Page 1

almanac 2019 north kitsap

Your guide to the people and places that make North Kitsap unique

SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE


PLAY WITH PASSION. RELAX IN STYLE. THAT’S THE POINT!

Hotel | Meeting Room • 94 Guest Rooms • Business Center All Your Favorite Games | 700+ Slots • Blackjack • Craps Live Music & Entertainment | Center Bar • Cutter Cigar Club • Boom Room Lounge Dining | Market Fresh Buffet • Little Boston Bistro • Point Julia Cafe

Kingston, Washington thepointcasinoandhotel.com 360.297.0070 The Point 2 Casino | N& Hotel o r ist proudly h K owned i t sand a operated p A l bym The a Port n a Gamble c 2 S’Klallam 0 1 9 Tribe.

You must be at least 21 years old to participate in gaming activities, attend entertainment events and to enter lounge/bar areas. Knowing your limit is your best bet—get help at (800) 547-6133.


welcome

O

n any given day in North Kitsap, visitors and residents alike can find themselves enjoying a walk through one of the area’s numerous wilderness trails, passing by mosscovered trees and ancient old-growth stumps, strolling along pristine, sandy beaches and learning about the various cultures that make up the collective history of this special place.

North Kitsap is home to the S’Klallam and Suquamish tribes who have called this place their home since time immemorial. Scandinavian settlers also moved to the area in the late 19th century for the bounty of natural resources, good salmon fishing and the area’s resemblance to the homeland they had left behind. Modern day settlers are drawn to the area for similar reasons as their predecessors: economic opportunity, good schools, safe neighborhoods, plentiful natural space. Those who proudly call North Kitsap home have a great respect for the natural wonder of this area, many work to preserve and maintain parks, trails and other green spaces through volunteer work, environmental organizations and grants.

for their own. This is evidenced by the spirit of volunteerism fostered by groups like North Kitsap Fishline and ShareNet which work to ensure that those who are struggling can get the help they need. This magazine will introduce you to some of North Kitsap’s story and will illustrate some of the things that make this place truly unique. Inside you will find profiles for each of North Kitsap’s communities: Hansville, Eglon, Indianola, Kingston, Keyport, Little Boston, Port Gamble, Poulsbo and Suquamish. Here you will find information on arts and entertainment, events, festivals, farmers markets, government offices, museums and much more. The North Kitsap Almanac is published by the North Kitsap Herald, a part of Sound Publishing’s Kitsap News Group. Read our daily news site KitsapDailyNews.com to stay up to date on local news and upcoming events. It is with a warm, friendly welcome that we wish you a safe and enjoyable stay in North Kitsap.

Top: The view of Puget Sound looking north from the Kingston ferry terminal. Bottom: Birds at Poulsbo’s Oyster Plant Park take refuge in manmade houses.

Emmie Kempf - courtesy photos

When you make North Kitsap your home, you become a member of a family that watches out

N o r t h

K i t s a p

A l m a n a c

2 0 1 9

|

3


Contents

The oversized Adirondack chairs are a tourist favorite in Kingston.

Welcome to North Kitsap | 3-4 Inside | 5 Quick reference | 8-12 Culture | 13-14 Poulsbo | 14-15 Hansville | 16-20 Indianola | 21-22 Keyport | 23-24 Kingston | 25-27 Port Gamble | 28-29 Map | 30-31 Port Gamble S’Klallam | 32-33

Emmie Kempf - courtesy photo

Suquamish | 34-37 Art | 38 Entertainment | 39-40 Faith | 41-44 Taste | 45 Get involved | 46-48 Be active | 49 Parks and trails | 50 Fitness and fun | 51-53 Education | 54-56 Weather | 57 Advertiser index | 58

NORTH KITSAP ALMANAC is an annual publication of the Sound Publishing’s Kitsap News Group 19351 8th Ave. NE, Suite 106, P.O. Box 278, Poulsbo WA. 98370 360-779-4464 | 360-779-8276 (fax)

ADMINISTRATION Terry Ward, publisher tward@soundpublishing.com Steve Perry, general manager sperry@soundpublishing.com Nick Twietmeyer, interim editor ntwietmeyer@soundpublishing.com Brian Judge, circulation manager bjudge@soundpublishing.com

Copyright 2019 Sound Publishing Inc.

4

|

N o r t h

K i t s a p

A l m a n a c

2 0 1 9


North Kitsap TAKING A LOOK AT THE CULTURE

Liberty Bay Marina.

T

Emmie Kempf - courtesy photo

he history and lives of those who have called North Kitsap home for millennia are still as closely tied to the area as ever.

Many members of the Suquamish and Port Gamble S’Klallam tribes continue to live with a direct link and reliance upon what the waters surrounding North Kitsap provide. Logging also proved to be a booming business for those who opted to strike out on their own and make a living through the hard, often dangerous work of 19th-century logging. The US Navy has had a presence in North Kitsap for more than a century, serving a vital role for the nation’s defense and the local economy by providing stable jobs to residents. A monument at Point No Point in Hansville, marks the place where US representatives and the Chemakum, S’Klallam and Skokomish peoples signed the Treaty of Point No Point on Jan. 26, 1855. The Point No Point Lighthouse is also a fixture of no small amount of historical significance. Still operational, the lighthouse serves as a navigational aid for sailors passing through Admiralty Inlet.

N o r t h

Nearby, in Little Boston the Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe’s Point Casino offers a chance for visitors to try their luck at the many games of chance. A central feature of the casino is the courtyard which features several story poles and totem poles created by Northwest Coast Native artists. When seeking to experience the culture of North Kitsap visitors should make a point to stop by the Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe’s House of Knowledge, which includes the tribe’s longhouse, elders center and the Little Boston Library. Along the West side of the Longhouse visitors can also find a veterans memorial. At Heronswood, a botanical garden owned by the S’Klallam Tribe, visitors can tour 15 acres of sprawling, lush, splendor, featuring plants collected from all over the world, as well as plants native to the region. Across Port Gamble Bay, the town of Port Gamble resembles the founders’ — William Talbot and Andrew Pope — hometown of East Machias, Maine. A mill operated here from 1853 until 1995. Today, Port Gamble is a National Historic Landmark District and a also features a popular events venue. Restored mid-1800s buildings

K i t s a p

A l m a n a c

house a variety of stores and shops. The Port Gamble Historical Museum is located on the lower floor of the general store. Suquamish is home to a number of culturally significant sites within walking distance including the Suquamish Museum and Chief Seattle’s gravesite at the Suquamish Cemetery. Old Man House Park — once the site of the largest winter longhouse in the Salish Sea — the Suquamish Veterans Memorial, and the House of Awakened Culture overlooking Port Madison are also must-see stops in the area. Downtown Poulsbo’s shopfronts and street names reflect the heritage of the Norwegians who settled on the banks of Liberty Bay starting in the 1880s. Downtown Poulsbo is a cultural district of sorts, with art galleries, bookstores, live theater, a marine science center, a historical museum, a maritime museum, and restaurants that reflect the diverse tastes of the unique city. At the U.S. Naval Undersea Museum in Keyport, visitors can study sea life, take a peek into a torpedo tube, and even operate a control panel in a recreated submarine control room. Admission is free.

2 0 1 9

|

5


We recognize that every student is an individual with a unique learning style, personality, passion and talent. That’s why we are committed to providing learning environments and academic interests that fit every student.

@nksd400 @nkschools @nksdnews 6

|

N o r t h

K i t s a p

A l m a n a c

2 0 1 9


publ ic se r v ice s ANIMAL/WILDLIFE Kitsap Humane Society 360-692-6977 | www.kitsap-humane.org Department of Fish and Wildlife 360-902-2200 | http://wdfw.wa.gov West Sound Wildlife Shelter 206-855-9057 | www.westsoundwildlife.org

CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE Poulsbo Chamber of Commerce 19735 10th Ave. NE, Suite S100, Poulsbo 98370 360-779-4848 | www.poulsbochamber.com

ShareNet (Kingston) 360-297-2266 | www.sharenetfoodbank.org

• District 2 (South Kitsap): Charlotte Garrido cgarrido@co.kitsap.wa.us

GOVERNMENT - CITY

• District 3 (Central Kitsap): Edward E. Wolfe ewolfe@co.kitsap.wa.us

Poulsbo City Hall 200 NE Moe St., Poulsbo 98370 360-779-3901 | www.cityofpoulsbo.com

GOVERNMENT - STATE

Mayor and City Council Becky Erickson, mayor. Connie Lord, Jeff McGinty, David Musgrove, Gary Nystul, Ed Stern, Kenneth Thomas, Abby Garland

GOVERNMENT - COUNTY

Greater Kingston Chamber of Commerce 25923 Washington Blvd, Kingston 98346 360-297-3813 | www.kingstonchamber.org

Kitsap County 614 Division St., Port Orchard 98366 360-337-5777 | www.kitsapgov.com

COURTS

Board of County Commissioners 619 Division St., Port Orchard 98366 360-337-7146

Poulsbo Municipal Court 200 NE Moe St., Poulsbo 98370 360-779-9846

CRISIS SERVICES

• District 1 (North Kitsap): Rob Gelder rgelder@co.kitsap.wa.us

Gov. Jay Inslee (D) P.O. Box 40002, Olympia 98504-0002 360-902-4111 | 1-800-833-6388 www.governor.wa.gov Sen. Christine Rolfes (D) 230A John A. Cherberg Building P.O. Box 40423, Olympia 98504-0423 360-786-7644 | rolfes.christine@leg.wa.gov Rep. Sherry Appleton(D) 132F Legislative Building P.O. Box 40600, Olympia 98504-0600 360-786-7934 | appleton.sherry@leg.wa.gov Rep. Drew Hansen (D) 370 John L. O’Brien Building P.O. Box 40600, Olympia 98504-0600 360-786-7842 | hansen.drew@leg.wa.gov

Domestic Violence Hotline 800-799-7233 Sexual Assault 24-hour Hot Line 1-866-831-2050

We put our money We put our money where heartis: is: where our our heart the the community. community.

Suicide Prevention Helpline 800-273-8255 Washington Poison Center 800-222-1222

FOOD BANKS North Kitsap Fishline (Poulsbo) 360-779-5190 | www.nkfishline.org Kingston Food Bank (Kingston) 360-297-4861

360-297-6800

25960 Ohio Ave NE, Suite 102 Kingston • 1 block from ferry SLICES • DINE-IN • CARRY OUT • DELIVERY

Poulsbo Branch Winslow Way Branch 360-394-8101 l 20148 10th Ave NE ColumbiaBank.com 206-842-5651 l www.ColumbiaBank.com Member FDIC

N o r t h

K i t s a p

You’ll You’llnotice noticethe thedifference. difference.

Equal Housing Lender

Member FDIC

Equal Housing Lender

A l m a n a c

2 0 1 9

|

7


publ ic se r v ice s GOVERNMENT - FEDERAL

Suquamish 98392 360-598-3311 | www.suquamish.nsn.us

Sen. Maria Cantwell (D) 206-220-6400 (Seattle) www.cantwell.senate.gov

Council members: Leonard Forsman, chairman; Bardow Lewis, vice chairman; Nigel Lawrence, Sammy Mabe, Luther “Jay” Mills, Rich Purser, Robin Sigo.

Sen. Patty Murray (D) 206-553-5545 (Seattle) www.murray.senate.gov

Kitsap Regional Library www.krl.org

Peninsula Community Health Services 360-337-3776 (Poulsbo) www.pchsweb.org

Kingston branch 26159 Dulay Road NE 360-297-3330

GOVERNMENT - TRIBAL Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe 31912 Little Boston Road Kingston 98346 360-297-2646 | www.pgst.nsn.us

Little Boston branch 31980 Little Boston Road NE 360-297-2670

You Have Better Things to Do Than Wait MEDICAL CARE Poulsbo branch 700 NE Lincoln Road 360-779-2915

Council members: Jeromy Sullivan, chairman; Chris Tom, vice chairman; Donovan Ashworth, Matthew Ives, Jamie Aikman, Renee Veregge.

You Have Better Things You Things to DoBetter Than Wait You Have Have Better Things to Do Than Wait You Have Better Things You Have Better Things You Have Better Things You Have Better Things

Suquamish Tribe 18490 Suquamish Way P.O. Box 498

The Doctors Clinic (urgent care) 19245 7th Ave. NE, Poulsbo 360-782-3500 | www.thedoctorsclinic.com Harrison Medical Center 866-844-9355 (WELL) www.harrisonmedical.org

LIBRARIES

Rep. Derek Kilmer (D) 360-373-9725 (Bremerton) www.kilmer.house.gov

20730 Bond Road, Poulsbo 360-779-7011 | www.immediateclinic.com/ poulsbo-urgent-care

ALL EMERGENCIES: 911

North Kitsap Family Practice (urgent care)

to Do Than Wait to Do Than Wait to Do Than Wait Than Wait toto DoDo Than Wait

We’re local! Get the services you need faster than you can get the boat We’re local! Get the services you need youservices can get you the boat We’refaster local! than Get the need

HIV-AIDS Information 800-874-AIDS Hospice of Kitsap County 360-698-4611 | facebook.com/hospiceofkc/ Kitsap Public Health District 360-728-2235 | www.kitsappublichealth.org Shellfish Water Quality Hotline 800-562-5632

PARKS AND RECREATION Kitsap County Parks and Recreation 360337-5350 | www.kitsapgov.com/parks City of Poulsbo Parks and Recreation 360-779-9898 | www.cityofpoulsbo.com/ parks-recreation/ Village Green Metropolitan Park District 360-297-1263 | www.myvillagegreen.org Commissioners: Bobbie Moore, Position 1; Tracy Darlene Harris, Position 2; Jason Manges, Position 3; Patrick Pearson, Position 4; Jim Moore, Position 5.

We’re Get the services you need We’relocal! local! Get the services you need

faster than you can get the boat

faster than you can get the boat We’re local! Get the services you need We’re local! Get the services you faster than you can get the boat of medicallylevel highest theneed providing to dedicated are we At Hear for Life Audiology, We’re local! Get the services you need faster than you can get the boat healthcare. hearing for services treatment oriented diagnostic and faster youcan canget get the boat fasterthan than you the boat

Call

At Hear for Life Audiology, we are dedicated to providing the highest level of medicallyhearing healthcare. for services treatment and oriented diagnostic appointment. an schedule to today 206-842-6374 of medicallylevellevel highest the the to providing dedicated are wewe Audiology, LifeLife forfor Hear AtAt of medicallyhighest to providing dedicated are Audiology, Hear We accept all providing the highest level of medicallytohealthcare. dedicated are for weservices Audiology, Lifeand for Hear Atoriented healthcare. hearing services treatment diagnostic oriented hearing for treatment and diagnostic healthcare. for hearing services treatment and we oriented appointment. anhighest to toschedule today 206-842-6374 Call level of medically- Major Insurance the providing dedicated are Life Audiology, fordiagnostic Hear At We accept all appointment. schedule to to today 206-842-6374 Call level of medicallyhighest providing the to dedicated we arean Audiology, Hear for Life At healthcare. hearing foran services treatment and diagnostic oriented appointment. schedule today 206-842-6374 Call Wethe accept all of medicallyInsurance highest providing to are dedicated we Audiology, for Life Hear At We accept all levelMajor healthcare. hearing for services treatment and diagnostic oriented Major Insurance appointment. an hearing to schedule today 206-842-6374 Call Major Insurance healthcare. services for treatment diagnostic and oriented We accept all Call 206-842-6374 today to schedule an appointment. We accept all Insurance Major Call 206-842-6374 today to schedule an appointment.

Since 1993 Olympic Printer Resources, Inc. DBA Olympic Technology Resources has been helping businesses and families to save money with our quality remanufactured cartridges

Major Insurance

We accept all Call 206-842-6374 today to schedule an appointment. Major Insurance

We accept all Major Insurance

Our toner cartridges are custom built here in Kingston

345 Knechtel Way NE #105 • Bainbridge Island, WA 98110 • 206-842-6374 345 Knechtel Way NE #105 • Bainbridge Island, WA 98110 • 206-842-6374

5 Knechtel Way NE #105 Bainbridge Island, WA 98110 206-842-6374 115Knechtel Village Way ••Port Ludlow, 98365 • 360-437-7767 345 Way NE #105WA • Bainbridge Island, WA •98110 • 206-842-6374

Savings of 20%-50% compared to new Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM) cartridges

115 Village Way • Port Ludlow, WA 98365 • 360-437-7767 5775 Soundview Drive • Gig Harbor WA 98335 • 253-514-8224 115•Village Way • Port Ludlow, WA • 115 Village Port WA 98365 • 98365 5775Way Soundview DriveLudlow, Gig Harbor WA 98335 253-514-8224 345 Knechtel Way NE #105 • •Bainbridge Island, WA •98110 • 206-842-6374

360-437-7767 360-437-7767 253-514-8224

360-297-8384 | www.olytechresources.com 26127 Calvary Lane NE, Suite 200 | Kingston

345 Knechtel Way NE #105 • Bainbridge Island, WA 98110 • 206-842-6374 5775 Soundview Drive •WA Gig98365 Harbor WA 98335 • 253-514-8224 115 Village Way•• Gig Port#105 Ludlow, • 360-437-7767 5775 Soundview Drive Harbor WA 98335 • 98110 • 206-842-6374 345 Knechtel • Bainbridge 115 VillageWay WayNE • Port Ludlow, WA Island, 98365WA • 360-437-7767 5775 Soundview DriveWay • Gig• Harbor WA 98335 • 253-514-8224 115 Village Port Ludlow, WA 98365 • 360-437-7767

5775 Soundview Drive • Gig Harbor WA 98335 • 253-514-8224

8

|

N o r t h

K i t s a p

345 Knechtel NE #105 • Bainbridge WA•98110 • 206-842-6374 5775Way Soundview Drive • Gig HarborIsland, WA 98335 253-514-8224 115 Village Way • Port Ludlow, WA 98365 • 360-437-7767

A l m a n a c

2 0 1 9


publ ic se r v ice s PORTS

Online: wsdot.wa.gov/ferries

Port of Eglon P.O. Box 451, Hansville 98340 360-297-4542 Commissioners: Timothy Holbrook, District 1; David A. Roberts, District 2; Russell Cordiner, District 3. Port of Indianola P.O. Box 496, Indianola 98342-0496 www.portofIndianola.com Commissioners: Jeff Henderson, District 1; Eric Cookson, District 2; John Lane District 3. Port of Keyport P.O. Box 195, Keyport 98345 360-627-0594 | www.portofkeyport.com Commissioners: John M. Thompson, Position 1; Brian Watne, Position 2; Gene Warden, Position 3. Port of Kingston 25864 Washington Blvd. P.O. Box 559, Kingston 98346 360-297-3545 | www.portofkingston.org Commissioners: Steve Heacock, District 1; Mary McClure, District 2; Laura Gronvoll, District 3. Port of Poulsbo P.O. Box 732, Poulsbo 98370 360-779-9905 | www.portofpoulsbo.com Commissioners: Steve Swann, Position 1; Mark DeSalvo, Position 2; Jonothan Saunders, Position 3.

Poulsbo Fire Department 360-779-3997 (non-emergency) Burn Ban Information 360-297-4888

UTILITIES

SCHOOL BOARD

Brem-Air Disposal (solid waste) 800-592-9995 | www.wm.com

North Kitsap School District 18360 Caldart Ave. NE, Poulsbo 98370 360-396-3001 | www.nkschools.org Superintendent: Dr. Laurynn Evans Board members: Beth Worthington, president; Jim Almond, Rick Eckert, Glen Robbins, Cindy Webster-Martinson.

City of Poulsbo (sewer, water, trash) 200 NE Moe St., Poulsbo 98370 360-779-4078 | www.cityofpoulsbo.com Kitsap Public Utilities District 1431 Finn Hill Road, Poulsbo 98370 360-779-7656 | www.kpud.org Puget Sound Energy 888-225-5773 | www.pse.com

TRANSPORTATION Hood Canal Bridge - 511 - Travel Info Kitsap Transit Bus service, carpool, fast ferries, RideShare 800-422-2877, 800-501-7433 | www.kitsaptransit.org Washington State Ferries Fares & Schedules: 888-808-7977 Traffic Conditions: 511

Bainbridge Disposal (solid waste) 206-842-4882 | www.bainbridgedisposal.com

VEHICLE/VESSEL LICENSING Driver’s License Examiner 19045 Highway 305, No. 140, Poulsbo 98370 | 360-779-5547 Vehicle and Vessel Licensing JRO, Inc. | 227 NW Lindvig Way, Poulsbo 360-697-4337

Zufelt and Zufelt “The Kingston Area Real Estate Specialists”

POLICE, FIRE PROTECTION All emergencies: 911 Kitsap County Sheriff’s Department 360-337-7101 (non-emergency) Poulsbo Police Department 200 NE Moe St. Poulsbo 98370 360-779-3113 (non-emergency) Port Gamble S’Klallam Police 31912 Little Boston Road NE Kingston 98346 360-930-9061 (non-emergency) Suquamish Police Department 18490 Suquamish Way NE Suquamish 98392 360-598-4334 (non-emergency)

Jan Zufelt, CRS & Lisa Zufelt

8208 NE St Hwy 104 Ste 105, Kingston

Washington State Patrol 360-596-4000

Call or Text or Email Us Today Jan: 360-620-2383 janz@johnlscott.com Lisa: 360-620-2383 lisaz@johnlscott.com

North Kitsap Fire & Rescue 360-297-3619 (non-emergency)

N o r t h

K i t s a p

A l m a n a c

2 0 1 9

| 9


Patti Shannon Managing Broker

“Her expertise was invaluable.”

Poulsbo Phone/Text 206-755-5139 PattiShannonRealtor.com

You You have have something something we want! YOU! we want! YOU!

SERVING BAINBRIDGE ISLAND POULSBO

Join us!

AND

Greater Kingston Kiwanis Every Thursday - 7:00 am Village Green 26159 Dulay Rd NE. Kingston

KINGSTON

Windermere Real Estate/BI, Inc. 840 Madison Avenue N Bainbridge Island, WA 98110

1 0

Serving Serving Local Local Needs Needs Community Building Community Building Helping Helping Kids Kids Fun and Social Fun and Social

greaterkingstonkiwanis.weebly.com Greater Kingston Kiwanis

|

N o r t h

K i t s a p

A l m a n a c

Poulsbo’s Scandinavian heritage is reflected in the aesthetic of local shopfronts.

H

File photo

aving officially assumed the moniker of the “Viking City,” it’s no wonder that Poulsbo’s history is largely influenced by the Scandinavian settlers who moved to the area around the 1880’s. Before settlers moved to the shores of what is now known as Liberty Bay, a community of the Suquamish People lived at the head of the bay for thousands of years. In 1855 the Suquamish signed the treaty of Point Elliott, which made the land available to newcomers. The Suquamish reserved land for themselves and their descendants on what is now the Port Madison Indian Reservation. The Suquamish Tribe also maintained their right to hunt, fish and harvest shellfish on their usual and accustomed grounds. In September 1883, Jorgen Eliason (18471937) rowed his boat into Liberty Bay and became Poulsbo’s first, permanent, non-native resident. Waves of Norwegian settlers soon followed Eliason from Norway and the Midwest, all searching for opportunity and a landscape that reminded them of the homeland they left behind.

2 0 1 9


THE SC ISLAND HOOL

Carts are available for use at the Liberrty Bay Marina. When Poulsbo was incorporated in 1907, the population of the small town was around 300 people and Norwegian was still spoken by many of the residents (this would remain the case until the 1940’s when World War II brought more jobs and new residents to the area).

Kindergarten through Fifth Grade

Emmie Kempf - courtesy photo

though, the city hosts the annual Viking Fest celebration which includes a parade through downtown, numerous vendors and food stalls and no shortage of rugged-looking vikings snarling at passersby.

Rich, Engaging Curriculum Small Class Sizes

Today Poulsbo remains a lively hub for visitors and residents to enjoy the numerous galleries, restaurants and cultural festivals throughout the year. Muriel Iverson Williams Waterfront Park is a prominent feature of the town, with many visitors opting to cruise in to the Port of Poulsbo Marina aboard their personal vessels. Poulsbo has not lost touch with their nordic roots

We’re just across the bridge

8553 NE Day Road Bainbridge Island

POULSBO AT A GLANCE

206-842-0400

Population - Population: 10,670 - Median Age: 40.2 - Number of Females: 5,036 - Number of Males: 4,164 - Average Family Size: 2.97 - Veterans: 1,027

26909 State Highway 104 NE Kingston, WA kingstongreens.com

TheIslandSchool.org

Education Earned college degree: 3,584 Housing Number of housing units: 4,312 Owner occupied: 2,560 Renter occupied: 1,566 Median home value: $311,500 Median rent: $1,085

THE EDUCATION EVERY CHILD

Call Us! 360-297-5156 asrstorage98346@gmail.com www.asrstorage.com

Based on 2017 estimations by the US Census Bureau

N o r t h

K i t s a p

A l m a n a c

2 0 1 9

DESERVES | 1 1


Kingston The Kingston ferry terminal provides a crucial link to Edmonds and Seattle.

T

he recent addition of Kitsap Transit’s passenger-only ferry service to Seattle from Kingston has cemented the small, waterfront town’s status as a gateway to the Olympic Peninsula for westbound visitors. The connection also serves as a key connection for North Kitsap residents, who previously had to commute to either Bainbridge Island or Bremerton to catch a ferry to Seattle. Kingston features a lively downtown area, a thriving marina, quiet beaches, seaview parks and natural places well worth exploring. Kingston is also home to numerous oversized Adirondack chairs, upon which visitors are welcome to sit for a photo — in fact, the chairs have enough room for a whole family to crowd

in for a group snapshot.

contribute to Kingston’s unique charm.

There’s something special about Kingston that beckons visitors to consider making the Little City by the Sea their home. Appletree Cove is a popular destination for boaters, fishers, kayakers and paddle boarders. The views of the Puget Sound are unrivaled, and visitors and residents alike can appreciate the restorative nature of taking in the beauty of the peninsula while on a local hike. Nearby is the award-winning White Horse Golf Club, owned and operated by Port Madison Enterprises, the economic development arm of the Suquamish Tribe. A farmers market and live music at Mike Wallace Park, the community’s Fourth of July celebration, and frequent waterfront events throughout the year all

While Kingston is an unincorporated town in Kitsap County, the community largely governs itself through a variety of public and non-profit agencies. The Port of Kingston owns Port of Kingston Marina, which offers 262 slips, a fuel dock, and a kayak and small-boat facility. The port district also owns the ferry landing, which it leases to Washington State Ferries; the much larger of the two ferry services in town.

Thank You for 35 Years of Support!

THE SPORT HAUS Specialists in running shoes... we make happy feet!

Running Walking Baseball

Soccer Tennis Football

Poulsbo Village Shopping Center

(360) 697-2311

Population - Population: 1,875 - Median Age: 48.7 - Number of Females: 942 - Number of Males: 943 - Average Family Size: 2.73 - Veterans: 138 Education Earned college degree: 688

Based on 2017 estimations by the US Census Bureau

Mon-Fri 9:30am-7:00pm • Sat 9:30-6:00pm

| N o r t h

KINGSTON AT A GLANCE

Housing Number of housing units: 957 Owner occupied: 600 Renter occupied: 357 Median home value: $252,800 Median rent: $1,141

Basketball Volleyball Lacrosse

1 2

Emmie Kempf - courtesy photo

K i t s a p A l m a n a c

2 0 1 9


The Indianola dock is a summertime favorite for folks looking to cool off.

File photo

retain its vacation aesthetic. The dock still stands, a mighty vestige of both bygone necessity and carefree summertime joy — the latter evidenced by the droves of visitors who flock to the dock during warmer months in order to leap from the dock to the cool water below.

Indianola

T

he most prominent feature of Indianola also happens to be what was once the town’s only link to the outside world. The Indianola dock is a sprawling, 900-foot long wooden testament to the small community’s origins as a vacation retreat. In 1916 the dock was constructed and the Indianola Beach Land Company formed and established Indianola as a summer community. Once built, the dock was the only means for people to get in (and out) of Indianola by boat. Passenger boats shuffled in and out on a daily basis by 1929 and in 1933 voters created the Port of Indianola for

The nearby Indianola Country Store & Deli is an imperative stop for the postswim munchies. Deli sandwiches, coffee, ice cream, cold refreshments and souvenirs can all be procured at the store as well, making it a valuable stop for any trip out to this North Kitsap favorite.

maintenance of the dock and mosquito fleet ferries servicing the small vacation destination. Today, a road is how most folks get to Indianola from elsewhere in North Kitsap, but the beachfront town still manages to

Every summer, residents celebrate Indianola Days, which features a car show, dance, pet parade, sand castle contest, salmon bake, tennis tournament and talent show. With no set date, the event always takes place on the weekend coinciding with the lowest minus tide of the year.

Serving Kitsap for Over 25 Years

INDIANOLA AT A GLANCE Population Population: 3,520 Median Age: 45.1 Number of Females: 1,786 Number of Males: 1,734Average Family Size: 2.45 Veterans: 381 Education Earned college degree: 1,292

Doug Hallock

Joy-filled education on Bainbridge Island.

Direct: (360) 271-1315 dhallock@windermere.com www.sellkingston.com www.facebook.com/doughallock

Grades 1-8 • Kindergarten Preschool • Parent-Child

Managing Broker

Housing Number of housing units: 1,657 Owner occupied: 1,121 Renter occupied: 289 Median home value: $265,700 Median rent: $1,316 Based on 2017 estimations by the US Census Bureau

N o r t h

K i t s a p

A l m a n a c

2 0 1 9

206-855-8041 • madronaschool.org

| 1 3


o

?

d

C

Hood Canal Bridge

Chamber & Visitor Info

WA State Ferry

Marina or Dock

Golf Course

Brewery

Hotel

Casino

Nursery

Park

Lighthouse

an

al

Puget Ave

104

?

View Dr

PORT GAMBLE

Wheeler 104

Hansville Greenway

Buck Lake

NE Twin Spits Rd

Salish Lane

int N oP o i nt R d

Skallam Point Casino & Pavilion

Po

Point No Point

HANSVILLE

Puget Sound

Paddle Bainbridge

VisitKitsap.com/WaterTrails for info & download map

Water Trails Map

HOME OF THE

NORTH KITSAP PENINSULA REGION NE Buck Lake Rd

Hansville Road NE Rainier Ave


3

Li NW n W dvi ay g

3

7th Ave

Front St.

de y An Pkw

or

?

8th Ave 6th Ave

Fj

Li dD

r be r

ty

Silverdale Kitsap Mall

Bond Rd

POULSBO

Ba

Fi

N

y KEYPORT

Raab Park

NE Hostmark St

Hood Canal Brewery

Rd

Co lu

305

Kiana Lodge

Agate Pass Bridge

Clearwater Casino & Resort

305

South ay St W

SUQUAMISH

Lincoln Ave.

NE Gunderson Rd

307

Bo

nd

H

BANGOR

Big Valley Rd 3rd Ave Jensen Way n rso

NW Bovella Lane Moe St

Vikin gA ve

ill 10th Ave S

Caldart Ave NE

E

Dulay Rd

Kingston-Edmonds Ferry

Kingston Ferry Terminal

BAINBRIDGE ISLAND

Bainbridge Island Seattle Ferry

Port Madison Bay

?

KINGSTON

White Horse Rd

INDIANOLA

North Kitsap Heritage Park

NE West Kingston Rd

104

NE

Kitsap Memorial Park

Port Gamble Rd

Rd N

W Augusta A ve

ook

Division St

and yH

nn

H mbia S t

Viking W ay NW

Miller Bay Rd

Suqua mi sh

NE ola Rd

An g eli ne Av e

Indian


Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe

The Port Gamble S’Klallam canoe family departs Point Julia for Port Gamble.

T

eekalet, which later became known as Port Gamble, is where S’Klallam ancestors lived until they were driven away with the arrival of the Pope and Talbot mill and the surrounding town. The U.S. government destroyed a S’Klallam village at Point Julia in 1939 and as a result, the tribe moved upland to Little Boston and

Coontown — named because of the large raccoon population there. Point Julia, however, still remains a large part of S’Klallam culture. The point serves as a holder of memories, a center of community and family life, a connection to the bay where the S’Klallam people have fished and clammed for millennia. The Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe is a signa-

19980 10th Ave Ne Suite 203 Poulsbo, WA 98370 (360) 779-6450

Dan Reber Financial Advisor

www.edwardjones.com/dan-reber

Western Red Brewing's mission is to brew and serve the best craft beers ever made in the Pacific Northwest. We are motivated to create and share our quality craft brews and celebrate Northwest life with those that share our passions.

tory to the Treaty of Point No Point in 1855. In the treaty, the United States obtained land in exchange for certain payments and obligations. The indigenous signatories reserved land over which they have jurisdiction, and retained certain cultural and natural resource rights within their historical territories. The Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe is governed by an elected council. The Tribal Council exercises full governmental authority over the Tribe’s land and resources. As a member of the Point No Point Treaty Council and the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission, the Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe works to protect the environment that has sustained its people for millennia and protect rights contained in the treaty, including the right to fish, hunt and gather in traditional areas. Today, the tribe owns The Point Hotel & Casino, which has four restaurants, a nightclub, an RV park and an events center; Heronswood Garden; Gliding Eagle Market; High Point Cannabis; and Kountry Korner gas station and store.

Propane Delivery Service 25¢ off per Gallon* with promo code NKA19

Open Hours: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday: 12-8pm Thursday, Friday, Saturday: 12-9pm • Sunday: 12-8pm

(360) 638-1313

www.KitsapPropane.com

19168 Jensen Way NE, Poulsbo, Washington Call (360) 626-1280 • westernredbrewing.com

1 6

|

N o r t h

File photo

*Valid once per account. 50 gal min. Other conditions apply.

K i t s a p

A l m a n a c

2 0 1 9


Port Gamble

Port Gamble’s Walker-Ames house has been called “washington’s most haunted house.”

F

ollowing the completion of an extensive cleanup of the former mill site nearshore, which saw the removal of thousands of creosote pilings and 150 years of wood waste from the bay, Port Gamble’s waterfront is now a much cleaner, healthier environment.

File photo

Streibel’s Deli Mart

6018 NE State HWY 104 | Kingston, Washington | (360) 297-8066

Today, visitors enjoy many of the amenities that the early mill-town families enjoyed: a New England-style town with tree-lined streets, a community theater, a general store, a variety of shops and stores, and scenery ideal for a wedding or an evening out. Buried at Port Gamble’s cemetery is Gustave Englebrecht, a Navy sailor killed in 1856 in a battle between crewmembers of the USS Massachusetts and a Haida raiding party. Englebrecht was the first U.S. Navy sailor to die in action in the Pacific. Ghost tours are offered regularly, which take visitors through locations around town that have been associated with reported paranormal activity. Visitors can even visit the infamous WalkerAmes house, called by some “the most haunted house in Washington.”

N o r t h

What about the Weather? What if someone gets sick? What if someone doesn’t show? What if someone gets hurt? What if we damage the location? Event Insurance won’t break the bank!

Invest in protecting yourself ! Most events fit within our most affordable package of coverage, starting at just $176 Quick, no hassle quotes are available. Simply fill out our questionnaire and we will get right back to you.

11175 NE 2nd Street, Kingston, WA 98346 • www.dwferguson.com • (360) 297-4844

K i t s a p

A l m a n a c

2 0 1 9

|

1 7


Suquamish Tribe Suquamish serves as a key stop for the annual Tribal Canoe Journey.

V

File photo

isitors and residents need not look far to see the influences of the Suquamish tribe in North Kitsap, anyone traveling from Mukilteo to the Whidbey Island town of Clinton have a decent chance of boarding the Washington State Ferry M/V Suquamish. In North Kitsap the Suquamish Tribe is a force, and not just one of economic vitality — by providing jobs, entertainment and new development to the area — but also of cultural and social preservation as well.

We’re small enough to care, and big enough to help. 21505 Market Pl NW Ste 109 Poulsbo, WA 98370

800.426.1601 1 8

|

N o r t h

The Suquamish Tribe is a sovereign, indigenous nation and a signatory to the Treaty of Point Elliott of 1855. In the treaty, the United States obtained land for non-Native settlement, in exchange for certain payments and obligations. The indigenous signatories reserved land over which they have jurisdiction, and retained certain cultural and natural resource rights within their historical territories. The Tribe’s economic success since the 1990s has enabled it to reacquire land lost during the allotment era.

pcfcu.org K i t s a p A l m a n a c

2 0 1 9


Creating Successful and Powerful Lives!

Our Mission: Top: Clearwater Casino, Bottom: Kiana Lodge.

Annie Lavalle photo

The Suquamish Clearwater Casino Resort is a sprawling testament to the tribe’s development in the area. In 2018, the Suquamish tribe reacquired 36-acres of land, leased since 1968 to nonNative residents. Something that the tribe’s chairman Leonard Forsman regarded as bad deal. The reacquisition of the land, Forsman said, was “an opportunity that the tribe has been waiting for for 50 years. We’ve endured, both politically and culturally and are in a place now that our ancestors who entered into that agreement, were hoping we’d be in when they did it.” The land, known as Suquamish Shores is expected to be developed extensively to include community spaces, a waterfront park, walking trails and a culturally-themed playground connecting the Suquamish Museum to the Veteran’s Monument near the House of Awakened Culture.

N o r t h

To Teach Students how to be World Class at Achieving Any Goal, Any Dream in Life…. And we do it through Becoming a Black Belt!! It’s just that we LOVE UKO. It’s just that we LOVE UKO. We wouldn’t be here for almost 10 years if we didn’t. They’re great people. It’s a great school. And the kids…. It’s something they’ll remember the rest of their lives. Diana Burko - Port Orchard

Email: UKOKarate@wavecable.com Phone: 360-871-5454

Port Orchard and Poulsbo

Website: UKOKarate.com

New Students Only. Offer may be closed at any time. Not Valid with any other offer.

K i t s a p

A l m a n a c

2 0 1 9

| 1 9


Keyport Keyport is home to a 19-slip marina.

K

File photo

eyport was established in 1896, and the Pacific Coast Torpedo Station followed just 18 years later, thus cementing Keyport’s role as a community with a direct link to the defense of the nation.

Where Children in Grades K—8th Find Joy in Learning!

Keyport is proud of its role, but it’s as much a community as it is Torpedo Town USA. Residents can set their clocks by the National Anthem, played over Naval Base Kitsap Keyport’s base loudspeakers every morning at 8. Keyport serves as one of the Navy’s two undersea warfare engineering stations. The Naval Undersea Museum in Keyport is one of 14 official U.S. Navy museums and is open to the public.

Faith

Character

Academics

Voters created the Port of Keyport in 1923, and the first order of business was constructing a public dock. Today, the Port of Keyport (www. portofkeyport.com) manages a marina with 14 private slips, 250 feet of guest moorage in five 50-foot slips, and a boat launch ramp. There is water and power at all slips.

Service

6974 Island Center Road, Bainbridge Island

(206) 842-6510 www.cardencountryschool.org

2 0

|

N o r t h

K i t s a p

A l m a n a c

2 0 1 9


T

hings tend to move just a little bit slower in Hansville and that’s a good thing. The unique waterfront majesty of this small community, located at the northern tip of the Kitsap Peninsula, has no rival. Standing on the banks of the shore, visitors will be treated to uninterrupted views of Whidbey Island, Admiralty Inlet and the tunes of a wide variety of birds that call the area home. While Hansville, may not be incorporated, there exists a strong sense of community, much of what you will find in this small community — a well-kept Norwegian Point Park, clean beaches and the trails that wind from Puget Sound to Hood Canal — are due to volunteer efforts.

Hansville & Eglon

Hansville is a place for folks looking to get out and experience a bit of nature. With hundreds of acres of greenways and open spaces for biking, walking, fishing, kayaking, birdwatching and much more, Hansville is a veritable playground for anyone with an appreciation of the outdoors. The Hansville Grocery and Hansgrill are a favorite gathering place for locals and visitors to the area. The proximity to the nearby web of walking trails makes the Hansgrill a prime lunch spot for hikers looking to fill up before heading back out. Ken Haywood is renowned among the regular patrons of the grill for cooking up his rotating weekly dinner specials, served only Thursday through Saturday. Heywood’s ribs are a local favorite and word travels quickly when it get out that he’s cooking up a batch. And don’t forget! Eglon is not Hansville “We don’t want to be Hansville; we’re Eglon,” Jacque Thornton once said in response to a county plan that lumped Eglon in with neighboring Hansville for the purposes of community planning. Indeed, Eglon is an independent community with its own rich history. A dock was built there

N o r t h

The Point No Point lighthouse continues to operate as a maritime navigational aid.

Nick Twietmeyer photo

in 1912, when the Mosquito Fleet, trails and wagon roads were the only means in and out of the community. The dock is gone, but the Eglon Port District owns a boat launch, parking lot, picnic area, and beach. Wendy Tweten wrote in the Kingston Community News in 2008: “It remains a small town with roots that go back more than 100 years. Community amenities include a church, meeting hall, cemetery, a fire truck (kept in one family’s garage), and the beach, where residents of Eglon still gather for bonfires and summer picnics just as they have for the last century.” Eglon voters elect port district commissioners to six-year terms.

K i t s a p

A l m a n a c

2 0 1 9

| 2 1


Liberrty Bay near the Poulsbo yacht Club

Emmie Kempf - courtesy photo

The natural beauty and resources of North Kitsap have sustained the needs of people here for millennia. Modern residents are still nurtured by the beauty and bounty of land and sea. You can learn more about our natural environment and your role as a caretaker at the following venues.

natural spaces

Fish Park 228 NW Lindvig Way (between Viking Avenue and Bond Road), Poulsbo. 360-394-9772 | www.cityofpoulsbo.com/parks. Features: 40 acres on Dogfish Creek and the Liberty Bay estuary, with entrances on Bond Road and on Viking Avenue. Features: Arboretum, bird and wildlife viewing, boardwalk, nature hiking trails, interpretive signage, pedestrian bridges, sitting areas, winding paths. Grovers Creek Salmon Hatchery 23175 Indianola Road NE, Poulsbo. 360-5983142. Call for hours.

Family Friendly Pets welcome on the deck Tuesdays: Trivia @ 7pm Thursdays: Prime Rib @ 5pm Friday & Saturday: Karaoke @ 9:30pm Wine Down Wednesday and Date Night Dinner Special 25% off all bottles of wine Happy Hour Monday - Friday 4pm-7pm Open 7 days a week Serving both Lunch & Dinner Breakfast Saturday and Sunday

11225 NE State Highway 104 Kingston, WA 360-881-0412 The Kingston Ale House

2 2

kingstonalehouse

| N o r t h

The hatchery is owned and operated by the Suquamish Tribe. Watch salmon make their way up the creek and the fish ladder into the holding ponds. Biologist Paul Dorn manages the Grover Creek Fish Hatchery and conducts salmon tours. SEA Discovery center 18743 Front St. NE, Poulsbo, 360-598-4460 | Hours: wp.wwu.edu/seacenterpoulsbo. The Marine Science Center offers an up-close introduction to the local marine ecosystem, with a touch tank, exhibits of more than 100 species of marine animals and plants, and an aquarium (the resident octopus is a popular attraction). Admission is free. Stillwaters Environmental Center 26059 Barber Cut Off Road, Kingston, 360297-1226 | Hours: www.stillwaters environmentalcenter.org. Stillwaters’ wetlands are part of a larger system that includes forest, freshwater and emergent salt marsh communities. The center has trails that lead to a viewing platform on the salt marsh and estuary off Puget Sound, and ponds full of sealife. Stillwaters presents numerous classes and events all year.

TheKingstonAH

K i t s a p A l m a n a c

2 0 1 9


P AR K S AND T R AIL S With approximately 90 parks and preserves, North Kitsap is conducive to an active lifestyle. It’s also a nature lover’s paradise. Enjoy secondgrowth forests and beautiful beaches; wildlife you’ll see include coyotes, raptors, river otters, seals and whales. These are the largest parks in North Kitsap. For a list of all parks, go to www.cityofpoulsbo.com and www.kitsapgov.com/parks.

HANSVILLE Foulweather Bluff A 101-acre preserve off Twin Spits Road, two miles northwest of Hansville. Features: A trail that meanders through a forest to a sandy beach on Hood Canal; more than 300 species of plants; stands of red alder, western hemlock, second-growth western red cedar; a coastal lagoon that is habitat for many bird species, including red-breasted nut hatches and winter wrens. Dogs and other pets are not allowed. Watch your step; the nearshore has several colonies of sand dollars. Hansville Greenway Hike from Puget Sound to Hood Canal on the Hansville Greenway trails. The greenway is 245 acres. Features: west shore of Buck Lake, two beaver ponds, other wetlands, and a portion of Hawk’s Hole Creek, which flows from Lower Hawk’s Pond to Hood Canal. Most of the land is second- and third-growth forest. The main entrance to the trail system is at Buck Lake County Park. Norwegian Point Park is the Puget Sound terminus of the Hansville Greenway trail system, but is not part of the Greenway. Buck Lake Park features a boat ramp for non-motorized watercraft, lake swimming, trout fishing, and trailheads to the Hansville Greenway Wildlife Corridor. Online: www.hansvillegreenway.org. Point No Point County Park A 60.8-acre park, located at the end of Point No Point Road off Hansville Road. The Treaty of Point No Point was negotiated and signed here in 1855; Point No Point Lighthouse was built in 1879. The lighthouse is open noon to 4 p.m. weekends April to September. Point No Point is on Admiralty Inlet and is popular for salmon fishing, sand-castle building, kite flying, bird watching and other beach activities. \

INDIANOLA

North Kitsap Heritage Park

Indianola Waterfront and Woodland Preserve An 80.91-acre preserve. Features: Undeveloped walking trails, mature mixed conifer forests, broadleaf forests, a seasonal stream that meanders to Miller Bay, public access to a low-bank beach on Puget Sound through a serene forested trail crossing over a tidal estuary. Wildlife includes bald eagles, Cooper’s hawks, ospreys, violet-green swallows, and pileated woodpeckers.

More than 800 acres of second-growth forest, with several miles of biking and walking trails. This park has no restrooms, and is pack-it-in/ pack-it-out with no trash collection. Online: www.kitsapgov.com/parks/

PORT GAMBLE Port Gamble Forest Heritage Park

Online: www.greatpeninsula.org/where/indianola.html.

A 535-acre park. Features: Biking, equestrian and walking trails; access to the bay for water trails and kayaking; parking lot. Pack-it-in/ pack-it-out.

KINGSTON

POULSBO

Carpenter Lake Reserve and Wildlife Sanctuary Carpenter Lake is the center of this 67-acre nature preserve. Features: Boardwalk with viewing platforms leading across a bog and a salt marsh to the lake. The trailhead is located behind Richard Gordon Elementary School on Barber Cut Off Road.

Fish Park 228 NW Lindvig Way (between Viking Avenue and Bond Road), Poulsbo. 360-394-9772 | www.cityofpoulsbo.com/parks/parks_parks_ trails.htm. Features: 40 acres on Dogfish Creek and the Liberty Bay estuary, with entrances on Bond Road and on Viking Avenue.

KINGSTON

KINGSTON at Kingston

$1 drink with purchase of any at Kingston 360-297-3350 Your local full service Kingston www.yourfoodmarket.com • at Follow us on Facebook $1foot drink with long Your local full service supermarket supermarket Your local full service supermarket purchase of any 360-297-3350 www.yourfoodmarket.com • Follow us on Facebook 10978 State Hwy 104 360-297-3350 foot long Your local full service supermarket

360-297-3350

www.yourfoodmarket.com www.yourfoodmarket.com Follow us on Facebook

Kingston

• Follow us on Facebook 360.297.4498 10978 State Hwy 104 Kingston

360.297.4498

Online: www.kitsapgov.com/parks.

N o r t h

K i t s a p

A l m a n a c

2 0 1 9

|

2 3


SCHOOL S PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Children’s Garden Montessori 3805 NE Sawdust Hill Road NE, Poulsbo Kristen Sundquist, director 360-779-1225 | www.cgmspoulsbo.com

North Kitsap School District 18360 Caldart Ave., Poulsbo 360-396-3001 | www.nkschools.org

The Farm Montessori School 17197 Clear Creek Road NW, Poulsbo 360-779-2620 Classes for 68 students ages 3-6.

The North Kitsap School District is comprised of six elementary schools, two middle schools, two high schools and a Parent Assisted Learning Program.

Gateway Christian School 705 Lincoln Road NE, Poulsbo 360-779-9189 | www.gatewaychristian schools.org Grades K-9.

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS Richard Gordon Elementary 26331 Barber Cut Off Road NE, Kingston Karen Tollefson, principal | 360-396-3800

Good Shepherd Montessori Preschool 15439 Sandy Hook Road NE, Poulsbo 360-779-2345 | www.gscmontessori.com Poulsbo Adventist School 1700 Lincoln Road NE, Poulsbo 360-779-6290 | www.poulsboadventist school.com Grades 1-8.

Hilder Pearson Elementary 15650 Central Valley Road NW, Poulsbo Deb Foreman, principal | 360-697-6266 Poulsbo Elementary School 18531 Noll Road NE, Poulsbo Drew Crandall, principal | 360-779-2911 Suquamish Elementary School 18950 Park Blvd. NE, Suquamish Gwen Lyon, principal | 360-598-4219 Vinland Elementary School 22104 Rhododendron Lane NW, Poulsbo Charley McCabe, principal | 360-779-8990 David Wolfle Elementary School 27089 Highland Road NE, Kingston Benjamin Degnin, principal | 360-394-6800

MIDDLE SCHOOLS Kingston Middle School 9000 NE West Kingston Road, Kingston Craig Barry, principal | 360-396-3400 Poulsbo Middle School 2003 Hostmark St., Poulsbo Josh Emmons, principal | 360-779-4453

HIGH SCHOOLS North Kitsap High School 1780 NE Hostmark St., Poulsbo Megan Sawicki, principal | 360-779-4408 Kingston High School 26201 Siyaya Ave. NE, Kingston Christy Cole, principal | 360-394-1200

INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS Chief Kitsap Academy 15838 Sandy Hook Road NE, Suquamish Fabian Castilleja, principal 360-394-8566 | https://suquamish.nsn.us. A school of the Suquamish Tribe Education Department. CENTRAL KITSAP Montessori 10323 Central Valley Road NE, Poulsbo Diana Zegers, administrator 360-698-7620 | www.ckmontessori.com

West Sound Academy 16571 Creative Drive NE, Poulsbo Barrie Hillman, head of school | 360-5985954, www.westsoundacademy.org College preparatory school for grades 6-12.

COLLEGES Northwest Indian College, little boston satellite site 31912 Little Boston Road NE, Kingston 360-297-6216. Olympic College, Poulsbo 1000 Olympic College Way NW, Poulsbo. 360394-2725 | email poulsbocampus@olympic. edu Washington State University at Olympic College Poulsbo 1000 Olympic College Way NW, Poulsbo. 360394-2700

ONE CALL FOR ALL! Serving Kitsap County Since 1988

• Complete Site Preparation and Development • Septic Design & Installation • Driveway Construction & Maintenance • Quality Retaining Walls

Silverwood School 14000 Central Valley Road NW, Poulsbo Jon Torgerson, head of school 360-697-7526 | www.silverwoodschool.org Grades 1-6.

• Land Clearing • Demolition & Removal • Drainage Control • Ditching & Utillties • Bulldozing & Excavating • Rock, Gravel & Top Soil Delivery

WESTERN ON THE PENINSULAs 1000 Olympic College Way NW, Poulsbo. Kathy Johnson | 360-394-2733, email western.peninsulas@wwu.edu Western on the Peninsulas is a satellite campus of Western Washington University.

LIC#CCWHITWEI963JT

2 4

| N o r t h

K i t s a p

A l m a n a c

2 0 1 9


INDIGENOUS HISTORY Suquamish Museum & Cultural Center 6861 NE South St., Suquamish. 360-3948499 | www.suquamishmuseum.org. The museum’s architecture is reminiscent of a Coast Salish longhouse. Ancestral objects, oral histories, photographs and contemporary items tell the story of the Suquamish people. The museum gift store features traditional items made by noted Coast Salish artists.

museums

Poulsbo Maritime Museum

Learn about local history — pre-contact, the logging era, the maritime era, and our Navy connection — at these local museums and cultural centers.

LATE 1800S/EARLY 1900S Port Gamble Historic Museum 1 Northeast View Drive, Port Gamble, 360297-8078 | www.portgamble.com/museum. Located on the lower floor of the Port Gamble General Store. Exhibits include rooms with period furnishings and items depicting life and work in this former New England-style mill

MARITIME HISTORY Poulsbo Maritime Museum 19010 Front St. NE, Poulsbo. | www.poulsbo history.com/poulsbo-maritime-museum.

File photo

town, which was established in 1853 and is now a National Historic Landmark.

Through imaginative exhibits and interactive displays, explore Poulsbo’s diverse maritime history — from families traveling dock to dock to get to their farm products to market, to the homeporting of codfish fleets, to the tour ships and paddle boards of today. See historic boats that have been restored or are undergoing restoration. Admission: Free.

Poulsbo Historical Museum

MILITARY HISTORY

Poulsbo City Hall, 200 NE Moe St., Poulsbo, 360-440-7354 | www.poulsbohistory.org.

U.S. Naval Undersea Museum

Learn about late 1800s/early 1900s life in this former fishing village.

1 Garnett Way, Keyport, 360-396-4148 | www.navalunderseamuseum.org. This museum is one of 14 Naval History & Heritage Command museums in the United States. Artifacts, exhibits and hands-on displays related to the U.S. Navy’s undersea history, exploration, and technical development. Admission: Free.

The museum’s Martinson Cabin at Viking Avenue and Lindvig Way is restored and furnished in period items, depicting life in a settlement cabin of the 1800s. Admission free at both museums.

We Deliver Peace of Mind... Worldwide! Let OUR family move YOUR family. The Hill family takes the business of moving personally “Our name is on our trucks - our reputation is on the line!”

Find out why many families on the move look to us, whether their journey is across town or around the world. We take care at every step and enjoy a long list of repeat customers. 2013 BCF Outstanding Philanthropic Company 2006 Poulsbo Chamber Community Builder Award 2004 KCF Business Award 2002 KCR-Caring Company Award

• Our People and our Moving Supplies Set Us Apart • FREE No-Obligation Estimates - Anywhere!

26394 Pioneer Way NW • Poulsbo, WA 98370 206-842-6715 • 360-697-3969 800-833-9555 hillmoving.com USDOT 534666 HG43090

N o r t h

K i t s a p

A l m a n a c

2 0 1 9

|

2 5


AD V E R T ISE R S INDE X Affordable Room.........................................11 Carden Country School...............................20 Columbia Bank............................................7 Dan Reber - Edward Jones...........................16 Doug Hallock...............................................13 DW Ferguson & Associates..........................17 First Federal................................................27 Greater Kingston Kiwanis............................10 Hear for Life................................................8 Hill Moving Services....................................25 Island School..............................................11 Jan Zuefelt..................................................9 Kingston Ale House.....................................22 Kingston Dental...........................................21 Kitsap Propane...........................................16 Madrona School..........................................13 North Kitsap Schools..................................6 Olympic Primer...........................................8 Patti Shannon..............................................10 Peninsula Federal........................................18 Port of Kingston..........................................21 Sport Haus..................................................12 Stolz NW.....................................................23 Strelbels Deli...............................................17 Susan Henry Real Estate.............................26 Thacker-Apple Dental...................................26 The Doctors Clinic.......................................28 The Point Casino and Hotel..........................2 UKO Karate School......................................19 Western Red Brewing..................................16 Westside Pizza............................................7 Whitworth Excavating..................................24 Emmie Kempf - courtesy photos

Broker/Owner, MBA • Residential Real Estate

26114 ILLINOIS AVE KINGSTON, WA 98034

DANIEL J. THACKER DDS, PS

COMPREHENSIVE FAMILY DENTISTRY

(360) 297-3392

www.appletreecovedental.com

2 6

|

N o r t h

K i t s a p A l m a n a c

Professional Residential Real Estate Service since 1998. Cell/Office: (360)

860-1152 www.SusanHenryRE.com susanhenry@centurytel.net 22084 S. Kingston Rd., PO Box 373, Indianola, WA 98342

2 0 1 9


KristiAnn Stecker

Jessica Connolly

Branch Manager

Customer Sales & Service Manager

Enrico Sio

Universal Banker

Machell Stone Universal Banker

Geoffrey Greseth Commercial Relationship Manager

Join the club.

2.06% APY* c

l

u

for balances under $750,000

b

206

Only at

Savings Account

ourfirstfed.com > 800.800.1577

N o r t h

K i t s a p

*APY means Annual Percentage Yield and assumes interest will remain on deposit for one year. A minimum balance of $20,000.00 in funds not previously held on deposit at First Federal is required to open this account. If your daily balance falls below $10,000 any day during the statement period, a monthly maintenance fee of $15.00 will be deducted from your account. Fees may reduce earnings. This is a variable interest rate account and rates may change after account is opened at bank discretion. Customers who have an active First Federal checking account with Direct Deposit each month will earn an additional 0.15% interest. Balance Tiers: $0.00-$749,999.99 = 2.06% APY, remaining balance above $750,000.00 = 1.01%-2.06% APY. We use the daily balance method to calculate the interest on your account and interest is compounded A l m a n monthly. a c 2 Rates 0 1 9are |effective 2 7 as of 06/14/2018.


A part of Franciscan Medical Group A part of Franciscan Medical Group

The Doctors Clinic, is a part of Franciscan Medical Group. The Doctors Clinic has 7 clinic locations and 80 health care

Theproviders Doctors Clinic, is a partprimary of Franciscan Medical Group. The Doctors Clinic hasthe 7 clinic locations andCHI 80 health care that integrate care, specialty care and ancillary services within Franciscan system. Franciscan Health that and The Doctors Clinic, work create healthier services community throughout Kitsap County. providers integrate primary care,together specialtytocare anda ancillary within the Franciscan system. CHI Franciscan Health and The Doctors Clinic, work together to create a healthier community throughout Kitsap County.

Por t Orchard |

Por t Orchard |

Poulsbo | Silverdale

Poulsbo | Silverdale

TheDoctorsClinic.com | (360) 782-3660

TheDoctorsClinic.com | (360) 782-3660

Profile for Sound Publishing

Almanac - 2019  

i20190220103458376.pdf

Almanac - 2019  

i20190220103458376.pdf