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OKANOGAN VALLEY

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SEAHAWKS SUPERBOWL SEND OFF

Teresa Hawkins/submitted photo

Tonasket 12’s gathered last Sunday afternoon at the Tonasket High School Football Field to celebrate and give a Seahawks’ send off to the Super Bowl. The fans dressed in blue and green and held banners and Re-Pete! signs as they formed up into the numbers one and two to form a twelve -- signifying the Twelfth Man.

Tonasket voters asked to approve $6.98 million bond Money would be used to reduce overcrowding, improve facilities THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET – The ballots are in the mail and Tonasket voters are being asked to approve a 12-year $6.98 million school facilities bond to alleviate overcrowding, build a new Alternative/Outreach school and upgrade athletic facilities to improve safety for participants. This is an even larger request than was asked of them last year – by nearly $1 million. However, the bond has some changes after a survey was sent out and a citizens’ committee worked with the school board and district to rework the project. The second attempt, f passed, would be collected at the rate of $1.58 per $1,000 of property valuation. After the failure of the intial bond vote, the board took a different tack in involving the community. A facilities committee was formed that incincluded Aaron Alberts, Dan Vassar, Ernie Cerillo, Gene Jones, Janet Bretz, John Verbeck, Kevin Terris, Michael Greene, Rob Inlow, Shane Freese, Stacey Kester and Carol Lanigan/ “We used three main premises during our discussion,” Suptendent Paul Turner said when the board approved the new plan last November. “One was ‘need vs. want.’ Cost was the second; and student programming. If we diverged, we tried to come back to those ideas to bring ourselves back and stay on focus on where we were at.” The project would affect nearly the entire campus,

divided into six sections: sports complex upgrades, Elementary School expansion; new space for the Alternative/Outreach school; Agricultural Shop expansion; Middle School expansion (that would also free up some High School space); and campus wide safety and security upgrades. “We had citizens on the committee, and the architect was here and met with the committee,” said Michael Greene with the facilities committee who also commented after the board approved the new plan. “We did community surveys, and the superintendent went out to speak with community groups. There was a lot of information gathered that led to the bond at the number that it did and the improvements that are being made. It adds value to every area of the facility ... it touches all areas of the school.” The improvements would involve: * Sports facilities upgrades would include an ADAaccessible path from the Elementary School all the way to Havillah Road; resurfacing the track (if not done in the next couple of years, it risks structural damage to the underlying track foundation); upgrading the baseball and softball fields (including the playing surfaces, as well as fencing to prevent injury to spectators); and restrooms/concessions (likely combined with the Elementary School expansion. * Elementary expansion would take place to the northwest of the building, extending into the current playground area. A new pod would create space for the preschool, Life Skills classroom, Resource rooms and specialists. Most of those currently taking up classroom space ( and in some cases, hallway space) in the existing pods, which would then revert to regular classroom use. The expansion also would include dual-use bathrooms that would be accessible only from the inside or outside of the building, depending on whether for

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 111 No. 05

students during school hours or for those attending athletic events outside. “Overall we end up with eight classrooms per pod,” Turner said. “Four classrooms per grade, which was our goal coming in, as well as accommodating other programs.” • Ag shop expansion will include three bays. One of the bays will include three labs, including one “wet” lab. • “Also some refrigerator and freezer units, as well as the mech lab,” Turner said. “Right now when they do a project on small engines, they have no place to put them. Over top would be a storage area, and with a steel roof we could run a hoist out over there. It also includes a covered sidewalk outdoors, and a sidewalk to the parking lot.” • Middle School expansion will have a domino effect on nearly every other portion of the project. With the expansion of the Ag shop, the new Ag classroom and teacher will be relocated into the high school proper creating more classroom space in the Middle School. Four additional classrooms will be constructed, which will also help alleviate space issues in the High School. Additionally, the Middle School gym will be expanded to the west. Currently, the gym is so small that bleachers cannot be fully opened for athletic events; this will allow the gym to be used to its full capacity as well as creating much of the framework for the Alternative/ Outreach school project. • *The Alternative / Outreach portion of the project had created much of the controversy surrounding the initial bond. Some wanted the school to continue in a facility completely detached from the primary campus, while others wanted to save money by incorporating it into a the current building.

Bin lot could become sandlot or soccer fields BY GARY A. DE VON MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE – The sometimes controversial bin lot at the south entrance to town should resound with shouts of joy as it will become a city park, thanks to generous offer made by the Prince family. The family contacted the city and has agreed to lease the land where Gold Digger Apples used to stack it’s apple bins for one dollar a year, for the next five years with an option for another five year renewal, according to Jim Prince, whose family goes back to the turn of the century in Oroville. “One thing I had drilled into me when I was a youngster is that you gotta give back,” said Prince. “Dad led the program to get the football field lighted and then he provided the

SEE PARK | PG A3

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

Princes lease land for park

Valley Life Calendar Letters/Opinion

A2 A3 A4

Community Hort Section Obituaries

A5 A6-7 A8

Sports Classifieds Cops & Courts

B1-3 B4-5 B6


PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 29, 2015

TONASKET CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 2015 BANQUET Business of the Year, OK Chevrolet Grand Marshals, the Attwoods

The Tonasket Chamber of Commerce held their annual officer installation and awards banquet at the Tonasket Community Cultural Center on the evening of Wednesday, Jan. 21. In addition to seating the new officers, the chamber gave out several awards, including Business of the Year, which went to OK Chevrolet (above), announced the Attwood Family as this year’s Grand Marshals for Founders Day (top right), named Roger Sawyer as Citizen of the Year (right) and the Okanogan County Sheriff’s Department as Organization of the Year (below, right). Bertha Wandler presented the Organization Award to Sheriff Frank Rogers and Jerry Asmussen and Lloyd Caton presented Citizen of the Year to Sawyer. This year’s slate of officers sees a return of Julie Alley as president, and Tonasket Mayor Patrick Plumb will take the place of Wes Heinsma as vice president. Aaron Kester will remain as secretary for the organization and Marilee Nielson will move to the treasurer’s spot, taking over for Jerry and Stephanie Bradley. This year’s board is made up of several people who served in the position last year including Robert N. Nau, past president Dale Crandall and Ed Lawrence. Lee Orr will fill the position on the board held in 2014 by Terri Orford.

Citizen of the Year, Roger Sawyer

Submitted photos

THANK YOU

The NW Ice Fishing Festival Committee (a part of the Oroville Chamber) wishes to thank the following organizations, businesses and individuals for their donations of funding, prizes and/or labor at the

Annual 2015 NW Ice Fishing Festival Akins Harvest Foods America’s Family Grill Big 5 Sporting Goods Borderland Historical Society Camaray Motel Community Auto Double ‘A’ Logging Eden Valley Guest Ranch Garrett Construction The Gazette-Tribune Hughes Department Store / ACE

It’s Still Good Kinross Lee Frank Mercantile Leah Cathryn Day Spa Mary Lou’s Gifts Mike Tibbs Les Schwab North 40 Outfitters Neal’s Auto Body & Glass Nulton Irrigation OK Chevy

Omak Chronicle Midway Building Supply Oroville Pharmacy Rancho Chico Restaurant / Tonasket Shannon’s Place Umpqua Bank Subway / Oroville Subway / Tonasket Trino’s Mexican Restaurant Veranda Beach World of Gaia

This event was sponsored by the Oroville Chamber of Commerce and hosted by the Molson Grange. Sponsors for this well attended event included:  $1000 Diamond Level: Kinross. This money paid the Sidley Lake Aerator electricity and

administrative festival costs.  $500 Gold Level: Hughes Department Store in Oroville and OK Chevrolet in Tonasket.  $250 Silver Level: Akins Harvest Foods of Oroville, Veranda Beach Resort, Garrett Construction, Camaray Motel of Oroville, and Mary Lou’s Gifts now of Tonasket.  $100 Bronze Level: Double ‘A’ Logging of Oroville.

Organization of the Year, Okanogan County Sheriff’s Department

It takes a lot of WORK to put on a festival of this magnitude... Tibbs Plumbing brought two bathrooms for the day at Sidley Lake, Pat Stice (Eden Valley Guest Ranch) operates the aerator at Sidley Lake and the Oroville Sportsmen Club, the one on Molson Lake.  Sandy Andrews (Camaray Motel) did the sponsor and prize coordination. The Arts and Crafts Show, hall decorations, a coloring contest, Bingo and Pinewood Derby were all coordinated by Mary Lou Kriner (Mary Lou’s Gifts).  The extra school parking lot plow job was by Dave Hilstad.  The Okanogan County Road Crew managed by Mike Reirdan did a terrific job of plowing parking outlets at Sidley Lake. The huge Grange Hall was warm due to the fire team of Bob and Linda McDaniel operating the early 1900’s furnace. It takes 12 hours and a lot of wood to warm up the whole hall (over 6000 square feet) in January.  We can’t forget to mention the fabulous food by the Molson Grange (breakfast) and our friends at Sitzmark for Lunch. Bingo was by Molson Grange with George Penner and Mary Lou Kriner as callers.  Pinewood Derby operation was by Rocky DeVon (Remax) assisted by Clerk Chrissy Fletcher.  Fishing registrars and raffle ticket sales were: Sandy Andrews (Camaray), Vicki Hart (Vicki’s Boutique) and Peggy Shaw (Umpqua).  The only fish judge was Dan Lepley (Oroville Building Supply).  The City of Oroville provided EMTs (Debra and Paul) at Sidley Lake all day.  Molson-Chesaw Fire Dept. Captain, Tim Mason was on hand all day to oversee safety.  Event Spokesman and promotion coordination were by Clyde Andrews (Camaray). 

sponsors, donors, volunteers and vendors! The proceeds from this event support the Sidley Lake Aerator Electricity and the Oroville Visitor Center, housed at the Oroville Depot Museum.

The 2016 NW Ice Fishing Festival is tentatively planned for January 16, 2016.

See you next year!

T 31 rad st iti An on nu al al

THANK YOU...

Tonasket Kiwanis Club

Groundhog Dinner

Saturday, Feb. 7, 2015 Tonasket High School Commons 5-7pm

Serving: Sausage, Coleslaw, Potatoes, Beverage, Vegetables & Dessert.

$9.50 - adults 13+ $4.50 - kids (12 and under) FREE for Preschoolers Bulk Sausage Avail. $3.50/lb. All Profits go back into Youth Fund!


JANUARY 22 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

LOCAL NEWS Central Washington schools selected to study outer solar system Oroville students among those participating in hands on science Submitted by Robin Stice

There seems to be enough snow for Sitzmak Ski Area to open this year. Lift evacuation training must be performed before operation can occur. Some ski patrol and staff had lift evacuation training on a very foggy Friday, Jan. 23. Len Firpo, a 20 year veteran with the patrol, was on hand with Manager, Jonathan Kenner explaining procedures and showing equipment before training began. Ski Patrol Director, Rob Sam (EMT) will be coordinating this year’s ski patrol operations. He showed the bent tube that goes over the lift cable that the rescue rope slides through. Bryan Further, a ski patrol member, is holding the rescue chair attached to a sturdy 100-foot rope. The rope loop that goes under the lift rider’s arms to secure them as they are lowered in the event of a prolonged lift stop. Kenner assured the group the lift was in good operation and expected no problems. Sitzmark plans to be open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays and holidays.

PARK | FROM A1 sure that Gold Digger would not be too badly impacted by having to move their storage somewhere else. They are a major employer.” Greg Moser, general manager of Gold Digger Inc. said the lot was convenient for storing bins, but that the growers’ cooperative would be able to find other places to keep them.

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD CARE NET ‘TEA’ PARTY

OROVILLE - Care Net is having a “Tea” party on Saturday, Jan 31 at 2 p.m. to celebrate with supporters and introduce other community members and organizations to Care Net. If you love Care Net please come. If you don’t know much about us please come and learn about our programs and the tremendous value Care Net is to the community. The meeting will be held at the Oroville Free Methodist Church, 1516 Fir St.

FIRST AID & CPR CLASS

OROVILLE - A First Aid and CPR Class will be held on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, Feb. 2, 3, and 4 from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. in the Oroville Grade School Library. Bring a pillow the first night. For information call Ben Hylton at 509-223-3412, leave message.

DIABETES SUPPORT GROUP

TONASKET - A Diabetes Support Group will next meet on Tuesday, Feb. 3 (the first Tuesday of each month) from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. in the boardroom at North Valley Hospital, 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket. This setting will give people an opportunity to ask questions and participate in discussion with other community members touched by diabetes. The discussion will be facilitated by a Certified Diabetes Educator. For more information see www.nvhospital.org or phone 509486-2151.

PHYSICAL WELLNESS CLASS

North Valley Community Schools presents a Physical Wellness Class on Tuesday, Feb. 3 at 6 p.m. If you’re not feeling your best, what do you do? Most people in our culture pop a pill to cover the symptoms. Do you want to really feel better? Come learn how to take simple steps to be healthier and meet your physical wellness goals. To sign up call Ellen at North Valley Community School at 509-476-2011.

ASSESSOR AT CHAMBER

OROVILLE - Scott Furman, Okanogan County Assessor will present the impact the fires and the closing of Kinross will have on property taxes at the Thursday, Feb. 5 meeting of the Oroville Chamber of Commerce at America’s Family Grill at 1 p.m. The public is invited to come with your general questions, but questions that concern your own personal property assessment is best taken up directly with the Assessors office. He can, however, certainly explain the process that can be taken to re-valuate any property.

HEARTSAVER FIRST AID/AED

North Valley Community Schools presents Heartsaver First Aid/AED on Thursday, Feb. 5 at 6 p.m. It’s a dangerous world out there! The more people who know first aid and CPR, the safer all of us are. This comprehensive First Aid/CPR class covers the basics of First Aid including medical, injury, and environmental emergencies, and adult, child and infant CPR with usage of AED. Students will receive an American Heart Association certified First Aid/ CPR card, valid for two years, upon completion of the course. To sign up call Ellen at North Valley Community School at 509-476-2011.

GET YOUR ACT TOGETHER

TONASKET - The Community Cultural Center of Tonasket will celebrate 20 years of talent shows with a theme of Sentimental Journey. We are hoping to welcome new talent as well as show some of our favorite performers (which is pretty much everyone) from the last 20 years. Please call Clare Paris at 509-4861199 to sign up for the show. The 20th Annual CCC Talent Show will be at the center, 411 Western Ave, Tonasket, on Saturday, Feb. 7, at 6:30 p.m. A baked potato supper will precede it, at 5:30 p.m. Volunteers are needed to help set up and clean up, prepare and serve food, bake desserts for the bake sale and help

at the door. Please call Janet Culp at 509-486-2061 to sign up to help. Volunteers see the show for free.

GREEN OKANOGAN FUNDRAISER & MEMBERSHIP DRIVE

TONASKET - Green Okanogan will be having a fundraiser auction and membership drive at the Community Cultural Center on Saturday, Feb. 14. Silent auction and music from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Dinner ($10) and live auction start at 7 p.m. Love your community and the Earth by helping Green Okanogan open a recycling center and restore this spring in Tonasket at 3 Rodeo Dr. (Across from Baker’s Acres). To donate auction items call Janet at 509-486-2061. For more info or to volunteer call Carol at 509-556-2250.

SAN LUIS OBISPO — High schools and colleges from 14 Central Washington communities have been selected to participate in a five-year citizen science astronomy research project to study the outer solar system. Schools from Oroville to Goldendale will join a total of 60 communities stretching across the western United States to form the Research and Education Collaborative Occultation Network (RECON). Funded by the National Science Foundation, RECON is led by planetary scientists John Keller from Cal Poly in San Luis Obispo, Calif. and Marc Buie of the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colo. “The goal of RECON is to determine the sizes, densities and other characteristics of newly discovered Kuiper Belt Objects orbiting the sun beyond Neptune,” Buie said. “Because these objects have been relatively undisturbed since their formation, they hold important clues about the origins of our solar system.” During the fall, Keller and Buie traveled more than 3,000 miles through Washington, Oregon, Nevada, Arizona and California. This week, the two scientists announced the communities that

“The team and students of Oroville Junior an Senior High School are looking forward to being part of an actual science research project.... and participating as actual scientists through this program” Ed Booker, Science Teacher Oroville High School

stretch along Highway 97 from Oroville to Wenatchee and follow Highway 82 from Ellensburg to Pasco. Goldendale represents the southernmost site in the state. “The project design requires telescopes spaced every 30 miles stretching from the Canadian border down to the Mexican border,” Keller said. “We’ve been thrilled by the extremely positive responses from all of the students, teachers and community members we’ve met.” Oroville science teacher Ed Booker said, “The team and students of Oroville Junior and Senior High Schools are looking forward to being part of an actual science research project by providing data and participating as actual scientists through this program.” “We are most excited about being on the cutting edge of

212 N Highway 97 • Tonasket WA

509-486-2183

SHROVE TUESDAY PANCAKE FEED

OROVILLE - The Oroville Episcopal Church will be hosting a Shrove Tuesday Pancake Feed on Tuesday, Feb. 17 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the church hall at 604 Central Ave. The breakfast will be sausage, pancakes, and homemade applesauce. Tickets are available at the Oroville Pharmacy or the door. Adults, $6; seniors, $5 and children 12 and under, $3.

PRACTICE SESSIONS

OROVILLE Practice Sessions, the hour long program offered by the Oroville Community Library on Thursday mornings at 10:30 a.m. in the activity room will continue throughout January and February. Allene Halliday shares information about American music from the 1920’s to the 1960’s that has endured and is relevant to the present day. Steve Pollard accompanies her renditions on guitar. The presentations include performances as well as rehearsal techniques plus the history of the style of musc that is still used in current entertainment venues, such as popular movies, etc. This ongoing series is free and is for all ages to enjoy. Call 509-476-2589 for additional information.

Hours 8am - 8pm 7 Days A Week We gladly accept EBT Quest cards and WIC checks.

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space discovery. Being a part of history and understanding our outer universe are very exciting,” said Nikki Medved, GearUp coordinator at Brewster High School. Central Washington University will also participate in the project. “For CWU, this is the opportunity for pre-service teachers and other interested undergraduates to work with high school students on a science research project,” said Physics Professor Bruce Palmquist. Telescopes and cameras will be delivered to these communities over the next month. During the spring, representatives from each community will receive training at workshops held in Kingman, Ariz., and Pasco, Wash. By early May, the network will be fully prepared to conduct up to eight coordinated observation campaigns of Kuiper Belt Objects each year through 2019. For a full list of schools involved in the project, visit the RECON website at www.tnorecon.net. Community members interested in joining local teams on this project are encouraged to contact recon@calpoly.edu. RECON – the Research and Education Cooperative Occultation Network – is a citizen science research project aimed at exploring the outer solar system. Funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) Division of Astronomical Sciences, this project involves teachers, students, amateur astronomers, and community members from across the Western United States in coordinated telescope observations to measure the sizes of objects from a region called the Kuiper Belt.

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there. It will be a real plus for people driving into town and seeing a park there. It should also help the neighbors with their property values by having a park nearby.” He described the lease as as a win-win for everyone. “We need ballfields for kids and there was some concern about the dust blowing into the neighbors’ yards. It really concerned us, but we also wanted to make

CAL POLY IN SAN LUIS OBISPO

Name:

the scoreboard and the fence. This is an attempt to try and continue the same thing.” Prince said it will be up to the city to decide what kind of ballfields will be made on the six plus acres. “I think that they are talking about putting in some soccer fields,” he said. “From an asthetic standpoint it will be nice to have a park there versus having the bins

SUBMITTED BY JOHN KELLER

will receive telescopes, cameras and training to join this fiveyear research effort. The RECON network in Washington will

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 29, 2015

THE TOWN CRIER

Cheer for the Seahawks, but don’t forget to vote ‘yes’ on the bond first

Good schools are so important and that’s why we urge those living within the Tonasket School District to vote ‘yes’ on the 12-year bond. Yes, nearly $7 million in facilities improvements is expensive and while the economy seems to be improving everywhere else, we aren’t seeing it as quickly in our neck of the woods. However, the best way to improve ones community is to have good, safe schools. Reducing overcrowding and class size is one of the number one factors in helping kids learn. A good education gives kids a fighting chance to go on and improve their lives, to become the kind of citizens we want in our towns and out in the world representing our communities. Schools that graduate students who stay in your community or go out in the world and then come back – they have a desire to live Out of in the place that offered them a home with a My Mind good education. That’s what most of us want, Gary A. DeVon to earn a good living and to raise our kids in a place where they feel safe and can find the skills to compete with any other kid in an ever more competitive world. Many years ago, after years of neglect, Tonasket made the choice to build new school facilities. Voters also approve levies every two years to keep the facilities they paid for in good condition. Right now it isn’t a case of neglect, it’s a case of growing too large for the great buildings that you voted to build. By voting for the bond you will help to reduce overcrowding, build a alternative school and make upgrades to sports facilities including making them ADA accessible for those in your community who deserve the same opportunities that we all do. The track, and ballfields also need upgrades, as well as the restrooms. Expansion of the elementary school will create space for the preschool, add classrooms and other rooms that currently are using classroom space or the hallways, in some cases. Then these classrooms could go back to being used for classrooms and thus reduce class sizes. The expansion of the elementary would include dual use restrooms that could also be used by the public during sporting events as well. The middle school would be expanded with four new classrooms, which would alleviate crowding issues at the high school. And the gym would also be expanded so there would be room to open up the bleachers for athletic events like they are supposed to do. The bond is expensive, but when most of us went to school our parents and grandparents paid for us to get a good education. Can our kids expect anything less? Waiting another year or two won’t result in lower costs. Now is the time to make sure that our kids can get the best education they can to go on to become valuable parts of our community. Cast your vote, get it in the mail and get back to getting ready for this Sunday’s Super Bowl. Go Seahawks! P.S. We hope you enjoy the front page photo that Teresa Hawkins shared with us. It goes to show that Seahawk fever is alive and well in Tonasket.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Vote ‘yes’ for the school bond

Dear Editor, I’ve never had children in the local schools, but have always voted for the school bonds and levies. Why? Because an educated public is one of the strongest aids to a truly democratic society. Because “our” children deserve an excellent education. Because a society that does not care for our most vulnerable members - children and elders - is a sorry culture, indeed. Don’t you wish that we could choose where our tax dollars go, that there was a checklist we could mark, and choose what would receive our hard earned tax money? Well, this is that opportunity! What better thing to invest in than our children, our future? Sincerely, Sandy Vaughn Chesaw

The Petri Dish

Making it cheaper to vote BY JERRY CORNFIELD THE EVERETT HERALD

Lawmakers are looking at ways to make the election process cheaper for voters, easier to see who is funding campaigns and harder to run initiatives with financial consequences. Holding fewer elections, paying the postage on mail-in ballots and new disclosure rules for pop-up political committees are among the ideas put forth thus far this session. Here are five bills receiving attention from lawmakers that could mean big changes in coming election cycles. Exposing dark money: Senate Bill 5153 takes aim at an emerging force in campaigns — political committees created and funded by nonprofit associations. Under existing rules, they can pretty much mask their identity and shield the source of their money because of their status. This is a big topic nationally — think Koch Brothers — and it is showing up in this state as well. In 2013, a group called Working Washington dumped bunches of money into passing a minimum wage measure in SeaTac. It took time to track the source of the money to a union-sponsored group. Also that year, the Grocery Manufacturers Association spent several million dollars to defeat a food-labeling initiative then tried unsuccessfully to keep its donors secret. This bill creates a new class of political committee called incidental committees.

COMPILED BY CLAYTON EMRY FORMER G-T PUBLISHER

The Oroville Gazette

These would file reports with the state Public Disclosure Commission if they spend at least $25,000 in a campaign for a statewide office or statewide ballot measure or $5,000 in a local contest like a county council race. Only those who contribute $2,000 or more to a committee must be identified. Enough with the advice: House Bill 1323 would eliminate those statewide advisory votes that let voters weigh in whether they like or dislike revenue-generating bills passed by the Legislature. These non-binding measures are the result of a provision in Initiative 960 which Mukilteo’s Tim Eyman sponsored and voters approved in 2007. It costs taxpayers to give their advice. The text of the bills and the votes of the lawmakers must appear in the voter pamphlets. In 2014, that information filled six pages and cost the state $87,761. In 2013, the tab was $164,444 for 10 pages of content. Election reduction: There would no longer be elections in February and April if House Bill 1379 became law. Instead, there would only be a primary in August and general election in November with provisions for special elections to deal with recalls and unexpected vacancies. Elections in February and April are typically when school districts and fire districts put their funding measures on the ballot. Picking up the tab: Some lawmakers worry the cost of a stamp — 49 cents for first class — is a barrier to voting. They’ve drawn up Senate Bill 5344 to require that return enve-

ITEMS FROM THE PAST

75 Years Ago: January 19-26, 1940: In keeping with a custom started several years ago, the annual President’s Birthday Ball will be held in Oroville Saturday night, January 27, at the Liberty Hall. The local committee held a meeting Wednesday evening to arrange for the dance and as yet have not secured the music for the affair. Net proceeds from these dances are used almost entirely within the state for aiding children suffering from infantile paralysis and otherwise crippled. According to an advertisement elsewhere in this issue, an administrator’s sale will be held at Barmon’s Store in Oroville starting Saturday, January 20 and every article in the store will be sold at reduced prices. Mrs. Barmon is quitting and the sale is being held to dispose of the merchandise in order to settle the estate of Harry Barmon. At a meeting of Hodges Post No. 84 of the American Legion held Friday night, it was decided that the post would sponsor a community movement to make the land at the fairgrounds lying between the race track and Osoyoos Lake, into a public park for picnic and swimming parties. Action was taken by the Town Council at their regular meeting Monday night, to have the curfew siren sounded again at approximately nine o’clock every night warning youngsters under 16 that they should be on their way home off the streets unless accompanied by an adult. According to a letter sent to all subscribers of the Pacific Telephone and Telegraph Company, in Oroville by the local Manager, Mary Williams, that the Central Office will be able to furnish information, in addition to the time of day, road conditions in this vicinity, moving picture schedules, the time and place of public entertainment, such as athletic events, school and church festivals and school activities. Grocery Prices: White Star Tuna Fish, 2 cans for $.25; Salmon, 2 cans for $.25; Shoulder pork roast, $.10 per lb.; 2 lb. jar School Boy peanut butter, $.27; 5 lb. macaroni, $.28; 1 lb. Money Saver Coffee, $.15.

The Oroville Gazette

50 Years Ago January 21-28, 1940: A new piece of equipment, which the county crew here in Oroville, is very proud of, was put to good use in the recent snow plowing activities. The truck is a FWD with a six-yard load capacity with four wheel drive. The vehicle, which cost in the neighborhood of $15,000, is one of four the county purchased this year. The Oroville Hornets stake their undefeated league record in Okanogan Friday night. The Bulldogs are winless this year and Oroville has already beaten them once this year with a rousing 73 to 35 victory. Mike Bourn, Oroville’s highest scorer, is currently in third place in North Central Washington with a 22.4 point average per game. The Okanogan County Public Utility District is virtually out of debt, Irv Woods, told members and guests at the Chamber Installation banquet at the Kozy Kitchen Kafe. Woods related how the PUD had started 15 years ago by borrowing $2 million to purchase the system from Washington Water Power. Tuesday morning at 5:45 a.m., screams informed Clifford Trevithick that a bobcat had their housecat by the neck in a death grip down in their window well. Clifford took the window out and rapped the bobcat with the window frame. The two cats rolled into the basement and the bobcat ran around the furnace, up and over Mrs. Trevithick’s canned fruit. Clifford turned the bobcat into a good cat with a .22 rifle bullet. Trevithick said that it gave him the most wonderful appetite for breakfast. Editor, Cleland Emry had this bit of humor: “I ran across this classified ad in a Minnesota paper, where the hidden costs are itemized. “For Sale, 1 Holstein cow, base price $100.00; accessories; Udder $75.00, two tone color, $50.00, four split hoofs @ $10.00 each, extra stomach, $55.00, dual horns (optional) $5.00 each. Total price $310.00.” PUD crews

lopes for primary and general election ballots include prepaid postage. Counties would pay and get reimbursed by the state. It might not be cheap. “The legislature finds that the postage, while only a small amount, amounts to the poll tax for many of our citizens,” reads the bill. Hold that budget-busting initiative: There’s a bipartisan uprising to keep expensive initiatives off the ballot unless they include a means of paying for themselves. Thirty-eight senators — half of them Republican, half Democrat — are proposing a constitutional amendment to turn down initiatives that would knock the state budget out of balance because of cost. Senate Joint Resolution 8201 must be approved by a two-thirds majority in each chamber and then it goes to the people for a simple majority vote. Voters’ approval of Initiative 1351 in November is pushing lawmakers in this direction. That measure requires smaller classes at every grade level. It will cost an estimated $4 billion to carry out and lawmakers don’t know where they will get that kind of money. That’s why it’s likely that sometime this session lawmakers will act to amend or suspend the ballot measure. Political reporter Jerry Cornfield’s blog, The Petri Dish, is at www.heraldnet.com. Contact him at 360-352-8623;jcornfield@ heraldnet.com and on Twitter at @dospueblos

have been fighting snow and fog in the hill country. There has been more than four feet of snow in this area. It has now settled to a compact 30 inches. Weather Wise, by Marge Frazier, official observer: Jan. 20, 40 degrees maximum and 18 degrees minimum; Jan. 21, 35 and 20; Jan. 22, 34 and 28; Jan. 23, 37 and 26; Jan. 24, 30 and 26; Jan. 25, 35 and 25 and Jan. 26, 30 and 12. Total precipitation, .93 inches and 77 inches of snow.

The Gazette-Tribune

25 Years Ago: January 18-25, 1990: The towns of Oroville, Tonasket and Riverside will be receiving a total of $4,500 in state excess liquor revenue for the second quarter of the fiscal year 1990. Oroville’s share will be $2,376.21 and Tonasket $2,671.26 while Riverside will get $356.43. Okanogan County will be getting $6,681.05. M&O levies will go before voters from the Tonasket and Oroville School Districts in less than a month. The voters in Tonasket will be asked to approve a levy that calls for no increase in the current rate. The two-year levy is for $415,000 each year or $2.63 per thousand of assessed value while in Oroville they will be voting on a $295,000 annual levy. This is $60,000 more than the previous levy due to higher cost of doing business and a drop in student enrollment. The stork was a little late in making the first baby born in the North Valley Hospital this year on Jan. 11 at 1:54 a.m. to Terri Barthel and Jose Luis Perez. The new arrival was named Donovan. Gene Scholtz, of Tonasket, has kept track of the precipitation in Northern Okanogan County for the Soil Conservation District for the past 20 years. The graph indicates a range of 6.02 inches in 1985 to a high of 20.35 inches in 1963, so overall it would average out at about 13.00 inches over the 20 years. Real Estate for sale in the upper valley: Family home in Oroville, 3 bdrm, free standing fireplace, partial basement fenced in yard, $38,500; Close to school, 2 bdrm house on 3 lots, fenced in yard, $20,000; 80 acres north of Oroville, $45,000; View of the water, immaculate condition 3 bdrm, 2 bath, TV room, large living room, attached garage, storage building, patio, all of this on a beautifully landscaped yard, $36,000; Lyon Den Tavern in Tonasket, owner says she is ready to sell.


OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 29, 2015 |

PAGE A5

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE Never catch a cold, but one caught me This is almost the end of January and so far I’ve remembered to write 2015. The weather is still changeable from day to day, but remains cold, even when the sun is shining. I guess I bragged once too often, “I never get a cold,” but one caught up with me. I had to miss my pinochle group Thursday as I didn’t want to share my affliction with the rest. Received a call today, that Beverly Storm had her follow-up surgery, after issues she had a few month ago, concerning her heart. She woke up and said she’d like a steak, so I guess all is well. A further up-date Saturday morning is that

Review of The Year SUBMITTED BY DARALYN HOLLENBECK

Bev is on her way home. Good News! And, Dean Brazle is once again home. Bob Hirst is not gaining strength as we wish he could. Margaret Straga, one of our faithful members at the Senior Center, is now confined to a wheelchair, due to weakness in her legs, causing her to have multiple falls. Ahhh! These Golden Years! Allie Miller, young lady that was in the serious car/logging truck accident recently is recuperating nicely, out of hospital, at the home of her aunt, in Spokane and grandma Judy Beanblossom is home, worrying from a distance.

BLUE STAR MOTHERS

NCW BLUE STAR MOTHERS

This ‘Moms of Military’ group formed in early 2010 to support parents who have children currently serving in any branch of the U.S. Armed Forces. As a non-profit 501(c)3 organization, we annually survey all that we have accomplished as part of good management. The community that supports us in serving will be encouraged to know what their donations, Hometown Soldier Calendar purchases, and fund raiser participation has provided in our effort to assist military families living in North Central Washington during times of duress created by their child’s service for our country. Here’s our summary, in no particular order: 73 Cell Phones were donated and recycled to raise funds. The 5th Hometown Soldier Calendar featuring local military personnel was created and is currently on sale. It is our hope that these calendars help buoy up our

military families through the current marathon of military action. We provide a near Weekly Column (46 out of 56 weeks!) for this newspaper educating our communities about military life and the local men and women serving. We hold monthly Support Meetings. Together we dig in to understanding military life, jargon, deployments, and how to best help our children integrate out of and back in to civilian life. It is often Moms who are the first identifiers of Traumatic Brain Injury or Post Traumatic Stress Disorder which is part of our education. We’ve enjoyed engaging Speakers from the Apple Valley American Red Cross, “Pets for Vets”, and the Northern Desert Composite Squadron of the Civil Air Patrol, as well as seasoned military mothers from our area. In kind, we have been invited as guest speakers for various organizations.

Donation to the NV Foundation can help Nursing Home

NURSING HOME NEWS

SUBMITTED BY NURSING HOME SUCCESS TEAM

officers and members of the Foundation work very quietly behind the scenes to help our Nursing Home and Hospital by providing monies when needed and available to assist with the costs of providing that excellent health care we have come to expect. Fact sheets will be distributed around the north county community in the beginning of February. Under the section “How Can You Help?” will be a suggestion to donate to the Foundation. For those of you who are wondering what you can do to help the Nursing Home right now or any time, donating to the Foundation is a great way to start. You should specify when writing your check that you are donating to the Nursing Home to ensure that your money will end up in the area you want it to be used. Donations specified for the

Did you know that the North Valley Community Health Association is the official name for the North Valley Foundation? We know it as the Foundation. It is also a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization. Its mission is to enhance medical care in the North Okanogan County through donations and gifts. As it says in its brochure: “Gifting through contributions and donations to the Foundation helps ensure the continuation of the excellent health care we have come to expect in the North Valley area.” Gifting through the Foundation is tax deductible. The Foundation officers are currently President Wayne Verbeck, Vice President Dick Larson, Treasurer Dixie Brown and Secretary Sam Nau. The

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS Getting ready for computer classes SUBMITTED BY BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT PRESIDENT, OROVILLE SENIOR CITIZENS

Tilly is prepping our computers. We will keep you posted as to when classes begin. We are thankful to Community Foundation of North Central Washington for their grant of $3000 towards our purchase of new computers. We are pursuing additional grants and donations to cover our extras including desks, mice and carrying cases. On Saturday, Feb. 14 we will be serving breakfast between 8 and 10 a.m. Mark your calendar for a scrumptious meal of pancakes, syrup, eggs, bacon, sausage, hash browns, fruit, coffee, orange juice, milk, all for the miserly price of $8, cheap. Look for our Valentine’s theme. Mark your calendar - bring your own honey. And, don’t forget your sweetheart. We have a new building committee composed of Betty Bair, Betty Steg, Ruth LaFrance and

me. Our first task is installing new flooring. We will be soliciting donations. Friday, Jan. 30 at 1 p.m., we will be showing the first half of Fiddler on the Roof. Mark your calendar again. Remember, our strength is in our members. Don’t forget to pay your dues. Pinochle report: Door Prize, Jim Fry Pinochle, Arden Penner; High Man, Ed Craig; High Woman, Danny Wietrick. 20 people were in attendance. Remember, Eat Desert First.

Subscribe to the... Okanogan Valley

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE www.gazette-tribune.com

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000

As I am writing this a bit early it has sausage, grinding the whole pig and you not been determined who will be play- can even buy some to take home and ing at the Super Bowl, after accusations enjoy at a later date. Monies made from of some “funny business” going on with this function are used in the community the footballs that were used. for projects. Serving time Grown men! They are such begins at 5 p.m. great mentors! No wonder And then, after having kids do dumb things somehad the ground hog dinner, times. ten days later you can go I was happy to have to the Episcopal Church, in Gonzaga win once again, Oroville, for their annual Thursday night. They must Shrove Tuesday pancake have left all the air in their feed and there too, you can ball. have wonderful sausage with A phone call came tellpancakes, applesauce and ing of the death of Phyllis THIS & THAT etc. Serving time is 5 p.m. to (Metz) Billups. After leaving 7 p.m. Feb. 17. this area, they had an eating Joyce Emry Last Saturday there were establishing, perhaps a driveliterally hundreds of birds, in, in Soap Lake. Starlings, I suppose, and they Have ever been to the Ground Hog were so busy landing and taking off in Dinner, in Tonasket? If not you should the trees of the neighbors, flying in huge go, on Saturday, Feb. 7, in the gym of groups and returning once again. They Tonasket High School. The Kiwanis were either really behind in their fall Club does all the work (with assistance migration, south, or a bit early in their from the ladies and youth) make the best spring return, or just maybe they know

April is National Month of the Military Child: A time when we appreciate the children of our local active duty military. This year we reached out to 24 kids ranging in ages from 0 – 18. They serve, too! ‘‘The Hero Walk,” our traveling display, has traveled from Oroville to Wenatchee. It is a collection of 87 used military boots adorned with an American flag and a picture of one of our hometown soldiers. Comfort Boxes are sent to our troops and their band of brothers. Our store room is full as we constantly look for more names and places to which to send. On Gold Star Mother’s Day the US Armed Forces Legacy Memorial in Tonasket flies the Blue Star Mothers’ Service Banner. We placed 53 gold stars upon the plaques of those Killed in Action and Missing in Action this year. A mother’s star turns from blue to gold if their child is killed while serving our country. We thank you for your support and interest! We would like to learn more about our area’s service men and women. Please contact us at 485-2906 or ncw. bluestars@yahoo.com. Nursing Home can be made for operating costs, such as the $50 gap between the Medicaid daily reimbursement and the actual daily cost to provide care to each Medicaid resident at the Nursing Home. Donations can also be used for Maintenance costs such as for windows, floors or reroofing of the Nursing Home. Monies are needed for equipment such as lifts, mattresses and wheel chairs. Donations are very much appreciated for maintenance and for items that need replacement. The Nursing Home is a home for our very vulnerable elderly to come where they can be cared for safely. As a home it has the same needs as our own homes do, but on a larger scale. Every little bit helps. Located in the Nursing Home and the Hospital are Foundation brochures with the information you need, or go to www. nvhospital.org and click on the Foundation link to find out how to donate. You can also contact Brenda Turner, 509-486-3118. Thank you for your interest and concern. We thank the Foundation members for the good work they do for us.

something we don’t. They were so restless and surely didn’t have a very good leader. I look at all the good scrap paper in our office waste basket, and my mind wanders back to when I was a little girl and I was often asked to sing at our school programs. My mom would copy the words to a new song from the radio and often used the brown paper sacks that our groceries came in. We didn’t have scrap paper. Much later when we had the G-T print shop she was elated to get a box of scraps left from the job work, (often nice colored pieces), that were garbage at the shop. She kept a box of jokes and other things that she liked to scribble down and remember. Do you suppose that is where my habit of putting things in “My Big Book of Stuff” comes from? Can you tell I’m a little short of things to write about this week, when I have to go to the waste basket for thoughts? ‘Til Next Week.

A cure for the winter blues SUBMITTED BY CYNTHIA GROUND, D.C. NORTH VALLEY COMMUNITY SCHOOLS

Do you have a case of the winter blues? Cabin fever? If you do, North Valley Community School has the cure! Coming up this week NVCS would like to offer the following classes: Physical Wellness Tuesday, Feb. 3, 6 p.m. If you’re not feeling your best, what do you do? Most people in our culture pop a pill to cover the symptoms. Do you want to really feel better? Come learn how to take simple steps to be healthier and meet your physical wellness goals. Nuts & Bolts for Non-Profit Tuesday Feb. 3 at 6:30 p.m. Are you creating a non-profit organization? Are you already part of one and need to brush up on how things work? This class will provide by-law guidelines, information on tax-exemption and how to apply for grants. Loved Ones at Home Wednesday, Feb. 4 at 6 p.m. Have you ever wondered about taking care of a loved one at home? Then this would be a great class to take. Are you getting to the age of needing someone’s help at home so you don’t have

Bringing back ‘It’s Showtime’ SUBMITTED BY ALLENE HALLIDAY

THE LEARNING TREE to go into a nursing home? This class will help you prepare and learn about your choices. Also learn how to take care of each other at home before something major happens! Clay Jewelry Thursday, Feb. 5, 6:30 p.m. Ever played with clay? Come let your inner artist run rampant for an evening! In this class you will make a pendant that can be a pin, necklace or bracelet. Heartsaver First Aid/AED Thursday Feb. 5 at 6 p.m. It’s a dangerous world out there! The more people who know first aid and CPR, the safer all of us are. This comprehensive First Aid/CPR class covers the basics of First Aid including medical, injury, and environmental emergencies, and adult, child and infant CPR with usage of AED. Students will receive an American Heart Association certified First Aid/CPR card, valid

FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY

FRIENDS OF THE OROVILLE LIBRARY

Friends of the Oroville Library will be heating up the wintry Saturday nights with their sensational Showtime! presentations at Vicki’s Backdoor. Kicking off the series on Valentine’s Day is the remarkable musical group, Reed Engels and Friends. Mark your calendars for this “can’t miss event” on Saturday, Feb. 14. On Saturday, Feb. 21 a longtime Okanogan favorite, Brock Hires, will be on the bandstand. For years, many of us in the region have been delighted by the performances of this young singer/guitarist who has literally grown up entertaining. His talent and dedication are amazing! Next will be the new musical

group, Nuance, made up of long time, well known local musicians. Feb. 28 is the date of their Showtime! debut at Vicki’s. Members of this team of music makers are Sam Howell, Walt Gilbert and Scott Teagarden. Slippery Slope brings the series to a close on March 7. Their theme is “Blues You Can Use and Other Tunes, too.” This band is made up of Chuck Oakes, Jim Attwood, Ron Champagne and Dave Wheatley. It will be quite an evening! Performances are open to the public at no charge and begin at 7:00 p.m. with doors opening at 6:30 p.m. Refreshments are available. FOL members wish to thank Rick Braman for booking the

Kids In College? Fill Out That FAFSA FINANCIAL FOCUS Sandra Rasmussen Financial Advisor 32 N Main St. Suite A Omak, WA 98841 509-826-1638 www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC Reported by Edward Jones

We’ve just begun the new year, but the next academic year is still months away. Nonetheless, if you have a child who will be attending college in the fall, it’s not too soon to start thinking about what might be a vital component of paying for his or her higher education: financial aid. Specifically, to help ensure that your child doesn’t miss out on federal and state student grants, work-study and loans for the 2015-2016 school year, you’ll want to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) as soon as possible. (You can start the application process by visiting www.fafsa.ed.gov.) Even if you have a fair amount of financial assets, you should probably fill out a FAFSA. In the first place, all parents receive an “asset protection allowance,” based on the age of the older parent. For

two-parent families, this allowance generally shelters between $25,000 and $50,000 in assets from FAFSA considerations; for single parents, the range is typically between $6,000 and $10,000. The allowance may be higher for parents 65 and older. Furthermore, in determining your expected family contribution, FAFSA won’t look at your pension plan, your IRA or your 401(k) or similar employer-sponsored retirement account.

Those of your assets held outside retirement plans — the balances in your checking and savings accounts, CDs, investment real estate, stocks, bonds, mutual funds, and so on — will be counted in the FAFSA calculations, but as a parent, you will only be expected to contribute up to 5.64 percent of these assets, as opposed to assets held in your child’s name, which are usually assessed at 20 percent.

and might incur a 10% penalty, as well.) Plus, your 529 plan contributions may be deductible on your state taxes. Like your other non-retirement assets, a 529 plan will be assessed at up to 5.64 percent for FAFSA purposes. Some families, seeking to totally keep their 529 plan assets out of aid calculations, ask the grandparents to own the account. This could be a problem, though, because while the grandparents’ 529 plan won’t be reported as an asset on FAFSA, withdrawals from the plan will be treated as untaxed income to the beneficiary (i.e., the grandchild) on the next year’s FAFSA — and that can have a big impact on financial aid, a much bigger impact, in fact, than if the 529 plan was listed as a parental asset. Consequently, you might want to ask the grandparent to award ownership of the 529 plan to you. However, some state plans don’t allow this change, so the grandparent might have to transfer the money to a different state’s plan before giving up ownership. In any case, be aware of these issues when you tackle the FAFSA. And don’t delay in filling it out. Colleges have a closing date for accepting financial aid applications — and that’s one deadline you won’t want to miss.

You may want to pay special attention to one particular asset — the 529 plan. A 529 plan is a popular college savings vehicle, and for a pretty good reason: The investment dollars you place in a 529 plan can grow tax-deferred, and withdrawals are free of federal and state taxes, provided the money is only used for higher education expenses. This article was written by Edward Jones for (The earnings portion of withdrawals used use by your local Edward Jones Financial for other purposes may be fully taxable, Advisor.

for two years, upon completion of the course. Surviving the 72 Hour Emergency Thursday, Feb. 5 at 6 p.m. How to survive in the wilderness for at least 72 hours is a skill we might need someday. What to do, what to take with you, and what not to do, as well as the best equipment needed along with lots of the usual candy and films make up the fun. The instructor has taught for over 40 years and served as president of SAR. Want to Learn Spanish? Thursday, Feb. 5 at 6 p.m. Have you been wanting to learn Spanish for an upcoming trip? Maybe you’d like to communicate better with your neighbors? Spanish is one of the most widely spoken languages in the world, and it is relatively easy for English speakers to learn. Whether you’re planning a trip to a Spanish speaking country or just want to have a beginning grasp of the language to use locally, this class is for you. To sign up for these classes and more, call Ellen Barttels at 509-476-2011 or check out North Valley Community School online at www.northvalleycommunityschools.com! NVCS is still searching for a board member. Do you have ideas or opinions? If you do, we can use you on the NVCS board of directors. Call Ellen at 509-476-2011.

performers as well as handling the sound system and lights for the shows. Our appreciation and thanks also to the sponsors of these four outstanding musical events: Bob Pellegrini of Upper Valley Disposal, Akin’s Harvest Foods, Hughes Department Store and Hometown Pizza. Those with questions should call 509-476-2589

Correspondents continued on page A8

MOVIES Oliver Theatre

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aCTiOn/BiOgraPhy/drama sTarring Bradley COOPer, sienna miller, kyle gallner. Fri. 6:30,9:45 saT.*3:00,6:30,9:45 sUn.*3:00,6:30 mOn.-ThUrs.6:30.

The

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No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.


PAGE A6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 29, 2015

Okanogan County

HORTICULTURE Meeting & Trade Show February 4th, 2015

Red hot summers hard on the apple crop

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NORTH COUNTY – While Washington has experienced record apple crops, record heat over the last couple of summers has been hard on growers, according to Greg Moser, general manager of Gold Digger Apples. “We had a record crop, but also had the hottest summer on record – two years in a row. That meant our pack outs were down which can mostly be attributed to the heat,” said Greg Moser Moser, who worries his growers at the cooperative will get lower returns on their fruit. “Lower pack outs mean it costs more to run... we definitely won’t have had the most promising year,” Moser said about last year’s crop. To fight against the heat growers try several strategies. Some

80th

Okanogan County Horticultural Association Annual Meeting

use misters or water less, but “For cherries most of our more times during the week. He growers made money, but some said on his own orchards he tried a others had too much damage.” product called he said. “That’s Surround, a why we’re sayclay material ing ‘we can’t he sprayed on “It can be a roller coast- wait until next the early fruit. year.’” er, but it’s all part of “Also, you Climate don’t pack Change or farming.” fruit during the Climate Cycle? Greg Moser, General Manager heat of the day M o s e r Gold Digger Apples Inc. and we get it d o e s n ’ t cooled down believe Global as soon as posWarming or sible in the warehouse. There are Climate Change is to blame. He so many things we are learning said one of Gold Digger’s field from the weather... it’s going to men recently gave a good presenbe a challenge,” he said. tation on the last 40 years of fruit Last year’s prices were good growing in this area. all across the state and are “Danny (Fletcher) gave a realexpected to be good this year as ly good history, we tend to forget well, he says. But if it’s not the about all the disasters we’ve had. heat it’s the cold, as this end of Over 40 years there have been the Okanogan Valley was also hit good years...but there have been with frost. cycles when they were bad.... it “Some of our growers saw as can be a roller coaster, but it’s all much as 50 percent of their crop part of farming.” was affected by the frost. We Moser said as recently as the peaked on lower grades because late 1970s and early 1980s the of the frost market. valley went through times of

Women in Agriculture meetings return Everyone has a story that needs to be told to promote agriculture! SUBMITTED BY DONNA ROLEN WSU EXTENSION OFFICE

Wednesday, February 4, 2015 Okanogan County Agriplex (County Fair Grounds, Omak)

Co-sponsored by: WSU Extension and Okanogan County Horticultural Association 9:00 - 9:40

Modern fire blight control materials- product choices and timing. Tim Smith, WSU (retired) – North Central Washington

9:40 - 10:00

WSU Endowment Advisory Committee Update. Sam Godwin, Chair, EAC Committee, Dr. Des Layne, WSU – TFREC, Wenatchee

10:00 – 11:00

2014 Little Cherry Disease, Mealybug and Spotted Wing Drosophila Dr Andrea Bixby-Brosi, WSU-TFREC, Wenatchee

11:00 - 11:20

Are you in the know? Resources you could/should be utilizing. Dr. Desmond Layne, WSU – TFREC, Wenatchee

11:20 - 11:45

Apple varieties of the future from the WSU apple breeding program Dr. Kate Evans, WSU TFREC - Wenatchee

11:45 - 12 noon Elections and Nominations - Choosing your representatives.

Okanogan County Horticultural Association Business Meeting 12:00 - 1:00

Lunch and Trade Show

1:00 - 1:30

Using the WSU-DAS version of the WSU Spray Guide. Dr. Ute Chambers, WSU TFREC-Wenatchee

1:30 - 2:00

Improving Association Services to the Industry. Jon DeVaney, Washington State Tree Fruit Association

2:00 - 2:30

Plotting the Future. Tom Auvil, Tree Fruit Research Commission

2:30 - 3:00

Modern Materials and Methods for Enhanced Weed Control. Tim Smith, WSU Extension (Retired)

You can now register for the 4th Annual Women in Agriculture Conference which offers women in Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Alaska a unique opportunity to gather in 28 locations for a 1-day event featuring knowledgeable speakers, inspiring stories, practical advice for improving farm management skills and networking with other women producers. Have you ever been asked, “Tell me about your farm?” It’s more important than ever to be able to talk about it positively and

with passion, no matter what you grow or how you sell it. Join us for an engaging, interactive day and learn who your audience is, what they want to know about your farm and what tools are best for you. Be inspired by our speakers: Emily Asmus from Welcome Table Farms in Walla Walla will be the keynote farmer. Asmus says a successful and consistent marketing plan is essential to being profitable. She will showcase how Welcome Table Farms keeps their “brand” fresh to build interest and loyalty. Learn what tools and techniques are critical to their marketing plan. Erica Mills from Claxon Marketing in Seattle will be instructing on how to better market their business. Every woman can-and should-have a consistently compelling way to describe her farm business, says Mills. She knows this isn’t easy and will help farms of all shapes and sizes tackle this tough chal-

IDEAS TO GROW WITH 418 S. Western, Tonasket

Phone: 509.486.2142

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By applying the most up-to-date technology, our experienced, dedicated and hard working crew continues to provide the best possible service to both growers and consumers.

3 pesticide education certification credits awarded for program attendance (Only the presentations relating to pesticides & use are eligible for credit hours) Extension programs and employment are available to all without discrimination. Evidence of noncompliance may be reported through your local Extension office.

extreme heat. “That said, 2013 was the hottest summer on record and 2014 replaced that. Hopefully 2015 won’t follow.” Moser said that Gold Digger will have a presence at the annual Horticulture meeting as they do every year. The cooperative, one of the largest private employers in the north end of the county, continues to grow about 20 percent each year. He says that’s due partly to new growers coming on board, new high density plantings and in some cases older growers retiring and new ones taking over with new methods. “There are also new varieties being planted... we’re always looking for what the next winner out there is. The growers’ co-op is also increasing its own orchards to guarantee the operation has the volume it needs. “The average age of the farmer is climbing, we want to keep jobs locally and secure the tonnage we need to operate,” Moser said.

302 S. Western, Tonasket  486-2104

lenge. Using proven tools that have been pressure-tested by thousands of users, you’ll learn a simple, 3-step marketing method and create a Marketing Action Plan that gets you results. Mark your calendar and join other women (men are also welcome!) to learn, network and be ready to take action. This conference is designed for women who have been farming for years, as well as for new and aspiring farmers. In Washington State, the event is being held at several locations, including Bremerton, Cathlamet, Chehalis, Colville, Everett, Goldendale, Montesano, Mount Vernon, Nespelem, Olympia, Pullman, Puyallup, Republic, Sequim, Spokane, Vancouver, Walla Walla, Wenatchee and Yakima.

NEARBY LOCATIONS: REPUBLIC: WSU Extension Ferry, County Courthouse, 350 E Delaware Ave. #9, Republic, WA 99166. Trevor Lane, WSU Extension, call 509-775-5225 or trevor. lane@wsu.edu. Tonia Jordan, WSU Extension, call 509-775-5225 or email jordant@wsu.edu NESPELEM: Tribal Administration Building Conference Room, 44 School Loop Road, Nespelem, WA 99155. Linda McLean, WSU Colville Reservation Extension call 509634-2305 or email ljmclean@ wsu.edu WENATCHEE: Confluence Technology Center 285 Technology Way, Wenatchee, WA 98801. Margaret Viebrock, WSU Extension call 509-745-8531 or email viebrock@wsu.edu Marcie Ostrom, WSU Extensionl, call 509-663-8181 or mrostrom@wsu.edu To learn more, view specific event locations, or to register, visit www.womeninag.wsu. edu. Registration fee is $30 but there is a $25 early bird special between January 10 and February 13; includes a light breakfast, lunch, handouts and tools you can use. Click on the Brown Paper Tickets button on our website, and find a location near you. Partial scholarships are available for aspiring farmers, college ag students and 4-H and FFA members. Contact Margaret at viebrock@wsu.edu for an application.


JANUARY 29, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A7

Colville Reservation youth gain ag knowledge at national meeting LINDA MCLEAN, DIRECTOR EDUCATOR WSU COLVILLE RESERVATION EXTENSION

Seven Colville Reservation teens were selected to attend and participate in the Intertribal Agriculture Council (IAC) Annual Membership Meeting, in Las Vegas, NV, December 8 – 11. The teens were: Kaelyn & Krista Marchand, Oliver Williams, Gabe & Winston Moses, Khani Priest and Gianna Bray. Each teen received an all-expense paid trip, sponsored by IAC, for them and a chaperone to participate in this annual, agriculture-focused, meeting. The 28th Annual IAC Membership Meeting boasted a full agenda for the general assembly, as well as a full youth conference, designed specifically for the youth participants. Food sovereignty was a strong theme throughout the meeting. The general meeting focused on success stories from tribal producers across the United States. Beneficial USDA programs were also showcased, to provide information on the technical side of ag production. The youth conference featured many of the same speakers, but the topics were tailored for the interests of the youth. Throughout the week, the youth had the opportunity to star in, and help create, a music video, “It’s All About that Ag,” which is up for viewing on YouTube. The youth conference heard from experts in Risk Management, Financial Literacy, Farm to Fork and the History and Future of Indian Agriculture, to name a few. Local Colville Reservation Extension educators, Linda McLean, Director and Dan Fagerlie, WSU Tribal Liaison, also participated as speakers. They presented “Agriculture Careers” to the youth conclave, regarding the different careers connected to agriculture. They also made two presentations to the General Assembly of IAC: “Extension Programs on Reservations” and

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Seven Colville Reservation teens were selected to attend and participate in the Intertribal Agriculture Council (IAC) Annual Membership Meeting, in Las Vegas, Nevada last DecemberThe teens were: Kaelyn & Krista Marchand, Oliver Williams, Gabe & Winston Moses, Khani Priest and Gianna Bray. Each teen received an all-expense paid trip, sponsored by IAC, for them and a chaperone to participate in this annual, agriculture-focused, meeting. “Developing 4-H Youth Programs on the Colville Reservation.” All were very well received. All seven of the youth who participated in the 2014 IAC meeting have an interest in agriculture development. They are all enrolled in either 4-H clubs or FFA clubs, and they are actively working to develop their own livestock herds or growing food to feed their families. “The youth are the leaders of tomorrow” stated Linda McLean, “These young people are to be commended for their efforts towards supporting agriculture development and contributing to the food sovereignty/food security of our reservation.” Be sure to check the video out on

Your one stop for complete

YouTube – “It’s All About That Ag!” If you would like more information on 4-H or how you can start a 4-H club in your area, please contact Linda McLean, Colville Reservation Extension Director, (509) 634-2305 or ljmclean@wsu.edu . Or you may contact Dan Fagerlie, FRTEP Project Director, (509) 690-0009 / (509) 775-3087 or fagerlie@wsu.edu or the Ferry County Extension office at, (509) 775-5225 ext. 1116 or the Okanogan County Extension office (509) 422-7245. Extension programs and employment are available to all without discrimination. Evidence of noncompliance may be reported through your local Extension office.

Crop Insurance in the Okanogan Valley OROVILLE: 815 Central, 476-3023 TONASKET: 323 S. Whitcomb, 486-2917 OMAK: 2 N. Main Street, 826-1156 BREWSTER: 538 W. Main, 689-0904

“Satisfaction through service, quality and diversification.” Gold Digger Apples is an aggressive company providing competitive returns to quality growers. Our commitment to quality, service and teamwork provides our family of growers the skills they need to be successful in today's global markets while supporting our local communities throughout the Okanogan Valley. We are dedicated to the future of our growers and work with them individually to become Global Gap compliant and audit ready.

Our growers’ loyalty and commitment to our communities has provided jobs and economic stability for over 75 years. (509) 476-3646

1220 Ironwood • PO Box 2550

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OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE www.gazette-tribune.com

Oroville, WA

98844

Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more. 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000

IDENTIFY ENERGY WASTING PRACTICES BE AN ENERGY CHAMPION!

BE AN ENERGY MeetingCHAMPION! & Trade Show

AND ELIMINATE THEM.

THEN…TAKE PRIDE IN YOUR EFFORTS TO REDUCE ENERGY WASTE!

leaky hardware not only provides more uniform irrigation for crops February 4th, 2015 Replacing but also reduces your water waste and lowers your energy costs. Even small hardware changes can add up to big cost savings for agricultural producers. And it’s so easy to save! Upgrading irrigation hardware is the easiest way to create a water and energy efficient system. Just as you replace older equipment when it wears out, always be looking for hardware upgrades that can end up saving you money!

BE AN ENERGY CHAMPION!

BE AN ENERGY CHAMPION!

IDENTIFY ENERGY WASTING PRACTICES AND CHANGE THEM IDENTIFY ENERGY WASTING PRACTICES AND CHANGE THEM Public Utility District No. 1 of Okanogan County 1331 2nd N., Okanogan, 422-3310 18 W. 1st Ave., Omak, 422-8380 THEN… 101 S. Bridge, Brewster, 689-2502 1500 Main, Oroville, 476-3531 307 S. Western Tonasket, 486-2131 TAKE Ave., PRIDE IN YOUR EFFORTS TO 201 Hwy. 20 South, Twisp, 997-2526

REDUCE ENERGY WASTE!

THEN…

Okanogan County PUD offers agricultural energy efficiency programs that provide financial incentives for our customers. These incentives can help make your energy efficiency upgrades affordable! These programs cover irrigation hardware, variable frequency drives on agricultural turbine pump applications and irrigation system equipment. Specific incentive reimbursement varies by program.

Public Utility District No. 1 of Okanogan County 1331 2nd N., Okanogan, 422-3310 18 W. 1st Ave., Omak, 422-8380 101 S. Bridge, Brewster, 689-2502 1500 Main, Oroville, 476-3531 307 S. Western Ave., Tonasket, 486-2131 201 Hwy. 20 South, Twisp, 997-2526

Contact your local Public Utility District’s Energy Services at 509.422.8427, for further information on TAKE PRIDE IN YOUR EFFORTS TO REDUCE ENERGYoffice WASTE! Repair leaks or consider system program requirements and incentives. improvements with the VFD controls (shown right) to ensure an efficient irrigation system.

Energy and water efficient hardware replacements reduce water waste, save on water costs, and provide more uniform irrigation for crops. These improvements reduce your risk of


PAGE A8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 29, 2015

Guests talk about school bond

OBITUARIES

Janis Allison

JANIS ALLISON Janis Allison age 71 of Oroville passed away Sunday, January 25, 2015 at North Valley Extended Care in Tonasket. She was born May 24, 1943 in Selma, California to parents Stanley Jay and Dorothy Leatta (Bibb) Allison. Janis grew up in Selma and Fresno, CA. On July 17, 1961 she married Larry B. Bailey in Fresno, CA. Together they had three children and lived in Fresno, Santa Cruz, Porterville and Bell Gardens, CA. In the late 1980’s, Janis moved to Oroville to be close to family. She was known by her family as Pamma. She was a unique mom...”one of a kind.” A spirited, sweet, kind and generous woman. She enjoyed meeting and getting to know people. Janis loved to read, dance and go on road trips. She had the gift of making a house a home and could decorate anything. She will be missed by family and friends. She is survived by two daughters: Charlene (Greg) Helm of Oroville and Shannon Bailey (Nick) Mieirs of Oroville; a son: Mike Bailey of Puerto Rico; a brother: Stanley Allison of Selma, Calif.; a sister: Darline King. of Dundee, Ore.; ten grandchildren: Sarah (Helm) Young, Justin (Jessica) Helm; Jordan, Taija and Deja Moore; Alissa, Andrew, Jadyn, Carly and Casey Mieirs and five great grandchildren:

Super Bowl Party planned on Sunday SUBMITTED BY SUE WISENER TONASKET EAGLES #3002

It is the middle of winter, I can’t wait for spring, but weather hasn’t been really bad so far depending where you live. On Sunday, Feb. 1 we will be having a Super Bowl Party Seahawks vs. Patriots starting at 3 p.m. It is a potluck, so bring your favorite dish. There will be door prizes and more and also 50 cents off on sprits during the game.

Super Bowl Potluck SUBMITTED BY JAN HANSEN OROVILLE EAGLES

Big doin’s at the Oroville Eagles! Super Bowl Sunday we will be open to the public for a potluck snacks event. Happy hour prices will be in effect and we will all be there to cheer on our team. Come on and join us! We now have lunch available every week day from 12 noon to 2: pm and the banquet room is open to the public. Come on in and give our Soup-n-Sandwiches a try. On Saturday, Feb. 14 we will have a Scotch Doubles Sweetheart Pool Tournament. Sign up

Phyllis Billups

PHYLLIS ALDEAN (METZ) BILLUPS Phyllis Aldean (Metz) Billups, 90, of Omak, Wash., passed away on Monday, January 19, 2015. Phyllis was born on September 12, 1924, to Orvil and Muriel Metz in Hardesty, Alberta, Canada and was the oldest of five siblings, including Raymond Metz, Duane Metz, Virginia (Metz) Montague and Sharon (Metz) Powell-Phyllis. She attended grade school in Hardesty and often rode her

TONASKET EAGLES Come join the fun. On Valentines Day we will be having a Prime Rib dinner, with all the trimmings starting at 5:30 p.m.. Bring your sweetheart. Enjoy a great meal and let them know you care.The price is only $17. Karaoke with Linda Wood to follow. Something new coming starting in March – Taco Tuesday, more information to come. We are saddened by the pass-

OROVILLE EAGLES at 1 p.m. and be ready to play at 1:30 p.m., $10 per couple. Sweetheart Dinner starts at 6:pm. We’ll eat Steak and Prawns and the rest of a special dinner. It will be $25 for you and your sweetheart and you can stay and hear and dance to North Half at 8 p.m. Come and spend Valentine’s Day with your sweetheart and the Oroville Eagles! Our Aerie meetings are the first and third Tuesday of the month and the Auxiliary meets on the second and fourth Tuesday.

509-486-0615

312 S. Whitcomb

beloved horse to school with brother, Raymond. The family moved from Hardesty to Oroville, Wash., where her family owned and operated an orchard. Phyllis met Norman Billups at a Grange hall dance in Molson, Wash. and they were married in Oroville on Oct.26, 1942. Phyllis was a WWII bride and her eldest son, Dennis, was born while husband, Norman, served in the U.S. Army overseas. She often said that she learned how to stretch a nickel because of the lack of supplies and rationing. After the War, Phyllis and Norman made their home in Molson, ranching and raising cattle. Three more children were born, Eldon, Trish and Bruce Billups. In 1966, Phyllis and Norman purchased the Soap Lake B&B Drive In and in 1976, moved to Grand Coulee, Wash., where they purchased and operated the B&B Drive ln. Norman passed away on May 16, 1988. Phyllis was a member and attended the Assembly of God Church in Electric City and Omak. Phyllis moved to Omak and lived at the Park Apartments for several years and for the last two years, she lived at Apple Springs Assisted Living. Phyllis is survived by son, Eldon (Kandi) Billups; son, Bruce (Kim) Billups; daughter, Trish (Bob) Butler; ten grandchildren; 19 great-grandchildren; two great-great-grandchildren and sisters, Virginia Montague and Sharon Powell. She was preceded in death by her father and mother, Orvil and Muriel Metz; husband, Norman Billups; son, Dennis Billups; brother, Duane Metz; brother, Raymond Metz; and granddaughter, Christina Nelson. Services will be held at Strate Funeral Home in Grand Coulee at 1 p.m. on Wednesday, January 28, 2015. A Graveside Service will follow at Spring Canyon Cemetery. The family would suggest, in lieu of flowers, that monetary donations be made to the Oroville Assembly of God Youth Group. Precht-Harrison-Nearents Chapel of Okanogan is in charge of the arrangements. ing of Penny Smith, she will be missed by many, many people. Joker Poker is back in big swing. Every Saturday at 7 p.m. is the drawing. You could win half of $2024. $1 per ticket and must be present to win. Pinochle scores are as follows: First place Carol Ross and Gene Michels; second place Leonard and Nellie Paulsen; Low Score went to Ted Zuchman and Ken Cook; Last Pinochle was Neil and Gladys Fifter ( Congratulations to every one). We wish all of hose that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the State. Happy hour is 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. every day and during Seahawks games. We have free pool every Sunday. Wednesday is Pool League and Burgers. Thursdays we play Bingo and eat Burgers and More. Fridays are Steak Night, Joker Poker and Meat Draw.

Did you know?

Think Green!

Hailey, Miles and Carter Helm and Coen and Livi (Helm) Young. Janis was preceded in death by her dad, Stanley J. Allison and her mom, Dorothy Allison and one sister, Della Hendryx There will be a service on Saturday, January 31, 2015 at the Lutheran Church in Oroville at 11 a.m. Rev. Dan Kunkel officiating. A potluck salad and desserts will follow. A separate memorial service will be held at a later date. Bergh Funeral Service and Crematory in care of arrangements.

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TONASKET GARDEN CLUB

SUBMITTED BY AUDREY HOLMES THE TONASKET GARDEN CLUB

The Hillside Apartments is where the Garden Club met on Monday, Jan, 12, 2015. Two guests attended; Kirsten Williams, Tonasket, and Cathy Bailey, Tonasket. Kirsten came on behalf of the Tonasket School Board to talk about the newly proposed School Bond to be sent out on January 23, 2015 to be voted on February 23, 2015. A very important and much needed Bond. Education needs have changed since the last Bond was approved in 1993. Since then, the District has expanded educational programs and technology to meet these changing needs of our children. These changes require additional space. Safety

issues also need to be addressed. Our other guest, Cathy Bailey, who is involved in plans for having a Tonasket Community Garden near the Tonasket railroad track, called “Share Our Garden.” It’s her passion. She’s trying to get people together to achieve this goal. It will involve groups, individuals, non-organic or organic. She needs help in any way that people can, lending equipment, labor, planting, watering or whatever it takes. For more information call Cathy at 509-486-9966 or shareourgarden@yahoo.com. The next meeting will be at the Hillside Apts. on Feb. 9. We will meet at 11 a.m. to make crafts for

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OkanoganValley

CHURCH GUIDE Come join us!

OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 9:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Visit us on the web: www.OrovilleUMC.org Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET

Tonasket Bible Church

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Trinity Episcopal Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am 602 Central Ave., Oroville Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Holy Rosary Catholic Church Warden • 476-2022 1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 11 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Church of Christ Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110 Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m. Immanuel Lutheran Church 1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15 Seventh-Day Adventist “For it is by grace you have been saved, through 10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9 Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146 “To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Bible Faith Family Church Pentacostal Church of God

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the Founder’s Day booth where we have crafts, plants, and baked goods. We encourage guests and new members to attend the meetings. The number to call for the time and place of meetings is 509-223-3427.

1012 Fir Street, Oroville • 476-3063 Pastor Claude Roberts SUNDAY: 9 - 9:30 a.m. Prayer & Fellowship 10:10 - 10:30 Coffee & Visiting 10:30 - 11:30 Church Service with Project 3:16 Band 6 - 7:30 p.m. Pursuit

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:15 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 9:15 am Praise Singing. 9:30 am Worship Service 11:00 am Sunday school for all ages Pastor Jim Yassey Albright 509-846-4278

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 11 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts 509-486-2192

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more. 1422 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000

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To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 509- 476-3602 ext 3050


‘Beast Mode’

JANUARY 29, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B6

BREAKDOWN HEAD

Lynch is known for his physical play, but he is also a player offensive-line coach Tom Cable described as one of the most intelligent he has ever coached.

EYES

Every running back needs vision, and the best ones, like Lynch, can recognize where a hole is going to be before it opens. Of course, that doesn’t keep Lynch from occasionally running into contact — seemingly on purpose.

W

hen the Seattle Seahawks acquired Marshawn Lynch in 2010, they didn’t just get a running back, they got an identity. Over the past five seasons, Lynch has not only been one of the NFL’s best backs, he has also helped define the physical, smash-mouth style that brought Seattle its first Super Bowl title. Here’s a look at what makes Lynch special.

MOUTH

Lynch’s silence has become a story in the past two years, as he prefers to let his game do the talking. This also is where the Skittles go.

HANDS

In addition to hanging onto the ball as a runner, Lynch has used his hands to secure a career-high 367 receiving yards and four touchdown catches this season.

STOMACH

ARM

Few running backs, if any, deliver as nasty a stiff-arm as Lynch. It’s a weapon that helps him turn good runs into great ones. Just ask former Saints cornerback Tracy Porter about it.

Lynch missed the first quarter of Seattle’s win in Arizona because of an upset stomach, and it has been an issue at other times as well, though never to the point that he missed a game.

BACK

Lynch regularly misses practice because of a balky back, although it has only caused him to miss one game since joining the Seahawks. How long his back holds up could determine how long he is a productive running back.

LEGS

The engines that give Lynch his rare power as a runner have carried him to 1,306 rushing yards and 13 touchdowns this season. Lynch’s legs don’t just provide power, they always keep churning, even when he appears to be stopped.

FEET

As much as Lynch is known for his bruising power, he’s surprisingly nimble. Head coach Pete Carroll compared Lynch to a slalom skier because of his quick feet, which help him avoid tacklers and find open running lanes.

Text by John Boyle, photo by Ian Terry, The Herald

2015

This Seahawks poster brought to you by

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PAGE B2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 29 2015

LOCAL SPORTS

Hornets get healthy and get win over LB a big difference between second and third this year (as far as who the Hornets would draw in the district tournament).” Monica Chavey led Liberty Bell (3-12, 3-7) with nine points.

BY BRENT BAKER HALFBAKED@OKVALLEYSPORTS.COM

OROVILLE - Jan. 23, 2015 Oroville’s girls basketball team is returning to something resembling a healthy state. The Hornets took out their frustration over Tuesday’s loss to Lake Roosevelt on Friday, shaking off the rust to claim a 69-37 victory. “We shot the ball better,” said Oroville coach Mike Bourn. “On Monday we had three freshman show up for practice, and that was it. The girls were at school Tuesday so they could play LR, but we weren’t ready.” The shooting wasn’t there early for either team as both squads missed a number of closein shots. Oroville (9-6, 6-3 CWL North) led 11-5 after one quarter, but exploded for 24 points in the second to go up 35-17 at the half. The game featured plenty of physical play, especially in the first half, which Liberty Bell coach Ed Smith said wasn’t necessarily good for the Mountain Lions. Lily Hilderbrand scored 21 points to lead all scorers, most of them in the paint. Mikayla Scott hit three 3-pointers and finished with 16 points, while Hannah Hilderbrand and Kendal Miller added 10 apiece. “We’re still in good position,” Bourn said. “We need to win at LR next Thursday and if we do that, we should be able to finish second (in the league). There’s

Brent Baker/submitted photo

Brent Baker/submitted photo

Lily Hilderbrand has seen plenty of physical defense throughout the season, but is still scoring nearly 20 points a gam including 21 against Liberty Bell on Friday.

Oroville’s Hannah Hilderbrand (left) and Faith Martin gang up on Liberty Bell’s Lauren Ochoa during Friday’s victory over the Mountain Lions.

Oroville makes a statement with win BY BRENT BAKER HALFBAKED@OKVALLEYSPORTS.COM

OROVILLE - Oroville’s boys basketball team has flown under the radar, coming close to challenging the upper tier of CWL North teams and winning a number of close games against the rest. The under the radar status may be a thing of the past as the Hornets sprung a 65-57 upset of Liberty Bell on Friday, a night after the Mountain Lions had knocked off Lake Roosevelt. That same LR team had beaten the 4-9 Hornets three days earlier by 16 points. But Oroville was ready for this one, bolting to a 10-1 lead in the opening minutes. That set the tone for the night as the Mountain Lions played

from behind the rest of the way as Liberty Bell trailed for all but a few seconds early in the second quarter. Micah Klemmeck’s steal-andscore briefly gave Liberty Bell an 18-17 lead in the second quarter, but Andrew Mieirs scored seven straight points, capped by a 3-pointer, to put the Hornets up 24-18. The Hornets led 39-30 at the half and maintained that margin midway through the fourth quarter, when Liberty Bell made its charge. Jose Dominguez, Andrew Reggiatore, Willy Duguay and Klemmeck all scored in a 9-2 run that pulled the Lions to within 59-57 with under two minutes to go. Liberty Bell had possession after an Oroville miss, but a Mieirs steal †set up Joe

Sarmiento’s critical 3-pointer with 1:20 left that gave Oroville a five-point lead. The Hornets tacked on three free throws in the final seconds to stay out of danger. Sarmiento and Bryce Glover each scored 16, Mieirs added 14, Lane Tietje scored 11 and Nathan Hugus had eight to account for all of the Hornets’ (5-9, 3-6 CWL North) points. Liberty Bell (11-4, 6-4) fell one game behind Lake Roosevelt in the loss column one night after beating the Raiders. The Mountain Lions were paced by Klemmeck with 13 points and Connor Cooley, who scored all 11 of his points in the second half.

LAKE ROOSEVELT 71, OROVILLE 55 OROVILLE - Lake Roosevelt

ran up 42 first half points to key a 71-55 victory at Oroville on Tuesday. The Raiders’ parade to the free throw line started early as Chance Garvin hit 6-of-7 at the stripe in the first quarter alone. LR hit 20-of-30 at the line for the game. Oroville was unable to recover from a 42-27 halftime deficit, though the Hornets played on even terms with the Raiders in the second half. Garvin finished with 23 points (including 11-of-15 at the line for the game) with Taren Redstar adding 15 and Jesse Louie scoring 12 for LR (7-5, 4-2 CWL North) Bryce Glover led Oroville (4-9, 2-6) with 21 points, with Andrew Mieirs adding 14.

BY BRENT BAKER

TONASKET - Tonasket overcame a big early deficit, but couldn’t maintain their momentum in falling 50-43 to Warden on Saturday. The Cougars jumped to a 23-10 first quarter lead. But the Tigers clawed back into the game by outscoring Warden 25-12 in the middle quarters to enter the final frame tied at 35-35. Warden outscored the Tigers 6-2 in the final 1:13 to secure the win, hitting 6-of-6 free throws down the stretch. JR Delgado led Warden (11-5) with 17 points. Colton Leep paced the Tigers (6-9) with 13 points, with Adrian McCarthy and Ethan Bensing added 10 apiece.

BREWSTER 73, TONASKET 37 BREWSTER - League-leading Brewster broke loose with a 47-19 run in the second half to run away from Tonasket’s upset bid on Friday, 73-37. The Bears led just 10-9 after one quarter and 26-18 at the half. Colton Leep scored 22 points for Tonasket, but no other Tiger managed more than four points. Meanwhile, Brewster’s Josh Hammons scored 16 of his 22 points in the second half, Luke Divis scored 12 of his 14 after halftime, and Timbo Taylor added 13. points. Brewster improved to 15-1 (10-0 CWL North) while Tonasket fell to 3-7 in league play. LIBERTY BELL 54, TONAS-

KET 50 WINTHROP - Tonasket showed a level of resolve it had lacked during a loss four days earlier to Manson. Liberty Bell, by the same token, had enough resolve of its own to withstand a furious Tiger comeback, holding on for a key 54-50 victory after Tonasket overcame a double-digit deficit to take the lead in the final minutes† The Mountain Lions held a 41-29 advantage late in the third quarter after opening the second half with a 10-3 run. The Tigers’ Ethan Bensing closed the third quarter with consecutive baskets and opened the fourth with a 3-pointer to cut the Mountain Lion lead to 41-36, and suddenly the game was on. A Colton Leep 3-pointer, a Christian Garcia basket and a hoop from Adrian McCarthy gave the Tigers a 49-48 lead. Jorge Lara broke loose for a fast break layup to put Liberty Bell up, but McCarthy tied it at 50 with a free throw with 1:48 left. Micah Klemmeck scored four points in the final 1:12 including the go-ahead bucket following up on a missed stealand-layup by Lara - †to give the Mountain Lions the lead for good. “We had some nice put-backs,” said Liberty Bell coach Kyle Acord. “Our offensive rebounding was big for us tonight.” Tonasket got the ball back with 22 seconds left, but took too long to get off a shot that could have cut the deficit in half.

“I should have called a time out with 22 seconds left,” said Tonasket coach Mike Larson. “We had a couple of guys in position to take good shots, but then they’d pass it off. They were thinking about getting the best shot, but when there’s winding down time, the best shot is the usually the first shot. Instead we get down to seven seconds without getting a shot up at all. “But hindsight is always 20/20.” It was a far cry from the teams’ first meeting, in which Liberty Bell exploded in the second half for a 70-46 win over the Tigers. “They played hard,”Acord said. “Both teams played hard. Last time there were spurts where the teams didn’t play hard. This time both teams played hard for the full 32 minutes.” The Tigers went early and often to Leep inside in the first half as Liberty Bell’s man-toman defense couldn’t keep the Tonasket post away from the basket. “They executed the offense we’ve been trying to run,” Larson said. “When you execute it, when you’re patient, you get good shots. We got some great shots in the second half.” Liberty Bell shifted to a 2-3 zone in the second half that helped build a 31-26 halftime lead to its 12-point advantage. Tonasket heated up outside in the late-going to get back in the game. “That helped us,” Acord said. “He’s such a strong inside player, it takes more than one man to guard him. The man to man

STANDINGS AND SCHEDULES GIRLS BASKETBALL CENT. WA LEAGUE NO. DIV. (2B) League W

Okanogan Lk Roosevelt Brewster Oroville Liberty Bell Manson Bridgeport Tonasket

9 7 7 6 3 2 2 2

Overall W

L

0 2 3 3 7 7 8 8

15 9 8 9 3 5 3 3

L

0 6 8 6 12 10 11 13

CENT. WA LEAGUE SO. DIV. (2B) League W

Brent Baker/submitted photo

Joe Sarmiento gets fouled from both sides in the first half of Oroville’s win over Liberty Bell.

Mabton White Swan Kittitas Waterville Soap Lake Warden

7 5 2 2 2 1

Overall W

L

0 1 4 4 5 5

15 12 8 6 3 5

L

2 3 6 8 10 11

BOYS BASKETBALL

Tough week for Tigers’ boys hoops HALFBAKED@OKVALLEYSPORTS.COM

LAKE ROOSEVELT 44, OROVILLE 37 OROVILLE - Jan. 20, 2015 - If Oroville’s girls basketball team felt sick before Tuesday’s game with Lake Roosevelt, the result of the contest didn’t do anything to make them feel better. The Raiders played one of their best games of the year to upset the Hornets on their home floor, 44-37. The winner of their Thursday, Jan. 29, rematch will have the inside track and the all-important second seed out of the CWL North to the district playoffs. Assistant coach Bill Cottrell said the Hornets hadn’t practiced at all in the three days before the game, due to illness. “LR’s girls wanted it more than we did,” he added. Six Raiders scored in the first half as they built a 22-13 lead, while the Hornets managed just four points not scored by Lily Hilderbrand. The Hornets narrowed the gap in the second half but couldn’t come back all the way. Katelynn Schilling led Lake Roosevelt with 17 points with Riley Epperson adding nine. Hilderbrand paced Oroville with 15 points and 18 rebounds, Hannah Hilderbrand added 11.

CENT. WA LEAGUE NO. DIV. (2B) League W

Brewster Okanogan Lk Roosevelt Liberty Bell Oroville Tonasket Manson Bridgeport

10 8 6 6 3 3 1 1

Overall W

L

1 1 3 4 6 7 8 9

15 12 8 11 5 6 6 3

L

1 3 6 4 9 9 9 11

CENT. WA LEAGUE SO. DIV. (2B) League W

Mabton Warden Waterville Soap Lake White Swan Kittitas

7 4 3 3 1 1

Overall W

L

0 2 3 4 5 5

14 11 7 4 3 1

L

3 5 8 8 12 12

SCHEDULES JAN. 29-FEB. 7

Thursday, Jan. 29 WR - Liberty Bell/Eastmont JV, 6 pm BB (JV/Var) - Oroville at Lake Roosevelt, 4:30/7:30 pm GB (JV/Var) - Oroville at Lake Roosevelt, 4:00/6:00 pm Friday, Jan. 30 BB (JV/Var) - Tonasket at Lake Roosevelt, 4:30/7:30 pm GB (JV/Var) - Tonasket at Lake Roosevelt, 3:00/6:00 pm BB (JV/Var) - Manson at Oroville, 4:30/7:30 pm GB (JV/Var) - Manson at Oroville, 4:00/6:00 pm Saturday, Jan. 31 WR - Tonasket & Oroville at CWL Mix & Match (Kittitas) Tuesday, Feb. 3 BB (JV/Var) - Oroville at Tonasket, 4:30/7:30 pm GB (JV/Var) - Oroville at Tonasket, 4:00/6:00 pm Brent Baker/submitted photo

Tonasket’s Charlie Sanchez drives upcourt at Liberty Bell last Tuesday. wasn’t working. “We gave it to them a few times there, but they got hot and did a nice job of finishing.” Leep finished with a gamehigh 24 points for the Tigers.

Cooley had 19 points and five rebounds, with Klemmeck adding 16 points, seven steals and two assists for the Mountain Lions (10-3, 5-3).

Thursday, Feb. 5 GB (JV/Var) - Brewster at Oroville, 4:00/6:00 pm BB (JV/Var) - Brewster at Oroville, 4:30/7:30 pm Friday, Feb. 6 GB (JV/Var) - Tonasket at Bridgeport, 4:00/6:00 pm BB (JV/Var) - Tonasket at Bridgeport, 4:30/7:30 pm Saturday, Feb. 7 WR - Sub-regional at Oroville (incl. Tonasket), 10 am.


JANUARY 29, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B3

LOCAL SPORTS

Warden edges Tigers

Suffer loses to Brewster Bears, Liberty Bell Lions

BY BRENT BAKER HALFBAKED@OKVALLEYSPORTS.COM

SPOKANE - Jan. 24, 2015 Tonasket and Warden should end up amongst the top teams on the Class B leaderboard at the state tournament next month. It’s too bad there isn’t a duals state tournament in Washington because they likely would be contenders for such a crown. The closest thing that Eastern Washington sees to such an event is the Dream Duals tournament at East Valley of Spokane, in which multiple tournaments of various school size classifications compete in a series of dual matches. The Class B section of the tournament featured Tonasket, Warden, Okanogan, Darrington, Concrete and Mary Walker, divided into two pools. Tonasket, Darrington and Mary Walker competed in a round robin to determine the three placings in their pool, while Okanogan, Concrete and Warden competed in the other. The Tigers defeated Darrington 54-6 and Mary Walker 57-18 to win their pool, while Warden similarly defeated Okanogan 61-9 and Concrete 58-24. The set the Tigers and Cougars against once another in a match that was dominated in the middle weights by the Tigers and the light and heavy weights by Warden.† The Cougars claimed a 33-30 victory to win the Dream Duals Class B title. “It was a very exciting match that came down to the wire,” said Tonasket coach Dave Mitchell, pointing out the improvement of a number of Tigers in rematches against Warden wrestlers they’d seen earlier in the season. Rycki Cruz set the tone for the match with a 12-11 victory at 138 pounds to give the Tigers the early lead.† The Tigers led 27-0 after a pin by Jorge Juarez (145); a 13-7 victory by Ryan Rylie (152) that avenged an earlier loss; a 6-3 victory by Zach Lofthus (160), a pin by Austin Knowlton (170) and a forfeit to Lucas Vugteveen (182).

Tigers break through, defeat Warden BY BRENT BAKER HALFBAKED@OKVALLEYSPORTS.COM

Terry Mills/submitted photo

Jorge Juarez pins his Okanogan opponent last Wednesday. But Warden flexed its muscle after a double forfeit at 195, with Jerry Reyes getting a pin at 220 and Joseph Pruneda (285) catching Chad Edwards with 20 seconds left in their match for a pin. The Tigers forfeited at 106, and Warden earned pins at 113 and 120 to take the lead. Rade Pilkinton (126) fought valiently against Tyson Yamane in a 9-5 loss. Yamane defeated two-time state champion Trent Skelton (Liberty Bell) at the Tigers’ Apple Pie tournament last week. Trevor Peterson (132) finished the match with a 2-1 victory over Peter Manville, scoring a reversal with seconds remaining in the match. The Tigers won their other two matches easily as both Darrington and Mary Walker had a number of forfeits; some got matches in against JV wrestlers from larger schools. Picking up wins on the mat against Darrington were Pilkinton, Peterson, Cruz, Rylie, Lofthus (160) and Vance Frazier (120). Winning on the mat against Mary Walker were Freese, Cruz, Juarez, Rylie, Knowlton, Edwards and Dallas Tyus (170), seeing his first action of the season.

“All in all it was a great day of wrestling,” Mitchell said. “We had a good following of parents and friends who made the trip to Spokane. our wrestlers and coaches appreciate their support.”

TIGERS SWEEP HOME DOUBLE DUAL TONASKET - Jan. 21, 2015 - Tonasket swept its double dual meet with Cascade and Cashmere on Wednesday, with Okanogan picking up a split with the same two former Caribou Trail League rivals. The Tigers beat Cascade 63-12 and Cashmere 54-12, while Okanogan defeated Cascade 34-32 and lost to Cashmere 34-23. Double winners (including forfeits) for the Tigers included Lucas Vugteveen (182), Frank Holfeltz (195), Morgan O’Brien (220), Chad Edwards (285), Tim Freese (113), Rade Pilkinton (126), Trevor Peterson (132), Rycki Cruz (145), †and Eithan Knowlton (152/160). Austin Knowlton (170) and Jorge Juarez (160) each won their only matches of the night. For Okanogan, Joe Mintzer (182) won twice, including a pin against Cascade in the final

TONASKET - Tonasket’s girls basketball team had suffered three straight losses in games they could have won over the past nine days. Saturday they pulled out a tight non-league victory over Warden, recovering from a slow start with a big second quarter that proved to be the difference in the game. Ashlynn Willis hit a pair of 3-pointers and Johnna Terris added one to key a 16-5 Tonasket run in the second quarter that gave the Tigers a 19-14 halftime lead. Tonasket survived a fourth quarter that included nine Warden free throws and a technical foul against the Tigers. Willis finished with 11 points and Terris added eight as the Tigers improved to 3-13 overall. Shania Kisler led Warden (5-11) with 17 points.

BREWSTER 33, TONASKET 25 BREWSTER - Brewster’s Markie Miller proved to be too much for Tonasket to handle on Friday, scoring 19 points to lead the Bears past the Tigers 33-25. Tonasket led 7-5 after one quarter, but Brewster got Miller untracked thereafter as she scored 17 of Brewster’s 28 points in the final three quarters. Ashlynn Willis scored 13 points to lead Tonasket and Rose Walts added eight. Maret Miller added six points for Brewster (8-8, 7-3). LIBERTY BELL 33, TONASKET 32 WINTHROP - It’s tough to mount a comeback when the shots aren’t falling. Tonasket’s girls basketball

GUN CLUB NEWS

team found a way to storm back into Tuesday’s game at Liberty Bell after managing just eight points in the first half, but the Mountain Lions held on by their fingernails to take a 33-32 victory over the Tigers. The victory lifted Liberty Bell into what would be the fifth and final playoff spot - albeit the district play-in game - if the season ended today. The Mountain Lions built a 30-18 lead early in the fourth quarter, but Tonasket scored nearly as many points in the final six minutes as they did the rest of the game to get back in it. Ashlynn Willis scored off a backdoor cut, then followed with a 22-foot 3-pointer to get the Tigers some long-awaited momentum. Lauren Fitzmaurice answered with what turned out to be a critical 3-pointer from the corner with five minutes left. That turned out to be the final Mountain Lion points of the night. Willis scored twice more, including off a steal with 1:50 to play. After an exchange of turnovers, the Tigers had one last possession with 33 seconds left. They missed five potential game-winners in the final seconds, mostly mid- to long-range jumpers. Fitzmaurice led Liberty Bell (3-9, 3-5 CWL North) with 13 points, including a pair of 3-pointers in the first half as the Mountain Lions built a 24-8 lead. The Tigers struggled to find an offensive rhythm as coach Stephanie Schertenleib went with a number of different lineups in the first half, but the offensive stubbornly refused to get untracked. Ashlynn Willis finally did so in the late-going, scoring all nine of her points in the Tigers’ 14-3 game-closing run. Jaden Vugteveen added eight for Tonasket.

Inland Empire Spokesman Review Telephonic Shoot SUBMITTED BY OROVILLE & TONASKET GUN CLUBS

Oroville Gun Club We are half way through the Inland Empire SpokesmanReview Telegraphic Shoot. This is the world’s largest shooting competition and has been going on for 97 years. We are proud to be part of that tradition. We shoot on Sunday at 1 p.m. and even though the day was nice and overcast, it was still hard to hit those elusive pigeons. In spite of lower scores we all had fun shooting the birds and shooting the breeze. Scores are:

16 YARD 22 21 19 17 13

Logan Faris Bob Peterson Vern Cole Paul Schwilke Scott Peterson

Tonasket Gun Club 16 YARD 25 24 23 22 22 16 11 5

Rick Lind Robert McDaniel Craig Jordan Randy Cline Jeff Taylor Jeff McMillan Jeremy Clark Logan Clark HANDICAP

19 17 16

Craig Jordan Jeff Taylor Randy Cline

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PAGE 4 B4

OKANOGAN 29,2015 2015 OKANOGAN VALLEY VALLEYGAZETTE-TRIBUNE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE|• JANUARY January 29,

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O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

WA Misc. Rentals Parking/RV Spaces with full hook-ups. Long-Term Leases. Close to town. $250.00/month Call (509) 476-3059

Announcements CRAB DINNER American Legion Post 84 is holding their annual crab dinner on Saturday, Feb 14th at 6 pm Tickets are $25 each and can be purchased at the Lounge or at Vicki’s Unique Boutique on Main St. Only 150 presale tickets, no tickets at the door.

3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH MOBILE HOME Quiet, country park community. Spacious and comfortable. Includes sewer, water and garbage for $650 per month. 509-223-3433

FIRST AID & CPR CLASS will be held on February 2nd, 3rd & 4th, 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. in the Oroville Grade School Library. Bring a pillow for the first night. For information, call Ben Hylton 509-223-3412 leave message.

CLEAN 2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH MOBILE HOME Located in quiet, country park. Sewer, water, garbage incl. $475.month. Call 509-223-3433

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Sudoku

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

Puzzle 5 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.49)

7 8 5

2 1

4 7

4

8

9

4 3

6

4 9

7 5 2

6

6 3

1 2

5

9

3

5

3 6

1

8 4

5

6 2

8 4

7 9

1 3

8

4

1

6 3 9

2 5

7

6

2

5 4 9

8

3 7 1

4

3 8 1

7

2 5 9

6

1

7

4

9

3 5 6

2

8

4 2

5 3

6

CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR

HAVE YOU HEARD? WE ARE EXPANDING AND ARE HIRING ADDITIONAL POSITIONS! JOIN US AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE! We are dedicated to our employees job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome. We have the following opportunities available: OKANOGAN: Dental Assistant part time on an as needed basis Dentist 2 Full time Omak Medical: MA– C Full time. Behavioral Health Interpreter Care Coordinator 1 Full time position. English/Spanish bilingual required

Brewster Jay Ave: MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time, shift is split between Jay Ave medical & Brewster Dental clinics WIC Peer Counselor 10 hours per week. English/ Spanish bilingual required. Brewster (Indian Ave): MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time Bridgeport Med/Dental: Hygienist Full time. Travel between Brewster and Bridgeport. MA-C or LPN Full time Tonasket RN Nurse Case Mgr. Full time MA-C or LPN Part time, on an as needed basis position. English/ Spanish bilingual required due to business need. Roomer Part time/24 hours per week. English/Spanish bilingual required. See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

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www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

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PRACTICE MANAGER TONASKET Confluence Health is growing! We are looking for a Practice Manager III for the Tonasket Clinic. This is an upper level management position. The Practice Manager III manages the overall operations of the practice, ensuring a vision and strategy for future growth. The Practice Manager III partners with a physician manager to implement and manage all aspects of the medical practice to support the strategic initiatives of Confluence Health. This position promotes high levels of satisfaction with patients, providers and staff through proactively addressing concerns through meaningful measures and interventions. To learn more about these opportunities and to apply on-line, please go to wvmedical.com and click on the Careers tab. If you’d like to speak with a Recruiter directly, please email us at Jobs@confluencehealth.org or call 509.665.7906

Business Opportunities

Oroville Dental: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis

Medium, difficulty rating 0.49 Sponsored by

Statewides particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good�, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. EVENTS-FESTIVALS

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Health General

2 RV SPACES

For Rent

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DINER FOR LEASE Lease this fully equipped and established 1950’s themed Diner at Veranda Beach Resort on the shores of Lake Osoyoos in Oroville Washington. This is an exciting business opportunity for an experienced and successful food and beverage operator with catering capabilities. The Veranda Beach Diner seats 30 inside and 60 on the Veranda and is licensed for adjacent pool side service. Contact Jim Hammond for details jim@legendresorts.com Check out our website www. verandabeach.com

Firewood NOTICE Washington State law requires wood sellers to provide an invoice (receipt) that shows the seller’s and buyer’s name and address and the date delivered. The invoice should also state the price, the quantity delivered and the quantity upon which the price is based. There should be a statement on the type and quality of the wood. When you buy firewood write the seller’s phone number and the license plate number of the delivery vehicle. The legal measure for firewood in Washington is the cord or a fraction of a cord. Estimate a cord by visualizing a four-foot by eight-foot space filled with wood to a height of four feet. Most long bed pickup trucks have beds that are close to the four-foot by 8-foot dimension. To make a firewood complaint, call 360902-1857. agr.wa.gov/inspection/ WeightsMeasures/Fire woodinformation.aspx agr.wa.gov/inspection/WeightsMeasures/Firewoodinformation.aspx

Statewides WNPA STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS – WEEK OF JANUARY 26, 2015 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $275 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a

PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT for only pennies. Reach 2.7 million readers in newspapers statewide for $275 classified or $1,350 display ad. Call this newspaper or (360) 515-0974 for details. BIG ONE Snohomish County 4-H Tack Sale Saturday, February 21 9am-3pm. Consignment: Wednesday 4-9pm, Thursday 9am-9pm, Friday 9am-6pm. For more information, 425-308-2815 or https://www.facebook.com/#!/events/416828768476278/416829378476217 LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com HELP WANTED If you have a vehicle that can tow at least 7,000 pounds, you can make a living delivering RVs as a contact driver for Foremost Transport! Be your own boss and see the country. ForemostTransport.Blogspot.com or 866-764-1601! Ready for a CAREER in Concrete Plant Production? Progressive Contractor seeking Concrete Batch Plant Operators. Mechanical background required. Will train on Plant. Travel required. Great Pay. jobs@acmecpi.com

Public Notices IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF BENTON In the Matter of the Estate of: William K Smith, Deceased. No. 14-4-00524-0 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.030 The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020 (1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of this notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the Decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication: January 15, 2015. William C Smith P.O Box 4428 W. Richland WA. 99353, Personal Representative Court of Probate Proceedings: BENTON COUNTY SUPERIOR COURT Cause No. 14-4-00524-0 Published: The Okanogan Valley Gazette Tribune. January 22, 29, February 5, 2015. #OVG610321 PUBLIC AUCTION There will be a Public Auction at Budget Towing, 32156 Hwy. 97, Tonasket, WA 98855, Phone 509-5601056, on Thursday, February 5th, 2015. Viewing Time will start at 11:00 a.m. with the auction at 12:00 p.m. Up for auction will be: 1) 1990 Honda Lic# 694-ZGU 2) 2002 Mitsubishi Lic# AQW-8042 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 29th, 2015 #611716 PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: February 3, 2015 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 1992 Acura Vigor (Black) Lic# 825MLG Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 29, 2015. #OVG610173 Abbr. Legal Description: N1/2 N 1/2 N1/2NW,24-34-29 Tax Parcel No.: 3429244005 Deed of Trust No. 3165981 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE

Public Notices THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Telephone: (877) 894-4663 Website:www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/ homeownership/post_purchase_ counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Telephone: (800) 569-4287 Website:www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/ sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction= search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc= dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: (800) 606-4819 Website: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee, Bruce J. Blohowiak will on February 27th 2015 at the hour of 10:00 a.m., inside the main entrance of the Okanogan County Courthouse, 149 3rd Avenue North, Okanogan, WA 98840, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the County of Okanogan, State of Washington, towit THE NORTH HALF OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 34 NORTH, RANGE 29 EAST, W.M. OKANOGAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON TOGETHER WITH A CERTAIN 2010 MANUFACTURED HOME WITH THE SERIAL #A000096, MODEL #1018A000096, MANUFACTURER’S NAME OF CHAMPION WITH HUD NUMBERS OF IDA230814, IDA230815, IDA230816 WITH THE DIMENSIONS OF 26 X 60. which is subject to a Deed of Trust Deed of Trust wherein dated July 29, 2011 wherein Arthur Schipper and Patricia Boyce were the Grantors; Security Title Guaranty, Omak, WA the Trustee; and Horizon Credit Union, the Beneficiary, which Deed of Trust was recorded under Auditor’s File No. 3165981, records of Okanagan County, Washington. II. No action commenced by the beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: 1. Failure to pay monthly payments 1,151.62 for the months of January 2014 through October 2014 $11,516.20 2. The failure to pay Late Charges: $430.74 3. Current foreclosure costs and fees: a.Cost of Title Report for foreclosure $576.17 b.Service/Posting Notice of Default $70.40 c. Copying (est) $5.00 d. Postage (est) $21.57 e. Attorney’s Fee $750.00 f. Escrow/impound overdraft $803.11 TOTAL CHARGES, COSTS AND FEES $14,173.19 IV. The sum owing on the obligation(s) secured by the Deed of Trust are as follows: Principal $ 163,292.63 together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from December 1st 2013, and/or as advanced and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on February 27th 2015. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, must be cured by February 16th 2015 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before February 16th 2015, the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after February 16th 2015 and before the sale, by the Borrower, Grantor(s), any Guarantor, or the holder of any recorded

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JANUARY 29 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE January 29, 2015 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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statement (if otherwise allowed) or any conditions of which the Trustee is not aware of that would cause the cancellation of this sale as to the real property described herein or any portion of said real property. Further, if any of these conditions exist, any sale will be null and void, the successful bidder’s funds shall be returned, and the Trustee and the Beneficiary shall not be liable to the successful bidder for any damages, costs and/or attorney fees. The sale of the property will be made without covenant or warranty regarding title, possession(s), encumbrances or condition. DATED: October 13th, 2014 By/s/Bruce J. Blohowiak Bruce J. Blohowiak, Successor Trustee 201W. North River Drive, Ste 500 Spokane, WA 99201 509-777-1388, Ext.2 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 29 and February 19, 2015. #OVG609909

PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: February 3, 2015 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 1992 Acura Vigor Lic# 311KAQ Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 29, 2015. #OVG610171

Serving the Community of Parry’s Acreage” is partially funded through the Washington State Community Development Block Grant Program with federal funds provided by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Potential future projects are water and sewer improvements and street projects. Funding sources on subsequent projects may include the Washington State Community Development Grant Program and other funding agencies such as USDA Rural Development, Washington State Department of Ecology, Drinking Water State Revolving Fund Program, Washington State Transportation Improvement Board, and other state and federal funding programs. As a result, a number of the state and federal equal opportunity and affirmative action requirements will apply to the selection process and throughout the City’s projects. An engineering firm will be considered for selection based on overall firm qualifications, experience, personnel, professional reputation, experience with funding programs, and other criteria determined by the City. Tonasket will select the firm it deems to be the most qualified and in the overall best interests of the City. Tonasket reserves the right to reject any and all submittals. The City of

Tonasket is an equal opportunity employer and affirmative action employer. Minority- and Women-owned businesses are encouraged to submit statements of qualification. Statements shall be submitted to Alice Attwood, Clerk-Treasurer, at 209 S. Whitcomb Ave, P.O. Box 487, Tonasket, WA. 98855 no later than 4:00 PM on Friday, February 13th, 2015. Each envelope shall be labeled “Engineering Services”. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 22, 29, 2015. #OVG611239

and (b) In the manner provided in RCW 11.40.070: (i) By filing the original of the claim with the foregoing Court, and (ii) By serving on or mailing to me at the address below a copy of the claim. The claim must be presented by the later of: (a) Thirty (30) days after I served or mailed this Notice as provided in RCW 11.40.020(1)(c), or (b) Four (4) months after the date of first publication of this Notice. If the claim is not presented within this time period, the claim will be forever barred except as provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective for claims against both the Decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication of this Notice: Jan. 15, 2015. /s/Linda Aronson Linda Aronson, Personal Representative Kristina K. McMullin Attorney for Personal Representative Garlington, Lohn & Robinson, PLLP PO Box 7909 Missoula, MT 59807 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 15, 22, 29, 2015. #OVG609066

junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following addresses: Patricia Boyce 126 Hayden Creek Rd. Omak, WA 98841 Arthur Schipper 126 Hayden Creek Rd. Omak, WA 98841 Arthur Schipper P.O. Box 4271 Omak, WA 98841 by both first-class and certified mail, return receipt requested, on the 18th day of August 2014 proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served on the 4th day of September 2014 with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the abovedescribed property. IX. Anyone having any objection to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the trustee’s sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060 and the Helping Families Save Their Homes Act of 2009. XI. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE XII. CONDITIONS OF SALE Any Trustee’s Sale is subject to a bankruptcy filing, a payoff, a rein-

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN In re the Estate of: HARRY H. TOPPING, Deceased. NO. 15-4-00001-1 NOTICE TO CREDITORS The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020 (1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FILING COPY OF NOTICE TO CREDITORS with Clerk of Court: January 20, 2015. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: January 29, 2015. /s/Hartley A. Topping HARTLEY A. TOPPING Personal Representative /s/Anthony Castelda ANTHONY CASTELDA, WSBA #28937 Attorney for Topping Estate P.O. Box 1307 Tonasket, WA 98855 (509) 486-1175 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 29, February 5, 12, 2015. #OVG612016

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF OKANOGAN Estate of GLENN M. HAUENSTEIN, Deceased. NO. 14-4-00120-8 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS PLEASE TAKE NOTICE The above Court has appointed Glenna Hauenstein as Personal Representative of Decedent’s estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must present the claim: (a) Before the time when the claim would be barred by any applicable statute of limitations, and (b) In the manner provided in RCW 11.40.070: (i) By filing the original of the claim with the foregoing Court, and (ii) By serving on or mailing to me at the address below a copy of the claim. The claim must be presented by the later of: (a) Thirty (30) days after I served or mailed this Notice as provided in RCW 11.40.020(1)(c), or (b) Four (4) months after the date of first publication of this Notice. If the claim is not presented within this time period, the claim will be forever barred except as provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective for claims against both the Decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication of this Notice: January 15, 2015 /s/Dale L. Crandall, Attorney for Glenna Hauenstein, Personal Representative P.O. Box 173 Loomis, WA 98827 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 15, 22, 29, 2015. #OVG609717

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY Estate of ELAINE M. SILTMAN, Deceased. NO. 14-4-00121-4 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) PLEASE TAKE NOTICE The above Court has appointed me as Personal Representative of Decedent’s estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must present the claim: (a) Before the time when the claim would be barred by any applicable statute of limitations,

Crosswords

REQUEST FOR STATEMENTS OF QUALIFICATIONS (RSQ) For PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERING SERVICES The City of Tonasket, pursuant to (Chapter 61, Laws of 1981), is inviting statements of qualifications and performance information from consulting engineering firms for the year 2015 to provide engineering services and architectural design related to water, wastewater, streets, sidewalks, storm drainage systems and other city owned facilities. Services may include engineering planning, reports, project designs, funding applications and assistance, construction administration and inspection, environmental reviews, rate studies and other work as directed. The City’s current project “Rehabilitate the Sewer Collection System

24. Supplement

8. French novelist Pierre

26. Flat

9. Was unfaithful (hyphenated)

29. Asian plant’s flaxlike fiber

10. Leader of the pack

31. Like “The X-Files”

11. Beyond’s partner

32. Sensory nerve endings

12. Exodus commemoration

36. Extol

13. Bias

37. Santa Claus feature

21. “Malcolm X” director

38. Certain surgeon’s “patient”

25. Barely beat

39. International commerce without government interference (2 wds)

26. Brand, in a way

42. Food containing milk products

28. Military officer who acts as assistant to a more senior office (3 wds)

43. Muscular and heavily built

29. Query before “Here goes!”

44. Bets

30. “God’s Little ___”

47. Family retriever dog, for short

31. “The Lord of the Rings” figure

48. “Beowulf,” e.g.

32. Back

49. Lawful

33. Face-to-face exam

56. Dungeons & Dragons snake-like creature

34. Bank

57. Mosque V.I.P. 58. Drunk, in slang

37. Small herring processed like a sardine

59. Percussion instrument

40. Toni Morrison’s “___ Baby”

60. “Blue” or “White” river 61. Open, in a way

41. Fraught with uncertainty or doubt

62. Increase, with “up”

43. Dracula, at times

63. Civil War side, with “the”

44. Proceeds

64. Cream puff

45. In pieces

41. Gave out

Across

ANSWERS

1. Eyeglasses 6. Preserve, in a way

47. British sailor (slang)

Down

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50. Arabic for “commander”

15. Think

51. Apple variety

1. Bursae

16. Biblical shepherd

52. Peewee

2. Alka-Seltzer sound

17. ___ del Sol

53. “The Sound of Music” backdrop

3. “... or ___!”

18. Motor vehicle

54. Caddie’s bagful

4. Pigeon’s home

19. Conclusion 20. Posted mph (2 wds) 23. Animal house

35. Undertake, with “out”

46. Lively Baroque dance

10. Hail Mary, e.g.

22. 20-20, e.g.

27. “How ___!”

55. Irascible

5. Wrap or bind in bandages 6. Philip Roth’s “The Human ___” 7. Jack-in-the-pulpit, e.g.

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Windermere Real Estate / Oroville

Sandy Peterson & Ron Peterson, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee Great investment, corner location, commercial building, currently all rented except one smaller unit .6,210 sq.ft of business space with lots of porential, good off street parking. NWNML# 734757 $249,950

www.orovillelakeandcountry.net

Lake and Country

1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444 Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon

Beautiful building site with deeded lake access on spectacular Palmer Lake! 2.45 acres with irrigation and domestic water, power and phone. Within short walking distance of the lake. Come discover the jewel of the Okanogan and build your dream home here! MLS#385134 $150,000

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 to advertise in our Real Estate Guide.


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 29 2015 |

COPS & COURTS COURTHOUSE CORRESPONDENT

SUPERIOR COURT

Criminal Serena Rae Smith, 22, Omak, pleaded guilty Nov. 18, 2014 to second-degree rape of a child. Smith was sentenced Jan. 22 to 12 months in jail and fined $1,110.50 for the crime that occurred between Aug. 1, 2012 and May 7, 2013. She was also fined $1,110.50 Matthew Aaron Velasquez, 37, Loomis, pleaded guilty Jan. 22 to POCS (methamphetamine) and third-degree DWLS. The court dismissed another charge: use of drug paraphernalia. Velasquez was sentenced to 74 days in jail and fined $3,110.50 for the June 9, 2014 crimes. The court dismissed Jan. 26 a charge against Blair Bear McDougal, 31, Omak: second-degree assault (with a deadly weapon). The charge was dismissed with prejudice. The court issued an arrest warrant for Raymond Valentine Dispenza, 74, Oroville, for second-degree rape of a child, three counts of second-degree child molestation, one count of first-degree incest (victim under 14) and three counts of second-degree incest (victim under 14). The crimes allegedly occurred between June and August of 2012.

DISTRICT COURT David Lee Swanberg, 20, Conconully, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Amy Elizabeth Tatshama, 30, Omak, guilty of DUI, third-degree theft and two counts of third-degree DWLS. Tatshama also had three additional charges dismissed: third-degree DWLS, third-degree theft and fourth-degree assault. Tatshama was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 352 days suspended, and fined a total of $4,200.89. Ian Ray Tatshama, 44, Omak, guilty of violation of a nocontact order and fourth-degree assault. Tatshama was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 354 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,466. Leonard Leroy Todd, 59, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Todd was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended, and fined $858. Lisa Doreen True, 50, Omak, guilty of DUI. True also had three third-degree DWLS charges dismissed. She was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 359 suspended, and fined $1,936. Chad Vanatta, 28, Tonasket, had a charge dismissed: use or delivery of drug paraphernalia. Amanda Lee Vanslyke, 28, Okanogan, had a third-degree theft charge dismissed. Jose Jesus Vega, 18, Tonasket, had an MIP/C charge dismissed. Kevin Erik Warbus, 18, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Warbus had an additional charge dismissed: no valid operator’s license without ID. He received a 90-day suspended sentence and fined $568. Rachael Anne Wolff, 26, Okanogan, guilty of no valid operator’s license without ID. Wolff received a 90-day suspended sentence and

fined $818.

911 CALLS & JAIL BOOKINGS Monday, Jan. 19, 2015 Structure fire on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Drugs on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Malicious mischief on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. One-vehicle hit-and-run crash on Toroda Creek Rd. near Wauconda. No injuries reported. Assault on S. Main St. in Omak. Theft on Webber Rd. near Tonasket. Tools reported missing. Domestic dispute on Omak River Rd. near Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Koala Dr. in Omak. No injuries reported. Theft on Copple Rd. near Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on Fir St. in Oroville. Public intoxication on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Warrant arrest on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Juan Carlos Dias Figueroa, 26, booked for no valid operator’s license without ID, DUI and a USBP detainer. Terry Joseph Hubbard, 34, DOC detainer. Norman Edward Whited, 63, booked on a Tonasket Police Department FTA warrant for first-degree negligent driving. Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015 Public intoxication on Conconully St. in Okanogan. Fraud on Kermal Rd. near Omak. One-vehicle crash on Bonaparte Lake Rd. near Tonasket. No injuries reported. Threats on Conconully St. in Okanogan. One-vehicle crash on Hart Rd. near Oroville. No injuries reported. Harassment on Riverside Cutoff Rd. near Riverside. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Malicious mischief on N. Juniper St. in Omak. Disorderly conduct on Main St. in Oroville. Lazaro Sanchez Ruiz, 60, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Lynn Michelle Stanley, 44, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for second-degree DWLS. Alan Ryne Stanger, 27, booked on an Omak Police Department FTC warrant for physical control. Clomiat Annemaude McCraigie, 39, booked for first-degree DWLS. Melvin Fay Ranck, 35, DOC detainer. Wednesday, Jan. 21, 2015 Assault on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on W. Oak St. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Elmway in Okanogan. Harassment on Pontiac Ridge Rd. near Chesaw. Domestic dispute on Elmway in Okanogan. DWLS on Edmonds St. in Omak. Weapons offense on S. Ash St. in Omak. DWLS on S. Ash St. in Omak. DWLS on S. Columbia St. in Omak. Harassment on Sidley Lake Dr. near Oroville. Malicious mischief on 11th Ave. in Oroville.

Chad Elliot Monnin, 40, booked for second-degree DWLS and OCSO FTA warrants for third-degree DWLS and DUI. Dane Adam Stalder, 25, booked on two counts of thirddegree DWLS. Warren McCrea, 26, DOC detainer. James Michael Eriksen, 32, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for DUI, two Snohomish County FTA warrants: TMVWOP and second-degree malicious mischief; and one count each of residential burglary and third-degree malicious mischief. Thomas Jay Roosma, 33, court commitment for DUI. Felipe Ramos Reyes, 19, court commitment for DUI (minor).

Thursday, Jan. 22, 2015 Domestic dispute on Apple Way Rd. in Okanogan. Weapons offense on Engh Rd. near Omak. Burglary on Rodeo Trail Rd. near Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Siwash Creek Rd. near Tonasket. Harassment on Omak River Rd. near Omak. Assault on FS 3010 near Tonasket. Malicious mischief on Nichols Rd. near Omak. DWLS on Dayton St. in Omak. Drugs on E. Dewberry Ave. in Omak. Two reports of trespassing on S. Main St. in Omak. James Carl Walker Jr., 46, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for DUI. Robert Wendell George, 45, DOC detainer. Billy Joe Rosenkilde, 35, DOC detainer. Jay Thomas Pierre, 54, booked on two counts of DUI. Anthony Kevin Baker, 26, booked for first-degree robbery, first-degree burglary, second-degree theft, two counts of second-degree assault and one count of third-degree theft. Friday, Jan. 23, 2015 Warrant arrest on Grainger Ave. in Omak. Rape on Mill St. in Okanogan. Lost property on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Tape recorder reported missing. Burglary on Copple Rd. near Omak. Storage unit reported burglarized. Violation of a no-contact order on Six Gun Way near Oroville. Domestic dispute on Queen St. in Okanogan. DWLS on Eastside Oroville Rd. near Oroville. Warrant arrest on Pine St. in Okanogan. Assault on Brooks Tract Rd. near Omak. DWLS on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Fraud on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Hanford St. in Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on Main St. in Oroville. Theft on W. Fifth St. in Tonasket. Mail reported missing. Joshua Dean Allen, 33, booked on two counts of seconddegree criminal trespassing and one count each of second-degree vehicle prowl and attempted thirddegree theft. Melvin Fay Ranck, 35, booked on a drug court violation. Lane Charles Priest, 21, booked

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on a drug court violation. Adrian Jose Lagarda, 20, booked on a drug court violation. Jeffrey Howard Herschlip, 57, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for extortion. Matessa Rose Jorgensen, 20, booked for POCS (methamphetamine) and third-degree theft. Cheyenne Rosemary Lezard, 19, booked on three Omak Police Department FTA warrants, all for third-degree theft. Marcos Florention Rosas, 30, booked on four Omak Police Department FTA warrants: three for thirddegree theft and one for obstruction; a Chelan County warrant for violation of a no-contact order (DV), and a DOC hold. Zane Michael Rehmke, 22, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for DUI. Kevin Michael Clark, 34, DOC hold.

Saturday, Jan. 24, 2015 Recovered vehicle on S. Granite St. in Omak. Burglary on N. First Ave. in Okanogan. Fraud on Hwy. 20 near Tonasket. Malicious mischief on Hwy. 20 near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on Jackson St. in Omak. Alcohol offense on Hanford St. in Omak. Weapons offense on E. Elberta Ave. in Omak. Assault on W. Central Ave. in Omak. Public intoxication on S. Ash St. in Omak. Burglary on Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket.

DENTISTRY

Bobby Bennett Saulmon, 67, booked for DUI. Thomas Lawrence Waters, 25, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant and a Grant County FTA warrant for DUI. Christopher Scott Milka, 46, booked for DUI. Fawn Marie Palmer, 36, booked for DUI and second-degree DWLS. Brandon Cate, no middle name listed, 28, booked for second-degree burglary, attempted second-degree theft, first-degree vehicle prowl and second-degree criminal trespassing. Christopher Parrott, no middle name listed, 26, booked for disorderly conduct. Derek Norman Boyd, 23, booked for attempting to elude a pursuing police vehicle, reckless endangerment and DUI. Cruz Viveros, no middle name listed, 20, booked for violation of a no-contact order. Joseph Kenneth Shawl, 44, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV).

Sunday, Jan. 25, 2015 DWLS on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. DWLS on Hwy. 97 near Omak. One-vehicle roll-over crash on Salmon Creek Rd. near Okanogan. No injuries reported. Traffic reported blocked. Harassment on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Locust St. in Omak. DWLS on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on E. Eighth Ave. in Omak.

Drugs on E. Sixth Ave. in Omak. Drugs on S. Birch St. in Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on Main St. in Oroville. One-vehicle hit-and-run crash on Main St. in Oroville. DWLS on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Elizabeth Placencio Sanabria, 21, booked for obstruction. Stephani Ann McCraigie, 48, booked on two Omak Police Department FTC warrants: DUI and hit-and-run (unattended). Michael Reyes Hansen, booked on a DOC warrant. Mellisa Rosa McCraigie, 31, booked for POCS (heroin) and on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS.

KEY: DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV – Domestic Violence FTA/C – Failure to Appear/ Comply (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff’s Officer RP - Reporting Party DOC – State Department of Corrections USBP – U.S. Border Patrol CBP – U.S. Customs and Border Protection. ICE – Immigration and Customs Enforcement

FAMILY PRACTICE

HEALTH CARE

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry Call us . . . Se Habla Español

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151 OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Office Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

New Patients and Insurance Plans Welcome. Care Credit

HEALTH CARE

(509) 826-6191

TONASKET

OROVILLE

509-486-2174

509-486-2174

HEALTH CARE

HEALTH CARE

Coagulation Clinic

OPTICAL

Toll Free

(866) 826-6191 www.okbhc.org

 Ophthalmology

509-826-1800

(509) 826-6191

www.wvmedical.com

Healthcare Services

916 Koala, Omak, WA 98841

(509) 826-5093

24 Hour Crisis Line

17 S. Western Ave. 1617 Main Street

A Branch of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

Health  Walk In Clinic  Family Practice  Laboratory  Surgery Center  Chemo Infusion

Drug Prevention Victim / Survivors’ Panel

In Tonasket & Oroville

CLINIC

 Behavioral

(509) 826-5600

Developmental Disabilities (509) 826-8496

Physician-owned and patient-centered

 Radiology

(509) 826-6191

Chemical Dependency

Psychiatric Services

OMAK

 Anti

Mental Health

“Providing our patients with the highest quality health care and service in a friendly and caring atmosphere.”

Columbia River

10

Locations

ACROSS the region

& growing

1.800.660.2129

Se Habla Espanol WWW . MYFAMILYHEALTH . ORG

Growing Healthcare Close to Home

COMPLED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT

Emergency VA Clinic  Surgical Center  Rehabilitation (Oroville & Tonasket)  Obstetrical Services  Imaging  Full-Service Laboratory  Extended Care  Swing Bed Program  

NORTH VALLEY HOSPITAL DISTRICT 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2151 www.nvhospital.org

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826-7919 For eye exams, 826-1800 UGO BARTELL, O.D.

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Call Charlene Helm 916 Koala • Omak, WA • wvmedical.com

509-476-3602 Ext 3050

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, January 29, 2015  

January 29, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, January 29, 2015  

January 29, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune