free-tuition for all. Don C. Brunell is a business analyst, writer and columnist. He recently retired as president of the Association of Washington Business, the state’s oldest and largest business organization, and now lives in Vancouver. He can be contacted at theBrunells@msn.com.

LETTERS POLICY Your opinions on issues of community interest and your reaction to stories and editorials contained in your Sequim Gazette are important to us and to your fellow readers. Thus our rules relating to letters submitted for publication are relatively simple. • Letters are welcome. Letters exceeding 250 words may be shortened. We strive to publish all letters. • Letters are subject to editing for spelling and grammar; we contact the writer when substantial changes are required, sending the letter back to the writer for revisions. Personal attacks and unsubstantiated allegations are not printed. • All letters must have a valid signature, with a printed name, address and phone number for verification. Only the name and town/community are printed. • Deadline for letters to appear in the next publication is noon Friday. Because of the volume of letters, not all letters are published the week they are submitted. Time-sensitive letters have a priority. • Letters are published subject to legal limitations relating to defamation and factual representation. • To submit letters, deliver or mail to 147 W. Washington St., Sequim, WA 98382; fax to 360-683-6670 or e-mail editor@sequimgazette.com.


Wednesday, July 3, 2019 • A13

SEQUIM GAZETTE

Footprinters picks 2019 Officer of the Year winners Chapter 74 of the International Footprint Association recognized 13 Officers of the Year from public safety agencies within Clallam County at their recent 12th-annual Officer of the Year Program. Law enforcement officers and firefighters were nominated by their host agencies and recognized at the awards dinner at Sequim Elks Lodge. Pictured are agency representatives (back row, from left) PenCom Communications Supervisor Susan Craig; Clallam County Sheriff Bill Benedict; Sequim Police Department Sgt. Sean Madison; Port Angeles Police Department Chief Brian Smith; Washington State Patrol Trooper Chelsea Hodgson; Chapter 74 Footprinter President George Eims; Clallam County Fire District 2 Chief Sam Phillips; Clal-

lam County Fire District 3 Assistant Chief Dan Orr; Clallam County Fire District 4 Chief Gregory Waters and U.S. Border Patrol Agent in Charge Corey Lindsay, with honorees (front row, from left) PenCom Communications Officer Kyle Wagner; Sylvia Orth, Clallam County Sheriff’s Office

FROM THE POLICE BLOTTER Sequim Avenue 11:00 a.m. — Vehicle accident, 100 block of South Seventh Avenue 12:54 p.m. — Theft, 1200 block of West Washington Street 3:25 p.m. — Theft, 500 block of West Washington Street 6:37 p.m. — DUI/DWI, Sequim-Dungeness Way/ Taylor Boulevard 7:18 p.m. — Theft, 1100 block of West Washington Street June 28 10:32 a.m. — DUI/DWI, 2100 block of Lotzgesell Road 10:45 a.m. — Vehicle accident, 1100 block of West Washington Street 12:11 p.m. — Vehicle accident, Evans Road/Griffith Farm Road 7:19 p.m. — Fireworks violation, 400 block of Hanley Way 11:34 p.m. — DUI/DWI, 300 block of East Washington Street June 29 8:23 a.m. — Warrant arrest, 300 block of West Prairies Street 11:12 a.m. — Theft, 600 block of Pinnell Road 2:15 p.m. — Domestic violence, Woods Road 4:15 p.m. — Assault, 700 block of West Washington Street 8:26 p.m. — Theft, 1200 block of West Washington Street June 30 6:06 p.m. — Boating violation, 100 block of Oyster House Road 8:17 p.m. — Vehicle accident, 500 block of Vautier Road 9:31 p.m. — Fireworks violation, 100 block of Taylor Cut-Off Road July 1 (report not available at press time)

David S. Benzick of Clallam County Fire District 4, and U.S. Border Patrol Agent Douglas W. Kuperus. The Footprinters also recognized CCFD2 Retired Assistant Chief Mike DeRousie and soon-to-retire Chief Sam Phillips for their years of service to the community.

Not present were: Danial Flint, Elwha Klallam Police Department Fish and Wildlife corporal; Clallam Bay Corrections Officer Randy Simonsen, and Andrew Lyon, Port Angeles Fire Department volunteer firefighter/EMT and U.S. Coast Guard chief machinery technician.

Emphasis on boating safety set for holiday SEQUIM GAZETTE STAFF The Clallam County Sheriff’s Office will be conducting heightened enforcement targeting boating under the influence as part of the national Operation Dry Water campaign. Law enforcement will be focused on educating boaters about safe boating practices, which includes boating sober, and enforcing the state’s boating under the influence laws.

With the summer boating season underway and the July 4 holiday approaching, the Clallam County Sheriff’s Office reminds boaters that impaired boating is against the law. Operating a vessel under the influence of alcohol or drugs is illegal on all bodies of water and can lead to serious injuries and consequences. In Washington state it is illegal to operate a vessel with a blood-alcohol content (BAC) level of .08 or higher — the

same as it is to operate a vehicle. “The accidents and tragedies that happen because individuals chose to drive drunk or impaired, on land or on the water, are preventable,” Clallam County Sheriff Bill Benedict said in a press release last week. “As law enforcement, it is our job to do all we can to ensure the safety of our recreational boaters and paddlers. That is why the Clallam County Sheriff’s Office is joining other

states and agencies across the country to do our part in keeping boaters safe and preventing accidents related to boating under the influence.” Alcohol is the leading contributing factor in recreational boating deaths, and a major contributor to accidents, according to U.S. Coast Guard Recreational boating statistics (2017). Visit operationdrywater.org for more information about boating under the influence.

Quilcene man acquitted of one sex charge BY JEANNIE MCMACKEN Olympic Peninsula News Group

Timonthy J. Rondeau Jr. of Quilcene, one of 10 defendants in the 2018 Net Nanny operation, has been found not guilty by a jury on one charge and had another dismissed by a judge. Rondeau, 32, was charged with attempted rape of a child. A jury found him not guilty on June 17, according to Deputy Prosecuting Attorney Julie St. Marie.

St. Marie said the evidence “was less” than the state had on the other defendants. She said the jury could not agree on a second charge of communicating with minors, a gross misdemeanor, which led Judge Keith Harper to declare a hung jury and dismiss the charge. Juries will hear cases against the two remaining defendants David L. Sprague of Sequim on Aug. 12 and Isaac J. Boyd of Sequim in December.

St. Marie said the other defendants in the internet sting operation were found guilty or pleaded guilty to charges. Thomas Gale, 53, of Port Townsend died before his arraignment. The 10 men were arrested in the March 22-25, 2018 as multi-agency sting, Individuals answered online ads, then drove to an address expecting to have sex with minors, law enforcement said. More than 60 law enforcement officials participated in the operation.

Olympia man sentenced for Sequim burglaries BY ROB OLLIKAINEN Olympic Peninsula News Group

An Olympia man has been sentenced to four years in prison for a pair of burglaries that occurred in the Sequim area last year, the Clallam County Sheriff’s Office said. Collin J. R. Kennedy, 28, was sentenced on June 26 to 48 months confinement plus one year of community custody after he pleaded guilty to two counts of residential burglary and single counts of forgery and heroin possession, court papers said. The Clallam County Sheriff’s Office said Kennedy stole about $2,880 worth of items from an East Sequim Bay Road residence in June 2018 and more than $5,300 worth of items from a Lost Mountain Road residence last November. Superior Court Judge Lauren Erickson sentenced Kennedy to the term recommended by deputy prosecuting attorney Matthew Roberson and defense attorney Charlie Commeree. Kennedy was charged in two other cases

The Clallam County Sheriff’s Office is seeking 28-year-old Collin J. Kennedy, identified a suspect in two recent attempted burglaries in the Lost Mountain area. Photos courtesy of Clallam County Sheriff’s Office

with second-degree theft and possession of methamphetamine. Those cases were dismissed pursuant to a plea agreement, court papers said. Clallam County Sheriff’s Deputy James Dixon said Kennedy broke into a residence on the 1700 block of East Sequim Bay Road and stole a $2,000 computer, necklaces and other items June 6, 2018, according to the affidavit for probable cause. The Sheriff’s Office used fingerprints and surveillance footage to identify Kennedy in

the East Sequim Bay Road burglary, Chief Criminal Deputy Brian King said. Kennedy broke into a home on the 3800 block of Lost Mountain Road last Nov. 28 and stole a $3,000 digital camera and lens, a $2,000 laptop computer, a $300 camera with no lens and other items, Deputy Matthew Murphy said in court documents. The owner of the home interrupted the burglary and chased Kennedy into the driveway, Murphy said. The victim grabbed hold of Kennedy and kneed him, but Kennedy was able to escape by pulling himself out of his coat, Murphy said in the affidavit for probable cause. About three hours later, a resident on the 600 block of Lost Mountain Road told deputies that he had captured video surveillance of a man approaching his door. The person in the footage was later identified as Kennedy, Murphy said. The Sheriff’s Office also used footprints to connect Kennedy to the burglary, King said. Kennedy was being held last week at the Washington Corrections Center near Shelton.

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The weekly police blotter includes incidents that occurred in the City of Sequim and in unincorporated Clallam County in the SequimDungeness Valley area. June 25 7:37 a.m. — Theft, near 100 block of Alaska Way 9:49 a.m. — Domestic violence, Cays Road 12:40 p.m. — Vehicle accident, 800 block of West Washington Street 1:53 p.m. — DUI/DWI, near 100 block of Carlsborg Road 2:37 p.m. — Theft, 1200 block of West Washington Street 5:29 p.m. — Domestic violence, East Cedar Street 5:34 p.m. — Theft, 1200 block of West Washington Street 8:50 p.m. — Warrant arrest, 100 block of South Seventh Avenue 9:47 p.m. — Vehicle prowl, 200 block of North Dunlap Avenue June 26 5:53 a.m. — Theft, 1200 block of West Washington Street 8:57 a.m. — Firearm purchase denial, 900 block of East Washington Street 9:12 a.m. — Assault, 600 block of North Garry Oak Drive 12:30 p.m. — Vehicle accident, 100 block of North Sequim Avenue 12:58 p.m. — Theft, 1200 block of West Washington Street June 27 2:49 a.m. — Liquor violation/MIP, 600 block of North Sequim Avenue 7:27 a.m. — Vehicle prowl, 800 block of East Washington Street 9:05 a.m. — Burglary, near 100 block of Talon Court 10:13 a.m. — Vehicle accident, 600 block of North

records specialist; Sequim Police Specialist Josh Rees; Sean Ryan, Port Angeles Police Department officer; Washington State Patrol Trooper Jamieson T. Hodgson; Trisha Tisdal, Clallam County Fire District 2 EMT; Travis Anderson, Clallam County Fire District 3 firefighter/EMT; Lt.

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A14 • Wednesday, July 3, 2019

SEQUIM GAZETTE

Hospital and charter review candidates offer views at forum BY CONOR DOWLEY Sequim Gazette

Residents got to hear viewpoints from prospective hospital commissioners and charter review board members at the League of Women Voters of Clallam County’s June 27. Three candidates for Olympic Medical Center (OMC) commissioner, District 1, position 1, along with 10 candidates for the Clallam County Charter Review Commission, District 1, at the forum held at the Sequim Transit Center. Warren Pierce, Nate Adkisson and Ann Marie Henninger, candidates on the ballot for OMC commissioner, gave opening statements as to their experiences, qualifications, and goals for serving in the position. Following the Aug. 6 primary, two of the three candidates vie for the position in the General Election on Nov. 5. Pierce and Adkisson have backgrounds in business management and the financial sector, respectively; they both said they want to help OMC run more efficiently, with Adkisson also wanting to find a way to help ease the financial burdens on those seeking medical care in the area.

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From page A-9 Request for Proposal for a different provider, but Waste Connections would likely be the only bidder since the next closest providers are in Kitsap County or the West End of Clallam County. He said some of their discussion points will include rates, frequency changes for pick-up, low income rates, snowbird/vacation hold options, and more. The idea of contracting construction waste was tabled, as city councilor Brandon Janisse said if the city did that it would likely shutter a local business. Garlington said Waste Connections’ rates for garbage/recycling pick-up are fair and city staff field a few calls a month about their service, but they are mostly

A registered nurse, Henninger said she seeks to help improve the financial state of OMC by helping improve service reimbursement, but also spoke of OMC needing help with workforce recruitment and retention as well as improving provider access. When asked about abortion access through the hospital, both Pierce and Adkisson expressed their pro-choice sentiments while saying that they don’t know enough about the entire situation as far as hospital policies and legal requirements to comment further. Henninger stated that she does “not believe abortion is health care.” When given a chance to follow up on that statement later, she added that while she does believe that people who want access to abortions should have it, she doesn’t think that hospitals should be the ones providing abortions. The opioid crisis was brought up as well, with all three candidates agreeing that OMC can do more. Pierce said he feels opiates are too cheap to acquire, and Adkisson spoke of the difficulties of “not in my backyard” attitudes in the area making offering treatment options challenging. The candidates were also

asked about the possibility of a hospital being built in Sequim, but they all spoke of the financial challenges that represents given steep Medicare reimbursement cuts in the region, as well as legal restrictions that make building a new hospital in the area difficult.

related to code enforcement of neighbors rather than the actual service provided. Councilors briefly discussed the differences between mandating or not garbage service. City councilor Jennifer States said that with non-mandatory collection, Waste Connections would be uncertain how many customers it would have in the city and costs could rise for users, so it’s to the city’s advantage to require it. City Attorney Kristina Nelson-Gross said city staff has not been enforcing mandatory garbage service to residents — despite it being required by the city’s Municipal Code. However, she said she wouldn’t send a case for lack of garbage service to court. “We need to come back and change the code to enforce this,” Nelson-Gross said.

Earlier this year, city councilors changed an ordinance that allows Waste Connections the ability to cut-off customers after 90 days of non-payment. Waste Connections staff said it’s reduced monthly non-payments from about $40,000 a month to $10,000 in the city.

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Charter review highlighted Ten candidates for the county charter review commission had a chance to speak to those in attendance. Five of the ten candidates for District 1 will be elected in November, and will begin their review process in January. Candidates present were Jim Stoffer, Ted Miller, Donald Hatler, Tony Corrado, David Lotzgesell, Gary DeKorte, Alex Fane, Candace Pratt and Judith Parker. Sue Erzen was out of the area, and sent a representative to read a prepared statement. The candidates were asked to speak of their qualifications and intended focus while on the commission, and many of the candidates spoke of environmental concerns, ranging from climate change to natural resource usage. Lotzgesell spoke pas-

Guy Cole Event Center rentals changing In an effort to increase usage at the recently remodeled Guy Cole Events Center, rates are changing at the facility in Carrie Blake Community Park. The new rates cost $40 per hour for a city resident for a minimum of two hours and a maximum of 10 hours, or $48 for out-of-city residents. City councilors voted unanimously for the changes on June 24. Previously, nonprofits could rent the facility for free at any time. Now it’s available to them MondayThursday (with Thursday available to paying customers if needed). Those looking to rent

sionately about wanting to clean up abandoned and deteriorating properties, while Tony Corrado wanted to help put together a better emergency plan for the county. Stoffer, who serves on Sequim’s school board, talked of wanting to represent the interest of schools of all of Clallam County. Pratt, formerly Sequim’s Mayor and currently on the city council, spoke of her concerns of the current state of the Community Development Director position, a sentiment that was echoed by several other candidates a more informal question and answer session after the statements. Washington State law allows its counties to adopt an individual constitution that allows them to alter their form of government, or to create additional requirements for their government beyond what the State constitution has in place. One of seven charter counties in the state, Clallam County adopted its charter in 1976, amending the charter five times since then. In the last review session in 2015, the charter review commission elected to move to have reviews performed in five-year cycles instead of the more traditional 10-year cycle. Friday-Sunday will see rates increase 20 percent for all parties with $48 per hour for city residents and $58 for non residents. Nonprofits will pay city resident rates on weekends. A $70 minimum cleaning fee is still enacted for any rental. A refundable damage deposit is also required for $150 or $500 with alcohol served for the hall, or $300 for the kitchen. Sarah VanAusdle, public works management analyst, said that the changes follow city councilors’ requests for opening smaller blocks of time for rentals, continuing free use for nonprofits and streamlining janitorial service. She said the Events Center was rented for 881 hours of its available 5,475 hours in 2018, which equates to 16 percent of availability. For more information on happenings in the City of Sequim, visit www.sequimwa. gov or call 360-683-4139. Reach Matthew Nash at mnash@sequimgazette. com.

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RN Ralph Parker has joined Olympic Medical Center as the organization’s new chief nursing officer, OMC officials announced last week. Parker replaces Lorraine Wall, who is retiring in October. Wall will continue serving as Hospital Chief Operating Officer in her remaining time at OMC. “We are fortunate to have Ralph join us,” Eric Lewis, chief executive officer said. “He is an excellent fit for OMC, and his experience working in hospitals of varying sizes throughout the country offers informative perspective as we transform our organization and implement our 2019-2022 Strategic Plan.” Parker will oversee all nursing units, including the intensive care unit/telemetry, medical/surgical/pediatrics, obstetrics, short stay

and surgical services. He will also lead the emergency ser vices department, including PARKER Trauma Level 3-associated work. Most recently, Parker was the chief nursing officer of a rural hospital in Rawlins, Wyo. He was also a nurse executive for a time at Wyoming State Hospital, a 104-bed psychiatric facility. He had also served as a nurse executive for more than 11 years in the Banner Health System, where he worked in progressive nurse leadership roles. “We are also fortunate Lorraine will be with us over the next few months to lead some important improvement projects,” Lewis said. “She has done a tremendous job in her time at Olympic Medical Center.”

Learn about advance care planning at free WOW! workshop Nurse Sandra L. Ulf offers “Who will speak for you, if you can’t speak for yourself?,” a free WOW! Working on Wellness Forum set for 2:30 p.m. Wednesday, July 10, at Trinity United Methodist Church, 100 S. Blake Ave. Seating is limited so attendees are encouraged to arrive early. An advance care plan features two main elements: it designates who you trust to be your medical decisionmaker if you are incapacitated, and it clarifies your wishes for how medical care, including life-sustaining treatment, should proceed if you are unable to communicate. Ulf has been a registered nurse since 1976 and worked in several areas of healthcare including inpatient, outpatient, home care, and hospice. She said she has always been passionate about patients being knowledgeable as to their health issues and the choices available to

them, particularly at the end of their final journey. W O W ! Working on Wellness is a ULF health education program of Dungeness Valley Health Wellness Clinic — Sequim’s free clinic. The clinic provides basic urgent care and chronic health care services to uninsured community members. The clinic’s work is supported by more than 70 volunteers, including physicians, other professional health care providers and laypersons, as well as private and public donations from the Sequim community and beyond. The Basic Urgent Care Clinic is open to patients on Monday and Thursday evenings beginning at 5 p.m. Individuals interested in supporting the clinic may call 360-582-0218.

Volunteer hospice group to host orientations for volunteers Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County offers monthly orientations for those interested in volunteering with the organization. July sessions are scheduled for 11 a.m.-noon on Thursday, July 11, in Sequim (call 360-775-7806 for directions), and 10-11 a.m. Friday, July 12, at 810 S. Albert St., Port Angeles. Volunteer positions are available to fit individual schedules and talents, and training is offered. The organization seeks volunteers for equipment

delivery and maintenance, front desk reception and several outreach positions are open. For no fee, VHOCC provides end-of-life nursing care, lends medical equipment and supplies, offers education programs, grief support groups, one-onone bereavement services and practical workshops on living alone. To learn more about the local non-profit serving Clallam County from Joyce to Diamond Point, visit vhocc.org, on Facebook or call 360-452-1511.

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Robert Wiley Hull, 85, passed away peacefully on May 26, 2019, with his wife, Midge, of 55 years by his side. Bob was born December 29, 1933, in Bayard, Nebraska, to Robert Francis Hull and Alma Dorothy Wiley Hull, as the second of five children. He spent his early years in Nebraska, Idaho and Orting, Washington, where he attended school, and later, Edison Technical in Seattle. He worked at Boeing as an apprentice machinist at an early age and then joined the US Air Force during the Korean Conflict. During his 22 year career as a radar technician and precision measurement equipment specialist (meteorologist), he was stationed in Mississippi, Washington, the Philippines, Nebraska, and Labrador. He retired to Edmonds where he was director of a daycare center and then worked for the USPS, in Tukwila, for several years. He retired in 1999 and moved to Sequim. Bob enjoyed fishing, hunting, curling, square dancing, playing bridge, rock collecting and spending time with his grandchildren. Bob was a member of the Church of Latter Day Saints and took his responsibility seriously. He was preceded in death by two children; two brothers; and his parents. He is survived by five children; two step-children; 18 grandchildren; 15 great-grandchildren; and one greatgreat-grandchild; two sisters; and many nieces and nephews. A private family service was held on June 2, 2019.

OMC picks Parker as new Chief Nursing Officer


Wednesday, July 3, 2019 • A15

SEQUIM GAZETTE

Roads

From page A-1 Under the county’s plan, the roundabout would cost $1 million, which Tyler said is a high estimate. “We’ve never built one before, so we’re throwing high numbers at it,” he said. “I think we can do it for less, and we’ll have some better numbers by the fall. A roundabout is a reasonable solution for safety there.” Commissioner Mark Ozias said they put the roundabout in following community input to improve safety at the intersection. Recent talk of the roundabout and other Sequim/ Dungeness projects in unincorporated Clallam County following a June 17 listening session. Ozias said they were measuring community interest in the roundabout and other projects including safety improvements on Medsker Road and Evans Road.

Medsker Road Tyler said he’s fielded concerns about widening Medsker Road since he’s worked for the county. “It’s just not reasonable to widen it,” he said. “The usage is pretty local.” However, community complaints often come about large trucks trying to navigate it and there’s no centerline on the road, county staff said. Ozias said there is a lot of interest in improving strip-

“They were shocked to learn that it would cost $4 million (but) that’s the reality. It’s why Clallam County doesn’t have stop lights.” Ross Tyler Clallam County engineer

ing and restricting the size of trucks and trucks with trailers. “From the roads’ perspective, we can put some signage on it north and south asking truck drivers not to turn,” Tyler said. “They can go to someplace like Taylor Boulevard because (Medsker) is not someplace you want to take your (semi-truck).” Medsker Road hasn’t been striped for many years because of the size of county equipment, but Tyler said he’s been in touch with the City of Sequim about possibly partnering to paint fog and road stripes. “It’s something we’ll do this construction season to put some kind of stripes on it,” he said.

Consensus among those at the listening session, Tyler said was to leave the intersection alone because people enjoy the road. Ozias said he heard Reandeau’s concerns that Evans Road isn’t up to the county’s standards, it’s a dangerous intersection, and he sustains a lot crop and equipment damage and sees a lot of trash. He said county staff’s goal

with its Comprehensive Plan is to support local agriculture and support working farms. “Should a formal request come forward, we have a lot to consider,” Ozias said. Tyler said the county holds several public meetings before commissioners adopt the final Transportation Improvement Program in the fall. He said another public meeting will be held in the Sequim area this fall. Reandeau could not be reached for comment. For more information about the Clallam County Roads Department, call 360417-2379. Reach Matthew Nash at Clallam County staff say a roundabout at Woodcock Road and mnash@sequimgazette.com. Sequim-Dungeness Way is slated for construction tentatively in 2021. Sequim Gazette file photo by Matthew Nash

Evans Road While nothing final is being proposed by county staff at this time, Tyler said, one farmer seeks a possible solution on Evans Road to cut down on traffic wrecks and litter and damage to his farm. Tyler said Bob Reandeau looks to close public access from Sequim-Dungeness Way along Evans Road to just past his farm near Davis Sand and Gravel. 972342377

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A16 • Wednesday, July 3, 2019

SEQUIM GAZETTE

Rotary Club of PEO chapters help SHS grad Sequim lauds Schuman with scholarship local students MILESTONES

Three local Sequim PEO Chapters recently honored Shayli Schmann, a recent Sequim High School graduate, at the groups’ annual scholarship recipient reception, held at the Paradise Restaurant on June 25 Each chapter contributed $750 for a combined total of $2250 which will further Schuman’s education; the recent high school graduate plans on attending Western Washington University in Bellingham. Schuman’s father Ken joined club members for the occasion. Submitted photo Pictured are (back row, from left) Chapter EP President Robin Amestoy, Chapter EP Scholarship Chairman Laura Anderson, FY President Mynra Juergens and HM President Carol Barnes, with (front row, from left) Ken Schumann and scholarship recipient Shayli Schumann.

The Rotary Club of Sequim honored three Sequim youths with Student of the month awards at the club’s May 30 meeting. April’s Student of the Month is Hope Glasser, a junior at Sequim High School. She participates in SHS soccer, basketball and track, and said she enjoys science GLASSER and literature. She was recognized for her hard work, good academics and overall good citizenship. The daughter of Greg and Kim Glasser, she is considering

a career in the dental field or as a teacher, Rotary members said. Ashley Rosales was recognized at the May Student of the Month, and is the youngest graduating senior in Sequim High School’s his- ROSALES tory, Rotary Club members note. She plays tennis at SHS and is a member of Honor Society. She helps out with the Boys & Girls Club summer food program. The daughter of Stephen and Kim Rosales, she is planning to attend the University of Washing-

ton to study law. June’s Student of the Month was Alissa Lofstrom, a Sequim High Junior who was recognized for her participation in Interact, as a board member for Habitat for Humanity, for her good citizenship a n d p a r- LOFSTROM ticipation in volleyball. The daughter of Ken and Mary Lofstrom, she works after school in a downtown retail store and has a significant interest in the environment. Her future plans include working for the Peace Corps and studying marine biology and restoration ecology. The public is invited to join the Rotary Club of Sequim for weekly lunch meetings. See www.sequimrotary.org or www. facebook.com/sequimnoonrotary.

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Winners of Peninsula College’s 2019 English Essay Award were announced at the college’s June Board of Trustees meeting. The annual contest, started in 2011, included six winning submissions, with each student receiving $300 provided by the Teorey family and the Peninsula College Foundation. To be eligible, students must be enrolled in an English course at Peninsula College. Winning submissions include: 1. “Abuela’s Meez” by Rosa Herrera-Orellana 2. “Falling into a Tree” by Michael Nelson 3. “How I Neglected My Daughters’ Financial Educa-

HERRERAORELLANA

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tion” by Robert Allen 4. “Relevance of AfricanAmerican History in Baseball to August Wilson’s Fences” by Samuel May 5. “Why Gender Stereotypes are Dangerous and Unnecessary” by Jaden Harris 6. “The Vehicle of my Soul” by Mr. Gonzales Herrera-Orellana studied in the Medical Assistant Program at Peninsula College. She has been accepted into Central Washington University in

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MAY

hopes of pursuing her BAS in Public Health with a specialization in Sexual Health. Nelson has been pursuing the expansion and development of both his knowledge and his responsibility by attending pre-nursing classes at PC. It is his goal in life to become as useful a human being as possible by seeking out teachers and instructors who walk a life-supporting path with skill and insight. Allen, who moved to Port Angeles from Texas in 2018, is

an IT specialist with the North Olympic Library System and played guitar and sang professionally for more than 30 years. May is a first-year Running Start student now pursuing his associate of arts degree. While having had a love for writing since elementary school, he has always viewed it as a mechanism for expressing his interests rather than an interest itself. One of the winning essays was submitted by an inmate at Clallam Bay Corrections center, Mr. Gonzales, who was enrolled in a Peninsula College English course. For more information about the award, contact Michael Mills at mmills@ pencol.edu.

972365945


Fresh at the market B-3

B Community Wednesday, July 3, 2019

SECTION

SEQUIM GAZETTE

Arts & Entertainment • Business • Calendar • Schools

First Friday Art Walk awash in PURPLE

BY RENNE EMIKO BROCK

First Friday Art Walk

For the Sequim Gazette

When: 5-8 p.m. July 5 Location: Various venues near downtown Sequim On the web: SequimArtWalk.com

Sequim’s First Friday Art Walk in July 5 theme is purple, the color of Sequim’s famous lavender blooms and representing potential, camaraderie, thoughtfulness, cultivated dignity, spiritual significance and extravagance. Find works of art and folks supporting the option to dress in tints and shades of purple as they enjoy a festive night on the town with friends and fellow Sequimmers preparing for Sequim Lavender Weekend later in the month. Come out and celebrate what makes Sequim so special! First Friday Art Walk Sequim is a fun, free ,self-guided tour of local art venues in Sequim from 5-8 p.m. the first Friday of every month. Visit SequimArtWalk.com to download and print your own map, find special events, links and how to be part of art. Initiated in 2006, the Art Walk is an encouraging and educational arts event sponsored and produced by Renne Emiko Brock with a mission to create approachable, accessible art and cultural venues that encourage the community to connect and celebrate expression and diversity. Note: Several regular Sequim Art Walk venues will be closed because of the July 4 holiday.

Civic center bonanza

“Balancing Act” by Patty Waite, is featured art in the Sequim City Arts Advisory Commission exhibit, “The Beach.”Submitted art

tables from Sequim artists for Habitat for Humanity of Clallam County’s “Recycle into Art” Art Auction fundraiser and vote for your community People’s Choice winner!

Other special events

Robert Steelquist’s photography is on display at Alder Wood Bistro during the First Friday Art Walk in July.

A lot of activity happening at Se- Submitted photos quim’s civic center! City Arts Advisory Commission hosts the opening exhibit and artist reception for “The Beach” at the Sequim Civic Center, 152 W. Cedar St. The jury reviewed a record 110 pieces of artwork from 50 artists before selecting 40 pieces to be included in the exhibit. Artists represented are: Lora Armstrong, Lynne Armstrong, Gary Bullock, Jane Burkey, Jeannine Chappell, Patrick D. Clark, Gdane Tammy Hall, whose “Cormorant” is pictured Curposney, Melissa Doyel, here, presents “Creating Animals from DriftChristopher Enges, Marilynn wood: A Lesson in Anatomy” at the Sequim Evans, Cindy Fullwiler, John Civic Center on July 5. Submitted photo Gussman, Paulette Hill, Rick bers, experience the Art Talk on Hill, David Johannessohn, Mark the Art Walk that will include demKennedy, Rita Kepner, Katherine onstrations from local presenters Loveland, Melissa Mann, Natalie talking about driftwood creations, Martin, Stacey Martin-Lopez, visual and virtual storytelling and Linda Martz, Gail McLain, Sharman Owings, Sallie Radock, Claudia using videography and drone phoSerafin, Linda Stadtmiller, Morgan tography. Presenters include: • 5:30 p.m. – Tammy Hall, “CreStephenson, Ryoko Toyama, Patty ating Animals from Driftwood: A Waite, Donna Wilson-Sommer and Lesson in Anatomy” Sandy Wolf. • 6:15 p.m. – Renne Emiko Brock: Inside the Sequim council cham-

Sequim Acrobatics performs at Olympic Theatre Arts during the July 5 First Friday Art Walk. Pictured here are team members Logan Laxson and Madison Ripley.

“Message in a Bottle – Visual and Virtual Storytelling in Art” • 7 p.m. – Christopher Enges: “The Living Beach: Using Videography & Drone Photography to Capture its Essence” In the Lobby, 5-8 p.m., meet and

greet the artists , including Hall, Emiko Brock, Enges and Volodymyr (Vlad) Husarovskyi, whose distinctive art is created from roots, burls and uniquely-shaped driftwood. Also at the Sequim Civic Center, enjoy a preview of the creative end

City band sets ‘Patriotic 4th’ concert SEQUIM GAZETTE STAFF Break out the red, white and blue for the Sequim City Band’s annual Independence Day concert, set for 3 p.m. Thursday, July 4, at the James Center for the Performing Arts, 350 N. Blake Ave. This free event is set just north of Carrie Blake Community Park. Attendees are encouraged to bring lawn chairs with shade, picnic baskets and cool beverages as they enjoy live, patriotic music featuring both classic and modern musical salutes to the U.S.A. The concert includes “America, the Beautiful,” plus classic marches from three composers of the golden age of the American patriotic march: “Hosts of Freedom” (Karl King), “National Emblem March” (E.E. Bagley) and “Fugue on Yankee Doodle” (John Philip

The Sequim City Band entertains a large crowd at the Independence Day concert in 2016. Submitted photo by Richard Greenway

Sousa). The commemorative feature for this year’s concert is “American Civil War Fantasy,” written in 1961 by Jerry Bilik; the compilation includes 10 familiar American folksongs from the mid-

19th century. The concert will include the band’s tradition of honoring military veterans and current military personnel with the “Armed Forces Salute,” which features each service branch’s song. The

band encourages all veterans and military personnel to wear a cap identifying their service branch. Now in its 28th season of presenting free public concerts, the Sequim City Band typically has its largest summer audience for its July 4 concert. Lawn seating at The James Center for the Performing Arts can easily accommodate more than 800 people, band members say. To reach the James Center, enter the north section of Carrie Blake Park from North Blake Avenue at the Fir Street intersection. Upcoming Sequim CIty Band concerts include “Movies, Musicals, and Marches” at 3 p.m. on Sunday, Aug. 18, and “American Melodies” at 3 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 15. For more information about the Sequim City Band, see www.sequimcityband. org.

A new venue on the Art Walk is Design2Scan3D, 207 W. Spruce St. The venue, which features 3-D printing, 3-D scanning and ceramics classes, will be showcasing a member of the Dungeness Bonsai Society and making a miniature stoneware mold. Meet Tristen Beck and Luke Shifflett, new owners of Sunshine Café at 145 W. Washington St. Enjoy some finger food and watch an artist use one of Tim Quinn’s designs to paint a mural on the wall inside the restaurant. Sequim Acrobatics performs for Art Walk-goers starting at 5:30 p.m. at Olympic Theatre Arts Gathering Hall, 414 N. Sequim Ave. Dedicated to the art of acrobatics, Sequim Acrobatics members will be performing stunts, gymnastics skills, acro yoga and acrobatic routines. The snack and beverage bar will be open. Visit Purple Haze Lavender’s downtown store at 127 W. Washington St. for a book signing with Bonnie Louise Gillis, author of “The Lavender of Sequim: America’s Provence.” Tracy Wealth Management, 149 W. Washington St., hosts local photographer Phil Tauran. Fascinated by the pictorialist movement of the

See ART WALK, B-8

Expand your reading, expand your world Books have amazing powers to both affirm our lives and expand our horizons. Everyone has personal preferences for certain types of authors or characters, and reading in a well-loved genre, style or subject can be relaxing, comforting and reassuring. But reading can also expand Off the Shelf our world view, taking us Sarah Morrison beyond our own lives, local culture, or current society, and letting us experience different times, lifestyles, life experiences, places and cultures. Take a minute to think of the last handful of books you’ve read. Beyond subject or genre, how much do they have in common? Do the authors have similar ages, ethnicity, gender or socio-economic background? Do the main characters fit a general mold of

See SHELF, B-4


B2 • Wednesday, July 3, 2019

SEQUIM GAZETTE

Explore transport, culture in ‘Wheels’ program SEQUIM GAZETTE STAFF Transportation across the state throughout the years — from canoe journeys to flying cars to Boeing’s latest planes — are in the spotlight for Harriet Baskas’ “Washington on Wheels: Odd and Innovative Transportation Ideas from the Pacific Northwest” presentation, set for 6 p.m. Friday, July 12, at the Sequim Library, 630 N. Sequim Ave. Baskas, and author and broadcaster, takes audiences on a tour of notable BASKAS highlight s of state transportation history in this Humanities Washington Speakers Bureau event — examining not just how we get around but why we travel and where we might be going next. The audience will be invited to share family stories of migration, memories of first flights and unforgettable car trips, and consider a future of autonomous cars and vacations in space. The event is free. A Seattle resident, Baskas has a master’s degree in communications from the University of Washington and has served as the general manager for three Pacific Northwest radio stations and has created award-winning radio for National Public Radio (NPR). Her books include “Hidden Treasures: What Museums Can’t or Won’t Show You.” She writes about airports, air travel and museums for outlets that include NBC News, CNBC and USA Today. Speakers Bureau talks are free public presentations on history, politics, music, philosophy and everything in between. Humanities Washington’s roster of presenters are professors, artists, activists, historians, performers, journalists and others — all chosen not only for their expertise but “their ability to inspire discussion with people of all ages and backgrounds.” All talks are free and open to the public, and each lasts about an hour. They are hosted through a wide range of organizations throughout Washington state.

Kait Saffold, left, and Sharon DelaBarre reading through the letters they transcribed by hand from the script on a set under construction. Photo courtesy of Olympic Theatre Arts

OTA casts, rehearses ‘Immigrant Letters’ Production coming to stage in July SEQUIM GAZETTE STAFF Apropos with an expected influx of out-of-towners, Olympic Theatre Arts’ production of “The Immigrant Garden ~ Letters” — set to coincide with Sequim’s Lavender Weekend in July — is cast and in rehearsal. Cast in the two leading roles are veteran actress Sharon DelaBarre as Louise Beauchamp, an elderly and somewhat eccentric English gardener, and newcomer Kait Saffold as Cecily Barnes, a young and dreamy Washingtonian gardener. Set in 1910, Caroline Wood”s play sees Barnes passionate about having a flower garden. She finds a catalogue from “Mrs. Beauchamp’s Mystical Flower Seed and Herb Emporium” and sends off to England for seeds. The contact blooms into an

exchange of letters between young Cecily and Beauchamp that grows into a friendship transcending time and oceans. “I love Louise; she starts off saying basically that she’s older so she’ll just do what she wants to,” DelaBarre says. “She embeds character into her flowers, the butterflies in her garden, the toads in the grass, whatever. She’s even given the brook in her garden a personality.” Saffold says, “Every time we rehearse I feel like it’s a really special project. There’s just a lot of good gems and lessons in there. Even though it’s a period play I feel like it’s really timeless.” Also cast is Della LaCour, who was born in the same city of Yorkshire, England, from which the character of Louise writes her letters. LaCour

plays Helen Curtis, a friend of Louise. “I have not been on the stage since I was a child,” LaCour says, “but, wow, something told me I needed to go do this. The underlying messages with flowers and life and roots and things — it’s really touching.” Director Cathy Marshal says the play touches her heart. “It conveys a heightened sense of relationships, especially inter-generational,” Marshal says. “You’ve got a young woman of seventeen and an older woman who is in her seventies communicating across continents. It’s a lovely idea just being able to be friends and get to know one another even with that kind of distance in 1910. The play is lighthearted in a lot of places, but it’s also real sweet and tender throughout.” Additionally, Joe Schulz plays Washington arborist John Burrows.

“There are some real basic human lessons in this show,” DelaBarre says. “It’s about flowers and gardens on the surface, but the play is really about human growth and blossoming, and growing into your potential.”

Play details “The Immigrant Garden ~ Letters” runs from July 12-21 . Performance times are Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. Pay-What-You-Will night is 7:30 p.m. Thursday, July 18. Tickets are $15 for the general public, $13 for OTA members and $10 for students with school identification card. Get tickets at the theatre box office (1-5 p.m., Monday through Friday) or online at www. OlympicTheatreArts.org. For more information, call the theatre at 360-683-7326.

Sequim’s Beta Nu helps fund summer strings camp SEQUIM GAZETTE STAFF The Port Angeles Symphony’s Summer Strings Camp for young musicians was recently awarded a $4,000 grant from the Beta Nu chapter of the Delta Kappa Gamma Society International. The chapter, based in Sequim, makes grants to educators and nonprofit organizations that offer local programs. This second annual camp will be held at NatureBridge at Olympic National Park’s Lake Crescent, to give students a chance to concentrate on developing their skills and on making music together, away from distrac-

tions at home. Fifteen students — twice as many as last year — will participate in the strings intensive Aug. 11-15. The camp culminates in two public concerts: one at the Lake Crescent Lodge on Aug. 15 and another at First Presbyterian Church, 139 W. Eighth St., Port Angeles, on Aug. 16. Both free performances will start at 7 p.m. Monique Mead, an internationally known music educator and performer, will again lead the Summer Strings Camp along with ensemble conductor James Ray, the departing director of orchestras at Port Angeles High School. Jesse Ahmann, a cel-

list from Port Angeles, will teach improvisation techniques and coach low strings. And t wo more alumnae of the school orchestras, Marley Cochran and Lauren Waldron, serve as mentors to the students at camp. Cochran, 19, is a violinist studying at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma while Waldron, 20, is a violist on a music scholarship at the College of Idaho. Waldron was the winner of the Port Angeles Symphony’s Nico Snel Young Artist Competition in 2018. For more information, call the Symphony office at 360-457-5579 or email to PASymphony@olypen.com.

Monique Mead of the Carnegie Mellon University School of Music will lead the Port Angeles Symphony’s Summer Strings Camp this August. The program culminates in two public concerts in and near Port Angeles. Submitted photo

Dr. Brooksby, One of my best friends came to you for an examination and treatment and was really impressed. He said that a visit to your office was different than any other professional office he had been to. What is a visit to your office like, and why are you so different? Impressed. Dear Impressed, WE DO NOT MAKE YOU WAIT. When I personally have to visit another professional, I hate more than anything to have my time wasted. I could never understand why someone would make an appointment for you at 3 and then keep you waiting until 4 or 5. I understand that occasionally things do not go as planned, but in my office, if you ever wait more than 30 minutes after your appointment time for me to see you, I will credit your account $10. I believe your time is valuable too. WE ANSWER YOUR QUESTIONS. The second thing I expect is to have them answer the questions I have about the care I will be receiving. I do not like having someone assume the position that they are superior to me in any way, and that I should simply do what they say. I also believe that there is usually more than one way to treat any given problem, and that each option has its advantages and disadvantages. I prefer to be involved in my treatment, because I accept things better when I understand why things are done the way that they are. WE LISTEN. In my office we take the time to listen to what you have to say. You live with you all day long. Your experiences and how you react to things are critical in finding the best solution to any problem. I find that if I carefully listen to a patient, I can often diagnose the problem before I actually do the examination. Once we have collected all of the information available, we can then sit down with you, confirm the diagnosis and then explore the available options. WE GIVE CHOICES. I had a patient this morning come in for an examination. They were convinced that there were only two options for treatment because they had already seen someone else for the problem. When we reviewed their options, they discovered that there were actually seven different options available. We discussed each option in detail and gave them the advantages and disadvantages of each option. We use models, x-rays and a mirror to help each patient understand what can and can not be done.

This takes more time and usually involves a couple of appointments before most patients decide what they want to accomplish. They can review a typed copy of the notes made last visit so that they can see clearly what each option involves. Some patients choose the option that is least expensive at the time. Many choose the option that provides them the longest lasting resolution to their problem. Some decide on a course that involves an early solution that can form the basis for a gradual progression to a longer lasting solution. Because the treatment options we provide can be life enhancing, sometimes they take a considerable amount of time to accomplish. Sometimes treating more slowly and methodically may substantially increase the longevity of the solution. It is essential that we work together to solve these problems. Often all that is needed is a little filling and all is good. But sometimes a whole lot more is required. It is my goal to treat each person as I would like to be treated myself. Most of my patients become my friends. Things do not always go perfectly and when there is an unexpected outcome, most of my patients understand why we are proceeding the way we are. They realize that we are doing all we can to achieve the outcomes they desire. A LITTLE MORE EXPENSIVE, BUT WORTH IT. Many patients ask how come they never have to wait for long in my waiting room. They ask why I take so much time with them to make sure they understand. The answer is simple. That is the way I would want to be treated. Since I control my schedule, I manage my schedule so that each person gets the time they deserve. I am a little bit more expensive and I expect patients to respect my time also. That way everyone stays happy, and my patients tell their friends, like yours did, about their visit to our office.

If you would like to meet Dr. Brooksby or if you have any kind of dental concern and would like a fresh look at what choices are available to you, call and schedule an examination and let’s see what we can do to help you.

680 W. Washington #E102 • 360-207-2117 • www.drbrooksby.com

972349251

Dr. Scott Brooksby - Sequim Advanced Dental


Wednesday, July 3, 2019 • B3

SEQUIM GAZETTE

Business

BUSINESS NEWS Aceto takes position at 1st Security Bank

SEQUIM GAZETTE

Enjoy ‘Berry Burst Day’

What’s New at the Market? April Hammerand Come enjoy “Berry Burst Days” at Sequim Farmers Market as we honor our local farmers and the joy of the luscious berries they provide. We think our berries are among the sweetest in the world and we want to celebrate our good fortune, so please come and celebrate with us. This event is sponsored by Hurricane Hills Winery and Blue Mountain Baking Company, both featuring products made from local berries. Our community is bursting with wonderful farms and the Sequim Farmers Market is lucky to have our local farmers bring their produce for all to enjoy. River Run Farm (certified organic) will be at the market every weekend with a variety of lettuces, including red leaf, red butter, green butter, oak leaf and romaine, along with beets, spinach, broccolini and Hakurei turnips. Also through the month of July, Joy Farm (certified organic) will start to bring snap peas, cauliflower and potatoes. Watch the Sequim Farmers Market Facebook page for up-to-date descriptions of produce that will be available at the market each weekend in July.

Check out local fruit such as these strawberries from Joy Farm, at the Sequim Farmers Market. Submitted photo

Sequim Farmers Market

Open: 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, July 6 Location: Sequim Civic Center Plaza, downtown Sequim More info: manager@sequimmarket.com or 360-582-6218 On the web: www.sequimmarket.com

focuses on beautiful melody and harmony. A special thanks to Bell & Davis Law and BrokersGroup Real Estate for supporting the Sequim Farmers Market. April Hammerand is the Market Manager for the Sequim Farmers Market. Reach her at manager@sequimmarket.com or 360-582-6218. For more information visit www. sequimmarket.com.

can support these hard work- playing a wide variety of old ing youth. In doing so, you and new, high energy, soulful encourage free enterprise; get music. Jam & Toast is a smaller high quality meat and good version of that with more inadvertising, plus the personal fluences on older traditional satisfaction of investing in type music made new and and promoting our youth to numerous fields of higher education and careers. Please come talk to these amazing AT IT’S BEST FOR A WHOLE LOT LESS! kids and see their animals at Talking 4-H the Sequim Farmer’s Market Community guests Clallam Saturday. County 4-H will have a booth at the Sequim Farmers Mar- Market tunes The Summer Live Music ket this Saturday to talk with members of the community series continues with Jam and about the upcoming Clallam Toast. Jam & Toast is a paired County Junior Livestock Auc- down version of the band tion in August. Bread & Gravy, and consists of While Supplies Last The 4-H youth will bring Northwest locals Angela Clift FINANCING AVAILABLE along a few animals includ- (vocals) and Stephanie Do360-681-7804 ing a calf, lamb, goat and enges (guitar, ukulele, vocals). Fine Furniture at Affordable Prices Hours: Mon.-Sat. 9:30-5:30, Sun. 11-4 rabbit. In addition, they will Bread & Gravy is a five- and have a PowerPoint presenta- sometimes six-member band 609 W. Washington St. • Sequim Next to JCPenney tion that will run every halfhour and will be available to answer questions about how businesses and members of the community can support these budding agricultural entrepreneurs. in one trip or Each year 4-H youth raise delivery is FREE† livestock to be auctioned off at the Clallam County Fair. These youth spend countless hours raising and working with their animals in preparation for the fair and livestock in one trip or delivery is FREE† show. This experience teaches them responsibility, how to produce food for the table, and the ups and downs of running a small business.  Learn the many ways you

Northwest Living

Board Member for Habitat for Humanity, and serves 1st Security Bank an- as a Family Mentor Leader nounced last week that for that organization. Anthony Scott Aceto was Two physicians join recently hired as Assistant Vice President-Branch staff at NOHN North Olympic HealthManager at the bank’s Secare Network announced quim office. last week that Dr. Kristin A c e t o Puhl and Dr. Mira Nelson has over 13 are joining the staff as years of experience in second-year resident physithe banking cians as of June 25. industry, inResident cluding six p h ysicia ns ACETO years as a begin their branch manager. He spe- second year cializes in working with of residency nonprofits, small and large with NOHN businesses, wealth man- a f ter comPUHL agement and professional pleting their services businesses. He f i r s t y e a r received the “Top 10 Per- at Swedish sonal Bankers Nationwide” Cherry Hill award from JP Morgan via the RuChase, was named to the ral Training Presidents Club for Top Track — a Performance in 2017 and j o i n t v e n NELSON 2018 at his previous finanture between cial institution, and was the NOHN, Olympic Medical National Sales and Service Center and Swedish CherAward Recipient at Wells ry Hill Family Medicine Fargo in 2009. “I am extremely honored Residency in Seattle. The to be a part of the 1st Secu- program is designed to rity team,” Aceto said. “The train physicians in rural leadership team’s dedica- communities and increase tion to creating a positive, the physician workforce in welcoming culture and communities with inadworkplace demonstrates equate primary care access. that the Bank lives its vi- About 60 percent who train sion of ‘building a great in rural settings remain for place to work and bank’ their career. For more information from the top down. With the company’s strong focus about NOHN’s Rural Trainon giving back to our com- ing Track program, contact munities and our custom- RTT Site Director Dr. Rob ers, it couldn’t be a better Epstein at repstein@nohnpa.org, or visit nohn-pa. fit for me.” Aceto is active in the org/about-us/rtt-residenSequim community as a cymedical-education.

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B4 • Wednesday, July 3, 2019

Shelf

From page B-1 of country of origin, skin color or life experiences? Do they tend to be set in one time period or location? Do you read only fiction or only nonfiction? If you are ready to range more broadly, there are plenty of ways to challenge yourself with wider reading experiences. Here are some tips for getting started. Read a book … • by an author under 30 • by a female (or male) author • by an immigrant author • with a biracial main character • with a Native main character • set on each continent • set in another U.S. state • published this year • published the decade you were born • translated from another language

Suggested reads Try Michelle “Adelman’s Piece of Mind,” about an adult character living with a traumatic brain injury suddenly having to adjust to life without her protective parent. In Sarah Waters’ “The Paying Guests,” a woman and her mother living in genteel poverty after WWI take in boarders to get by; an accidental murder complicates the attraction the woman has for a married female guest. Anouk Markovits’ “I Am Forbidden” begins by following two sisters

SEQUIM GAZETTE

A&E BRIEFS

living in the insular, ultraorthodox Hasidic Jewish community of Brooklyn after WWII, following the family through the years to 2005 Manhattan. A myst er y s et in 1920s B o m b a y, Sujata M a s se y ’s “The Widows of Malabar Hill” focuses on Parveen Mistry, a female lawyer relegated to little more than paperwork until a group of Muslim widows, living in seclusion and unable to talk to men, give her the opportunity to meet with clients. A thoughtful fiction set in Antarctica is Ashley Shelby’s “South Pole Station.”

‘Women in Shakespeare’ plus wine, dessert on tap Join Anna Andersen, director of The “Taming” of the Shrew, and Janet Lucas, Dean of Arts and Sciences at Peninsula College, as they delve into the realm of women in Shakespeare — as seen through the eyes of the #MeToo generation — at the Women in ShakespeareWine & Dessert Talk, set for 6-8 p.m. Friday, July 12, at the Port Angeles Fine Arts Center, 1203 E. Lauridsen Blvd. Cost is $25 (at the door). A brief history of the plight of women in Shakespeare’s time will be followed by an examination of some of his most notable female characters. The evening’s conversation pairs with flour-less chocolate cake and choice of red or white wine. Call 360-457-3532, email The Carpe Diem Quartet helps kick off the 2019 Concerts in the Barn series in Quilcene on to pafac@olypen.com or see July 5, 6 and 7. Submitted photo www.pafac.org/women-inshakespeare.html for more information.

Search and locate To find books featuring authors of other genders, ethnicities or backgrounds, search “ability diverse,” “LGBTQIA diverse,” “religiously diverse” or “culturally diverse” in NoveList, one of NOLS’ online resources, for lists to get started. NoveList and other reading suggestion databases can be accessed for free with your library card at www.nols. org/readers-advisory. You can even receive a personalized reading list — whatever your interests or preference — through NOLS’ BookMatch program. Fill out the simple form and a real, live, library staff member will create a custom reading list for you within a few days. And, of course, stop by the Sequim Library at 630 N. Sequim Ave. to get inperson suggestions from your friendly library staff, or call 360-683-1161. Sarah Morrison is a librarian with the North Olympic Library System.

972383938

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH of Sequim

Book group examines ‘If Today Be Sweet’ The Second Saturday Book DiscussionGrouptalksabout Thrity Umrigar’s “If Today Be Sweet” at 3 p.m. Saturday, July 13, at the Sequim L i b r a r y, 630 N. Sequim Ave. In t he novel, the recently widowed Tehmina Sethna is asked to choose between continuing her old life in India and starting a new one in an unfamiliar country with her son, his American wife and their child. To participate, simply read the book and attend the discussion; no reservations are needed, and drop-ins are welcome. To view a complete list of 2019 Book Discussion Group selections, visit www. nols.org/book-discussiongroups. Copies of the title are available in various formats including regular print, large print, audiobook on CD and downloadable eBook, which may be requested online by visiting the library catalog at www.nols.org; a limited number of copies of each book discussion selection are available at the library. For more information, visit www.nols.org, email to discover@nols.org or call 360-683-1161.

Concerts in the Barn series kicks off July 5

1323 Sequim Dungeness Way, (360) 683-2114 FREE Vacation Bible School Theme: In The Wild Ages: kids age 5 to those who have finished 6th Grade Dates: Monday, July 8 - Thursday, July 11 Time: 9:00am- Noon (lunch included) Family Fun Day: Thursday, July 11, 11:00a, - 2:00pm; outdoor hot dog cookout with bouncy house Online Registration Available at www.fbcsequim.com

Organizers of Concerts in the Barn announced the program’s third season of free chamber music concerts held in its iconic barn in Quilcene. This year, the season begins on Friday, July 5, and continues each weekend through July 21.

Working on Wellness®

“Who will speak for you, if you can’t speak for yourself?” Wednesday, July 13 2:30-3:30pm

Trinity United Methodist 100 South Blake Ave, Sequim WA

presents

Debbie Harding’s art is on display this month at One of a Kind Art Gallery in Port Angeles. Submitted art

The farm opens to visitors at noon each concert day. At 1 p.m., the barn doors open for patrons to reserve seats, either on pews or hay bales in the loft. Concerts begin at 2 p.m.; no tickets are required. This year, Concerts in the Barn features the Carpe Diem String Quartet, featuring Concerts in the Barn veterans first violinist Charles Wetherbee and violist Korine Fujiwara, with second violinist Marisa Ishikawa and cellist Gregory Sauer. On Friday, July 5, mandolinist/composer Jeff Midkiff joins the quartet to perform traditional folk and fiddling tunes as well as original compositions. On July 6 and 7, Carpe Diem and Midkiff perform Midkiff’s string quintet “Gypsy” as well as music composed by Fujiwara. The Quartet also will perform Samuel Barber’s American string quartet. For more about the series, see ConcertsInTheBarn. org, email to concertsinthebarn@gmail.com or call 360-732-0732.

Accordion social set in Sequim Charlie Brown of Gig Harbor is the featured player at the next Sequim Accordion Social, slated for 1-4 p.m. Sunday, July 14, at the

Harding, Falk picked artists of month

Charlie Brown is the featured player at the July 14 Sequim Accordion Social. Submitted photo

Shipley Center, 921 E. Hammond St. A $2-$3 admission donation is requested at the door to help pay for the rental of the room. All players are asked to bring their accordion and a song or two to play for the crowd. Accordion lovers and dancers are invited as well. Brown is a veteran of the Nevada lounge circuit, was a headliner at the Top of the Wheel at Harvey’s Casino and The Sahara in Lake Tahoe and often appeared there in the 1960s, 70s and 80s. He toured Europe for more than two years in the early 1960s, and played the cruise ship SS Universe in the 1980s.

Debbie Harding and Barb Falk are July Artists of the Month at One of a Kind Art Gallery, 115 E. Railroad Ave., Port Angeles. Harding, a pastel artist who moved with her husband Casey from Santa Rosa to Sequim, is a member of the Olympic Peninsula Art Association and was the artist/presenter at the group’s March meeting. She was selected by Olympic Theater Arts to do the artwork for their upcoming musical, “Quilters” and was juried into the Blue Whole Gallery January show in 2019. Falk comes from a large family in Wisconsin, she developed a strong love and respect for animals and the great outdoors, as reflected in many of her acrylic paintings. A member of the Olympic Peninsula Art Association, Falk’s work has been displayed at various businesses and shows throughout the area. Owned by Mary Comeau, One of a Kind Art Gallery represents more than 40 artist encompassing a variety of media and showcases two artists each month. See www.oneofakindartgallery. com.

FOR COMMUNITY, NOT FOR PROFIT

Olympic Theatre Arts

With...

COMING SOON!

Speaker:

Sandra L. Ulf

Olympic Medical Center Advanced Care Planning Program

Immigrant Garden ~ Letters Wood ne

by Caroli

directed by Cathy Marshall sponsored by Mike Medler

An order from a seed catalogue begins a friendship transcending time and oceans.

Working on Wellness is a program of

Proud Supporters

Cherie Gray This Wellness Forum is offered in collaboration with

Thursday, July 18 at 7:30 p.m.

July 12—July 21

Olympic Theatre Arts Center, 414 N. Sequim Ave. OlympicTheatreArts.org. (360) 683-7326

972381628

The Baritelle family in memory of John Baritelle

Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. Sunday matinees at 2:00 p.m. Pay-What-You-Will night:


Wednesday, July 3, 2019 • B5

SEQUIM GAZETTE

COMMUNITY CALENDAR Deadline for items appearing in the community calendar is noon on Wednesday, one week before publication at editor@sequimgazette. com or delivered to the Sequim Gazette at 147 W. Washington St.

Music/Dance/Etc.

Auditions/Submissions • Soroptimist International of Sequim’s 22nd Gala Garden Show, seeking art submissions. Deadline: July 15. Mail entries to: Gala Garden Show Artwork, PO Box 2076, Sequim, WA 98382. More info: sisgsartwork@ gmail.com or 360-683-4788. • Grand Olympics Chorus of Sweet Adelines International accepting new members: 6:45 p.m. Mondays, 990 E. Washington St., Suite E-102. www.GrandOlympicsChorus.org.

Ongoing music/dance

Mondays • Grand Olympic Chorus rehearsals for women’s a cappella four-part harmony. 6:45 p.m. 990 E. Washington St., Ste. 102. Call Beth, 360775-1415, or Wendy, 360683-0141. • Shipley Center ukulele group. 1-3 p.m. 921 E. Hammond St. $3 non-members/$2 members. Beginner’s classes available, 360-477-4240. Tuesdays • Jason Paul and Friends, blues-jazz-rock, 4-6 p.m., Wind Rose Cellars, 143 W. Washington St. • The Cat’s Meow, jazz for dancers hosted by Port Angeles Senior Swingers Dance Group, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh St., $5 (first time free), 360-582-9026. • Sequim Community Orchestra rehearsals. 7- 9 p.m. September-June, James Center for the Performing Arts, www.sequim communityorchestra.org. • Olympic Peninsula Men’s Chorus rehearsal. 6:30- 8:30 p.m. Sunland Golf and Country Club clubhouse, 109 Hilltop Road. • Olympic Mountain Cloggers. 6 p.m. Howard Wood Memorial Theater, 132½ W. Washington St., 360-681Events, exhibits 3987. • First Friday Art Walk • Rhody O’s Square Dance

The Pacific Science Center’s Science on Wheels brings “A Space Odyssey” to the Sequim Middle School on July 9. Photo courtesy of Pacific Science Center

Pacific Science Center bringing ‘A Space Odyssey’ to peninsula SEQUIM GAZETTE STAFF As part of the Summer Reading Program, the Pacific Science Center’s Science on Wheels is traveling to the North Olympic Library System to present “A Space Odyssey” at three local libraries. The presentation comes to the Sequim Middle School, 301 W. Hendrickson Road, at 10:30 a.m. on Tuesday, July 9, and 2 p.m. later that day at the Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St. The Forks Branch Library hosts the program at 4 p.m. on Wednesday, July 10. Children can cheer on friends and help an “astronaut-in-training” prepare for a trip to the moon, as this show takes off with a demonstration about balloons in the Club. 7:30 p.m. Gardiner Community Center, 360683-2409. Wednesdays • Open mic with Victor Reventlow. Sign-ups 5:30 p.m., Big Elk, 1707 E. Washington St. 360-797-4906. • Jerry’s Classic Country Band, 6 p.m. Sequim VFW Post 4760, 169 E. Washington St. • Sequim City Band rehearsal. 7-9 p.m. James Center for the Performing Arts (in north Carrie Blake Community Park), 350 N. Blake Ave., www.sequimcityband. org, scb@sequimcityband. org or 360-207-4722. Thursdays • Open mic at Rainshadow Coffee, 157 W. Cedar St. 5:30-8:30 p.m. All ages, acts welcome. 360-797-1654 or therain shadowcafe@gmail. com. • Open mic jam session with Jillian, Disco Bay Detour, 282332 US Highway 101, Port Townsend. 7-9 p.m. disco baydetour@gmail.com. Saturdays • Jerry’s Classic Country Band, 6 p.m. Sequim VFW Post 4760, 169 E. Washington St.

Ongoing Events • Alcoholics Anonymous, 877-682-4143 or 360-7970259 or www.district55aa. com for meeting schedule, times. • Shipley Center classes, activities. 921 E. Hammond St., Sequim, 360-683-6806. • Blue Mountain Yoga+, 803 Carlsborg Road, Suite D, has all levels of classes in yoga, tai chi and meditation. Also, studio available to rent for events. Call 360-775-9078 or visit www.bluemountain yoga.co for class times/cost, visit FB page.

vacuum of space. Attendees can contemplate the real size of the moon, investigate astronomy tools and cheer on a friend as they race at the speed of light. The theme for the 2019 Summer Reading Program is “A Universe of Stories.” This summertime celebration encourages children to keep reading during the summer break from school and features a reading challenge with prizes and a multitude of events for all ages. The summer program is supported by the Friends of the Library at all four NOLS libraries. For more information about the Summer Reading Program and other events, visit www.nols.org/srp, call 360-417-8500 or email to discover@nols.org.

Sundays • Full Contact Trivia, 6 p.m., Wii Bowling 8 p.m. Oasis Bar & Grill, 301 E. Washington St., 360-582-3143. • Bingo, noon, Sequim Elks Lodge, 143 Port Williams Road. $10 buy-in, 360683-2763. Mondays • Monday Musicale meetings, third Monday, Queen of Angels Catholic church fellowship hall, 209 W. 11th St., Port Angeles. 360-477-8601. • WSU Clallam County Master Gardeners tend plots at Port Angeles Fifth Street Community Garden, 10 a.m.noon; home gardeners welcome to ask questions about vegetable gardening. 360565-2679. • Ping-pong, advanced, 360-681-4675; bingo, 360683-9546. • Sequim Duplicate Bridge Club games, 12:30 p.m., Masonic Lodge, 100 S. Fifth Ave., $5. 360-582-1289. • Sequim Valley Car Club, 6 p.m. third Monday, Sequim Elks Club, 143 Port Williams Road, 360-460-8319. • Peninsula Button Club, 1-3 p.m. fourth Monday, First Federal, 1202 W. Washington St., 360-683-7935. Tuesdays • CADWGA (Cedars at Dungeness Women’s Golf Association). Players tee off at 8:30 a.m. Applications at The Cedars at Dungeness, 1965 Woodcock Road. 360683-6344. • Civil Air Patrol Dungeness Squadron, 6-8 p.m. Tuesdays, Sequim Middle School cafeteria, 301 W. Hendrickson Road, open to cadets age 12-18 and adults with aviation interests, mark. swanson@wawg.cap.gov or 360-912-2888. • Highland Irrigation Dis-

Dining Guide We have a NEW PASTRY CHEF! Come try out our selection of Summer Treats!

Now Catering for FAMILY get togethers (360) 683-1055 • 609 W Washington St, Sequim

Daily Specials Specials and and Events Events Daily and Events Daily Specials Mondays - $6.75 Burger & Fries All Day

Mondays FriesAll AllDay Day Mondays- -$6.75 $6.75Burger Burger & Fries Tuesdays - South of the Border Specials

Tuesdays- -South Southof of the the Border Border Specials Tuesdays Specials

Wednesdays - Amazing Ribs & Heavenly Wings

Wednesdays- -Amazing Amazing Ribs Ribs & Wednesdays & Heavenly HeavenlyWings Wings Thursdays - $7.25 Steak & Fries... Wow!

Thursdays- -$7.25 $7.25 Steak Steak & & Fries... Thursdays Fries...Wow! Wow!

Fridays - “The Best Prime Rib on the Planet”

DON BELL, CPA

Fridays- -“The “TheBest Best Prime Prime Rib Fridays Rib on onthe thePlanet” Planet” Saturdays - Spaghetti & Meatballs

Tax Preparation Tax Planning

Sundays - Free “Full Contact” Trivia at 6pm

16 Beers Beers On On Tap Tap 16

Sundays - Free “Full Contact” Trivia at 6pm

QuickBooks Consulting

Beers OnUntil Tap9pm All16 Ages Welcome All Ages Welcome Until 9pm

All Ages Until 301 E.Welcome Washington St.9pm

301 E. Washington St.

Training and Support

Sequim 301 E. Washington St. Sequim (360) 582-3143 Sequim (360) 582-3143 www.TheOasisSequim.com (360) 582-3143 www.TheOasisSequim.com

Formation of Business Entities for Best Tax Benefits Customized Accounting Packages Customized Payroll Services

Find us on Facebook

Find us on Facebook www.TheOasisSequim.com 972378803

www.bgc-op.org • 360-683-8095

Find us on Facebook

972317532

Present and Future Needs

Saturdays - Spaghetti & Meatballs Saturdays Meatballs Sundays -- Spaghetti Free “Full & Contact” Trivia at 6pm

962297017

Make a difference by donating TODAY!

Business, Individual, Trusts & Estates

Give us a call today 360.683.5290 264 West Washington St., Sequim, WA

trict, 7 p.m., first Tuesday, Adagio Bean & Leaf, 481 E. Washington St. • Sequim/Dungeness Kiwanis Club, noon-1 p.m., second/fourth Tuesday, Paradise Restaurant, 703 N. Sequim Ave. • Sequim Diabetes support group, 10-11 a.m., first

Tuesday, Shipley Center, 921 E. Hammond St., 683-6806. • Skwim Toastmasters Club. Meets every Tuesday, 7 p.m. 135 Fairway Drive, Sequim. Guests welcome. Contact Lindy MacLaine, 206-818-3070. • Greywolf Fly Fishers Club, 2 p.m., third Tuesday, Clallam PUD building, 104 Hooker Road, Carlsborg; 360457-9546. • Drop-in grief support group, 1:30-3 p.m. first/third Tuesday, Sequim Community Church, 950 N. Fifth Ave. Paul Fiorini, 360-582-3796. • Peninsula Community Drum Circle, 6:30-8:30 p.m., fourth Tuesday; for July 23, Aug. 27, at Pam’s Labyrinth, 186 Deer Ridge Lane (off Hooker Road), 360-683-3819. • National MS Society support group, 2-4 p.m., last Tuesday, OMC Sequim Medical Building, second floor conference room, 840 N. Fifth Ave., 206-817-5636. Wednesdays • Weight Watchers reimagined. 5-6:30 p.m., 150 E. Bell St. 800-651-6000, www. weightwatchers.com. • Olympic Theatre Arts improvisation classes. 6:30- 8:30 p.m., first and third Wednesdays, at 414 N. Sequim Ave. Register at www.Olympic TheatreArts.org, at OTA box office or 360-683-7326. • Celebrate Recovery, 6- 8 p.m., Dungeness Community Church, 45 Eberle Lane, 360683-7333. • PAL (Parents of Addicted Loved Ones), 6-7:30 p.m., first and third Wednesdays, Sequim Community Church, 950 N. Fifth Ave., 360-5656368. • The Olympic Peninsula Oneness Blessings Circle, 6:30-8 p.m. every Wednesday, 2227 E. Lindberg Road, Port Angeles, 360-477-5682. • Bird walks at Railroad Bridge Park, 360-681-4076.

972369242

Thursday, July 4 • Sequim City Band, “Patriotic 4th Celebration,” 3 p.m., The James Center for the Performing Arts, 350 N. Blake Ave. • Buck Ellard Band, country, 6 p.m., 7 Cedars Casino’s Club Seven, 270756 US Highway 101. Friday, July 5 • Twisted Roots, jazz, 7-9 p.m. Wind Rose Cellars, 143 W. Washington St. • Hippy & The Squids, 7 p.m., 7 Cedars Casino’s Rainforest Cafe, 270756 US Highway 101. • DJ O.B.1, 9 p.m., 7 Cedars Casino’s Club Seven, 270756 US Highway 101. Saturday, July 6 • Jenny Davis Trio, 7- 9 p.m., Wind Rose Cellars, 143 W. Washington St. • Joel Gibson Jr., 7 p.m., 7 Cedars Casino’s Rainforest Cafe, 270756 US Highway 101. • Shades of Huey Lewis, tribute to Huey Lewis and The News, 9 p.m., 7 Cedars Casino’s Club Seven, 270756 US Highway 101. Sunday, July 7 • Olympic Generations, “Americana” favorites, 68:30 p.m., $10 (members $8), Sequim Elks Lodge, 143 Port Williams Road. Tuesday, July 9 • Music in the Park series: John Hoover and the Mighty Quinns (music of John Denver), 6 p.m., James Center for the Performing Arts, 500 N. Blake Ave. Thursday, July 11 • Black Diamond Junction, classic hits, 6 p.m., 7 Cedars Casino’s Club Seven, 270756 US Highway 101. Friday, July 12 • FarmStrong, 6-8:30 p.m., $10 (members $8), Sequim Elks Lodge, 143 Port Williams Road. • Dawn Martin, 7- 9 p.m., Wind Rose Cellars, 143 W. Washington St. • Buck Ellard, 7 p.m., 7 Cedars Casino’s Rainforest Cafe, 270756 US Highway 101. • Silver City 6, classic rock, 9 p.m., 7 Cedars Casino’s Club Seven, 270756 US Highway 101. Saturday, July 13 • Cort Armstrong and Stringology, gypsy jazz, 7-9 p.m. Wind Rose Cellars, 143 W. Washington St. • Bread & Gravy, 7 p.m., 7 Cedars Casino’s Rainforest Cafe, 270756 US Highway 101. • Ty Herndon, acoustic country, 9 p.m., $15/$20, 7 Cedars Casino’s Club Seven, 270756 US Highway 101. Sunday, July 14 • Rude & UnProfessional, swing and other genres, 6-8:30 p.m., $10 (members $8), Sequim Elks Lodge, 143 Port Williams Road. Tuesday, July 16 • Music in the Park series: Stardust Big Band, big band, 6 p.m., James Center for the Performing Arts, 500 N. Blake Ave.

Sequim, 5-8 p.m. July 5. Various venues near downtown Sequim. www.SequimArt Walk.com. • Concerts in the Barn, Quilcene. Free chamber music concerts, weekends, July 5-21. ConcertsInTheBarn. org, concertsinthebarn@ gmail.com, 360-732-0732. • Olympic Theatre Arts’ production of “The Immigrant Garden ~ Letters,” July 12-21; Fridays and Saturdays, 7:30 p.m., Sundays, 2 p.m. Pay-What-You-Will night 7:30 p.m. Thursday, July 18. Tickets $15,, $13 for OTA members, $10 students. www.OlympicTheatreArts. org, 360-683-7326. • Accordion social, 1-4 p.m. Sunday, July 14, Shipley Center, 921 E. Hammond St. $2-$3 donation. • Class & Sass, “Drag Kweens from up and down the West Coast,” Friday, July 19; doors open at 7:30 p.m., show (21+) at 8 p.m. $15 presale, $20 at door, proceeds go to Sequim Food Bank; DJ O.B.1 performs through 1 a.m. 7 Cedars Casino’s Club Seven, 270756 US Highway 101. www.7cedarsresort.com/ class-sass.html?evtd= 201907-19. • Tour de Lavender biking event, 8 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 3. Fun Ride and Metric Century rides to area lavender farms. www.tourdelavender.com.


B6 • Wednesday, July 3, 2019

SEQUIM GAZETTE

Fertilizers 101: The basics Do not use manure as the only source of nitrogen in a garden because manures are usually high in phosphorus relative to nitrogen.

Because of a production error, the June 26 “Get It Growing Column” was only partially printed. Here is the article in full. — MD Plants need many different nutrients to grow normally. They get some of these nutrients from the air and water; most they get from the soil. Three nutrients that Get It plants Growing from the get soil by Judy English – nitrogen, and Jeanette phosphorus Stehr-Green and potassium – are needed in relatively large quantities. As a result, these nutrients, often called the primary nutrients, are at the heart of most plant fertilizers.

potassium.) The three numbers together are called the nitrogen-phosphorus-potassium (or N-P-K) ratio. For example, if the numbers on a bag of fertilizer are 5-1010, then by weight, 5 percent is nitrogen, 10 percent is phosphorus and 10 percent is potassium. But what is the remaining 75 percent of the bag by weight? It is “inert ingredients” which make the fertilizer easier to distribute. “Inert ingredients” vary by manufacturer, and are usually sand or other materials that have no nutritional value for plants.

Fertilizers, by the numbers

Chemical vs. organic

Every commercial fertilizer is labelled with three numbers that indicate the percentage of total fertilizer weight represented by the three primary nutrients. (See photo.) The percentage of nitrogen (N) by weight is always the first number, followed by phosphorus (P) and then potassium (K). (The K is for kalium, the Latin word for

What is the difference between “chemical” fertilizers (sometimes called “processed”) and “organic” fertilizers? Chemical fertilizers are manufactured or extracted from natural materials that often undergo extensive processing. The nitrogen in chemical fertilizers is derived from petroleum and natural gas. The phosphorus is

derived from rock and undergoes treatment with sulfuric acid. Most potassium is mined from underground deposits of soluble minerals. Organic fertilizers are natural materials that undergo little to no processing. Organic sources of nitrogen include animal manures, blood meal, fish meal and alfalfa meal. Phosphorus can be found in bone meal and rock phosphate while potassium can be found in greensand and kelp meal. Organic producers may use a combination of these materials to give a balanced fertilizer product. Chemical fertilizers are highly concentrated. When applied to plants, they give the plant a big shot of pure nutrient; they do not provide organic matter. Conversely, organic fertilizers break down slowly, giving plants a smaller dose of nutrients over a longer period of time. They also “feed” the soil because they contain a lot of organic matter which is broken down by beneficial soil organ-

All commercial fertilizers, chemical or organic, list the percent of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (N-P-K) by weight on the container. Select fertilizers based on soil test results and nutrients needed by your plants at certain points in their life cycles. Photo courtesy of Clallam County Master Gardeners

isms, increasing their number ports leafy, vegetative growth, and diversity. sometimes at the expense of fruit development. Apply higher Smart use of fertilizers amounts of nitrogen just prior Time fertilizer use with to and during periods of rapid your plant’s life cycle: when growth, when plants need it it needs particular nutrients. most. Avoid applying nitrogen For instance, nitrogen sup- during fruit development or

Dungeness Valley Lutheran Church

Faith

1-800-22-UNITE

360-582-7101 / 417-0105

Sunday Worship

Sequim Worship Center

360-683-6076

414 N. Sequim Ave.

Christ, Scientist

Pastors: Tim Richards, Wayne Yamamoto David Piper, Britt Hemphill 45 Eberle Lane, Sequim

(4.5 miles N. of Hwy 101 on Sequim-Dungeness Way)

360-683-7333

Office open Mon-Thurs 8:30-4:30 and Fri 8:30-1

www.dcchurch.org

Sequim Center for Spiritual Living

Worship Service - 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour - 11:00 a.m. Bible Studies & Classes for all ages Check web or phone for more information

Church 683-7373

2280804

Shane McCrossen, Senior Pastor Pat Lynn, Student Ministries Pastor

WEDNESDAY Youth Groups - 6 p.m.

THURSDAY

AWANA – 6:00 p.m.

PENINSULA Worldwide

CHURCH OF GOD Meeting at the American Legion Hall 107 E. Prairie Street off Sequim St. Sunday Bible Study and Worship at 10 am Wednesday Bible Study at 7:00 pm

Visitors Welcome For more information 360-417-0826

2280791

2280761

If you have a Bible question we will give you a Bible answer. Phone: 360 808-1021

A Bible Based Church Services: Saturday at 1 p.m. Gardiner Community Center 980 Old Gardiner Road

Holds Sunday Service 10:00 Pioneer Park

Rev. Lynn Osborne INFORMATION CALL 681-0177

2280811

2280786

Pastors: Mark & Collette Pekar sequimadventist@sequimsdachurch.org

847 North Sequim Ave. 360-683-4135 www.sequimbible.org

A Center For Positive Living

2280810

30 Sanford Lane Mountain View Christian School

683-6170 255 Medsker Rd.

9:00 am and 10:45 am Nursery through 5th-Grade Programs are available at 2nd service, 1st service offers Nursery through 1st-grade. Youth Class at 10:45 in Chapel.

Mass Schedule: Saturday Vigil: 5:00 p.m. Sunday: 8:30 & 10:30 a.m. Monday, Thursday & Friday: 8:30 a.m. Wednesday: 12:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every 2nd Sunday 2 p.m. Confession: 30 minutes prior to all daily Masses on Wednesday & Friday Weekend Confessions: Saturday 3:30 - 4:30 p.m.

SUNDAY WORSHIP

Sat. 9:30 a.m. Sabbath School 10:45 a.m. Worship Service

337 West Spruce • 683-9174

Sunday Worship Services

2280802

2280800

2280817

Sequim Seventh-day Adventist Church

First Church of

Sunday Service: 10:00 a.m. Wednesday: 7:00 p.m. Sunday School: 10:00 a.m. (held at Reading Room) Christian Science Reading Room 121 North Sequim Avenue 12 - 3 pm Tues - Sat ChristianScienceSequim.com ALL ARE WELCOME

Website: www.obfchurch.org

360-683-6731

Dungeness Community Church

www.clallamcatholic.com

(in the Olympic Theatre Arts Building)

“Sharing Good News from the edge of the Olympic Mountains to the Ends of the Earth”

683-5367

church@sequimtumc.org www.sequimtumc.org

2280778

sequimworshipcenter.org

Sunday School & Nursery: 10:00 a.m. Worship Service: 10:00 a.m. Bill Green, Pastor

101 E. Maple St., Sequim

Pastor Rich Hay

SUNDAY MORNING SERVICE 10:45 AM

100 South Blake Ave.

Saint Joseph Parish

Weekly programs provided for youth and adults, such as AWANA and Precept Bible studies

SUNDAYS Bible Study 9:15 a.m. Morning Service 10:45 a.m. Evening Service 6:00 p.m. WEDNESDAYS Prayer Meeting 6:00 p.m. www.fbcsequim.com Pastor Wes Funkhouser Pastor to Senior Adults Ed Dorstad 360-683-2114

TriniTy UniTed MeThodisT ChUrCh

w w w. s e q u i m c o m m u n i t y c h u r c h . o r g

10:00 a.m. Worship, Nursery & Children’s Church 10:00 a.m. Tuesday Precept Bible Study

640 N. Sequim Avenue 360-683-7981

VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL

KINGDOM ROCK - July 8-12, 9am-12pm Register online, Ages 4-12 P.O. Box 925, Sequim, WA 98382 Pastors Steve Eaton and Roger Stites http://www.faithlutheransequim.org

Sunday School for all ages 950 N. Fifth Avenue - (360) 683-4194 Loving infant care Dr. Scott E. Koenigsaecker, Lead Pastor Rev. Rick Dietzman, Associate Pastor Nathan Funston, Director of Worship, Music & Arts Keith Sandell, Director of Youth Ministries Jennifer Gillis, Director of Children’s Ministries

OLYMPIC BIBLE FELLOWSHIP

Rev. David L. Westman

Sunday Worship Services 8:30 & 11 a.m. Adult Bible Classes and Sunday School 9:45 a.m.

2280820

8:30 a.m. & 11:00 a.m. Summer Hours (6/2-9/1) 8:30am & 10:00am Pastor Russ Britton www.dvelca.org 360-681-0946

1323 Sequim-Dungeness Way

SUNDAY WORSHIP 9am: Contemporary 10am: Blended 11am: Modern

2280814

2280754

Weekly study sessions

E.L.C.A. 925 N. Sequim Ave. Reach Out, Share God’s Love.

2280777

“This is the hour when ye must associate with all the earth’s peoples in extreme kindliness and love .......” ‘Abdu’l-Baha

(SBC)

382 W. Cedar 683-4803

2280784

The Baha’i

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH SEQUIM

2280781

The Lord is like a father to his children, tender and compassionate to those who fear him. For he knows how weak we are; he remembers we are only dust. – Psalm 103: 13-14

FAITH LUTHERAN CHURCH L.C.M.S.

late in the growing season when plants cannot use it efficiently and winter rains will just leach it from the soil. Because chemical fertilizers do not contain organic matter, using chemical fertilizers as the only source of plant nutrients can be detrimental to the health of the soil and the beneficial organisms that live in the soil. When using chemical fertilizers, also apply compost to “feed” the soil organisms. Do not use manure as the only source of nitrogen in a garden because manures are usually high in phosphorus relative to nitrogen. Application of sufficient manure to meet your garden’s nitrogen needs can result in excess phosphorus in the soil. Excess phosphorus can harm your plants and move into surface water, harming water quality and aquatic organisms. Understanding fertilizers will help you use them wisely. For more information on use of fertilizers, check out “A Home Gardener’s Guide to Soils and Fertilizers” (EM063E) available for free at cru.cahe.wsu. edu/CEPublications/EM063E/ EM063E.pdf. Judy English and Jeanette Stehr-Green are WSU-certified Clallam County Master Gardeners.


Wednesday, July 3, 2019 • B7

SEQUIM GAZETTE

S.T.E.A.M. takes over Boys & Girls Club BY CONOR DOWLEY Sequim Gazette

It’s going to be a busy summer at the Boys and Girls Club in Sequim. From kindergartners to high schoolers, youths who attend the club this summer will be kept busy with the “Full S.T.E.A.M. Ahead” program. In addition to STEM topics of science, technology, engineering and mathematics, unit director Dave Miller and his staff are adding the arts to the mix. “Last (summer) we focused on reading and literacy,” Miller said. “This year we wanted to bring in the (S.T.E.A.M.) aspect. “Plus, it gives us more of a variety of activities to do that are locally based.” Each week features a different general theme, with daily activities exploring all S.T.E.A.M. aspects of that theme. Much of the program will happen in the club’s morning camp that runs from 8 a.m.-noon each weekday, and includes breakfast for

every child in the building. That morning camp comes with an additional cost on top of the $30 per year membership to help the club manage the extra hours — morning camp participation costs $15 per day, or $65 per week. Afternoons at the club — which runs various activities from noon-6 p.m. and include the service of both lunch and a snack — are part of the annual membership fee. Club members also have the opportunity to go on field trips to various locations and activities across the region. “We live in such a wonderful area with so many different ecosystems,” Miller said. “Our goal is to give our kids a hands on experience that involves the environment around them.” Club members will have plenty of time for regular fun and games outside of S.T.E.A.M. activities as well, including plenty of outdoor time such as the recent field day the Hunter Carlson, right, plays ladder ball while his brother Jacob, left, and several other Boys & Girls Club memclub put together helping celebrate bers watch on at the club’s recent field day to celebrate the end of the 2018-19 school year. Sequim Gazette photo by Conor Dowley the end of the school year.

Schools out, we’re in — Week 1 Boys & Girls Clubs of the Olympic Peninsula Editor’s note: The following is the first of a summerlong series detailing activities at the Sequim Boys & Girls Club. Call 360-683-8095 or see www.bgc-op.org for more information. — MD Summer is off to a good start and last week was our first full week of all day programming. Doors open with our morning camp, where participants pay a modest $15 a day, or $65, a week for an action-packed morning before free lunch and when the club opens to all members at noon for no charge. The Carroll C. Kendall Club didn’t skip a beat as the youths transitioned from school year to summer. The last day of school was buzzing with happiness as the club filled with kids celebrating the last day of school. We said goodbye to members we know will spend their summer at home, with family, in other towns or with parents that also enjoy the summers off. For many others, we will continue to see their smiling faces and together we’ll share in the summer experiences, making 2019 memorable. The clubhouse doors unlocked at 7:45 a.m. on June 20 and we welcomed 100 members before noon. This year, our summer camp program takes on the theme “Full S.T.E.A.M. Ahead.” Our morning campers will enjoy a week of activities, games, crafts and field trips. Our afternoon programs will provide academic en-

Youths at the Sequim Boys & Girls Club take a break from putting a floor puzzle together. Photos courtesy of Boys & Girls Clubs of the Olympic Peninsula

richment though several evidence based programs “Brain Gain,” “Stride Academy” and some locally-developed and volunteer-run programs like “Science Club” and “Robotics Club.” We will bury our heads in books, hit the computer keyboards, jump into physical games, create incredible art and learn so much this summer.

Morning Camp “Full S.T.E.A.M. Ahead” with our summer of science, technology, engineering, arts and math. Members will

spend a week diving deeper into the sea-life, atmosphere and weather. They will take a look at motors and transportation one week, math and numbers another week as well as exploring the work of Picasso’s and other artists. A week will be spent on both the art of music, and bridge engineering. Last week our morning campers participated in the first full week of summer camp, “Mysteries of the Deep.” Campers made jellyfish art and Lego masterpieces, baked cookies to look like sand dollars and had crab races in the gym. The kids dropped to their hands and feet, belly up and crawled to the finish line hoping to be faster than their peers.

Feeding the Future We had a successful launch to our Summer Lunch Program and have just completed our first week serving USDA-approved meals to all children under age 18.

In Sequim we serve lunch from noon-1 p.m., not only at the Boys & Girls Club but at Elk Creek Apartments, SeaBreeze Apartments and Carrie Blake Community Park. Starting July 8 we will add Sequim High School and feed summer school students and the public until July 26. The program’s success is attributed to the community service model coordinated by program leaders. If it weren’t for community involvement a program of this size, feeding free lunches to Sequim (and Port Angeles) children would not be obtainable. Again this year, the faith communities and civic organizations help us keep costs and a nutritious meal available for those in need. Children are enjoying the lunches served, and continue to come out for tasty meals in their lunch bags. If you can help us during the weeks of July 8 or July 15, call the Sequim club at 360-683-8095, as we are still Sequim Boys & Girls Club youths build a tower. seeking volunteer help.

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Pictured, from left, are: Liz Mueller, Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe tribal vice chair; community member Celeste Dybeck and Dr. Kathryn “Kit” Matthew, director of the Institute of Museum and Library Services. Submitted photo

Jamestown S’Klallam Tribal Library receives national award SEQUIM GAZETTE STAFF

330978

The Institute for Museum and Library Service recently presented 10 museums and libraries from around the United States — including the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribal Library in Blyn — with the 2019 National Medal for Museum and Library Service.

High quality custom home built by Rick Anderson Homes. Nestled at the end of a quiet cul de sac, this smart home pairs all of the modern conveniences found in new homes with an exquisite level of craftsmanship and natural beauty. Superb privacy as it abuts a quiet greenbelt along w/bright and sunny southern exposure. Not a stair to be found with this comfortable, flowing floor plan. Very low maintenance landscaping provides beauty from every window. Hardwood floors, Quartz counters, and custom cabinetry.

The medal is the nation’s highest honor given to libraries and museums that “make significant and exceptional contributions to their communities.” Accepting the award in Washington, D.C., from the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribal Library were tribal librarian Bonnie Roos and community member Celeste Dybeck.

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330058 Incredible contemporary style home with views that have to be seen to be believed. Set atop the gated community of Louella Heights, this stylish home boasts the finest of materials, world class views, and an extraordinary architectural design. Over 3,000 SF of Brazilian Cherry floors, Nana style windows, a 10 ft. X 20 ft. skylight over the open loft, metal roof, Bleimeister cabinetry, Juliet balconies with built-in overhead heaters. Views of Sequim Bay, the Strait, the Cascades and Baker and Sequim's farms.

“St. Augustine Beach” by Patrick D. Clark is one of several selected pieces for Sequim’s City Arts Advisory Commission exhibit, “The Beach,” on July 5. Submitted art

Art Walk From page B-1

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330784 Beauty abounds inside and out at this extraordinary home perched above the majestic Elwha River. Rare craftsmanship throughout the home with awe-inspiring natural beauty out every window including views of the river below, the Strait to the north and the Olympic Mountains to the south. A kitchen fit for a chef where beauty meets functionality and a gorgeous living room highlighted by a river rock fireplace built by a master of his craft. Master on the main floor plus two handsome offices- extra BRs up.

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early 20th century and also impressionism, he invites you to discover an unusual photograph. In honor of the Sequim Lavender Weekend, Pondicherri, at 119 E. Washington St., is featuring floral paper artist My Woolly Mammoth, as well as henna artist Ellie Curtis. Forage Gifts & Northwest Treasures, 121 W. Washington St. is showcasing all things that inspire us in Sequim with creative works from local artists. Blue Whole Gallery, 129 W. Washington St., features art from Jeannine Chappell and Clallam Bay Corrections Center inmates. Chappell, known for her work with animal images (particularly the owl), showcases both digital paintings and mixed media paintings in the window. During the opening reception from 5-8 p.m., she will discuss her art. From 1-2 p.m. on Saturday, July 6, she will present a free art talk at the gallery. Initiated by Blue Whole member Ken Dvorak and Welfare for Animals Guild, individuals at Clallam Bay’s corrections center are pleased to help WAG by making and donating their artwork. Rainshadow Café, at 157 W. Cedar St., hosts live music with Hot Llamas — a group that describes themselves as “rural funk” from the Pacific Northwest. Alder Wood Bistro, 139 W. Alder St,. showcases recent photography of Sequim author-photographer Robert Steelquist. The exhibition, “Square Birds,” features intimate portraits of wild birds that draws the viewer’s gaze

A b o v e i s “A l paca” by Jeannine Chappell, one of the featured artists at the Blue Whole Gallery this month, along with artwork from Clallam Bay Corrections Center inmates (left).

to the birds’ eye. Check out local artists and craftspeople at the Sequim Farmers Market showcase at Centennial Place on the corner of 100 East Washington Street and Sequim Avenue. Painter-teacher Shirley Rudolf has arranged for members of North Olympic Watercolorists to display their artwork at First Security Bank, 114 S. Sequim Ave., and members of Rudolf’s Art Group to display their artwork at Harbor Audiology & Hearing Center, 538 N. Fifth Ave.

For more To participate as a venue or artist on the Official First Friday Art Walk Sequim map, listing and website,

contact Emiko Brock at 360-460-3023 or renne@ uniqueasyou.com. Artists of any media are encouraged to get information to her for publicity and opportunities. To create inclusion between venues, artists and audience, everyone is encouraged to participate in the Art Walk’s monthly themes as a fun community activity in any creative form they wish to express it. Themes include: January is silver, February is red, March is green, April is pink, May is aqua, June is white, July is purple, August is yellow, September is blue, October is orange, November is brown and December is gold. Join the Art Walk Facebook page at facebook.com/sequimartwalk.


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HARLEY: ‘10 FLSTSB, (Crossbones), 11,151 m i l e s, l o t s o f ex t ra s, B OAT / T R A I L E R : ‘ 1 4 , $15,000. 360-460-6971 w/glavanized E-Z Loader, Johnson 50hp, depth HARLEY DAVIDSON: f i n d e r, m a n y ex t r a s . ‘06 Electric Glide, 13,300 $2000. (360)683-1308 or miles. $7,000. (360)460-1539 (480)266-9304

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Solmar

Carlsborg

BELL BOY: ‘78 , cabin cruiser, 24’, inboard/outboard, rebuilt outdrive and engine. ‘84 Caulkins trailer. $2500 obo. (360)670-1109

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HOTWOODS.com: Fish & Sport 15, 4 pontoon, 9.9 Johnson, 55 Minnkota, Honda 1000 generat o r, d e ck 5 ’ X 1 3 ’ 6 ” . $4500. Sequim. (509)885-0999

Motorcycles

Jamestown

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Pinnell

Abbott

One Horse Ln

Macleay

Hwy

HARRISON FARRELL: ‘86 Hard chine, sloop, 23’, incl., trailer, $4000. (360)774-6064

SAILBOAT: 25’ Coronad o, 1 5 H P O u t b o a r d , sleeps 5, moorage, $3,900. 360-385-2012

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Peterson

Woodcock

Franson Howe

Madrona Terrace Forest Ridge

GO FISHING, Whale watching, lake floating on your own 26’ Cabin Cruiser. $2,800. (360)640-0875

5th Wheel Trailer: Arctic TRAVEL TRAILER: ‘06 Fox, 33’ quality trailer Wildwood, 27’ 2-door su- n e e d s w o r k . $ 2 , 7 0 0 . p e r s l i d e, q u e e n b e d , 360-385-2311 $12,000. (360)808-1904 BIG HORN by Hear tTents & land: ‘10, 34’, 3 slides, Travel Trailers great shape. $21,000. ‘12 Dutchman Denali, (360)460-6720 excellent! Sleeps 10, $21K. 360-477-1966 Campers/Canopies

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2 0 0 7 J AY C O S e l e c t 1 2 H W Te n t Tr a i l e r sleeps 6, Queen & King beds, furnace, stove, hot water heater, Shower & toilet, 2 propane tanks 2008 HI-LO 17ft Towlite $4,500. Includes Champop-up hard-sided trail- p i o n G a s G e n e r a t o r er, bathroom, stove, wa- CALL 360-681-5271 t e r h e a t e r, e l e c t r i c Marine tongue lift, electric hook Miscellaneous up(30 amp) water, sewer, newer tires, battery, “I FOUND IT IN FREEBIES!” 10’ LIVINGSTON: Fresh fully loaded 3400 lbs, paint in/out, galv trailer, easy towing! $8,500. Minn Kota elec. motor, Home Furnishings 360-681-0199 new oars/battery. $725. (360)457-8209 BAR: Free standing with 24’ Kit Campanion trailfo o t r a i l , M a h o g a n y, er, ‘96, double doors, ‘ 8 4 C hampion Bass country scene carving. AC, excel cond. $3,800. Boat, 17,’ excellent con$1,500. (360)683-5855 360-775-7869 dition. $7,250. 360-3852792 pls leave message

ALL 2019 RPODS IN STOCK $19,995 SAVE UP TO $4,700

G L A S S P LY: 1 7 ’ , s o f t top, 280 Volvo Penta inboard/outboard drive on trailer, Evinrude 15hp troller, trim tabs, depth finder, GPS, Boss marine FM/CD player, crab pot, line and pot puller, down riggers, anchor, float coat and 2 vests. Other extras. Nice clean unit. $6500. (360)461-7429

2 slides, excellent cond. $25,000/firm. (360)477-1895

A P L AC E F O R M O M has helped over a million families find senior living. Our trusted, local a d v i s o r s h e l p ERROR AND find solutions to your CORRECTION NOTICE unique needs at no cost A d v e r t i s e r s p l e a s e to you. Call 855-415check your ad on the 4148. first date of publication. Farm Fencing While we are happy to & Equipment m a ke a n y n e c e s s a r y changes or corrections, TRACTOR: ‘50, Ferguwe can not be respon- son, TO-20, rare, runs sible for errors appear- a n d d r i ve s x l n t , n ew ing after the first publica- tires, PTO, $3,250/obo. tion. (360)452-2484 WELFARE For Animals Heavy Equipment Guild (WAG) is looking for “shor t ter m” foster homes. Please call: WANTED: (360)460-6258. Small Older Crawler (bulldozer) running or not, even garden size, also small farm tractor with loader, Skidsteer etc, any condition. Also backhoe unit for tractor, old tools, anvils, vises, post vises, old advertising signs, old barn items, private party. Cash. 360-204-1017

Michael D. Smith’s

BOB

Domestic Services Adult/Elder Care

Still

A donor-supported, non-profit, no-kill organization

LAWN MAINTENANCE: 360-912-3847

Apartments for Rent Clallam County

WANTED: Greater Sequim area. 1 year plus rental to live in. Smaller guest house, art studio, converted garage - out building, house trailer etc. Must have water, elect., sewer. single older man, no pets. Steven R. Houts. (208)721-2389

SAVE THE DATE! safehavenpfoa.org ◆ 360-452-0414

Employment Wanted

2012 Springdale 2 1 2 R B L S 2 5 ’ Tra i l e r with Slide-out Lounge/Dinette. Trailer in excellent condition used 6-8 times since 2012. Includes Reese We i g h t D i s t r i bu t i o n Hitch along with shank and ball for tow vehicle. Full queen bed, flat screen TV, many extras. $14,250. Call (360) 385-9524

Classic 1992, 23’ Hi-Low “Fun Lite” Travel Trailer Improve your tow gas mileage significantly and camp in style with this easy-tow fully contained and collapsible trailer. It has a new electric tongue hoist, or iginal roll-out-awning (in good shape) , and an effective air conditioner. The trailer has been well maintained and is ready to “I FOUND IT IN FREEBIES!” travel. $5,500. Call F O R E S T R I V E R : ‘ 0 7 , Brent: 360-775-8969 for Sunseeker, 31’ 2 slides, a viewing. 14,7k mi, 5000 miles on HOLIDAY RAMBLER: all new tires in Sept., ‘07, 24ft, Aluma lite trav$ 1 , 0 0 0 p i l l o w q u e e n el trailer. $8,500. mattress, drapes, well (360)457-4636 cared for, runs perfectly. $31,900/obo. Travel Trailer: 2016, 24’ 360-370-7770 Forest River Max, loaded, LED lighting, elec. FOREST RIVER: ‘17, stabilzer jacks, power FR3, Class A, 32’, 2 aw n i n g , A / C, 1 s l i d e slides, 18k miles, room, excel. condition! $72,500. Tow car also $24,750. 360-797-3068 available. 360-461-1912 or 208-661-0940 U t i l i t y Tr a i l e r : ITASCA: ‘03, Suncrusi- 2000#GVWR, 4’ X 6.5’, er, 38K miles, 35ft, 8.1 3/4” plywood box, $500. 360-461-3947 Chev with Allison trans,

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE Businesses promoting home improvement, including but not limited to, electrical services, insulation, hardwood floors, roofing, carpentry, painting/wallpapering, plaster/drywall, construction, tile, masonry, cement work or landscaping are required to operate with a contracting license if advertising in this section. If you have questions or concerns regarding h o m e s e r v i c e a d ve r t i s i n g , please contact the Washington State Department of Labor and Industry, toll free 1-800-6470982

Johnson Creek

FELINE FINE AT HARBINGER WINE - JULY 13

WE LOOK FORWARD TO WORKING WITH YOU

Peninsula Daily News Circulation Departments We are looking for individuals interested in routes. Must be reliable, 18 yrs. of age, have a valid Washington State Drivers License, proof of insurance and a reliable vehicle. Early morning delivery, deadline for delivery: 6:30 a.m. Call (360)452-4507 or email: Circulation@ peninsuladaily news.com

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G L A S S P LY: 1 7 ’ , s o f t top, 280 Volvo Penta inboard/outboard drive on trailer, Evinrude 15hp troller, trim tabs, depth finder, GPS, Boss marine FM/CD player, crab pot, line and pot puller, down riggers, anchor, float coat and 2 vests. Lost Other extras. Nice clean unit. $6500. L O S T YO U R P E T ? (360)461-7429 Please call us, we may have it! Olympic PeninMotorhomes sula Humane Society. 452-5226. 2105 High- FORD: 27’ Class C, runs way 101, Port Angeles. good, everything works. $3500 obo or trade for Home Services 20’-24’ travel trailer. Les. Windows/Glass (360)808-1904

Brown

Field Mowing

Tractor Services

Sneak-a-Peek

S T I L L PAY I N G T O O much for your MEDICATION? Save up to 90% on RX refill! Order today and receive free shipping on 1st order prescr iption required. Call 1-866-685-6901.

Sequim Ave South

Landscape Maintenance

Chaise Lounge: down seat and two pillows Good cond., 70x39x31, $80. 503-853-5880

en C ick

Knapp

VOTED #1 RENTAL AGENCY IN CLALLAM COUNTY 2018!

Marine Miscellaneous

Guiles

417-2810

Tents & Travel Trailers

Home Furnishings

PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT statewide with a $325 classified listing or $1,575 for a display ad. Call this newspaper or 360-3442938 for details.

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All rental and real estate for sale adver tising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for the rental or sale of real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertising in this newspaper are available on an equal o p p o r t u n i t y b a s i s. To complain of discrimination call HUD at (206)220-5170.

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(360)

Announcements

E. S

FSBO: Mountain view, Lovely 2BD 2 BA 2 car 2 6 3 0 s f. h o m e , p l u s garage, w/d, $1250 mo. apar tment. Lg kitchen avail 8/15. 360-681-8066 w/island, 3Br, 3Ba, detached 4 car garage, YOUR TRASH IS handicap ramps. SOMEBODY’S TREASURE. ADVERTISE IN 30 Mantle Rd. $415,000. GARAGE SALES (360)809-9351

Employment General

Real Estate for Rent Clallam County

Ch

Real Estate for Rent Clallam County

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Real Estate for Rent Clallam County

E. S

Real Estate for Sale Clallam County

. o o p Rd

SPONSOR 2 PETS! FOR LESS THAN

$1.50 A DAY!

Help a shelter pet find a forever home

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C-3

CountyWide Classifieds D Serving Clallam County D July 3, 2019 Legal Notices General

Legal Notices - General

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF KING In re: the Matter of the Estate of: CYNTHIA L. DeVORE, Deceased. No. 19-4-11654-1 SEA PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.010 et seq. MARK W. DeVORE has been appointed and has qualified as Personal Representative (PR) of the above captioned estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as p r o v i d e d i n RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the PR or the PR’s attorney at the address stated below, a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the PR served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(3); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the Decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATED: June 12, 2019 FIRST PUBLICATION: JUNE 19, 2019 /s/James W. Spencer J a m e s W. S p e n c e r, WSBA No. 366000 Attorney for the Personal Representative Address for Mailing or Service: BROTHERS & HENDERSON, P.S. 2722 EASTLAKE AVENUE EAST, SUITE 200 SEATTLE, WASHINGTON 98102-3143 Pub: June 19, 26, July 3, 2019 Legal No. 861137

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF KING In Re the Estate of: KATHLEEN CUNNINGHAM, Deceased. Case No. 19-4-11045-4 SEA PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.030 The Personal Representative named below has been appointed and has qualified as Personal Representative of this Estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the Court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the N o t i c e t o t h e c r e d i t o r a s p r ov i d e d i n R C W 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the Notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to the claims against both the Decedent’s probate assets and nonprobate assets. Date of first publication: June 19, 2019 DATED THIS 13th day of June, 2019, at Seattle, Washington. /s/ Laurence D. Halvorsen, Personal Representative Attorney’s for Personal Representative /s/ MICHAEL P. MAY, WSBA #49608 Ridgway Law Group, P.S. 701 Fifth Avenue, Suite 4640 Seattle, Washington 98104-7035 (206) 838-2501 PUB: PDN June 19, 26, July 3, 2019 Legal #: 860871

Harley Davidson, 2002 Dyna Low-Rider, great c o n d i t i o n , n ew t i r e s , 21,000 mi. and extras. $5,800. 360-301-0213

Vehicles Wanted

CHEV: ‘02, Camero convertible, auto, V6, silver with burgundy leather upholstery, 85K miles, To y o t i r e s , i n g o o d shape, all power, always garaged. $4,700. (360)461-1742 or (360)460-2694

D O N AT E YO U R C A R TO CHARITY. Receive maximum value of write off for your taxes. Runn i n g o r n o t ! All conditions accepted. Free pickup. Call for details, 855-635-4229.

H O N DA : ‘ 9 2 , A c c o r d wagon, clean, sunroof, spotless, 186K miles, $2,000. (360)457-5435 KIA: ‘11, Soul, 97,937 mi, white, 25mpg and 32 hwy, clean, $9,500. (360)681-4232 VW: ‘02, Golf, 2.0, 4 Dr, 5 spd, 36/mpg, 108k mi, great stereo, great cond. $5,000. (360)452-9685 Pickup Trucks Others

‘00 Chevy S10 4WD. Extra cab, nice truck! Needs motor work. $1,000. 360-460-2667 BUY WITH CONFIDENCE! ‘08 Dodge Ram 4x4 2500 Heavy Duty, SXT, 62,804K low mileage, MOPAR warrenty to July ‘20, Cummins 100,000 p o w e r t r a i n w a r r a n t y, front and rear towing receivers, lift airbags rear axle, very strong vehicle, newer tires and batteries, local service, 1 o w n e r, c l e a n c a r fa x . $28,500 obo. 360-582-1292 or 310-995-7966

FREEBIES Mail to: PO Box 1330, Port Angeles WA 98362 or FAX to: (360) 417-3507 Email: lclenard@sequimgazette.com

5th wheel/trailer Prodigy C u l t i v a t o r / e l e c t r i c : brake control, like new Craftsman , works great, $25, OBO.360-417-8118 wonderful in small areas. $25. 360-928-3447 AMMO: 12 gauge shotgun 7.5 birdshot, 8 box- DINING SET: Table and es (200) rounds, $40 for (4) chairs. $40. Sequim all. 360-452-9685 (928)304-1774 BABY JOGGER: ver y “I FOUND IT IN FREEBIES!” good condition, $40. 360-452-6632 DOG KENNEL: large, 18” x 30” with tray and 2 B I R D C AG E : L a r g e , doors, good condition, ve r y g o o d c o n d i t i o n , $40. 360-457-8221 17X17X21 inches. $25. (360)797-1330 FREE: 4 drawer dresser, BOOTS, MENS: Denali, w i t h m i r r o r, o l d , b u t Thermo Lite, leather and good. 360-461-7129 rubber, size 10, $15. FREE: Entertainment 360-683-7435 C e n t e r, O a k , g o o d CAMERA TRIPOD: An- condtion. (360)316-1623 tique, all brass. $30. (360)681-2978 FREE: Metal crib (safe CEILING FAN: Harbor and sturdy), mattress B r e e z e , 5 2 ” , a g e d and bedding, like new. 360-565-1036 bronze finish, new in box. $75. (360)582-0373 FULL BED: Complete, COCOA FIBER CORES: ver y nice. Mattresses, For gardens, 7 bricks to- headboard, frame, only tal, $35. 360-775-5248 $99. 360-928-0236

NO PHONE CALLS! Bring your ads to: Sequim Gazette, 147 W. Washington, Sequim Peninsula Daily News, 305 West 1st St., Port Angeles INLINE SKATES: ad- MISC: Yeti Mug, 30 oz justable size 4-7, great tumbler + Tal stainless shape. $10. with pads. water bottle, both $35. $15. 360-457-6431 360-457-6494 JACKET: Leather Motor Cycle, “Eagle Leather” XL, Very nice. $75. 360-620-2480

MOVING BOXES: 25 or s o, s m a l l , m e d i u m , large. $1 ea. Wardrobe. $3 ea. (360)681-2451

LIFE VESTS: Stearns OFFICE CHAIR: LeathXL adult size. Two vests er, fair condition. All ad$20. each, Good condi- justments work, $29. tion. 360 379-1532 360-477-6100 LOUNGE CHAIR: Wick- Original Budweiser boter and wrought iron, with t l e b y C a r l C o n r a d , foot stool, $100. stamped with DOC, $75. 360-477-2207 360-452-6842 L U G G A G E : 1 l a r g e PET DOOR: Pet Safe, black, 2-wheeled, 1 blue Medium, 8 1/8 X 11 3/4, 2 - w h e e l e d , c a r r y - o n , new in box, $15. $50. 360-477-9030 360-808-6009 MISC: Executive desk RELOAD: RCBS, press, c h a i r. $ 4 5 . C o m p u t e r s c a l e s, d i e s, c a l i p e r, desk, holds a pr inter. much more. $100. $25. (360)683-0768 (360)991-1965 MISC: Treadmill. $40. Weighted Blanket: 15 R o c k i n g c h a i r. $ 4 0 . Lbs; 60x80” Gray with Backrest. $15. Lv msg. velour cover, $45. (360)504-2942 360-406-0657

S LD consider it

“Nobody does it better.”

Sell your used or unwanted merchandise for as little as $6.Place your ad by calling

683-3311

it’s time to put some extra cash in your pocket

FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL

683-3311

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WILDER AUTO You Can Count On Us!

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101 and Deer Park Rd, Port Angeles STK# H7910A 1 only, subject to prior sale. Sale Price plus tax and license. A negotiable $150 documentation fee may be added. See Wilder Auto for details. Ad expires 1 week from date of publication.

D O D G E : ‘ 0 0 , D a ko t a X LT, V 6 , 2 W D, G r ay, with shell, $2,000. 360-461-6047

Welfare for Animals Guild

(360) 460-6258 www.petfinder.com welfare4animals@hotmail.com Sponsored by caring pet lovers. MR. COOPER is a 12-year-old Labrador Retriever/Boxer mix. He came to WAG because his elderly human can no longer care for him. He is sweet, loving, gets along with other dogs and enjoys short walks. Mr. Cooper is having a difficult time with the transition and would do best in a quiet and calm home environment where he is honored and attended to. His health is good though he does have some lumps and bumps from age. He is on an arthritis supplement. ANDY is a striking and sweet 2-year-old Whippet with some Border Collie. He is very athletic and built for agility and other competitive canine sports. Andy completed our Dog Training Program and is wonderful on leash, knows some basic obedience and is very social. He is still very much a kid and needs someone to continue to build his confidence. Andy would love a canine companion, most likely preferring a female. He does have anxiety being left alone in a room or house, so he would need access to a yard.

360-477-2883

FORD: ‘08 F350 Lariat.

www.stinkydogubathe.com

4WD, automatic, leather great condition. 119K. $16000. 360-461-3947

AASTE is a stunning Blue Merle Australian Shepherd/ Australian Cattle Dog. Aaste is 8-years-old. Aaste is protective and very devoted to her human companion. She knows basic obedience and is willing and eager to have a job. Aaste will need a human companion that understands her working breed. She must have daily activity and cannot be left alone outside as she will find a way to escape. Aaste does well with some dogs, but not all.

BEETLE: ‘74 gold color, Sport Utility Vehicles Others sunroof, new tires plus studs, mags, Ger man CHEV: ‘96 Blazer, 4.3 L, b r a k e s , r e f u r b i s h e d . good cond., well main$4200 obo. tained, 4 door. $1200. 360-457-7432 (360)683-4050 S U B UA R U : Fo r e s t e r 2.5i Limited, ‘16, 13K miles, exc. cond., $25,000. 360-457-5937

crossword answers from last week

ACROSS

1. Bridge building degree 4. Catches 9. A heavy type of music 14. Original “Twilight Zone” host Serling 15. Rodent species 16. Finnish lake 17. Street (abbr.) 18. Home of the US Naval Academy 20. It held a convention once 22. Makes a loud, ringing sound 23. Cave 24. Lessening of something 28. MJ’s nickname “__ Jordan” 29. One’s way of doing things 30. Wings

31. Quotes as evidence for 33. Acts glumly 37. A man’s title 38. It comes first 39. Edible mollusk 41. Resembles a pouch 42. He/she checks your health 43. Nobel Prize-winning biochemist 44. Stop momentarily 46. Formerly (archaic) 49. Commercial 50. White vestment worn by clergy 51. Island people of the Mediterranean 55. Prices 58. On a line at right angles to a ship’s length

59. Where boats are parked 60. One who values reason 64. It might be on your driveway 65. Small Iranian village 66. Used to emphasize 67. Mathematical term (abbr.) 68. Long necked birds 69. Eyeglasses 70. When you hope to get there

DOWN

1. Portuguese district 2. An assembly of witches 3. Having few teeth 4. The act of going across 5. Nepalese dynasty 6. “Bye Bye Birdie” actress __-Margaret 7. What the princess found

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DODGE: ‘10, RAM 1500, 4Dr, 4x4, 142K, 4.7 ltr, tow pkg, silver, grt cond. $8,900. (303)638-6278

FORD: ‘08 F-350 Lariat, extended cab, 6.4L diesel. 77,700 mi. Original owner, very good condiAutomobiles tion, many extras. Others $22,900. Call for details. ‘05 Prius, great gas mile360-808-6430 age 116K, $7,500; ‘89 Dodge Van, original 318, GMC: ‘89, Sierra, 3/4 ton, Needs work. $500. 60K, $8,500. (360)477-6516 360-461-1917

BUICK: ‘00 Century ltd edition, V6, new tires, new brakes, 134K miles. $2500. 253-439-0436

683-3311

Puzzle answers in next week’s issue.

Automobiles 1 - t o n d u a l l y, d i e s e l , Classics & Collectibles

PORSCHE: ‘87, 944, good condition, sun roof, power windows, 121k miles, AM/FM/CD. $9,300. (360)452-2468

Locally Focused

• 1 ad per household per week • Private parties only • 4 lines, 1 Wednesday • Run as space permits • No pets or livestock • No garage sales • No firewood, lumber, or construction materials

crossword Compliments of Wilder Auto

Motorcycles

Automobiles Others

RUN A FREE AD FOR ITEMS PRICED $100 AND UNDER! DEADLINE: FRIDAY 3PM

PLEASE CALL TO MAKE RESERVATIONS. (SOME RESTRIC TIONS APPLY)

42 Dory Rd., Sequim | 360-582-9686 | countrypawsresort.com

beneath her mattress 8. Pennsylvania transit organization 9. Winnie the Pooh creator 10. Riddle 11. Grads wear one 12. Body part 13. The top of a pot 19. A type of meal 21. Lake __, one of the Great 24. Capital of Jordan 25. A type of logic 26. Khoikhoi peoples 27. A fixed time of prayer in Christian liturgies 31. Arrives 32. Lemur 34. Small bodies of still water 35. __ route

36. Breaks apart 40. A type of line 41. Caption that translates 45. Winged 47. Criticize severely 48. Leg bones 52. Monetary unit 53. 007’s creator 54. Accumulate 56. Establish by law or with authority 57. Breed of goat 59. Millisecond 60. Mock 61. Make older 62. Some don’t want to be given any 63. Wrath

ALICE is a 3-year-old Siberian Husky. She is very gentle, loving and kind-hearted. Alice’s bonded companion is WINSTON. Winston is an all white husky. He is deeply committed to Alice and is very loving and attached to her. Winston is just over one-year-old. These two beauties need to stay together when they are adopted. Both Alice and Winston are very active and have the classic Husky disposition that demands a lot of interaction, attention and activity.

Would you like to sponsor this pet page? Call 683-3311


C-4

CountyWide Classifieds D Serving Clallam County D July 3, 2019

MAKE YOUR BUSINESS EVERYONE’S BUSINESS!

SERVICES DIRECTORY

Put a little Heaven in your Haven

Licensed & Insured

SCREENS

EMPLOYMENT

WANTED: MORE RESPECT

2281046

(360) 681-2442

Decks • Fences Additions Sheds Concrete • Flooring

PAINTING

Interior • Exterior • Drywall Decks • Garage • Floors

Serving the area since 1999

• Remodels • Decks • Home Additions • Doors & Windows • Outbuildings • Wheel Chair Ramps

Sequim • Lic#MDCONC*834PZ

HEATING If you knew what was in the air, you’d reconsider breathing.

Get up to 99.98% more out of your air.

The revolutionary new Trane CleanEffects™ is the first central air system that removes up to 99.98% of the allergens from all the air that it heats or cools. Isn’t it time you expected more from your system? Expect more from your 360-683-3901 (Sequim) 360-385-5354 ( Port Townsend) independent Trane dealer.

Repairs • Maintenance Landscaping Honey-do Lists Product Assembly

Licensed • Bonded • Insured • AMERIHC882JW

NEW DUNGENESS NURSERY

SUMMER HOT DAYS...

HOT COLOR FOR YOUR YARD!

Because we are open 12 months a year, Everything is containerized!

360-681-0132 Nursery is open 12 months a year!

Open 7 days a week Hours 9AM-5PM

facebook.com/newdungenessnursery/

4911 Sequim Dungeness Way (in Dungeness, just past Nash’s) PLUMBING & PUMPS 24 HOUR SERVICE 7 DAYS A WEEK

PAINTING

MAINTENANCE

PLUMBING & PUMPS

Gutter Cleaning Moss Control Hauling/Moving Pressure Washing

Water Heaters • Faucets • Toilets • Pumps & Repair Pipe Replacement • Disposals • Leak Repairs • Remodeling Water Purification • Pipe Thawing • Sewer Camera & Locator

NO TRAVEL CHARGE

Lic.#THREECI863BG

2281047

2384208

“One call, because we do it all”

2281826

Open 7 days a week, 24 hours a day for all services. Over 20 Years Experience Serving Clallam County Call now for fast & reliable service!

Mention this ad for a $5 discount! Port Angeles - 360-452-3259 • Sequim - 360-683-9191 Brother’s Plumbing Inc. State Cont. Reg. No. CC0190BROTHP1914RG

REAL ESTATE

ADVERTISE HERE WE DO REPAIR!

2239756

YOUR ONE STOP SHOP

PLUMBING Water Heater Repair & Installation • Toilets • Sinks • Faucets Drain Cleaning • Garbage Disposals • Water Filtration Systems

Cell: 670-3187 Office: 417-0344

NURSERY Free Landscape Consultation

2239762

HANDYMAN

State & Federal Certified Renovator

2276679

360-775- 9897

www.threecrownsinc.com

CONSTRUCTION

GENERAL CONTRACTOR Excellent Homeowner Service

LANDSCI966RW

THREE CROWNS INC. Tile • Baths • Kitchens Flooring • Doors & Windows

CONSTRUCTION, INC.

2281036

MAINTENANCE

Licensed-Insured #604225038

AMERICA’S HANDYMAN

360.681.5448

LIC# BYDESGI944MG

360-582-0384

Estimates - No Job Too Small! Competitive Rates

CONSTRUCTION

“We don’t wear our overalls just to look professional.”

“Your Aging In Place Contractor”

360.582.1843

253-312-6283

195 DEER RIDGE LANE SEQUIM, 98382 In practiceWA 42 years.

PAINTING

360-683-3311

AGING IN PLACE

REMODEL

360-775-6676

(360) 683-2272 Dr. Robin Gardner

trentleeblore@outlook.com

Whatever you want in a new job, you’ll find your way to it in the Classifieds.

LIC#PENIN*961CF

220 Carlsborg Rd. Sequim, WA

HytinL*977JA

Trent Blore

Yard Service • Trimming/Pruning Moss Removal • Gutter Cleaning Hauling/Moving • Handy Man • Rototilling Brush Removal • Chimney Sweep

How May I Help You?

Make your Business Everyone’s Business!

Advertise it in the

SERVICES DIRECTORY Call 683-3311 Today!

DOL#73802

360.681.8879

(360) 504-2347 www.jamieparrishplumbing.com

Country Paws Resort & Grooming WHERE THE TAILS ARE WAGGIN’ AND THE DOGS ARE BRAGGIN’

VACATION SAVINGS Stay 3 nights and Get the 4th night

FREE.

Expires 07/31/19

07/03/19

COUPON

Lic# JAMIEPP880NN • Bonded • Insured

2281045

SCREENS

683-3058

Free Estimates!

In-Home Pet Euthanasia

2239761

683-1677

Mowing - Trimming Grass Removal - Yard Clean Up

2284077

681-6656

KEN REED

Husband & wife ready to serve all your landscaping needs.

GREEN MONSTER SERVICES

New & Re-Roof Maintenance & Repair Certifications Inspections Pre-decisionROOFM**035P2 Counseling Cremation Services RALPH W. CLOSE

2355967

2281042

Free Estimates for: Bi-Monthly Monthly

ROOFGoodbye MANAGEMENT Perfect

Hytinen Landscaping

2383556

TNT Lawn Mowing 25 YEARS EXPERIENCE Service

PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

1767309

For a Healthy & Beautiful yard this spring, now is the time for clean-ups! 2281044

A STEP ABOVE THE BEST Quality Cleaning

ROOFING PET SERVICES

LAWN SERVICE

LANDSCAPING

LAWN SERVICE

2281043

Housecleaning

PLEASE CALL TO MAKE RESERVATIONS. (SOME RESTRIC TIONS APPLY)

42 Dory Rd., Sequim | 360-582-9686 | countrypawsresort.com

Profile for Sound Publishing

Sequim Gazette, July 03, 2019  

July 03, 2019 edition of the Sequim Gazette

Sequim Gazette, July 03, 2019  

July 03, 2019 edition of the Sequim Gazette