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Magda Gómez ADVANCING DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION AT Tri-C Dr. HELEN MUGA Engineer/Entrepreneur

BLACK HISTORY MONTH CELEBRATION

LaSHAWN REED-KENDRICKS Women Business Advocate


SAVE THE DATE - FREE EVENT

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EMPOWERING NEO WOMEN! 2nd Annual FINANCIAL LITERACY AND BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

APRIL 28th, 2017 CLEVELAND OHIO!

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Beletu (Bele') Wondwossen

Founder / Publisher Shelley M. Shockley

Managing Editor Writers Shelley M. Shockley Ruby Lee Gamble A. Michele Garrett Kim Brown

Creative Bele’ Wondwossen

Cover Story: Kimberly SmithWoodford Photo: Eric Benson

Contributors

LADIES! WOULD YOU LIKE TO... - START A BUSINESS - GROW YOUR BUSINESS - MANAGE MONEY SMARTLY - BUILD YOUR WEALTH...? THIS EVENT IS FOR YOU! ORGANIZED BY:

APRIL 28 —2017— 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM at

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From the Editor: Shelley M. Shockley

H

appy New Year, and welcome to another edition of P h e n o m e n a l Wo m a n Magazine. In this edition, we seek to bring you the stories of women challenging themselves and often the system in an effort to improve the world in which we live. We also pay homage to some of the trailblazing women who have passed before us in honor of Black History Month. As always, I invite you to grab a cup of your favorite beverage and read through these offerings with the hope that something will pique your curiosity or prompt you to action. I have coined this my year of “Action,” because far too often we sit idly and discuss the problems that sneak in and take residence in our minds and lives but rarely do we collectively put in the work to change the situations. This has been a challenge for me both personally and professionally.

insurance, Kendricks has launched Essentials 4 Success, a non-profit with the goal of “helping women be their best selves.” So if you are seeking to start your own venture or have taken the leap into business but have reached a plateau and want to continue ascending, Kendricks' story is a must read. After reading their stories, every woman reading this column should be able to think of something they can do to help effect change in their communities. You may not have the financial wherewithal to start a business, or nonprofit and you may not have a job that allows you to develop a program yet I know that there is something we can all do to make things a little better. Here are a few ideas that do not require financial support: ·

Introduce yourself to your neighbors. We consistently hear, “it takes a village” but the village has to know one another to bring about change.

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Smile. Professional women and African American women are often stereotyped as mean because of the stern expressions they regularly wear. Lighten your load, lift your spirits and smile more often – you will feel so much better. I know this from personal experience.

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Take time out for you. When you are feeling refreshed and the stressors of the world have been removed, you'll exude a confidence that spreads to others. You'll automatically smile a little more and in most cases, this new aura will permeate to others.

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Volunteer. The act of giving of your time to help someone else can be more rewarding for you than from the recipient on occasion. We are living in perilous times and many people are truly in need of assistance, and those of us that have time on our hands should be more willing to offer a helping hand.

Three of the women we have featured have a head start on us and if we want to keep up, today is the day to put movement into the words we speak so eloquently. From a very young age, Tri-C's Director of Diversity & Inclusion, Magda Gomez witnessed the hard work and the unselfish giving of her parents who championed equity and inclusion for Puerto Ricans. That training has led to a career of service to others for their daughter. Leading by example, Gomez is committed to taking Tri-C's existing diversity and inclusion efforts to the next level. Check out her amazing story and consider how you can work to be more inclusive in your life. If you have followed this publication for any length of time, you know that we are big on promoting STEM careers and encouraging girls to strive for success in these areas, so you too will enjoy the story of Dr. Helen Muga. Dr. Muga's story will not only pique your curiosity about her homeland of Papua New Guinea but cause your heart to swell with pride when you see her exemplary commitment to engineering and her students. Inclusion is another central theme to many of our articles and usually we are touting the need of many voices at the table so that industries reflect our world. Well, LaShawn Kendricks seeks to ensure that more women have the ability to be included in the category of entrepreneur. Bringing a wealth of experience from teaching to 4 ▒ JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2017

Let's all work to make our own place in history by doing the little things that will improve our communities one person at a time. Let's start to exchange ideas and share our successes. We are open to your suggestions and ideas, so drop us a line and share the good things in our community. Until next time, have a great month and enjoy this edition of Phenomenal Woman!


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CONTENTS

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Marsha Walker Eastwood:

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Lessons I Learned From Mattie Ida

Kyle Dreyfuss-Well s

COVER

Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer District Black History Month Celebration

The women behind Hidden Figures

LaSHAWN REED-KENDRICKS

Entrepreneur/ Women Business Advocate

Dr. HELEN MUGA

MAGDA GÓMEZ Advancing Diversity & Inclusion at Tri-C

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Engineer/Professor/ Entrepreneur 5 Tips for Managing Diabetes

Delicious Recipes

27 28

Movie Review

32

WIN TICKETS!

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Lessons I Learned From Mattie Ida My great aunt, Mattie Ida was born in 1889. She was a short stout woman who had survived the Great Depression, and who had seen more hard times than anyone I have ever met in my life. What she lacked in stature was more than compensated for in her knowledge By Marsha Walker Eastwood, of business matters BS.Ed, MSHSV and financial PWM - Guest Writer management, long before the term “financial literacy” was in common use. She always had her own house, and she always had a job. She would sit me down and tell me about how my father had to drop out of school to find work, and surviving on meals of long gravy (I later learned this was a browned flour gravy, thinned as much as possible to conserve flour) and baking powder biscuits or hot water cornbread. She worked as “the help” for a stockbroker and his wife – The Gunns. She wore so many hats, I often wondered how she managed it all. Three to four days a week she 6 ▒ JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2017

was the cook, the housekeeper and mentor to their four children, who lovingly called her “OA”. She worked in a house where money was plentiful, and no one did without. Mattie Ida supplemented her income by running a rooming house- the same house I grew up in. It was a fourbedroom wood frame house with one bathroom, upstairs. Each roomer paid $100.00 a month rent. At home, she wore her financial manager hat, and would sit at the kitchen table twice a month to “pay the man”, which is how she described paying the bills. The money was always divided into four piles - debt, survival (the utility bills, food, property taxes, and stamps), insurance, and savings. The money for savings was always stuck inside the pages of her bank book. Anything left over was placed in a white cotton handkerchief that was knotted and attached to a strap on her undershirt. I remember many a time sitting in one of the mismatched kitchen chairs, watching her dip her Garrett brand snuff, and listening to her stories, which always ended with the admonition, “No matter how hard times get, there ain't never no need to spend everything, 'cause you never know when you might need something.” Every two weeks she and I and my sister, would “go to town”, to Society for Savings Bank where she would deposit money into the savings account, and then we would go to the various places she owed money and make those payments.


Just as “money smart” as she was, my parents were reckless spendthrifts. Although they both worked decent paying jobs, my siblings and I often went without clothes, food and other necessities of life. As a child, I could never understand how an old woman who cleaned other people's homes and cooked for them was never broke, and my parents were habitually without funds, so I started to pay closer attention to how Mattie Ida did things.

called a Financial Planner. This was how I learned about annuities, pension planning, long term care, and various types of insurance. But like so many women I felt as if I didn't have the energy to just get started. I was losing ground, and frustrated and worried about outliving what little money I had. I was also reminded on an almost daily basis that the more things change, the more they stay the same.

By the time I started school, I was ahead of the game. I was financially literate! She taught me how to save, how credit worked -if you really, really didn't need it right away, save for it until you could afford it, and use the credit for emergencies. I also knew about insurance. I even participated in the school banking program. But my lessons were just beginning. On my own at the age of 17, I was a young wife, parent, and a working woman as well. I had to open a checking account to pay bills. I had to learn how to establish credit, and I had to learn how to save a little something, so I purchased the old Series E Savings Bonds through my job. This was all tantamount to Financial Literacy 98, as there was so much more to come. The real lessons were forty years away.

We are now in the 21st century and women continue to outlive men, for many reasons, so it is incumbent upon us as working women to take measures to provide for ourselves down the road. Financial literacy for women is no longer an option. According to a 2013 Women, Money and Power Study of women making over $30,000, conducted by Allianz Insurance, 60% of women say they are the primary breadwinner in their households, 12% of all women say they have not yet begun saving for retirement, 40% of women fear ending up broke and homeless, 50% of divorced women say that financial planning seems an impossible task in their lives, over 90% of women say they feel they need to be more involved in financial planning, and 62% of women still don't have a financial professional.

In 1996, I was suddenly widowed with seven kids at home and no money. All my savings were gone from having to be a stay at home mom and caretaker. Slowly I began to lose more. First my van, and then my home to a predatory lender. That was my wake-up call! I knew I needed to start to fix things and protect myself, but it wasn't easy. I discovered that the things I needed to learn about were called financial products, sold by a new type of agent,

These figures are all indicators that women need to become more responsible in preparing for their financial futures. The earlier we start, the more protected we will be. As for Mattie Ida, died at the ripe old age of 97 with a very nice portfolio. © Marsha Walker Eastwood

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Kyle Dreyfuss-Wells to be appointed CEO, Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer District Leadership, passion, commitment among words used to describe Dreyfuss-Wells as CEO Ciaccia prepares for February retirement

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yle Dreyfuss-Wells will be appointed Chief Executive Officer, Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer District effective February 11, 2017. DreyfussWells will succeed Julius Ciaccia who, after more than nine years as CEO, will retire on February 10. "Under the leadership of CEO Ciaccia, the Sewer District has become one of the most renowned progressive environmental organizations in the nation," DreyfussWells said. "I would like to thank the Board of Trustees for giving me the opportunity to build upon those successes." Dreyfuss-Wells has been with the Sewer District since 2008, and currently is the Deputy Director of Watershed Programs. In addition to her leadership role in the development and implementation of the Regional Stormwater Management Program, Dreyfuss-Wells played a critical role in the negotiations with the federal government of Project Clean Lake, the Sewer District's program to significantly reduce the amount of raw sewage discharging into the environment. She has led on the Sewer District's Green Infrastructure Program, including the implementation of the grants program, which is designed to remove stormwater from the combined system as redevelopment activities occur. She has been integral in the development of the Member Community Infrastructure Program, a funding program provided by the Sewer District to assist member communities in addressing water quality and quantity 10 â–’ JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2017

issues associated with aging sewer infrastructure that adversely impact human health and the environment. "Since she began her career with us, Kyle demonstrated significant leadership related to water-quality issues, both at the Sewer District and during her work with national water organizations like the National Association of Clean Water Agencies," said Ciaccia. "This will be beneficial as the Sewer District continues to lead on local and national sewer- and stormwater-infrastructure issues, from highperforming plant operations to regional stormwater management efforts." Currently, Dreyfuss-Wells is chair of the National Association of Clean Water Agency's Stormwater Management Committee and the District 1 Natural Resources Assistance Council for the Ohio Public Works Commission's Clean Ohio Conservation Program. Darnell Brown, Chief Operating Officer for the City of Cleveland and Sewer District Board President, says Dreyfuss-Wells has demonstrated enthusiastic leadership and a commitment to this region. "She has not only played an integral role in addressing wastewater issues like combined sewer overflows, she's a visionary and a pioneer in matters related to stormwater issues. This is extremely important as we continue to enhance this piece of our core mission.�


Brown went on to say that in her previous work as Director of the Chagrin River Watershed Partners, Inc., she worked with local municipalities to improve their stormwater control best practices, protecting our region's water quality resources. "She's perfectly situated to continue our decades-long work in improving sewer infrastructure as well as carrying out our Regional Stormwater Management Program.” “I'm also pleased that we had such a strong internal candidate to promote to the CEO position," said Brown. "It speaks highly to the talent we have in this organization." "Kyle's passion is second to none, and that's saying a lot when you're among Julius Ciaccia's Senior Staff," said Jack Bacci, Mayor of Cuyahoga Heights and Sewer District Trustee. "Notably, I'm impressed with Kyle's commitment to continuing the Sewer District's role in protecting our

region's most valuable asset, Lake Erie, ensuring its sustainability for future generations. …We are also excited that Kyle will continue the Sewer District's high level of attentiveness to the needs and concerns of our elected officials and customers." Dreyfuss-Wells received her BS in Biology Summa Cum Laude from The Ohio State University. She received a MPA and a MS in Environmental Science with honors at Indiana University's School of Public and Environmental Affairs, and served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Samoa. Before joining the Sewer District, she was Director of the Chagrin River Watershed Partners, Inc., a non-profit organization serving 35 municipalities on Cleveland's east side improving land-use decision-making in the 267 squaremile Chagrin River watershed. Source: www.neorsd.org

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As we celebrate Black History Month, we take a look at the women behind the movie "Hidden Figures”

Katherine Johnson Date of Birth: August 26, 1918 Hometown: White Sulphur Springs, WV Education: B.S., Mathematics and French, West Virginia State College, 1937 Hired by NACA: June 1953 Retired from NASA: 1986 Actress Playing Role in Hidden Figures: Taraji P. Henson Photo Credits: NASA

Being handpicked to be one of three black students to integrate West Virginia's graduate schools is something that many people would consider one of their life's most notable moments, but it's just one of several breakthroughs that have marked Katherine Johnson's long and remarkable life. Born in White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia in 1918, Katherine Johnson's intense curiosity and brilliance with numbers vaulted her ahead several grades in school. By thirteen, she was attending the high school on the campus of historically black West Virginia State College. At eighteen, she enrolled in the college itself, where she made quick work of the school's math curriculum and found a mentor in math professor W. W. Schieffelin Claytor, the third African American to earn a PhD in Mathematics. Katherine graduated with highest honors in 1937 and took a job teaching at a black public school in Virginia. When West Virginia decided to quietly integrate its graduate schools in 1939, West Virginia State's president Dr. John W. Davis selected Katherine and two male students as the first black students to be offered spots at the state's flagship school, West Virginia University. Katherine left her teaching job, and enrolled in the graduate math program. At the end of the first session, however, she decided to leave school to start a family with her husband. She returned to teaching when her three daughters got older, but it wasn't until 1952 that a relative told her about open positions at the all-black West Area Computing section at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics' (NACA's) Langley laboratory, headed by fellow West Virginian Dorothy Vaughan. Katherine and her husband, James Goble, decided to move the family to Newport News to pursue the opportunity, and Katherine began work at Langley in the summer of 1953. Just two weeks into Katherine's tenure in the office, Dorothy Vaughan assigned her to a project in the Maneuver Loads Branch of the Flight Research Division, and Katherine's temporary position soon became permanent. She spent the next four years analyzing data from flight test, and worked on the investigation of a plane crash caused by wake turbulence. As she was wrapping up this work her husband died of cancer in December 1956. The 1957 launch of the Soviet satellite Sputnik changed 12 ▒ JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2017

history—and Katherine Johnson's life. In 1957, Katherine provided some of the math for the 1958 document Notes on Space Technology, a compendium of a series of 1958 lectures given by engineers in the Flight Research Division and the Pilotless Aircraft Research Division (PARD). Engineers from those groups formed the core of the Space Task Group, the NACA's first official foray into space travel, and Katherine, who had worked with many of them since coming to Langley, “came along with the program” as the NACA became NASA later that year. She did trajectory analysis for Alan Shepard's May 1961 mission Freedom 7, America's first human spaceflight. In 1960, she and engineer Ted Skopinski coauthored Determination of Azimuth Angle at Burnout for Placing a Satellite Over a Selected Earth Position, a report laying out the equations describing an orbital spaceflight in which the landing position of the spacecraft is specified. It was the first time a woman in the Flight Research Division had received credit as an author of a research report. In 1962, as NASA prepared for the orbital mission of John Glenn, Katherine Johnson was called upon to do the work that she would become most known for. The complexity of the orbital flight had required the construction of a worldwide communications network, linking tracking stations around the world to IBM computers in Washington, DC, Cape Canaveral, and Bermuda. The computers had been programmed with the orbital equations that would control the trajectory of the capsule in Glenn's Friendship 7 mission, from blast off to splashdown, but the astronauts were wary of putting their lives in the care of the electronic calculating machines, which were prone to hiccups and blackouts. As a part of the preflight checklist, Glenn asked engineers to “get the girl”—Katherine Johnson—to run the same numbers through the same equations that had been programmed into the computer, but by hand, on her desktop mechanical calculating machine. “If she says they're good,'” Katherine Johnson remembers the astronaut saying, “then I'm ready to go.” Glenn's flight was a success, and marked a turning point in the competition between the United States and the Soviet Union in space. When asked to name her greatest contribution to space exploration, Katherine Johnson talks about the calculations that helped synch Project Apollo's Lunar Lander with the moon-orbiting Command and Service Module. She also worked on the Space Shuttle and the Earth Resources Satellite, and authored or coauthored 26 research reports. She retired in 1986, after thirty-three years at Langley. “I loved going to work every single day,” she says. In 2015, at age 97, Katherine Johnson added another extraordinary achievement to her long list: President Obama awarded her the Presidential Medal of Freedom, America's highest civilian honor. Source: NASA – Biography by Margot Lee Shetterly


Mary Jackson Date of Birth: April 9, 1921 Hometown: Hampton, VA Education: B.S., Mathematics and Physical Science, Hampton Institute, 1942 Hired by NACA: April 1951 Retired from NASA: 1985 Date of Death: February 11, 2005 Actress Playing Role in Hidden Figures: Janelle Monáe

For Mary Winston Jackson, a love of science and a commitment to improving the lives of the people around her were one and the same. In the 1970s, she helped the youngsters in the science club at Hampton's King Street Community center build their own wind tunnel and use it to conduct experiments. “We have to do something like this to get them interested in science," she said in an article for the local newspaper. "Sometimes they are not aware of the number of black scientists, and don't even know of the career opportunities until it is too late." Mary's own path to an engineering career at the NASA Langley Research Center was far from direct. A native of Hampton, Virginia, she graduated from Hampton Institute in 1942 with a dual degree in Math and Physical Sciences, and accepted a job as a math teacher at a black school in Calvert County, Maryland. Hampton had become one of the nerve centers of the World War II home front effort, and after a year of teaching, Mary returned home, finding a position as the receptionist at the King Street USO Club, which served the city's black population. It would take three more career changes—a post as a bookkeeper in Hampton Institute's Health Department, a stint at home following the birth of her son, Levi, and a job as an Army secretary at Fort Monroe—before Mary landed at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory's segregated West Area Computing section in 1951, reporting to the group's supervisor Dorothy Vaughan. After two years in the computing pool, Mary Jackson received an offer to work for engineer Kazimierz Czarnecki in the 4-foot by 4-foot Supersonic Pressure Tunnel, a 60,000 horsepower wind tunnel capable of blasting models with winds approaching twice the speed of sound. Czarnecki offered Mary hands-on experience conducting experiments in the facility, and eventually suggested that she enter a training program that would allow her to earn a promotion from mathematician to engineer. Trainees had to take graduate level math and physics in after-work courses managed by the University of Virginia. Because the classes were held at then-segregated Hampton High School, however, Mary needed special permission from the City of Hampton to join her white peers in the classroom. Never one to flinch in the face of a challenge, Mary completed the courses, earned the promotion, and in 1958 became NASA's first black female engineer. That same year, she co-authored her first report, Effects of

Photo Credits: NASA

Nose Angle and Mach Number on Transition on Cones at Supersonic Speeds. Mary Jackson began her engineering career in an era in which female engineers of any background were a rarity; in the 1950s, she very well may have been the only black female aeronautical engineer in the field. For nearly two decades she enjoyed a productive engineering career, authoring or co-authoring a dozen or so research reports, most focused on the behavior of the boundary layer of air around airplanes. As the years progressed, the promotions slowed, and she became frustrated at her inability to break into management-level grades. In 1979, seeing that the glass ceiling was the rule rather than the exception for the center's female professionals, she made a final, dramatic career change, leaving engineering and taking a demotion to fill the open position of Langley's Federal Women's Program Manager. There, she worked hard to impact the hiring and promotion of the next generation of all of NASA's female mathematicians, engineers and scientists. Mary retired from Langley in 1985. Among her many honors were an Apollo Group Achievement Award, and being named Langley's Volunteer of the Year in 1976. She served as the chair of one of the center's annual United Way campaigns, was a Girl Scout troop leader for more than three decades, and a member of the National Technical Association (the oldest African American technical organization in the United States). She and her husband Levi had an open-door policy for young Langley recruits trying to gain their footing in a new town and a new career. A 1976 Langley Researcher profile might have done the best job capturing Mary Jackson's spirit and character, calling her a “gentlelady, wife and mother, humanitarian and scientist.” For Mary Jackson, science and service went hand in hand. Source NASA: – Biography by Margot Lee Shetterly

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Dorothy Vaughan years after President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 8802 into law, prohibiting racial, religious and ethnic discrimination in the country's defense industry, the Laboratory began hiring black women to meet the skyrocketing demand for processing aeronautical research data. Urgency and twenty-four hour shifts prevailed-- as did Jim Crow laws which required newlyhired "colored" mathematicians to work separately from their white female counterparts. Dorothy Vaughan was assigned to the segregated "West Area Computing" unit, an all-black group of female mathematicians, who were originally required to use separate dining and bathroom facilities. Over time, both individually and as a group, the West Computers distinguished themselves with contributions to virtually every area of research at Langley.

Young Dorothy Vaughan Credits: Courtesy Vaughan Family

Date of Birth: September 20, 1910 Hometown: Kansas City, MO Education: B.A., Mathematics, Wilberforce University, 1929 Hired by NACA: December 1943 Retired from NASA: 1971 Date of Death: November 10, 2008 Actress Playing Role in Hidden Figures: Octavia Spencer In an era when NASA is led by an African American man (Administrator Charles Bolden) and a woman (Deputy Administrator Dava Newman), and when recent NASA Center Directors come from a variety of backgrounds, it's easy to overlook the people who paved the way for the agency's current robust and diverse workforce and leadership. Those who speak of NASA's pioneers rarely mention the name Dorothy Vaughan, but as the head of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics' (NACA's) segregated West Area Computing Unit from 1949 until 1958, Vaughan was both a respected mathematician and NASA's first African-American manager. Dorothy Vaughan came to the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory in 1943, during the height of World War II, leaving her position as the math teacher at Robert Russa Moton High School in Farmville, VA to take what she believed would be a temporary war job. Two 14 â–’ JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2017

The group's original section heads (first Margery Hannah, then Blanche Sponsler) were white. In 1949, Dorothy Vaughan was promoted to lead the group, making her the NACA's first black supervisor, and one of the NACA's few female supervisors. The Section Head title gave Dorothy rare Laboratory-wide visibility, and she collaborated with other well-known (white) computers like Vera Huckel and Sara Bullock on projects such as compiling a handbook for algebraic methods for calculating machines. Vaughan was a steadfast advocate for the women of West Computing, and even intervened on behalf of white computers in other groups who deserved promotions or pay raises. Engineers valued her recommendations as to the best "girls" for a particular project, and for challenging assignments they often requested that she personally handle the work. Dorothy Vaughan helmed West Computing for nearly a decade. In 1958, when the NACA made the transition to NASA, segregated facilities, including the West Computing office, were abolished. Dorothy Vaughan and many of the former West Computers joined the new Analysis and Computation Division (ACD), a racially and genderintegrated group on the frontier of electronic computing. Dorothy Vaughan became an expert FORTRAN programmer, and she also contributed to the Scout Launch Vehicle Program. Dorothy Vaughan retired from NASA in 1971. She sought, but never received, another management position at Langley. Her legacy lives on in the successful careers of notable West Computing alumni, including Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson, Eunice Smith and Kathryn Peddrew, a n d t h e a c h i e ve m e n t s o f s e c o n d - g e n e ra t i o n mathematicians and engineers such as Dr. Christine Darden. Source NASA – Biography by Margot Lee Shetterly


Meet the author... Margot Lee Shetterly

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hetterly is the author of Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race (William Morrow/HarperCollins). She’s also the founder of The Human Computer Project, an endeavor that is recovering the names and accomplishments of all of the women who worked as human computers, mathematicians, scientists and engineers at the NACA and NASA from the 1930s through the 1980s. Shetterly is a Hampton, Virginia native, University of Virginia graduate, an entrepreneur, and an intrepid traveler who spent 11 years living in Mexico. Shetterly currently lives in Charlottesville, VA. Source: margotleeshetterly.com

HIDDEN FIGURES: THE AMERICAN DREAM AND THE UNTOLD STORY OF THE BLACK WOMEN MATHEMATICIANS WHO HELPED WIN THE SPACE RACE recovers the history of these pioneering women and situates it in the intersection of the defining movements of the American century: the Cold War, the Space Race, the Civil Rights movement and the quest for gender equality. ORDER HIDDEN FIGURES FROM AMAZON.COM, BARNES AND NOBLE, THROUGH INDIEBOUND, ITUNES, GOOGLE PLAY

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ON VIEW NOW - MAY 14, 2017

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LaShawn Reed-Kendricks Entrepreneur and advocate for gender equality

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ccording to studies conducted by the UN, women and girls represent half of the world's population and therefore also half of its potential. But, today gender inequality persists ever ywhere and stagnates social progress. Disadvantages in education translate into lack of access to skills and limited opportunities in the labour market. Women's and girls' empowerment is essential to expand economic growth and promote social development. Hence, advancing gender equality is critical to all areas of a healthy society, from reducing poverty to promoting the health, education, protection and the well-being of girls and boys. An entrepreneur, advocate for gender equality and mom to three daughters, LaShawn Reed-Kendricks leads by example. She emphasizes, “we must change our thought process of how we see ourselves.” An advocate for nurturing and transforming young women and girls, Kendricks suggests a simple yet powerful way of inspiring them, “we have to teach our 18 ▒ JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2017

young girls that they can be whatever they aspire to be. When we show them images of women like Michelle Obama, Oprah Winfrey, Sheryl Sandberg etc. we are planting the seed that they too can be great leaders.” Early in life, the values of hard work and the resulting payoff were instilled in her by her parents. While her mother held a corporate job, her dad worked in a factory environment. He was also an entrepreneur and co-owned a mechanic shop on the East Side of Cleveland where he worked after hours and on weekends. She believes that her entrepreneurial spirit was a result of what she witnessed while growing up! Kendricks' mom always told her “if you're willing to put in the work, the payoff will always come.” Given her young age, she didn't understand what her mom meant but as an adult admits “her mom couldn't have been more right.” She widely credits her parents who taught her the importance of being a leader and not a follower.


The educational path of Kendricks was a bit untraditional. She went to college right after high school, but it didn't last long. She came home after partying out her first year and it wasn't until her third daughter was born that she told her husband that she was going back to school. Kendricks successfully pursued her studies and received an associate degree in Business and a bachelor's degree in Business management from Indiana Wesleyan University. She then transferred to Ursuline College and obtained her master's degree in Business Administration.

According to Kendricks, the third challenge most women entrepreneurs face is 'coping with the fear of failure.' Failure is a real possibility when starting a business and women tend to fear this possibility more so than men. She states that “fear is viewed as a negative so most women are afraid of attempting business ownership for fear of failing.” She explains to her clients that “most successful people in the world have failed over and over again, but they've picked themselves up and learned from their mistakes making sure not to make the same mistakes again.”

Kendricks has worked in the higher education industry, insurance, banking and for the last six years of her career in the nonprofit sector. After gaining extensive experience in several entrepreneurial support organizations and to transform her vision into a reality, Kendricks founded 'Essentials 4 Success,' a company dedicated to assisting women entrepreneurs who are starting a business or who are stuck in their approach to achieving that next level of success.

The core of Kendricks commitment lies in women empowerment and gender parity. To reinforce these ideals, she founded the non-profit organization 'Success Her Way' that aims to connect, educate and elevate emerging women business leaders and aspiring entrepreneurs. In addition to providing emerging leaders with the resources they need to keep them inspired throughout their journeys, Success Her Way is working to create a mentoring program for young women between the ages of 14-21.

Guided by her motto of helping women be their best self, the company offers 1:1 coaching sessions, group workshops, networking events and conferences to help women entrepreneurs design a strategic roadmap to achieve their idea of success.

Kendricks also serves as director of corporate relations at the Ohio Minority Supplier Development Council (OMSDC). Its mission is to create and foster an environment for the development of mutually beneficial relationships and opportunities between Certified Minority Business Enterprises and Member organizations. The organization strives to expand opportunities for minority-owned companies; encourages mutually beneficial economic links between minority suppliers and the public and private sectors. It also helps to build a stronger, more equitable society by supporting and promoting minority business development.

While Kendricks agrees that women have come a long way establishing their businesses, her interaction with clients coupled with further analysis revealed three core issues that challenge their success. First, she believes that “women don't tend to own their accomplishments.” She continues “When I first meet with a client, I ask them to complete a business consultation form. One of the questions I ask is what have you done well in your business? There's always a downplayed response from this question. It's not until I speak with them that I can pull out the wonderful things they've done in their businesses.” A second challenge faced by women business owners, she says is “putting together the right advisory board for their businesses.” With the majority of industries being male dominated, she argues that “difficulties in making the right connection can sometimes be an impediment towards building the right advisory committee.”

Kendricks has been a member of the Plexus LGBT Chamber board of directors since 2014 and also serves as the NAACP WIN committee co-chair. Success Her Way will be hosting its annual 'Success Her Way Empowerment Summit' May 5th and May 6th at the Hilton Garden Inn, Mayfield Heights, Ohio. For more information please visit: www.essentials4success.biz and follow on Facebook and Instagram at Essentials 4 Success.

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Magda Gómez Advancing Diversity & Inclusion at Tri-C By Kimberly Smith Woodford

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hat could be more rewarding than landing a major position at your alma mater? For Magda Gómez, Director of Diversity and Inclusion at Cuyahoga Community College (Tri-C), it's a wonderful opportunity in her career which began much earlier as a grass roots community organizer. As a little girl growing up in Cleveland, the importance of family and community values were ingrained in her from the start. Her parents moved from Puerto Rico to Cleveland in the early 1960's and soon built a legacy of championing equity and inclusion for Hispanics living in northeast Ohio. As Tri-C's Director of Diversity and Inclusion (D&I) she continues to hold the torch of inclusion. Just six short months into her new position with Ohio's largest community college, Gómez has hit the ground running in ensuring that the college's staff and faculty reflect the diverse student body.

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As part of the college's Human Resource Division, Gómez focuses on implementing the college's diversity and inclusion initiatives which includes building and maintaining a diverse workforce and academic culture that the staff, faculty and student body can embrace. As affirmed in its' diversity and inclusion mission statement “Tri-C stands with the belief that diversity enriches not only the institution but society as a whole, and is therefore committed to appreciating diverse perspectives and valuing the collective differences and similarities that make Tri-C a leading community organization.” Striving to fulfill Tri-C's mission, Gómez says “we want to make sure that our employees are provided with opportunities for professional development as it relates to diversity and inclusion training.” Further adding “What that means is how do we mitigate biases in the work place – how do we become civil towards each other as well!”

'traditional student.' But un-phased, and with the help of her mentors, she received her Associates Degree at Tri-C followed by John Carroll University where she earned a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Communications and later received her Masters Degree in Social Administration under the Louis Stokes Fellowship at Case Western Reserve University. Gómez's mentor, CWRU Professor, Mark Chupp, Ph.D., whom she met while working as a Community Organizer for Ohio City, Inc., nudged and convinced his protégé to enter the Fellowship. He describes Gómez as a consummate professional who's not afraid to take on large tasks and is able to complete them on time with the highest quality. “Her personal and professional commitment to the Puerto Rican community has persisted throughout the years and has produced many positive outcomes creating a much stronger network of residents and professionals working together,” Chupp shared.

Gómez says she is appreciative of the amazing people she has met along her journey. Still, she proudly credits her mother and father for instilling her family values. They Gómez and her staff work collaboratively with a cross modeled it she says. “I was a divorced mother with two section of staff from several departments to develop tools children when I entered college,” she says. Adding that “I for inclusion that include, an employee awards system, am so grateful for my parents who p r o f e s s i o n a l d e ve l o p m e n t supported me and my family training for new hires, support while I decided what I wanted to groups for minorities, do with my life.” Having a strong veterans, the disabled, foster family bond is the foundation to children who have aged out of ones' success and Gómez proudly We want to make sure the system, and the LGBTQ admits, she is grateful to have the communities. Additionally a that our employees support and love of her children monthly Diversity Guest who are also college graduates Speaker Series offers faculty, are provided with opportunities and her husband, Jim O'Connor, s t aff, and st udent s t he for professional development as whom she met while working at opportunity to hear speakers Ohio City Inc. “Next to having a d d r e s s s p e c i f i c t o p i c s it relates to diversity and each of my children, meeting Jim surrounding equality and inclusion training. was the best thing to ever happen inclusion. Such resources to me,” she shared. enable Tri-C's employees and the student body to gain greater awareness and understanding of the college's corporate culture that embraces and values inclusivity of all walks of life regardless of age, race, gender, or sexual orientation. In the four years leading up to Gómez's new position, she worked as the Marketing Communications Manager with Tri-C's D&I Department, where she was recognized as someone to watch in Crain's Cleveland's 2015 by 'Who to Watch in Marketing,' special edition. Her promotion followed - yet, with gracious confidence, she acknowledges that working on the D&I team prepared her for the transition. “I had the opportunity to work with my predecessor, making sure that the collateral material and the website effectively communicated the school's diversity efforts,” she explains. “When my predecessor stepped down from her role, it was an opportunity for me to step in, which I welcomed.” Gómez has been described as a 'late bloomer.' She was 30 years old when she first entered college and being a Hispanic female, she did not fit the description of the

She reflected on how her parents love for the traditions of the Hispanic culture, including the colorful conversations, playing dominos, food, and music had an impact in what drives her to be the role model she is today. Her father, now 86, is still active after more than fifty years tireless work - with a lengthy list of accomplishments including the first President of the Hispanic Parent Union at CMSD, founding board member of the Spanish American Committee, and founding board member of the Puerto Rican Friendly Day Festival Committee (now the Latin Festival) in which Ms. Gómez herself was bestowed the honor of being the parade's Madrina or Godmother in 2016. Like father like daughter, her extensive community and civic involvement is pretty impressive as well. She has served on numerous boards including the Cleveland Metropolitan School Board and the Cleveland Rape Crisis Center. She's Co-chair of the Spanish Language Advisory Board for the Cuyahoga County Board of Elections and Continued on next page

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President of Hispanic Community Programs at the Hispanic Community Roundtable of Cleveland and is a founding member of LATINA, Inc. (Leading and Advocating Together In New Arenas). In some ways she has come full circle, serving on boards with friends such as John Hairston who worked with her father years before. In just a brief time, this 'late bloomer,' has proven herself as a tremendous leader with her accomplishments in helping others. Her work recently garnered her accolades from her alma mater, Case Western Reserve University where she was presented with a 'Distinguished Alumnus Award' at the Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences during the university's Centennial Celebration Ceremony. Great civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. said, “An individual has not started living until he can rise above the narrow confines of his individualistic concerns to the broader concerns of all humanity.” A champion of diversity and inclusion, Gómez continues to leverage all the talents at Tri-C to make it a successful and exemplary organization. As a social advocate, leader, teacher, mentor, mentee, mother, wife, daughter and friend to many, Gómez is truly phenomenal, proving there's no stopping her and her devotion to build on her family's legacy. (Photo credit page 20&22: Eric Benson) 22 ▒ JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2017

Phenomenal Facts ·

Associate of Arts (A.A), Communications Cuyahoga Community College

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BA, Communications John Carroll University

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MSSA, Social Administration, Community Development Case Western Reserve University

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President (Chair), Hispanic Roundtable Community Programs

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Worked on the planning committee of 'Convencion Hispana' an event that occurs every three years in Cleveland

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Received the 'Louis Stokes Community Achievement Award'

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Served on the board of education for the Cleveland Metropolitan School District


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Dr Helen Muga: Athlete/Engineer/Professor/Entrepreneur/Mentor

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he was a former professional athlete and track star. Today, Dr. Helen Muga wears many hats. Her competitive spirit at a young age and a vision to improve the lives of others culminated in her becoming an engineer, professor, and entrepreneur. And if these weren't enough, she also takes the time to instill a love of science and engineering into the minds of elementary school students. Dr. Muga is originally from Papua New Guinea, a country located in the South Pacific. With a population of just over seven million and one of the most culturally diverse countries in the world, Papua New Guinea is home to more languages than any other country, over 820 indigenous languages, representing 12% of the world's total! She moved to the U.S. almost 14 years ago to pursue a Ph.D. in Environmental Engineering and has stayed here ever since. Dr. Muga is one of the first Papua New Guineans to hold a Ph.D. in an engineering field. PWM recently caught up with this phenomenal woman to discuss her upbringing, activities and her vision! 24 â–’ JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2017

As a former professional athlete for Papua New Guinea, Muga represented her country at various international meets while she was a college student. The highlight of her running career was leading her 4 x 100 meter relay team to a national record and winning gold in 1999 at an international competition. Her specialty events were the 100m, 200m, and 400m plus the relays. This record stood for almost 8 years! She no longer runs competitively but instead does martial arts and competes at tournaments here in Ohio. The competitive spirit she developed at a young age contributed to her success and remarkable achievements. Muga has four degrees – a Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry, a Master of Science degree in Chemical Engineering, a Master of Science degree in Environmental Engineering, and a Ph.D. in Environmental Engineering. Her areas of expertise are in water and wastewater treatment and design, renewable energy, international development work, education, and sustainable development.


PICTURED ON LEFT (PAGE 24) – DR. HELEN MUGA standing next to her

water filtration system for purifying water. This system is a commercial scale system that produces 3,000 gallons/day of purified water. This system is also used at Pacific Water, Alliance, OH brick and mortar store. This system can also be used for purifying water in developing countries.

Currently, Dr. Muga is an engineering professor in the Department of Engineering at the University of Mount Union in Alliance, Ohio. She is one of two original founders of the Department of Engineering, and the Civil and Mechanical Engineering programs at the University of Mount Union. The other founder and chair was Dr. Donna Mihalek. The engineering department and the engineering programs were established in Fall 2010. Dr. Muga is one of a few ethnic minorities to ever start an engineering program. Prior to moving to Alliance, she was a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering at the University of South Florida (USF), Tampa, a post she held for two years. During her time at USF, she was responsible for acquiring one of the largest grants, at the time, to the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering (a little over $783,000). The grant was used to support Master and Ph.D. students. At the University of Mount Union, Dr. Muga has been instrumental in developing and leading the required global engineering experience for all mechanical and civil engineering students from the ground up. She is the lead professor for the global engineering experience at the University and speaks four languages and has extensive international experience living/working in different countries around the world. To acquaint her engineering students with a global experience and along the way help developing countries obtain clean water, sanitation and electricity, she has led over eight international trips with students, and taken over 80 engineering students abroad so far! Muga has been keen in becoming an entrepreneur for as long as she remembers. She says “I've always wanted to be the founder of a company. It was just a matter of when. Now looking back, I wish I had jumped into it earlier on instead of waiting for the right time. There is never a right time, sometimes you just have to jump into it and figure things out as you go.” She recently started Pacific Water, a retail water store in Alliance that provides fresh, tasty, healthy water as well as other water products. She developed this brand as a way to expose her students to the business world of water, and to show them how to build a business from the ground-up

using their passion(s), strengths and expertise while serving the greater community. Pacific Water also offers professional consulting services in engineering and environmental services. When asked about some of the challenges she faced starting her company, her response was clear, “resources where to go and what to do.” She credits her engineering and research background with figuring out some of the answers. “I figured out earlier that if I don't have the answer, I'm going to research and find out. And if research didn't work, I'm going to ask people in my network. I wasn't afraid to ask questions that I didn't have answers to.” Dr. Muga admits the challenges she faces in being a professor and an entrepreneur. While Pacific Water has been in operation for only a little more than six months, her engineering students who are interns assist with running the retail store. She stressed that “This is a winwin for me because when I started Pacific Water, it was to give my students an opportunity to experience the business side of water. I teach them water and wastewater treatment in the classroom, but I also wanted them to see the entrepreneurship/business side of the water industry.” Dr. Muga is a strong proponent of women in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) and strives to give women engineers more opportunities and encourages them to remain in engineering. She underscores that “encouraging, engaging, and exposing girls in STEM should really start earlier in the education process for example in K-5. Recognizing a girl's interest and ability in STEM coupled with engagement in STEMrelated activities is important to retention.” Our discussions with Dr. Muga clearly revealed her determination and commitment to her works. She continues the nurturing of her engineering students and plans to transform her vision of developing and manufacturing innovative water technologies into a reality. Summing up, she said “life is about overcoming challenges and to be at your best always and if you want something, you work hard for it and you never ever give!”

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Getty Images

5 Tips for Managing Diabetes Living with diabetes is no laughing matter, but as many would say, laughter is often the best medicine. Get Moving When it comes to diabetes, small lifestyle changes can make a big difference. Taking the first step toward exercising can be difficult for many, but a little bit goes a long way. Try parking further away from the door, taking the stairs instead of the elevator or taking the longer route when you walk the dog. Whatever it may be, choose an activity that you enjoy doing and keep it consistent.

best friends with your dentist, but it's crucial to establish a good relationship. They're the expert who you can turn to for all your oral health care needs, and oral health care is important for those living with diabetes. Find Your Tribe When you're living with diabetes, you need a strong support system. Be it friends, family or an online community, things are easier when you've got your tribe. A good place to get your questions answered and find people who are going through the same journey as you is OralHealthandDiabetes.com.

Give Your Smile Some Extra TLC You're twice as likely to develop gum disease if you have diabetes. When Brown learned that, she immediately started taking better care of her teeth. She recommends brushing morning and night with a specially formulated toothpaste like Colgate Total, which reduces 83 percent more germs that cause gingivitis, the most common form of gum disease, as compared to an ordinary nonantibacterial toothpaste.

Live Confidently “Every time I think about my type 2 diabetes, I say to myself 'So what? You are a strong, confident woman. Don't let your diabetes run your life,'” Brown said. Diabetes isn't a hindrance, it's just a slight hiccup in life that you learn to live with. Get your mindset right, don't let it dictate what you can or cannot do.

Befriend Your Dentist Don't be afraid to become friends with your dentist. Brown has her dentist on speed-dial, even calling or texting him in the middle of the night sometimes. You don't have to be

When Brown was a kid her mom would say, “Sometimes you have to laugh to keep from crying.” That's sometimes what people do when they get any kind of health diagnosis. The first response is, “Oh no,” and then you find a way around it.

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Photo: Getty Images

A TOTAL BODY APPROACH TO A NEW YOU Do more in the New Year New Year's resolutions typically focus on reactive goals like losing weight or getting back into that workout routine. However, thinking about resolutions in a more proactive, long-term way can give you more motivation and the willpower to stick with it. A commitment to proactive total body care, including these tips from Massage Envy, can keep your body and mind tuned up, allowing you to do more of what you love in 2017 and beyond.

caused by stress. Spending time with friends, meditating and practicing mindfulness can help, but there are also physical ways to soothe stress. A quick walk can do wonders for clearing your head, and a single massage session can lower your heart rate and blood pressure, relax your muscles and increase the production of endorphins, your body's natural "feel good" chemical. Stress relief is one of the benefits of regular massage therapy, and a key component for anyone trying to achieve a lifestyle that gives them the freedom to do more of what they love.

Veg out on the good stuff Feel confident by upping your skincare Skin is an organ – the body's largest organ, in fact. That's why it's so important to pay attention to it. Regular skincare can help you feel good on the outside by reversing signs of aging, improving skin tone and texture, moisturizing skin and reducing blemishes and breakouts, and better on the inside, as feeling good about how your skin looks can boost your confidence. A daily hydrating moisturizer with SPF does double duty to protect and hydrate. Regular facials that cater to your skin's unique needs can also help minimize wrinkles, cleanse pores, encourage skin cell renewal and improve overall tone and texture.

Live happier and stress free The Statistic Brain Research Institute reports that 77 percent of people regularly experience physical symptoms

A healthy diet can help you maintain a healthy weight, feel good and boost your body's immunity so you can stay well. Occasionally, indulging your sweet tooth or salty cravings is OK, but to really take care of your body, leading healthfocused agencies recommend piling your plate high with colorful fruits and veggies, lean meats like chicken and fish, and whole grains. If you started off with a commitment to eating better in the New Year, push hard to stick to it. Before long, you'll find yourself automatically making smarter choices when it comes to mealtime, and when you put good fuel in your body, you get better results. Including total body care in your resolutions this year and beyond can create positive changes that last a lifetime. Visit MassageEnvy.com to learn more about steps you can take to boost your overall well-being. www.PHENOMENALWOMAN.me â–’ 27


Whole and Hearty

GRILLED CITRUS ROSEMARY CATFISH Recipe courtesy of The Catfish Institute Servings: 4 Citrus Sauce: 1 lime, juice and zest only 1 lemon, zest only 1 orange, zest only 6 ounces pineapple juice 1/2 cup brown sugar 1 tablespoon fresh rosemary, chopped 1/4 teaspoon salt Catfish: 4 U.S. farm-raised catfish fillets 2 lemons salt, to taste freshly ground black pepper, to taste Heat grill. To make citrus sauce: In small saucepan, combine all sauce ingredients. Bring to boil; reduce heat and simmer 5 minutes. To make catfish: Place catfish in shallow dish and squeeze 1/2 fresh lemon over each fillet. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Let rest 5 minutes. Grill catfish fillets, skin-side-up, 3-4 minutes. Flip over and grill 2-3 more minutes. Transfer catfish to serving plates and spoon warmed citrus sauce over fillets.

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A hearty meat-and-potatoes meal is a sure way to warm up on a cold winter night. This heart-healthy, one-dish meal is made with lean top round beef, lots of vegetables and a spicy herb mixture. Find more healthy main dish ideas at health.gov.

Black Skillet Beef with Greens and Red Potatoes Recipe courtesy of the USDA 1 1 1 1/2 1/2 1/4 1/4 1/8 1/8 8 3

lbs top round beef tablespoon paprika teaspoons oregano tsp. chili powder tsp garlic powder tsp black pepper tsp red pepper tsp dry mustard nonstick spray red-skinned potatoes, halved cups onion, finely chopped

2 2 2

2

cups beef broth large garlic cloves, minced large carrots, peeled and cut into 2 1/2-inch strips bunches (1/2 pound each) mustard, kale or turnip greens, stems removed, coarsely torn

Partially freeze beef. Thinly slice across grain into strips 1/8inch thick and 3 inches wide. Trim away visible fat. Combine paprika, oregano, chili powder, garlic powder, black pepper, red pepper and dry mustard. Coat strips of meat with spice mixture. Spray large, heavy skillet with nonstick spray. Heat pan over high heat. Add meat; cook, stirring constantly, 5 minutes. Add potatoes, onion, broth and garlic. Cook over medium heat, covered, 20 minutes. Stir in carrots; lay greens over top and cook, covered, until carrots are tender, about 15 minutes. Serve in large serving bowl with crusty bread for dunking. Photos courtesy of Getty Images


SMART START

Blueberry Buckwheat Pancakes Recipe created by The Chef Next Door on behalf of Milk Means More Prep time: 5 minutes Cook time: 15 minutes Servings: 4 3/4 3/4 2 1 1/2 1/2 1/2 2 1 3/4

cup buckwheat flour cup all-purpose flour tablespoons sugar teaspoons baking powder teaspoon baking soda teaspoon salt eggs cups lactose-free, 2 percent

White Pizza Frittata Recipe created by Rachel Cooks on behalf of Milk Means More Prep time: 10 minutes, Cook time: 35 minutes, Servings: 8 Heat oven to 325 F. 1 1 12 12 1/4 1/4 1/2 3/4 1/2 1/4 1/2

tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil large clove garlic, minced oz. frozen spinach, thawed & water pressed out large eggs cup skim milk teaspoon ground black pepper teaspoon dried oregano leaves cup part-skim ricotta cheese cup grated Parmesan cheese cup minced fresh basil cup shredded, part-skim mozzarella cheese

milk 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract 2 cups fresh blueberries, plus additional for topping (optional) syrup (optional) In large bowl, whisk together flours, sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt. In small bowl, beat eggs then add milk, oil and vanilla; mix well. Stir wet ingredients into dry ingredients and mix to combine. Heat griddle or large skillet over medium heat. Using 1/4 measuring cup, pour batter onto griddle. Gently place several blueberries all over surface of pancakes. Flip pancakes when bubbles start to form around edges and bottoms are golden brown. Cook on other side until golden brown, about 2 minutes. Remove to plate and cover to keep warm. Top pancakes with additional blueberries and syrup before serving, if desired.

In oven-safe skillet, heat olive oil over medium heat. Add garlic and cook 2 minutes, or until fragrant. Once garlic is fragrant, add spinach; break up to incorporate and heat. In medium bowl, whisk together eggs, milk, pepper, oregano, ricotta, Parmesan and basil. Add egg mixture to skillet, reduce heat to low and cook 1 minute, stirring gently. Move to oven and bake 25-30 minutes, or until eggs are almost completely set. Carefully remove from oven and add mozzarella. Return to oven and bake until mozzarella is melted, about 5 minutes. May be served hot, at room temperature or cold.

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Love is in the Air – Every Day!

Sweetheart Dark Chocolate Brownies Prep: 20 minutes Cook: 25 minutes Makes: 10+ servings For the brownies: 1/2 cup butter, cut into pieces 4 ounces dark chocolate, chopped 2 eggs, at room temperature 3/4 cup white sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla 1/2 cup all-purpose flour 1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

For the glaze: 2 1

ounces semisweet chocolate tablespoon unsalted butter

Preheat the oven to 350°F. In small pot over low heat, melt 1/2 cup of butter and 4 ounces of dark chocolate together until smooth. Add eggs one at a time, and whisk to combine after each addition. Add sugar and vanilla and stir to combine.

Chocolates? Roses? Been there, done that. Everyone wants to make sure the special someone in their lives knows how much they care. Here are some easy and fun ways to prove that he or she is number one in your book. Make a Playlist of “Your Songs” Whether it was playing when you first met or is the soundtrack to your favorite movie, every couple has songs that mean something special to them. In the car, leave a CD or MP3 player stocked with your most memorable tunes as a special surprise and a suddenly-better commute. Do the house chores. Seriously. Fix that item you've been saying you would fix forever. Empty the dishwasher and clean the bathroom. When they get home, have all the chores done, that way the only thing left to do is enjoy each other's company. Put Pen to Paper Hide little notes with heartfelt sentiments on the refrigerator, on the nightstand, taped to the computer screen – any place they might stumble upon it throughout a typical day. Your note might be found after a long meeting or last-minute deadline, providing a moment of reprieve and happiness during a hectic day. Raise a Glass and Indulge – Together Toast each other with some tasty treats. Pop some bubbly, then enjoy mixing these recipes together. For more romantic wines www.barefootwines.com. 30 ▒ JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2017

and

recipes,

visit

Add flour, cocoa powder and salt and stir until smooth. Transfer batter into a 9 x 9 aluminum foil lined baking pan and place it into the oven for 25 minutes and bake until done. While brownies are baking, melt together semisweet chocolate and 1 tablespoon of unsalted butter for the glaze. Once melted, set aside. When brownies are done, let them cool. Once cooled, drizzle glaze over brownies, and spread it on top using an offset spatula.

Barefoot Bubbly Ruby Red Bliss Makes: 2 servings 3 ounces cranberry juice 1/2 ounce lime juice 6 ounces Barefoot Red Moscato Champagne 2 skewer cranberries for garnish Place chilled juices in flutes. Top with Barefoot Bubbly Red Moscato. Garnish with cranberries. Cheers!


Valentine's Recipes You'll Love to Share If the way to your loved one's heart is through the stomach, there's no better way to start off this Valentine's Day than with a homemade breakfast prepared with love. Whether you're whipping up a breakfast for a spouse with a sophisticated palate or trying to tempt the taste buds of your littlest loves, explore these ideas to get inspired. ·

Red is the color of love, so build your menu around fresh strawberries or raspberries, which pair perfectly with French toast or crepes, and can even dress up a simple cereal.

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For a more sensible menu, opt for a fruity berry smoothie or a parfait layered with fresh fruit, low-fat yogurt and granola. Add a hint of loving indulgence by sprinkling dark chocolate shavings on top.

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Show your affection with a plate of these colorful Cocoa-Kissed Red Velvet Pancakes featuring rich 100 percent cocoa, buttermilk and fresh berries. Heartshaped cookie cutters lend a special touch to these fluffy, flavorful pancakes. Add sweet garnishes like powdered sugar and berries for a sensational way to say “I love you.”

Find more recipes you'll love to share with your nearest and dearest this Valentine's Day at Culinary.net. Cocoa-Kissed Red Velvet Pancakes Recipe courtesy of Nestlé Servings: 10 pancakes 1 1/4 3

1 1/2 1/2 1 1 2 1 1/2 1

teaspoon baking powder teaspoon baking soda teaspoon salt large egg cup reduced-fat buttermilk or low-fat milk tablespoons unsalted butter, melted teaspoons vanilla extract teaspoon red food coloring heart-shaped pancake cutters or cookie cutters (optional) butter, for garnish (optional) powdered sugar, for garnish (optional) maple syrup, for garnish (optional) fresh berries, for garnish (optional) In large bowl, combine flour, sugar, baking cocoa, baking powder, baking soda and salt; stir well. In separate large bowl, whisk together egg, buttermilk, unsalted butter, vanilla extract and food coloring. Add to flour mixture; stir to combine. Allow mixture to sit 5 minutes. Heat nonstick skillet or griddle over medium heat. Brush with oil or butter. Add about 1/4 cup batter to skillet. Cook about 2 minutes, or until bubbles start to form on top. Flip and cook 1-2 minutes, or until bottom is lightly browned. Serve immediately with butter, powdered sugar, syrup and berries, if desired. Tip: If using pancake or cookie cutters, be sure to coat with oil so pancakes don't stick. Place cutters in skillet and pour batter into cutters. Remove cutters before flipping.

cup all-purpose flour cup granulated sugar tablespoons Nestlé Toll House Baking Cocoa www.PHENOMENALWOMAN.me ▒ 31


Hidden Figures is Amazing!!! By R. Lee Gamble Film Diva www.filmdiva3.com

actresses around. I hate to say it, and Empire fans don't hate, but after seeing her on the screen in this role it is hard to see her go back to a role as limiting as Cookie. She is better than that.

Hidden Figures will do more for African-Americans than reveal the identity of three brilliant women who helped to put our Astronauts in space. This film, along with August Wilson's Fences, will remind Hollywood, that America is ready for "black" movies that do not need a man wearing a dress cutting the fool, or focused on the negative stereotypes of drug dealers, baby mamas, and the like.

What can anyone say about Octavia Butler? She gave a portrayal of Dorothy Vaughn that at times was not only funny but intense. Butler takes command on the screen, which draws you into the character. There is no way to watch this and not see your mother, sister, aunt or the church lady in her.

I was never more proud to see the theater fill up with people of all races anxious to learn about the three African-American women, Katherine G. Johnson, Dorothy Vaughn, and Mary Jackson whose mathematical, computer and engineering skills were integral to getting John Glenn launched into space. More than their combined accomplishments, understanding how they had to overcome racism and sexism to achieve their goals is the main take away. Director Theodore Melfi had the chance to work with a brilliant cast. Taraji P. Henson gave a masterful performance as Katherine G. Johnson. She proves time and time again that when given the opportunity she has a range that can place her in the category with the best 32 â–’ JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2017

Rounding out the trio is Janelle Monae, a triple threat in the entertainment business. She can sing, she can dance and has shown in this film, that she can act. Monae has the acting chops and there is no way that this will be the last time we will see her on the screen. She gave a fabulous performance. The cast of Kevin Costner, Kirsten Dunst, Jim Parsons and Golden Globe nominee Mahershala Ali are all amazing adding to the success of the film. If you do not see this movie, you will miss out on cinematic gold. Prepare to hear these names during award season because they are all deserving of recognition. Just like the ladies of NASA are no longer hidden let's hope Hollywood does not ignore these inspirational performances.


Paterson is a Beautiful Film Full of Poetry By R. Lee Gamble Film Diva www.filmdiva3.com Paterson (Adam Driver) is a bus driver in the city of Paterson, New Jersey - they share the name. Every day, Paterson adheres to a simple routine: he drives his daily route, observing the city as it drifts across his windshield and overhearing fragments of conversation swirling around him; he writes poetry into a notebook; he walks his dog; he stops in a bar and drinks exactly one beer. He goes home to his wife, Laura (Golshifteh Farahani). By contrast, Laura's world is ever changing. New dreams come to her almost daily, each a different and inspired project. Paterson loves Laura, and she loves him. He supports her newfound ambitions; she champions his secret gift for poetry. The history and energy of the City of Paterson are as a felt presence in the film, and its simple structure unfolds over the course of a single week. The quiet triumphs and defeats of daily life are observed, along with the poetry evident in its smallest details. Adam Driver is thoughtful and comical in this beautiful film. Poetry becomes the star and to hear Driver reading the words add to it. Director Jim Jarmusch, an Akron native, has a unique vision and understanding of older cities. What many people find dirty and gritty about cities like Patterson, Akron, and Detroit, Jarmusch has the

insane ability to say no, let me show you how amazing these cities are. He adds in historical facts about the famous people from Patterson with dialogue. Casual conversations turn into lessons about Lou Costello or boxer "Hurricane" Ruben Carter. One thing I would love to thank Jarmusch for is his portrayal of African-Americans. Paterson has a favorite bar in his neighborhood run by a black owner. Everyone knows him there. He and his dog arrive at the bar the same time every day. The black characters in the bar are real people, living their lives, and dealing with real life problems. Refreshing. One of the best scenes is when Paterson and his dog are standing outside of a laundromat, listening to a young black guy (Method Man) working on his rap while he washes his clothes. Paterson automatically recognizes the beauty of the poetry inside of the lyrics the man is trying to create. Paterson was able to appreciate, at that moment, that poetry exists everywhere - even in the laundromat. Will this film be for everyone - no. It is slow moving and if you are not a fan of poetry that can be a bit much. However, Jarmusch presents a slice of life in the week of a bus driver named Paterson. Unlike darker films that are out right now, I enjoyed seeing how the creative mind works, while driving a bus. I like Paterson - the film and the character. It is a sweet film.

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PEGGY ZONE FISHER AND THE DIVERSITY CENTER OF NORTHEAST OHIO

PUZZLE PIECE BY PUZZLE PIECE A family’s journey with

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ARIANA GRANDE ·

February 26, 2017 - February 26, 2017

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Venue: Quicken Loans Arena

Ariana Grande Dangerous Woman Tour With Little Mix and Victoria Monet

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February 24, 2017 - March 05, 2017

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Venue: International Exposition Center

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February 17, 2017 - February 26, 2017

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Mark your calendars; the 8th annual Downtown Cleveland Restaurant Week will run February 20th through March 1st, 2015; a week that gives you the opportunity to experience Downtown's thriving culinary scene. DTRW features $30 3-course dinner menus and $15 lunch specials at select restaurants. Over the course of the week, nearly 50 restaurants prepare unbelievably tasty price-fixed menus to serve to the hundreds and hundreds of patrons.

REPAIRING A NATION February 9th - 26th KARAMU HOUSE 2355 East 89th Street, Cleveland, OH 44106 What if you knew an injustice had been done, and you had it in your power to make it right? It's 2001, and the Davis family gathers for a typical holiday celebration in their native Tulsa, Oklahoma. But all goes awry when Lois insists the family join a lawsuit seeking reparations for the Tulsa Race Riots that devastated the Davis family 80 years ago. Tickets: Adult: $37, Senior: $32 (62 +), Student: $15 (under 25 with ID), Preview: $20 (Student $10) Group Pricing: 10 - 50 tickets $30, 50 or more tickets $25, Student price available Contact Group Sales: Jaime Weinfeld, (216) 795-7077 To purchase tickets click on the calendar below. Tickets purchased within one week of the show will be held at will call.

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Customizing Tri-C Programs With Needs of 21st Century Employers

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CSU HELPS STUDENTS

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TINA HOBBS Making Her Cinematic Mark

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DR. HELEN MUGA

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Fascinating Journey to Nursing

Taking STEM to Elementary Schools

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GOING THE DISTANCE

FOR OUR

COMMUNITIES. At Dominion East Ohio, going the distance for our customers means more than just delivering safe, affordable natural gas. It means being a positive force in the communities we serve. Our EnergyShareÂŽ program has raised $6.8 million and helped more than 70,000 people in Ohio alone. These resources, combined with more than 6,300 volunteer hours from our employees, have benefited organizations as diverse as the American Red Cross, the Boy Scouts of America and the Ohio & Erie Canalway Coalition.

Jan-Feb 2017  

Phenomenal Woman Magazine

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