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The Internationalist Spring 2015

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The Internationalist

Nishimachi International School Spring 2015 Vol. 54

65

Anniversary Special TH


The Internationalist Spring 2015 Vol. 54

In This Issue...

Headmaster Terence M. Christian Director of Development Philippe Eymard Managing editor  Mayumi Nakayama ‘90 Editor Anne Papantonio Art design Akira Tomomitsu (NEUES) The Internationalist, Spring 2015 vol. 54, is published by the Development Office for alumni, parents, students, faculty, and friends of Nishimachi International School. Article contributors Lalaka (Ogawa) Fukuma '90 Nancy Hashima '83 Wendy Kobayashi Mitsuko Kodaira Jan Opdahl Joanne Park and Angela Zheng Reimi Willett Photography Terry Christian Philippe Eymard Riki Hirasawa Haruko (Kawai) Kohno '85 Mayumi Nakayama '90 Toshiko Ohta Mona Olsen '98 Hi Cheese!

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Alumni Article “The Power of a Nishimachi Network: Making a Difference in Entrepreneurship Education in Conversations with Entrepreneurs at Cornell University: Toranosuke Matsuoka ‘96 and Mona Anita K. Olsen ‘98” Joanne Park and Angela Zhang

Nishimachi International School Development Office 2-14-7 Moto Azabu, Minato-ku Tokyo 106-0046 Japan Tel: 03-3451-5520 Fax: 03-3456-0197 E-mail: development@nishimachi.ac.jp alumni@nishimachi.ac.jp 学校法人  西町インターナショナルスクール 〒 106-0046  東京都港区元麻布 2-14-7 渉外開発室

電話:03-3451-5520 ファックス:03-3456-0197 メール: development@nishimachi.ac.jp

Visit us at http://jp.nishimachi.ac.jp

Correction

In the fall 2014 issue of The Internationalist, the name of the university is incorrect in the caption to figure 2, page 9. The name should be Tokyo University of the Arts. Nishimachi apologizes for the error to Kana Shimohigashi and to Tokyo University of the Arts. 西町インターナショナルスクール The Internationalist 2014年 Fall号、9ページ、11ページ の英文での図例表記に間違った表記がございました。謹んでお詫びを申し上げるととも に下記のように訂正をさせていただきます。 誤: Page 9 Fig. 2 “Yoshiko in Black,” Meisetsu Watanabe, circa 1951, Tokyo Geijutsu University collection 正: Page 9 Fig. 2 Meisetsu Watanabe, Yoshiko in Black, 1951. Tokyo University of the Arts. 誤: Page 11 Fig. 4 “Sand Memory,” Meisetsu Watanabe, circa 1992, the Nima Sand Museum collection 正: Page 11 Fig. 4 Meisetsu Watanabe, Sand Memory, 1992. Nima Sand Museum.


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The Internationalist Spring 2015 65th Anniversary Special

Feature Article Nishimachi Turns 65 The Nishimachi Legacy

8 Outreach Scholarship Announcements 33 Message from Nishimachi-Kai 36 Faces from Food Fair 2014 38 Staff and Alumni Postmarks 39 In Memoriam 44 Other Announcements


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The Internationalist Spring 2015

The Power of a Nishimachi Network

Making a Difference in Entrepreneurship Education in Conversations with Entrepreneurs at Cornell University: Toranosuke Matsuoka ‘96 and Mona Anita K. Olsen ‘98 By: Joanne

Park and Angela Zhang

Cornell University Students

separate continents, their stories would come to intersect for the first time while attending Nishimachi International School (NIS) and continue to grow throughout their various moves around the globe. When we asked Tora about his education at Nishimachi, he shared with us his love for the school: “I was well received at NIS. In my memory, NIS was 50 percent local Japanese students and 50 percent American students whose parents were working in Japan. I blended in both ways because I was in the middle of those two groups of students. Because of the small size of the class and the family-oriented environment, all of us became friends quickly.” “There was definitely a strong bond built at that time and a special comradery. There are these connecting points. Even after I left Japan I realized how unique the NIS community is because everyone spoke a form of Japlish, which is half Japanese and half English, to each other. It unified us in our own unique language. Going to NIS was definitely an advantage because the education was incredible. Prior to attending high school in Hawaii, I was two years ahead of my classmates. I had already fulfilled my language requirement and my math requirement. The educational level of curriculum of NIS was very strong.”

A Meeting of Internationalists Born in London to New Yorkers, Mona Anita K. Olsen, Ph.D. is of Norwegian descent and identifies herself as a third culture kid (TCK). Toranosuke Matsuoka also comes from a nuanced heritage; his mother is a Jewish New Yorker, while his Japanese father is of samurai lineage. Although the two internationalists began their journey in

Like Tora, Mona Anita fondly reminisces about her experiences at Nishimachi, emphasizing the quality and strength of education she received while there: “In Japan, [I] was first exposed to experiential learning. I still remember the seclusions in bamboo forests and rice planting on my homestay. I was encouraged to journal my thoughts and perspectives throughout the new experiences. This practice has helped me articulate my identity as I have moved through different chapters of life and given me an ability to connect more quickly with an increasing international population in the classroom. Also, this early exposure to a style of academic discipline that reached beyond the classroom is no doubt partly responsible for the development of my interest in making a difference when educating students at Cornell about entrepreneurship using forms of experiential learning.”

Reunited in their Enthusiasm for Entrepreneurship Mona Anita is a Fulbrighter and founder of the educational non-profit iMADdu (which stands for I make a difference,


The Internationalist Spring 2015

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do you?). At Cornell University, Mona Anita is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Management and Organizational Behavior at The School of Hotel Administration and the Assistant Academic Director of The Leland C. and Mary M. Pillsbury Institute for Hospitality Entrepreneurship (http://www.monaanitaolsen.com). She teaches several entrepreneurship courses. One of these classes is HADM 3135/6135: Conversations with Entrepreneurs, where 80 students receive a rich exposure to the entrepreneurial journey through weekly guest speakers who share their own stories and highlight the challenges and benefits of entrepreneurship. During the Fall 2014 semester, Mona Anita invited Tora to Cornell to present his journey to a class of young entrepreneurial minds. Tora is a successful restaurant entrepreneur, one of his restaurants is the popular restaurant Sen in Sag Harbor, New York. With dozens of aspiring entrepreneurs focused on learning from his experiences, Tora shared his journey and advice: “When I was 13, I got a phone call from my father. He said, ‘after graduation, you will come to the restaurant and work for me until the day before you start high school.’ So that first year, I showed up in Sag Harbor. My father said, ‘It is an honor to work as a dishwasher. You haven’t earned that honor and you will start by cleaning the basement and scrubbing dumpsters.’ It was a unique experience, quite humbling. I was promoted to different positions, learning about both the back and the front of house operations of a restaurant. The comradery of a team working together was great and I met a lot of people. As my experience grew, my appreciation and love for the industry deepened. After graduating high school, I moved to Sag Harbor to become the general manager.” “Most recently, I have partnered with Benihana of Tokyo. My two other restaurants in the Hamptons are also growing, and there are other business opportunities that I am currently working on to expand in the market as well. Time is always limited in a time-for-money job, but time is unlimited in a transaction job. If I could set up enough restaurants and implement the infrastructure needed for consistent execution, I could open up an almost unlimited number of restaurants that I would never need to work in but would always produce profit.” “If I could pass on one piece of advice to students and young entrepreneurs, I would tell them to go out, try, and

fail. Finding yourself takes time, but even if it is a wrong one, you will still learn from it. The lessons are not only about the business but also about yourself, such as your process of overcoming challenges. Once you get on the entrepreneurial level, one of the biggest challenges is realizing where your strengths and weaknesses are.”

The Student Perspective of the Value of Conversations with Entrepreneurs From a Cornell student perspective, we were lucky enough to take Conversations with Entrepreneurs and listen to the knowledge and experiences that Mona Anita and Tora were happy to share. The interaction between these two passionate, motivated Nishimachi alumni illuminated the value of the entrepreneurial mind and indomitable spirit, and they challenged us to think critically about how we can progress in our own careers. Through speaker presentations, reflections, networking, entrepreneurial career planning, and the narration of our entrepreneurial journey, we gained insight into not only the elements of entrepreneurship, but also more importantly, how we can explore our own interests and develop personal goals within the sphere of entrepreneurship. Conversations with Entrepreneurs with Dr. Olsen is undoubtedly the most influential course we have taken so far in our academic career and one that we would consider to be a necessity for anyone who believes in innovation and value creation. Tora’s presentation from Dr. Olsen’s class can be viewed here: http://vimeo.com/monaanitaolsen/ toranosukematsuokaphoenixrisinggroup


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The Internationalist Spring 2015

Nishimachi Community Service

Build a Classroom in the Philippines Mitsuko Kodaira and Reimi Willett Build a School Campaign Co-Chairs

Thank you to all the volunteers who made it happen! Build a School Campaign to rebuild a school in the Philippines, which was devastated by Typhoon Haiyan in November 2013, was able to raise ¥1,829,278 (approximately $18,000), and reach our goal. The proceeds were raised by bingo ‘night’; Flea Market 2014; Brick Sales (donations); StuCo (Halloween, brick sale, lemonade sale, baked sale, and popsicle sale); Oktoberfest; gently used toy sale; and library book sale. The money raised will go towards completing an elementary school gym, which is also used as an emergency shelter, at Estancia Central School, in Estancia, Philippines.

ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT and DRINK

beer • whiskey • soft drinks • sausages • snacks

Nishimachi International School TNK Community Service Committee

Parents’ Talent Show

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Prizes

! ! ! !

BBQ

Adults only

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In support of building a one-room classroom in the Philippines

Saturday, October 4, 2014 6:00pm–9:00pm @ Nishimachi Gym

Quilt Cards for Sale

5,000 yen per person

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Featuring Premium Malt’s draft beer, direct from the Musashino Brewery. Professional servers from Suntory will serve and conduct “hands-on” demonstrations!

Blank greeting cards with beautiful Nishimachi quilts!

Sponsored by - - - - - - - - - - - - - Please tear off and return with your payment to the Matsukata House - - - - - - - - - - - - - ! Name: ________________________________________! Phone: ________________________________ Email: ________________________________! Number of tickets requested: ________________________________! Total amount enclosed: ¥___________________________! “Kaguya Hime”

from 2014 “From Japan with Love” from 2013 “Peace Crane” from 2012

200 yen for 1 card Pack of 6 (2 of each design) for 1000 yen TNK Community Service Committee ~ All Proceeds Go To Charity ~


The Internationalist Spring 2015

Nishimachi Community Service

MS Toy Drive and Clothes Drive Toy & Clothes Drive Complete!. Thank you to everyone for supporting the toy and clothes drives. Great job MS students and teachers! We also sent over 100 boxes of clothes to Tohoku in early December, and we sent over 200 toys to support the OGA Xmas Party in Minamisanriku held mid-December.

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The Internationalist Spring 2015

Outreach Scholarship Program

2014 Walkathon and Runathon for Outreach Scholarship Jan Opdahl

Alumni Parent and Vice Chair, Board of Directors, Nishimachi Inernational School The second annual Walkathon/Runathon for Outreach Scholarships on November 15 was a huge success thanks to you! We had about 250 people, including one Viking, either running or walking the course, wearing their Outreach t-shirts for one full hour around Jingu Gaien. It was truly a community event as we had students, parents, teachers, staff, board members, trustees, friends, family and even a few four-legged furry friends joining in the fun. After the invigorating exercise, prizes such as Baskin Robbins gift cards, a Fitbit fitness tracker and two pairs

of Converse shoes were handed out to the lucky winners. But the real winner is, of course, Nishimachi’s Outreach Scholarship program. From this event, we raised 1.3 million yen, which is double the amount from last year! The goal for this school year is to raise 13 million yen to help fund seven scholarships. We will have two more Outreach events, the InConcert 3! in March and the golf tournament in May to continue to raise awareness and funds for this unique and worthy program that benefits the entire school. Many thanks to our generous sponsors and prize donors: MetLife Insurance K.K., PwC Japan, Morgan Stanley, Nishimachi Board of Trustees and Directors, Jeff Hsu, Andrew Deane, Dan Weiss, and Peter Opdahl.   Thank you very much for your support and enthusiasm and we hope to see you at next year’s walkathon!


The Internationalist Spring 2015

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Outreach Scholarship Program

In Concert! 3 -Let’s Dancefor Outreach Scholarship Wendy Kobayashi Current Parent

I Love Rock ‘n Roll...    If that sounds like you, hopefully you were at the latest In Concert! played live and loud at Nishimachi on Saturday, March 14, in support of the school’s Outreach Scholarship Program. This was number three in the series of concerts held in celebration of all the musical talent the school can boast within the ranks of its adult community (which is quite a bit!).   If you were one of the 150 or so people there, you’ll know it was a blast.  This time the event was billed as a ‘Dance Party,’ and dance we certainly did!  Back by popular demand, and getting the party started for us once again in inimitable style, was the Yalla Family, fronted by alumnus Hakuryu “Anubiz” Shimizu ‘01.  Yalla Family played a set of original, mainly hip-hop material, which included the band’s hit, “Beginning,” and also serenaded three lucky ‘March Birthday’ ladies in the audience with their rendition of “Happy Birthday.”    After a short interval, where the music was masterfully kept pumping by (who else?) Adam Suzor, it was the turn of The Nishimachi All Stars—an eclectic and exciting mix of parents-past-and-present-plus-headmaster appearing as a band for “one night, and one night only”—to bring the house down with their very own take on classic rock and pop anthems.  Whether it was Terry Christian singing

perennial favorite “Black Magic Woman,” Mariko Ras giving Joan Jett and Jon Bon Jovi a run for their money, or the mellifluous voice of Andréa Hopkins-Borroni telling us to “Unchain My Heart” and “Stand By Me,” all these and more were anchored by the stunning professional guitar-playing of Takuro Kubo, skillfully supported by Keith McConnell and Andrew Ras, with Takashi Nakajima on drums and John Montgomery on harmonica.   With a whisky and beer bar sponsored by Suntory and a buffet catered by Kiwi Kitchen, the event raised close to one million yen for our school’s Outreach Scholarship Program.  As importantly, it was a wonderful way to bring together so many members of the school community for an unforgettable evening of contemporary music.  Did we mention there was dancing...?

Next up! Outreach Golf Tournament! Nishimachi 2015 Outreach Scholarship 12th Annual Golf Tournament is on Saturday, May 16. Looking forward to seeing you there!


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The Internationalist Spring 2015

65th Anniversary Special

65th Anniversary Special Mayumi Nakayama

Nishimachi International School Alumni Relations and Development Officer Class of 1990

S

ixty-five years have passed since Tané Matsukata, in the aftermath of a devastating war, had the idea of exposing Japanese children to a more international curriculum and established a small school for four students on the family property in Moto Azabu, where she taught them English. Over the years, the school evolved into what came to be known as Nishimachi International School, with a student body comprising both Japanese- and non-Japanese-language children and a rigorous dual-language academic program. The school has grown exponentially since those early days, as we know, but Nishimachi remains true to Ms. Matsukata’s core vision of educating children to be citizens of the world. Some 370 students now attend Nishimachi, representing approximately 30 countries from around the world. The cycle repeats itself year after year. Hundreds of students arrive with the new school year and leave at the end. Some move on after just a year or two, while others complete the full ten-year program. Regardless of the time frame, all the alumni I speak with feel pretty lucky to have had the chance to spend some time at Nishimachi and have had the broad exposure it offers to so many diverse points of view. I am one of the lucky ones. I had the privilege of attending Nishimachi for six wonderful years, from kindergarten through grade five. Nishimachi is special. Everyone agrees. The community is small and supportive, and people— whether they be students, faculty, alumni, administration, or parents—develop lifelong ties. It does not matter how many (or few) years a group may have been together as a class, or how many years have passed since individual class members last spoke to classmates or teachers; Nishimachi alumni find they can pick up the conversation where they last left off and move right along. But what does being special mean? In honor of Nishimachi’s sixty-fifth birthday, we thought this might be a good time to try to get beyond the clichés. To do that, we thought we should hear it from the horse’s mouth—and turn the spotlight on you, our alumni, for this issue of <i>The Internationalist</i>, in order to better understand the role your early years at the school played as your lives unrolled subsequently. There are the many friendships you made here but what else? We developed a questionnaire to find out more about you, post-Nishimachi, for example, where you finished your education, what you do for a living, what you value in life, what concerns you about the world today, and so on. We asked for your most enduring memories of the school; we asked about teachers who might have had a lasting impact on who you are today. We asked what was the most important thing you learned at Nishimachi. And you told us. Nishimachi has almost 5,500 alumni around the globe. We selected Nishimachi graduates, and were amazed at the response. Twenty-two alumni sent in completed questionnaires—extremely sincere and thoughtful appraisals of their lives. We learned a lot about them—and also about the school—and think you will be moved, as we were, when you read their stories. I am beginning to understand the breadth, depth, and specificity of Nishimachi’s “specialness” and invite you to do the same.


65th Anniversary Special

The Internationalist Spring 2015

Class of 1969

Marla Petal “I have been able to integrate the diversity and richness of my education and experience into what I do, and how I do it. It all comes together in a meaningful way, nothing wasted, all of value.”

The most important things I learned at Nishimachi were to think critically, to write, to celebrate diversity. Most enduring memories of Nishimachi: the teachers who respected us, and had high expectations for us; standing on the stairs in the Matsukata House singing “Ode to Joy”; making yukatas in Girl Scouts; ski trips (leather ski boots, wooden skis.); Japlish on the playground; good friends, challenging work, caring about one another. The teachers who had the greatest impact on the person I am today: Mrs. Forster, whose inspiring stories and slides from Southeast Asia, and whose deep respect for history and culture, and sense of dignity and decorum, have stayed with me (her two books are both wonderful); Miss Risser, who taught me how to write and how to study (those “How to Study and Why” records, The English 2000 book, and the SRA cards were all really great); and Mr. Hawkins, whose enthusiasm for science, scientific method, and optimism have stayed with me. The high expectations those three had of us, in fact that all our teachers had of us, were a tremendous gift. The most exciting thing about my life today: I have been able to integrate the diversity and richness of my education and experience into what I do, and how I do it. It all comes together in a meaningful way, nothing wasted, all of value. The best part of my job: I get to work with others who work hard and continue to believe that their modest contribution makes a difference in people’s lives. I imagine that, as a result of our work to reduce disaster risks and increase resilience, many young lives will be saved and many young people will eventually realize their right to a basic, quality education, and be able to pursue their dreams and aspirations, as I have been privileged to do. The thing that concerns me most about the world today: the consequences of human error, and hubris, are so devastating.

Age: 59 Country of Residence: United States Education: American School in Japan; American School in London; University of Sussex; University of Houston; University of California, Los Angeles Occupation: Senior Advisor for Education and Disaster Risk Reduction Organization: Save the Children

When I’m not at work, you’ll most likely find me spending time with family and friends, cooking for them if they come my way, checking up on them on Facebook, enjoying interspecies friendship videos, watching a good movie, reading, thinking about the creative projects I’d like to tackle, but don’t seem to find time for. If I were to write an autobiography, the book’s title would be: Carpe Diem. The most important things in my life today are my family, my friends, and my work. If I could give one piece of advice to my 15-yearold self, it would be: Seize the day!

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The Internationalist Spring 2015

65th Anniversary Special Class of 1972

Judith Guyer-Almstadt Age: 57 Country of Residence: Switzerland Education: Villa Park High School; University of California, Santa Barbara; Lesley University Occupation: Clinical Psychologist Affiliation: Private psychiatric practice for mind-body medicine in Lenzburg, Switzerland

“Many lives, including mine, have been enriched thanks to [Tané Matsukata’s] keen insight, enthusiasm, hard work, and determination. I will be eternally grateful.” The most important thing I learned at Nishimachi was “Let there be peace on earth, and let it begin with me.” World peace is an ideal we must never stop striving for, and it calls for each individual to assume responsibility for bringing about peace—in themselves, in their homes, in their communities. Most enduring memories of Nishimachi: I attended Nishimachi from ages11-15, and I will carry the memories of those four extraordinary years with me forever. Naturally, I have wonderful memories of ski trips to Zao (and the snow monsters), and overnight field trips to Kazuno (we were one of the first groups to go!). I also have vivid memories of the long and tedious hours (on the weekend) spent cutting and gluing pictures and text onto cardboard layouts for the yearbook. I remember the time Mr. Hawkins, our girls’ basketball coach, rotated me into a game only a few minutes before the end, and, much to everyone’s surprise, I immediately scored two points for the team. I will never forget our first junior high school dance, and slow dancing (with …) to The Beatles, The Hollies, Glen Campbell, and Creedence Clearwater Revival. And how could I ever forget singing “You’ve Got a Friend” at our graduation ceremony in June 1972? None of these memories would be what they are, however, without the people that shared these moments with me—my fellow classmates. It’s so exciting to still be connected to so many of

them today. I am awe-inspired by the incredible people they have become—each of them working hard, living life passionately and to the fullest, contributing to their communities and the world in wonderful, meaningful ways. The teachers who had the greatest impact on the person I am today: I’m sure that all my teachers at Nishimachi had an impact on the person I am today. Nonetheless, I thank Mr. Hawkins for teaching me the importance of hard work and discipline; Dorothy Risser, for being a wonderful role model in bringing passion to whatever you do; and David Randall, for teaching me that kindness and humor go a long way towards making the world a nicer place. It was only later in life that I developed an appreciation for the great significance of Tané Matsukata’s vision in post-war Japan: to establish a non-traditional, coeducational, multinational, bilingual school for both the local and expat communities. Many lives, including mine, have been enriched thanks to her keen insight, enthusiasm, hard work, and determination. I will be eternally grateful. The most exciting thing about my life today: Through my mindfulness practice, I have learned the importance of living and appreciating life one moment at a time. I am grateful for the well-being and good health of my beautiful children and all those I hold dear in my heart. I am thankful that I grabbed the opportunity in my forties to pursue not yet fulfilled professional desires and goals, and that I had the tenacity and energy to achieve them. The best part of my job is working with others to diminish pain and suffering and to develop the capacity for healing and personal development. ➚


65th Anniversary Special

The Internationalist Spring 2015

Class of 1970

Mark Melnick On the ninth grade trip to Kyoto and Nara: “I can still recite the Buddhist chant from visiting Tenrikyo that one morning…”

The most important things I learned at Nishimachi are Japanese/English bilingual language skills and a multicultural sensitivity assimilated through the daily interaction I had with schoolmates of various nationalities. All of those contributed to my career as an agricultural commodity exporter to Asia. Most enduring memories of Nishimachi: The ninth grade overnight school trip to Kyoto and Nara (I can still recite the Buddhist chant from visiting Tenrikyo that one morning); and getting the wooden stick slap at Tenryuji during our experiential 座禅 (zazen) session. That experience, I think, contributes to my interest in, and appreciation for, history today. The lifelong friends I made at Nishimachi are very precious to me. Kinships were established not only in classrooms but at dance parties and ramen stands (when five kids would cram into a taxi and rush to a place under the Shibuya station overpass after basketball practice). I have so many memories like that from the thousands of days I spent at Nishimachi. The teachers who had the greatest impact on the person I am today: Ms. [maybe Miss is better in this context?] Yoroi (now Mrs. Kawai), my kindergarten teacher; Mrs. Hirooka, my first grade teacher; Mrs. Kurtz, my sixth grade

The thing that concerns me most about the world today: One of my biggest concerns is global food losses and food waste, with all the implications. Recent statistics show that roughly one third of the food produced in the world for human consumption every year—approximately 1.3 billion tons—gets lost or wasted. This is simply not sustainable. When I’m not at work, you’ll most likely find me: The downside of a mid-life career change is that I am almost always working or studying. On those rare occasions when I am not working or studying, I am most likely spending quality downtime with someone special, listening to

Age: 59 years Country of Residence: United States Education: San Francisco State University (B.A.); University of San Francisco (M.A.) Occupation: President Company: Trex Corporation

teacher. I was a problem student with family issues. Many of the teachers understood the difficulties I was having and showed great compassion and flexibility. Nishimachi was a place that gave me a sense of security. The thing that concerns me most about the world today: world leaders who do not know how to forgive.

my music, watching a good movie, walking or jogging in the forest, and cooking or going out for, and enjoying, great food. I also still love to travel whenever I can. If I were to write an autobiography, the book’s title would most likely be inspired by the lyrics of a Beatles tune like, for example, “All You Need Is Love,” or “Imagine,” or perhaps by a book that has touched me deeply like, for example, Jack Kornfield’s A Path with Heart. If I could give one piece of advice to my 15-yearold self, it would be: Make each moment count, and be present for each moment.

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The Internationalist Spring 2015

65th Anniversary Special similar to the one I grew up with in Japan.

Class of 1980

Henrik Gistren “At NIS…we put politics aside and sat next to, and played with, friends from countries which were essentially at war with our own.” Age: 49         Education: M.Sc., Mechanical Engineering  Occupation: Chief Commercial Officer Company: Jari Celulose Country of Residence: Brazil

The most important things I learned at Nishimachi: learning to get along with people from all nationalities and religions, and to respect their cultures. Throughout history, tensions typically run high between nations at some time or other, and that includes the seventies and eighties while I was at Nishimachi. Yet, at NIS, which had many children from diplomatic families in the student body, we put politics aside and sat next to, and played with, friends from countries which were essentially at war with our own. During my nine years at NIS I never once witnessed any racism, religious intolerance, or national-pride related disputes. For me this carried over into high school, college, and my professional career, and was the reason, in my opinion, I was asked to head up global sales for a multinational company with customers all over the world.   Large organizations with seemingly unlimited resources are not always better. I learned that at NIS—a relatively small school compared to other K-9 educational institutions—and that motivated me later in life to work at smaller, streamlined start-ups as well as to start my own companies—after having the experience of working at larger, inefficient organizations where individual ideas very often got lost in the system. I learned to thrive as a TCK (Third Culture Kid) at Nishimachi, which is coming in handy now for my kids, who find themselves in a situation

NIS taught me the beauty of Japan and its wonderful culture and history. Most enduring memory of Nishimachi: When I started at NIS in first grade as a 5-year-old, I was so shy I would always stay in the classroom during recess with Miss Hirooka, my teacher, instead of going out to play with the others. She was aware of this and finally one day told me to wait in the room for a few minutes while she put on her tennis shoes so she and I could go outside to play, together. Dreading [Mortified at] the thought of appearing on the playground with our first grade teacher in the midst of all my classmates, I bolted out the door before she got back and joined the first group I ran into. Thereafter, I made sure I always found a group or someone to play with during recess. (I doubt whether Miss Hirooka even had any tennis shoes with her to put on that day.) The teachers who had the greatest impact on the person I am today: Miss Hirooka, my first grade teacher; Mr. Brentnall, my fifth grade teacher; David Green, my eighth grade homeroom teacher, junior high math teacher, and junior high basketball coach; and Susan Feringer-Coury (Nettle), my ninth grade homeroom teacher and social studies and history teacher. The most exciting thing about my life today is the global aspect: I am a Swede raised in Japan, living in Brazil with an American wife and dual-citizen kids, who travels to all corners of the world, especially Asia, Europe, and North America. Much of this is thanks to being raised as a TCK in Japan.  The best part of my job is making an impact on environmental sustainability while developing customers in new markets all over the world. The thing that concerns me most about the world today is cultural and religious intolerance. When I’m not at work, you’ll most likely find me doing fun stuff with my family, on the golf course, or on my motorcycle. If I were to write an autobiography, the book’s title would be: How to Turn Being Geographically Confused into a Positive Attribute. The most important things in my life today are my family, including the immediate family here in Brazil, my parents in Sweden, and my brothers and their wives in Japan. If I could give one piece of advice to my 15-yearold self, it would be to work at a restaurant at least one summer, or part-time after school. You will be going to them for the rest of your life so it is good to know what goes on there. You also learn how to deal with rude customers, unfair bosses, and a tough working environment. Also, start saving on a regular basis as soon as you have some extra money to put aside, no matter how small a sum. You will always have to have bank accounts to manage and investments to optimize.


65th Anniversary Special

The Internationalist Spring 2015

Class of 1981

Julie Fujishima “Being bilingual means not only speaking two languages but also having in-depth knowledge of the people and culture identified with both.”

Age: 48 Country of Residence: Japan Education: Le Rosey; The American School In Japan; Sophia University Occupation: Executive Vice President Company: Johnny & Associates

The most important thing I learned at Nishimachi: Being bilingual means not only speaking two languages but also having in-depth knowledge of the people and culture identified with both.

The things that concern me most about the world today: Climate change, the spread of infectious diseases, and the food crisis are the greatest threats to the planet.

Most enduring memory of Nishimachi: Our class trip to Chiba in the ninth grade on bicycle. I cannot believe that we went so far without taking a train or car.

When I’m not at work, you’ll most likely find me either having dinner with a client or at home resting!

The teachers at Nishimachi who had the greatest impact on the person I am today: Ms. Matsukata, Ms. Hirooka, Ms. Kitamura, Ms. Takada. The most exciting thing about my life today is being a full-time, working mom with a daughter going to the same school from which I graduated! The best part of my job: When I feel that what I do can make a positive difference to other people’s lives.

If I were to write an autobiography, the book’s title would be: Work Seven Days a Week and Keep Smiling! The most important things in my life today are my daughter and the people who support me at home and at work. If I could give one piece of advice to my fifteenyear-old self, it would be: Listen to what adults say. They know what they are talking about.

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The Internationalist Spring 2015

65th Anniversary Special Class of 1982

Yoko Nogami so many times in my life when I look back to see how, and where, I learned to overcome some obstacle, and many times it would be something I did in Kazuno. There is a sense of confidence which comes from this, knowing that I can survive most anything. That is not an easy lesson to teach a young person. Age: 48 Education: Boston University (B.F.A.); University of South Florida (M.F.A.) Occupation: Visual Arts Faculty Institution: Pinellas County Center for the Arts at Gibbs High School Country of Residence: United States

“There are so many times in my life when I look back to see how, and where, I learned to overcome some obstacle, and many times it would be something I did in Kazuno.” The most important things I learned at Nishimachi: As a teacher in a public school system in the United States, I cannot help but compare the experiences I had as a student at NIS to what my students are living through here on a daily basis. The most important thing I remember from my time at NIS is the nurturing environment and the mutual trust and respect teachers and students had for each other which, as a result, provided a safe haven and a second home to for many of us. NIS taught us to thrive as individuals even though every student came from a very different place, to respect one another despite our differences, and to celebrate diversity. Most enduring memories of Nishimachi: There are so many memories that I cherish. I feel that my summer camp experiences with Mr. Hawkins probably shaped my life more than anything else. Self-sufficient living helped me gain the confidence to realize that I can live with a minimal number of “things” in my life. Who needs running water, plumbing, or someone to build your house? The teachers who had the greatest impact on the person I am today: Miss Hirooka was my first grade teacher and also my first English tutor prior to my arrival at NIS. She strongly believed in establishing a firm foundation for language learning right from the start—and that proper pronunciation was the key element. It was not easy, but she guided both my parents and me at the same time as we took our first steps toward becoming global citizens.   At the camp in Kazuno, Mr. Hawkins taught me the necessary foundations for living. There are

The most exciting thing about my life today: My work as an artist has been moving toward a hybridization of culture and identity. I am enjoying getting older (!) and being able to analyze my life in this context. I am trying to develop a visual “communication” between cultures, intertwining them until something completely new manifests itself. Watching my daughter as she grows up and deals with this duality in her own way is also fascinating. The best part of my job: I am located in a place extremely alien to where I grew up. I teach students who will most likely never travel to Japan. Many come to me not knowing the difference between China and Japan. Each year I welcome a new group of students and say good-bye to the group I worked closely with for the four-year duration of our magnet program in Florida. The best part of my job is watching my students as their worlds open up to infinite possibilities, helping them realize that they can go anywhere they want to go. Playing a small part in this awakening is extremely satisfying.  The thing that concerns me most about the world today: NHK World has been my primary connection to what is happening in Japan. While I celebrate Japan’s global outlook and how far we have come, I am highly concerned about the way in which we seem to be moving toward dangerous confrontations, which we may not be equipped to handle.  I would prefer Japan to maintain its peaceful role in world affairs and not to plunge us into a war.  When I’m not at work, you’ll most likely find me in my studio or in a swamp.  The curse of being an artist is to always have to be working on something or researching something else. Happily, I am able to merge the two strands— research into Florida folk and wildlife and a new work straddling swamp life and my unchanging identity as a Tokyo kid.  If I were to write an autobiography, the book’s title would be: The Adventures of Toko, Told by an Alligator. The most important thing in my life today is my daughter, Tora.  If I could give one piece of advice to my 15-yearold self, it would be: Get a job, do your homework, stop worrying about the small stuff (and then go kick myself…)


65th Anniversary Special

The Internationalist Spring 2015

Class of 1984

Robert Sharp “I learned to view people based on their own merits rather than on a national or ethnic stereotype.”

Age: 45 Country of Residence:  United States Education:  B.A., Asian History Occupation:  That’s a complicated question. I’m involved in four companies, all of which include several of my siblings and a good friend from ASIJ.   Company:  Digieffects, Toolfarm, LifeFlix, Red Giant

The most important things I learned at Nishimachi: to view people based on their own merits rather than on a national or ethnic stereotype. I also learned to be comfortable with new people and new situations at an unusually early age. Most enduring memory of Nishimachi: March 1982. St. Mary’s Invitational Tournament.  I was in seventh grade watching the eighth and ninth grade JV-A team play Ebara-dai-yon in the semifinals. Ebara had soundly beaten the JV-A team earlier in the season. We were down by one point with three seconds to go, and we had the ball. The ball was inbounded at midcourt to John Reineck, who powered in from the left side for an uncontested lay-up to win the game. I will never forget that moment! It made me feel that anything was achievable with enough will power and faith. The teacher who had the greatest impact on the person I am today: Mr. Green. He always believed in me. The most exciting thing about my life today is my children. It’s fascinating seeing them grow up in this age of rapid technological

innovation. Thankfully, there wasn’t any social media when I was a kid!

The best part of my job is working with family, and with friends I’ve known since growing up in Japan, and traveling to Japan frequently for work. The thing that concerns me most about the world today: There seems to be a trend towards extremism. In the United States, politics and the media are increasingly forcing people to identify with one extreme or the other, when, in fact, most people actually share the same moderate, centrist values.    When I’m not at work, you’ll most likely find me with my kids.   If I were to write an autobiography, the book’s title would be: The Path of Most Resistance. The most important things in my life today are my children and my businesses.   If I could give one piece of advice to my 15-yearold self, it would be: Learn to write code.

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The Internationalist Spring 2015

65th Anniversary Special Class of 1985

Gary Tateyama “I’m lucky to have a good job that allows me the chance to travel and explore the world I was introduced to at Nishimachi.”

Age: 45 Country of Residence: United States Education: ASIJ, Colorado State University (B.S.), Colorado State University (Doctor of Veterinary Medicine) Occupation: Veterinarian Affiliation: Yorba Regional Animal Hospital

The most important thing I learned at Nishimachi was how to get along with people from all walks of life. Most enduring memories of Nishimachi: My best memories are from the ski weeks and the ninth grade bike trip with Mr. Green and three classmates. I still remember diving under the wobbly desks when the 50-year-old Matsukata House, which housed our classrooms, shook during the many earthquakes we had. Nothing could really top our trip to China with Ms. Feringer. The teachers who had the greatest impact on the person I am today: Mr. Fujino, with whom I keep in contact to this day, was a great teacher and inspired me to be a good person. Ohtasensei was the best person to have to as my first teacher for Japanese. She made me want to learn the language. I’m lucky to still be in contact with her as well. Ms. Feringer was a great person to introduce me to the world with her social studies class and our trip to China. The most exciting thing about my life today: I’m lucky to have a good job that allows me the chance to travel and explore the world I was introduced to at Nishimachi. (I am heading on a cruise to the Caribbean later this year.) The best part of my job is being able to make a difference in people’s lives by helping to save a beloved family member, and, when the time comes to say good-bye, helping my clients

through that very tough and sad process. (I love being able to play with cute dogs and cats on a daily basis as well.) The thing that concerns me most about the world today is the continuing, widespread violence. The constant threat of terrorist attacks. Whether it’s gun violence, racial violence, or war—it’s all very disturbing. When I’m not at work, you’ll most likely find me at the movies, on the golf course, watching TV, or at the gym in a Zumba or kickboxing class. If I were to write an autobiography, the book’s title would be: Young at Heart and Always Will Be... The most important things in my life today are my husband, my dogs, and my health. If I could give one piece of advice to my 15-yearold self, it would be: Being gay is ok—be yourself and don’t be so darn shy!


65th Anniversary Special

The Internationalist Spring 2015

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Class of 1987

Kiki Jiang-Yamaguchi The most important things I learned at Nishimachi: I learned many things at Nishimachi, but one of the most important experiences I had was spending time with people from all around the world. This gave me the opportunity to see similarities and learn respect for the differences among us; it also helped me realize, and hold onto, my own identity as a third generation Chinese. I think it was not really a learning process for me, but rather something that I just became aware of naturally through exposure to the warm Nishimachi atmosphere. I believe this has not changed at all. Nishimachi continues to be a strong and supportive community. Living all my life in Japan, I was lucky to grow up in Nishimachi’s multicultural environment, an experience that is not accessible to many today. Most enduring memory of Nishimachi: Kazuno looks so much nicer now, but, back in my time, the girls’ bunks and the boys’ bunks were basically hand-built shacks. Although it was cold at night in a sleeping bag on a mat, the situation actually made the trip exciting and adventurous. I have lots of fun memories of going on hikes, cooking breakfast, and waking my friends up to go to the outdoor bathroom at night! Another important and enduring memory from my time at Nishimachi is of my last year there, when I was in grade nine. That year was a special year for me. We had a big class with twenty of us altogether. We all, boys and girls, became very close and made such a good team. We went to cheer one another on at basketball games, enjoyed being lab partners with one another, and had such good times on the ski trip, at Kazuno, and at dances. The friendships we built that last year at Nishimachi are precious and continue to this day. I gained self-confidence that year through what we learned and experienced as leaders of the student body.

“I was lucky to grow up in Nishimachi’s multicultural environment, an experience that is not accessible to many today.” The teachers who had the greatest impact on the person I am today: Ms. Takata, Ms. Feringer, and all the Japanese teachers. Ms. Takata was my grade four homeroom teacher, and Ms. Feringer was my grade seven social studies teacher. They were both very strict and had high expectations of us but very vibrant and warm at the same time. When I was a child, I didn’t have a clue how important strict teachers were, but, looking back at my Nishimachi time, I still remember how happy I felt when they praised me or when I received a good score on a test. It wasn’t only the strictness I remember. I won’t forget their passion and love. The most exciting thing about my life today: I’m back at Nishimachi working as an admissions officer! I never thought I would work at a school, let alone Nishimachi, the school from which I graduated. The best part of my job is meeting new families and returning and alumni families who are interested in applying to Nishimachi, but most of all, it is wonderful that I get to see old friends when they visit Nishimachi after a long absence. When I’m not at work, you’ll most likely find me with my family! The most important thing in my life today is the relationship with my family. I grew up in a big family that taught me how to care for, and love, people and to be strong and positive. I will continue to cherish this strong bond and do my best to pass it on to my children.

Age: 42 Country of Residence: Japan Education: ASIJ, Sophia University Occupation: Admissions Officer Institution: Nishimachi International School


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The Internationalist Spring 2015

65th Anniversary Special Class of 1989

Yukiko Stephens

“My Japanese teachers not only made sure my Japanese language skills were strong but taught me to have a deep understanding of, and respect and appreciation for, my own culture and heritage.”

Age: 41 Country of Residence: Singapore Education:  Tufts University (B.A.) Occupation: Stay-At-Home-Mum/ Translator/Interpreter

The most important things I learned at Nishimachi were to empathize with people from different backgrounds and to view the world as a playground. My most enduring memory of Nishimachi is of Mr. Green telling us on ski trips to act like ambassadors for our respective countries. I still aspire to do this today and hope to teach the same to my children. The teachers who had the greatest impact on the person I am today: I am forever grateful to the Japanese teachers I had at Nishimachi: 河 合先生、北村先生、北条先生、近藤先生、and 笹山先生 (Kawai-sensei, Kitamura-sensei, Hojo-sensei, Kondo-sensei, and Sasayama-sensei). They not only made sure my Japanese language skills were strong but taught me to have a deep understanding of, and respect and appreciation for, my own culture and heritage. All are necessary components for the ambassadors Mr. Green encouraged us to be. The most exciting thing about my life today is spending quality time with my family. I find true joy in moments when I manage to be fully present with my children—much harder than one thinks! The best part of being a stay-at-home mother is getting to experience all of the highs, lows, and everything in between of my children’s childhoods. In retrospect, they are little for such a short time that I want to embrace as many moments with them as possible. I myself left home at age 14 so I know it won’t be too long before my kids leave the nest. 

I started meditating in my late twenties, and, after some years as an international tax consultant, I slowly carved out a career in interpreting and translating for some of the meditation teachers I met along the way. The best part of being an interpreter for these teachers is that I get to experience their teachings and energies in a very special way. It is a very privileged position to be in so as to absorb all they have to offer. I feel grateful that my two jobs complement each other and that they are great catalysts for my personal growth.  My meditation practices help me gain much needed perspective in my role as a mother. I have learned that deep and profound lessons can be found not only at meditation retreats but in each little moment of one’s seemingly mundane day.  In short, my kids, rascals that they are, have been the best teachers yet in training me in the art of patience!  The most exciting thing about my life today is recognizing that my deepest identity is stillness. If I could give one piece of advice to my 15-yearold self, it would be: I lost my father at the beginning of my last year at Nishimachi (ninth grade). The NIS community came through to support my mum and me at this pivotal time of my life. I would tell my 15-year-old self to feel safe and loved, and that she will continue to meet wonderful people in life. She should trust her instincts and follow her heart, and her own unique path will unfold.


65th Anniversary Special

The Internationalist Spring 2015

21

Class of 1990

William Hammell The most important things I learned at Nishimachi were patience, perspective, and perseverance— in other words, to deliberate and not to jump to conclusions, to consider other viewpoints while articulating my own, and to keep working on things that are important to me.   Most enduring memories of Nishimachi: the experience of a quiet and reserved kid (me), sporting an ill-fitting suit and a clip-on tie, awkwardly emceeing a musical event in front of a gymnasium full of people. I still wince at some of the cheesy jokes I had to tell between the showtune numbers performed by my classmates. A close second would be digging for sweet potatoes at Nishi-Nasuno.   The teachers who had the greatest impact on the person I am today: My Japanese teachers— especially Hōjō-sensei, Kondō-sensei, and Sasayama-sensei in junior high—always pushed me to do better; Mr. Biddick encouraged me to write what I wanted, how I wanted; Mr. Tanaka was an exemplar of boundless enthusiasm and passionate eccentricity.   The most exciting thing about my life today is watching my daughter grow up.   The best part of my job is flexibility, as I can set my own hours and work anywhere I can take my laptop.   The thing that concerns me most about the world today is how ignorance, intolerance, and inequality continue to cause violence and misery around the world, despite the urgency of problems like climate change and resource depletion that require global solidarity and unified effort.   When I’m not at work, you’ll most likely find me walking our dog around the neighborhood.   If I were to write an autobiography, the book’s title would be: The Enka Soul of an Eclectic Editor.   The most important things in my life today: Since the question is about “things” and not “people,” I would say that words are the most important.  They are my livelihood, my refuge, sources of both pleasure and frustration, and my life would be utterly diminished without them. (That said, the absence of words is often good, too.)   If I could give one piece of advice to my 15-yearold self, it would be: Relax! Take a deep breath, don’t overthink, and just try to absorb as much as you can from whatever situation in which you find yourself.

“Relax! Take a deep breath, don’t overthink, and just try to absorb as much as you can from whatever situation in which you find yourself.”

Age: 39 Country of Residence: United States Education: Punahou School, Georgetown University, Yale University Occupation: Editor Affiliation: Freelance


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The Internationalist Spring 2015

65th Anniversary Special Class of 1991

Taro Hornmark “Be humble and try to learn how things have been done before you try to change things for the better.”

Age: 39 Country of Residence: United States Education: Princeton University Occupation: Managing Director Company: Credit Suisse

The teachers who had the greatest impact on the person I am today: One individual who has been important to me is Mr. Montgomery. I recall he was the first teacher who complained to my parents that my reading was poor and I needed to study harder. As a result, my parents threw away my Nintendo family computer, and I actually had no choice but to study harder. I think had that not happened things could have been materially different for me. Not only was he a great teacher to me then, but we also share many common interests and so we’ve stayed close ever since. I also had several other memorable teachers; in particular the Japanese teachers (Kitamura-sensei, Sasayama-sensei, and others) stand out. They were very strict, and the workload seemed unfair to me at the time. Now that I have my own children, though, I appreciate how difficult it is to have kids learn multiple languages. In the end, there is no replacement for just working hard and putting

in the hours, and being strict is probably the only way to make that happen. I feel indebted to them for the Japanese fluency I have.

The most exciting thing about my life today is that I am surrounded by people I like. I have a family that I enjoy growing old with, coworkers that can challenge me, and friends (though many are far away) whom I can have fun with. I don’t think I can ask for more.   If I could give one piece of advice to my 15-yearold self: I have two pieces of advice I would give myself. Regardless of what you do, expertise in anything takes a long time. There’s always a lot to learn from someone with more experience than you. Be humble and try to learn how things have been done before you try to change things for the better. The other bit of advice is: The long hair has to go.


65th Anniversary Special

The Internationalist Spring 2015

23

Class of 1992

Teruko Kuroda “Art class taught me to use my imagination—as well to be patient and not to worry about getting my hands dirty. It made me a more wellrounded person.” The most important things I learned at Nishimachi: Nishimachi taught me many important lessons, and I am truly grateful. I think the most important lesson I learned was how to become a responsible global citizen. Having interactions with friends from around the globe early on made me appreciative of other cultures as well as of my own, expanded my horizons, and opened up possibilities for me to work and live all around the world. Knowing that I have friends wherever I go is also a unique yet special advantage I have as a member of the Nishimachi family. Most enduring memories of Nishimachi: While I was still at Nishimachi, many graduates who came back to visit talked about how much Mr. Tanaka’s art classes inspired them. Art, really? was my reaction back then. I did enjoy the classes as we had opportunities to create pottery and do air brush painting as well as silk screening, etc., but art was only a hobby for me. However, art class taught me to use my imagination—as well to be patient and not to not to worry about getting my hands dirty. It made me a more well-rounded person. I just wish I had continued doing more creative things upon graduating from Nishimachi, since, as Einstein says, “imagination is more important than knowledge.” On the same subject, Walt Disney says that “every child is born with a vivid imagination. But as a muscle grows flabby with disuse, so the bright imagination of a child pales in later years if he ceases to exercise it.” The teachers who had the greatest impact on the person I am today: There are so many teachers that influenced me that I wouldn’t want to have to single just one out.. The most exciting thing about my life today: I am going through a lot of change at the moment. I got married last year and am expecting a baby this summer. It is daunting going through so much that’s new in such a short period of time, but it is definitely an exciting moment. I am looking forward to a new chapter in life. The best part of my job is working for a company that provides magical experiences for everyone, regardless of their stage in life.

Age: 37 Country of Residence: Japan Education: ISSH, University of the Sacred Heart, Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth Occupation: Manager Company: The Walt Disney Company (Japan) Ltd.

When I’m not at work, you’ll most likely find me out on the golf course or in the streets training for my next marathon. If I were to write an autobiography, the book’s title would be: All I Really Need to Know I Learned at Nishimachi (from Robert Fulghum’s All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten) The most important things in my life today are my family and friends. As I face motherhood, I appreciate my family more and more. I am also grateful for my friends around the world who have supported me wherever I am. If I could give one piece of advice to my 15-yearold self, it would be: Be curious, confident, courageous, and flexible. You will continue to expand your horizons only if you are willing to embrace change. Trying to do the unknown takes courage, but only experience makes you wiser and stronger.


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The Internationalist Spring 2015

65th Anniversary Special Class of 1993

Argyro Caminis “Some of the most abiding memories were those when boundaries [between groups] broke down, and there we all were sharing in something meaningful to all of us.” The most important things I learned at Nishimachi are: how close relationships and one’s young self can blossom and flourish in a close-knit and open-minded community; and the lifelong value in seeking out, understanding, and appreciating one’s own heritage and that of others. Most enduring memories of Nishimachi: There are many. For all of the inclusiveness that we learned and valued, it was (and is) only natural to have cliques and different friend groups. I think that some of the most abiding memories were those that came from the times when boundaries broke down, and there we all were sharing in something meaningful to all of us. I have such precious memories of running each morning of sixth grade, preparing for Food Fair, competing in Sports Day, going on annual ski trips at Iwappara, and graduating with my class. The best part of my job is working closely with people, where I can learn about their lives, inner selves, and different cultures—and in turn my own self. The thing that concerns me most about the world today is violence, and, underlying that, people not respecting one another as fellow human beings, all of whom share many similar vulnerabilities and fears. Age: 37 Country of Residence: United States Education: St. Paul’s School; Yale College; Yale School of Medicine; Harvard School of Public Health Occupation: Psychiatrist and Instructor of Psychiatry Institution: McLean Hospital and Harvard Medical School

When I’m not at work, you’ll most likely find me: relaxing at home, at the gym or going for a rejuvenating run, eating sushi, and meandering slowly through the aisles of Asian food stores. With more time on my hands, I’m going to a play, enjoying an art exhibit, hiking/camping/ skiing, eating (adventurously) with friends (especially from NIS!), and traveling for fun. If I could give one piece of advice to my 15-yearold self: Don’t hold back! Listen to your heart! Find your own voice! I’m so glad you can see how meaningful this experience, and these people, are to you. Let this set a kind of bar, no matter where your life may take you.


65th Anniversary Special

The Internationalist Spring 2015

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Class of 1994

Lisa Katayama The most important thing I learned at Nishimachi was how to connect with people who don’t look or think like anyone else I know. Most enduring memory of Nishimachi: in the seventh grade, when my girlfriends and I were caught in the eighth grade boys’ room during the junior high ski trip. The boys were reading us a slightly romantic excerpt from a novel in a hushed tone when we heard teachers at the door. Instead of skiing the next day, we were tasked with carrying skis up the snowy hill to the buses. Mr. Priest called us the “bad gang,” and we wore that label proudly until we graduated.  The teachers who had the greatest impact on the person I am today: Many of the teachers left an imprint on who I am today. I don’t feel right naming just one!   The most exciting thing about my life today: I’m growing kale on my patio. I know that sounds so West Coast, but I have always been terrible at keeping plants alive and staying still, so the fact that I’ve been grounded long enough to watch seeds turn to leaves feels a little bit like a miracle.  The best part of my job: I get to work with some of the most creative, inspiring human beings on the planet, starting with my boss, Joi Ito (NIS class of 1981), and the community of extraordinary, diverse individuals that we are building together at the MIT Media Lab and beyond. I get to travel to places like Nairobi, Mexico City, and Navajo Nation. I also run my own nonprofit called The Tofu Project, which keeps me connected to Japan through creative projects built in collaboration with some very unique future leaders. In 2014, we worked with a transgender man who leads the LGBTQ movement in Tokyo and a woman who uses clay to teach kids how to make things with their hands. We have a bicultural team, and together we come up with impact-driven initiatives at the intersection of Japan and the U.S., business and creativity, personal growth and global awareness.  The thing that concerns me most about the world today: As we dive into this historic moment of technological innovation in which a few key organizations have the capacity to scale access to web-driven resources like never before, I am concerned that these agents of change are not prioritizing the best interest of most humans. How can we amplify opportunities for lessprivileged individuals and communities so that they don’t feel left behind or further entrenched in the margins of society? How do we make sure that the rapid infiltration of tech in the privileged world doesn’t turn our world into an episode of Black Mirror?

Age: 36 Country of Residence: United States Education: Tufts University (B.A., International Relations and French Literature), Columbia University (M.A., Human Rights) Occupation: Program Manager, Director’s Fellows Company: MIT Media Lab

“Speak up for what you believe in and encourage your peers and mentors to spar with you. It’s the only way to grow fearlessly.” When I’m not at work, you’ll most likely find me eating delicious food or running up a hill in beautiful San Francisco; sitting with AIDS patients and foster kids in the volunteer positions that I’ve held for the past six years; setting up Google Hangout calls between my dog (in SF) and my nephew (in Tokyo). If I were to write an autobiography, the book’s title would be: It’s Just Me.  The most important things in my life today are a healthy body and supportive friends and family who surround me with love so that I can do good work in the world and live with purpose.  If I could give one piece of advice to my 15-yearold self, it would be: Speak up for what you believe in and encourage your peers and mentors to spar with you. It’s the only way to grow fearlessly. 


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The Internationalist Spring 2015

65th Anniversary Special Class of 1997

Geoffrey Katsuhisa “Sometimes the lessons were direct teaching moments; at other times I learned from just watching the teachers themselves.”

to take anything away from anybody that I may fail to mention, so, instead, will mention the qualities and lessons they imparted to me. I was taught about fairness, openness, working hard, patience, community, integrity, and having fun, to name a few things. Sometimes the lessons were direct teaching moments; at other times I learned from just watching the teachers themselves.  The most exciting thing about my life today: my wife, Miya, and I are expecting a baby boy at the end of April.  

Age: 33 Country of Residence: Japan Education: Bellevue High School, Santa Clara University Occupation: Assistant Coach/Translator Affiliation: Chiba Jets, National Basketball League (NBL)

The most important things I learned at Nishimachi were compassion, understanding, and integrity. My most enduring memory of Nishimachi is of the people and the family-oriented, embracing culture of the school. Some of my closest friends to this day are my childhood friends from Nishimachi.   The teachers who had the greatest impact on the person I am today: All of my teachers had an impact on me in their own way, and I am grateful to them for the time they spent teaching me and for their positive influence.  I don’t want

The best part of my job: I get to do what I love, and my wife is very understanding and supportive of my career. I discovered basketball at Nishimachi in the third grade, and it’s been a big part of my life ever since.   The thing that concerns me most about the world today: The fighting and warring in different parts of the world concern me. The gap between rich and poor concerns me.  I think more empathy, openness, trust, and compassion for one another, along with the courage and initiative to do the right thing when the right thing is asked of us, will go a long way in making a difference. When I’m not at work, you’ll most likely find me spending time with family and friends. If I were to write an autobiography, the book’s title would be: The People in My Life. The most important things in my life today are my family and friends. If I could give one piece of advice to my 15-yearold self, it would be: Just be yourself.


65th Anniversary Special Class of 1998

Catherine Watkins The most important thing I learned at Nishimachi: I would have to say exposure to diversity. I’m not just talking about sharing a class with different skin colors or languages, but something far beyond that. I came to not only tolerate, but also appreciate, that others in my class might have a whole other way of thinking about everything. I was exposed to not only various races, cultures, languages, religions, but also different upbringings and ways of life. I remember one time, not long after starting at NIS, I noticed that one of my classmates wrote her “a”s differently than I did. I thought it was a bit weird, but I decided it was OK, since her way of writing an “a” seemed to be working well for her, just as my way of sculpting the letter was fine for me. One of the greatest things Nishimachi has is an amazing collection of students and faculty from around the world, and just about everyone has been taught and has learned in a slightly different manner. Nishimachi fosters this type of environment, and I now find it so dull when people around me think and act as if they are carbon copies of one another.

The Internationalist Spring 2015

“Nishimachi has an amazing collection of students and faculty from around the world, and just about everyone has been taught and has learned in a slightly different manner. Nishimachi fosters this type of environment, and I now find it so dull when people around me think and act as if they are carbon copies of one another.”

If I were to write an autobiography, the book’s title would be: Riding Bikes before I Learned about Brakes. The most important things in my life today are family, my dog, spending as much time outside as possible, and listening to those to whom no one else wants to listen. If I could give one piece of advice to my 15-yearold self, it would be: Calm down. Whatever it is, it’s probably not the end of the world. Just you wait, the best of life is yet to come. Take your time. You are more prepared than you think. (Though at 15 I would have never slowed down enough to take this advice!)

Most enduring memory of Nishimachi: When I think about my time at Nishimachi, the first thing I think of is the core group of friends with whom I spent the most time. We were an odd group, comprised of individuals with drastically different backgrounds, yet we had no problem being the best of friends. The teacher who had the greatest impact on the person I am today: I have a lot of favorite teachers from my time at NIS, but the one who probably had the most impact on me was David Green. I met Mr. Green within the first day or two of starting at Nishimachi, and he was one of those teachers who was always involved in something I was doing, whether it was science class or darkroom or Kazuno or ski trips or sports. The most exciting thing about my life today is riding my bike. I have dedicated over a decade to competitive cycling, and every year it seems to bring me someplace new—whether that is in traveling or in trying a new type of riding. The best part of my job is always getting to meet new people. Every day I meet patients and families whose stories never cease to amaze, and I always learn something new. The thing that concerns me most about the world today is people’s inability to see another’s point of view—it’s why neighbors argue and wars start. When I’m not at work, you’ll most likely find me on one of my bikes (or skis if there’s snow on the ground), or with my beloved dog.

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Age: 31 Country of Residence: United States Education: Lake Forest High School, College of William and Mary (B.A.), Emory University (M.T.S.), Loyola University Chicago (M.A.P.C.) Occupation: Chaplain Institution: Ann & Robert H Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago


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The Internationalist Spring 2015

65th Anniversary Special Class of 2000

David Chin Age: 30 Country of Residence: United States Education: ASIJ; Singapore American School; Carleton College (B.A., biology); University of Illinois at Chicago (online masters program, health informatics, expected completion, December 2015)

The most important things I learned at Nishimachi: What I remember most about Nishimachi was the emphasis on being a global citizen regardless of your country of origin and the importance of friends and family. Although we may all come from different countries and cultures, we must strive to understand each other and be respectful of everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s beliefs. We may disagree when it comes to a wide range of issues, but we can at least begin to appreciate, or be open to understanding, why someone else may have another opinion. With Nishimachi being such a small and closeknit community, we had to rely on one another. There were many times that I tried to isolate myself for various reasons, but I have my old friends to thank for pulling me out and helping me. Nishimachi was more than a school for me and it gave me the foundation for who I am today. Most enduring memories of Nishimachi: Some of my favorite memories date from working in the old darkroom, learning the basics of photography on old film cameras and how to develop our pictures using the enlargers and various chemical baths. We learned the importance of watching a scene unfold, and how to try to predict what was going to happen next in order to capture a pure moments to help tell the story. I especially remember the Ayumi rush, where we had to work through most of the weekend to get all the student photos developed and delivered to the Ayumi staff. It was a mad rush with everyone working hard to complete our snapshot of the community.

The teachers who had the greatest impact on the person I am today: I remember having many great teachers at Nishimachi, and they all taught me many things besides academics. John Montgomery introduced me to the world of blues music and encouraged me to learn how to play the guitar. Mr. Montgomery introduced me to the likes of Eric Clapton, Carlos Santana, and many others. His always upbeat attitude never ceased to put a smile on my face, and I will always remember him playing his guitar and outrunning us all in long-distance and cross country races. David Green introduced me to science and photography, both of which I have pursued as passions and as a career path in my adult life. Mr. Green taught us the ways of the darkroom and when to press the shutter. He also awakened in me a love of science, particularly biology, which became my major in college and the springboard for my first career in the biotech industry. The most exciting thing about my life today is knowing that there are so many possibilities out there in terms of careers and lifestyles to choose from. Nishimachi taught me that where Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m from does not define who I am, and all my years of living overseas have only reinforced that idea of flexibility and adaptability. I am currently in the process of changing careers from biotech and laboratory sciences to healthcare, and I am also slowly building up my own photography business. It has taken me many years to figure out in which direction I want to take my life, and part of figuring that out was looking back at the lessons I learned from Nishimachi. By no means is everything a walk through a garden of roses, but right now I am the most excited and optimistic about my life than I have ever been. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m engaged to the


65th Anniversary Special

The Internationalist Spring 2015

“Nishimachi taught me that where I’m from does not define who I am, and all my years of living overseas have only reinforced that idea of flexibility and adaptability.”

love of my life, and I’m beginning two great new careers. There’s very little to not be excited about! The best part of my job: I am currently a full-time student and am building up my photography business. You could say my job is doing well in my remaining coursework, contacting clients, and taking and editing pictures, not to mention all the administrative tasks that come with running your own business. As far as my graduate program goes, the best part about that is speaking with my classmates about their experiences in the healthcare field and learning about how dynamic and complex healthcare really is. For photography, one would expect the best part is taking pictures, but, for me, it actually is learning about the people I photograph and developing a connection with them in an effort to convey that through the photo. It’s amazing what you learn about a person when you just talk to them, without having a camera pointing at them. Eventually they forget you even have one, will no longer be self conscious, and become completely relaxed. That entire process is the best part of being a photographer for me. The thing that concerns me most about the world today: I am most concerned with how extreme, narrow, and shallow many people’s views are on many different issues. Politics, religion, societal norms, right, wrong, etc. There is so much noise and not enough meaningful dialogue. I listen to politicians and lawmakers on the news, and I sometimes wonder if I’m watching elected officials who are supposed to represent our interests or a bunch of five-year-olds arguing over whose turn it is to use the playground swing after being egged on by the troublemakers hiding around the corner. I see walking-talking contradictions on all sides of almost every news topic and am dismayed that the next generation seems to care more about celebrity selfies on Instagram and has no idea of history (people, places, events, yet can recite word for word every single song from the next big boy-band or twerking hip-hop artist at the drop of a hat. I am worried that we will find ourselves in a world consumed by materialism, extremism, and intolerance, all stemming from a lack of, or unwillingness to, understand the person on the other side of the fence. When I’m not at work, you’ll most likely find me: My fiancée and I take ballroom dancing lessons twice a month, and, when we have the time, we go out to local dancing events with our ballroom friends. If we’re not dancing, we’re most likely at home playing with our three cats or looking

for the next great new restaurant to try. I also practice kendo (Japanese fencing) and try to make it to practice twice a week. If I were to write an autobiography, the book’s title would be: Hold On, Still Thinking... The most important things in my life today are taking care of my cats and my fiancée, getting a good start on my new career paths, keeping in touch with my parents, brother, and extended family members, and remaining optimistic about the future. If I could give one piece of advice to my 15-yearold self, it would be: A lot of people, mostly adults, will tell you that they have their lives figured out. Here’s the secret: Most of them don’t have a clue what they’re doing and are just winging it. There are a few who do, and you may not know who they are at first, but, trust me, you will once you meet them, and they will have the greatest impact on your life. You will go through many, many hardships and challenges in the years to come. Along the way you’ll cry, get angry, fall in love, have your heart broken, make new friends, find new interests, have your heart mended, lose some friends, start from scratch, feel like you’re Einstein one moment and a complete idiot the next, and everything will sometimes feel pointless. No one ever said life was easy. But that’s entirely the point. Life throws you challenges to make you stronger. The experience you gain from overcoming those challenges will help pave the way for you in the future. You will stumble along the way, no question about that. You may even fail from time to time. And that’s ok. You are human. Even in the darkest hours of your life, there will always be a way out. Help will always come and sometimes from the last place you’d expect. No matter what comes your way, overcome it. Push through it. Keep reaching for that next step, even if you have to crawl on your hands and knees to reach it. Remember that night Dad talked about perseverance? Here’s what he quoted just to remind you. Ah, but a man’s reach should exceed his grasp, Or what’s a heaven for? —Robert Browning

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The Internationalist Spring 2015

65th Anniversary Special Class of 1999

Maiko Nakarai The most important things I learned at Nishimachi: The value of lifelong friendships, and accepting and loving each other for who we are.

“The most important things I learned at Nishimachi: The value of lifelong friendships, and accepting and loving each other for who we are.”

Most enduring memories of Nishimachi: The time I got to spend with my classmates and teachers, both on memorable trips like ski trips and Kazuno, and also at school and on sports teams. The best part of my job is learning about what employees in different industries and workplaces do, helping employers learn about and navigate the law, and helping bring about the resolution of disputes. The thing that concerns me most about the world today is the hatred and fear that comes from ignorance and generalizations, and how quickly we tend to forget the lessons learned from history. When I’m not at work, you’ll most likely find me spending time with friends, exploring the Bay Area, and chasing after my dog. The most exciting things in my life today: Professionally, spending time in courtrooms before judges and juries; and, personally, meeting new people and connecting with old friends. If I could give one piece of advice to my 15-yearold self, it would be: Travel and see more of the world!

Class of 2001

Rachel Vandenbrink Age: 28 Country of Residence: United States Education: University of Chicago (B.A.) Occupation: Graduate student in international relations, The Fletcher School, Tufts University (formerly, English News Editor, Radio Free Asia)

Age: 30 Country of Residence: United States Education: The Taft School; Harvard University (B.A.); New York University School of Law (J.D.) Occupation: Labor and Employment Attorney Company: Littler Mendelson, P.C.

“Giving those [graduation] speeches was terrifying, but for years afterward I was proud I had done it.”

The most important thing I learned at Nishimachi: I was very well prepared for the rest of my education. Most enduring memories of Nishimachi: Among many memories of good times with my Nishimachi classmates, two stick with me in particular: first, the time Beate Sirota Gordon came and spoke to us about how she helped get new rights for women included in Japan’s postwar constitution. Second, my ninth grade graduation, because giving those speeches was terrifying, but for years afterward I was proud I ➚ had done it.


65th Anniversary Special

The Internationalist Spring 2015

Class of 2003

Alyssa Yoneyama “On the math front, I owe my math foundation to [Mr. Fujino]—he ran a solid program and a tight ship!”

Age: 27 Country of Residence: United States Education: South Torrance High School; University of California, Berkeley (B.A.); University of Southern California (M.S.) Occupation: Marketing Specialist Company: XYZ.com, LLC

The most important things I learned at Nishimachi: I learned the importance of being open to and learning from new experiences. We were lucky to be exposed to so many things at Nishimachi— everything from U.S. history and building a school in Cambodia to learning how to juggle in P.E., all of which contributed to the person I’ve become. Most enduring memories of Nishimachi: standing on stage with my fellow ‘03ers and delivering my graduation speech in Japanese and English. And one of my most painful (and funny) memories is simultaneously spraining both of my ankles on the basketball court. The teacher who had the greatest impact on the person I am today: Mr. Fujino. Mr. Fujino was the most challenging teacher I had; he was always very honest with me (I was a “difficult” teenager at the time) and helped me flourish. On the math front, I owe my math foundation to him—he ran a solid program and a tight ship!

The teachers who had the greatest impact on the person I am today: I can’t name any one teacher because I had so many good ones I wouldn’t want to leave anyone out. The most exciting thing about my life today: After a few years in the working world, I’m very happy to be a student again and excited about my classes this semester.

The best part of my job is knowing that my team and I are building a new foundation that will enable others to build their online presence. It’s exciting to market a product like .xyz (a new domain extension that we launched in June 2014) and to watch our hard work pay off as it’s become the world’s largest and fastest growing domain with over 780,000 registrations. And Japan is our third largest market! When I’m not at work, you’ll most likely find me exploring new restaurants and bars throughout Los Angeles. If I were to write an autobiography, the book’s title would be: Goes with the Flow, Unless... If I could give one piece of advice to my 15-year-old self: Keep studying Japanese. It will be useful for your future. And eat as much nihonshoku as you can before leaving Tokyo!

The best part of my job: In my previous job as a reporter covering human rights news at Radio Free Asia, it was putting out stories that the world might not have heard about if not for me and my colleagues. If I could give one piece of advice to my 15-yearold self, it would be: Dream big.

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The Internationalist Spring 2015

65th Anniversary Special Class of 2003

Kayla Cahoon “It wasn’t until I left Nishimachi that I realized that we kind of got tricked into an excellent education. Sneaky.” Age: 26 Country of Residence: United States Education: International School of the Sacred Heart; University of Southern California (B.A., political science); University of Southern California (M.A. in teaching) Occupation: Middle School History Teacher Institution: Green Dot Public Schools

The most important thing I learned at Nishimachi was confidence. I got to grow up with a tight-knit group of people at Nishimachi, and it allowed me to very much develop my own personality and be comfortable with that. As I watch so many of my students struggle with self-esteem, I am very grateful for that. My most enduring memory of Nishimachi is of being in class with my friends. At the time, I thought our teachers were letting us get away with murder! When I think back on school, I mostly remember hanging out with my friends in class. It is only now, as a teacher, that I realize that we were learning at the same time. Learning a lot too! It wasn’t until I left Nishimachi that I realized that we kind of got tricked into an excellent education. Sneaky. The teacher who had the greatest impact on the person I am today: Mr. Fujino. While I knew at the time he was an extremely dedicated teacher, it is only now that I am a teacher myself I realize just how dedicated. At the time, hanging out until 6 or 7 p.m., doing math homework in his room while he graded, seemed normal. Now, I spend a lot of miserable time grading, and I realize that Fuj did so much grading. But it gave us instant feedback and made us correct our mistakes in a timely manner—and I ended up pretty darn good at math. The most exciting thing about my life today is every day really. My job as a middle school teacher in south L.A. is pretty crazy on a daily

basis, and I never know what new drama will unfold. You can call my job many things, but dull sure isn’t one of them. The best part of my job is my kids. My students are on average way behind academically, are suffering a lot from poverty and other socioemotional issues, and struggle with stuff we couldn’t have imagined at Nishimachi. As much as they challenge me on a daily basis, I love ‘em. The relationships I build with them and the strides I see them make throughout the year make the insanity of what I do worthwhile. The thing that concerns me most about the world today is the gigantic gap in opportunities for different people around the world. The difference between the educational opportunities we had at Nishimachi versus what my kids in south L.A. don’t have is astounding. On average, my students are already three grade levels behind in reading and math by the sixth grade. How does that happen? There is something deeply wrong with a system that allows that to occur routinely. When I’m not at work, you’ll most likely find me in bed watching TV or at yoga. Both are necessary to keep me sane. The most important things in my life today are my people. I am one of the few adults I know who can say they’ve had the same best friends since elementary school, and that’s pretty awesome.


The Internationalist Spring 2015

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Nishimachi-Kai Annual Alumni BBQ Nancy Hashima ’83 Nishimachi-Kai Chair

Come and enjoy the annual Nishimachi-Kai BBQ on Saturday, June 13, 2015! Our homemade, grilled-on-the-spot, all-you-can-eat, yakiniku-style BBQ is one of the most popular Nishimachi-Kai events of the school year. We hope this event, beloved by a core group of hearty, repeat eaters, will attract even more old friends this year as well as everyone in the current school community! This is a great opportunity for alumni to catch up with one another and for those new to the school to talk with alumni and find out why Nishimachi has always been such a special school. We will induct the new graduates of 2015 into Nishimachi-Kai. Our riveting basketball game begins at 2 p.m.  All those who want to play: Bring your sneakers!

June IAC Block Party 2015

Let’s all join the all-international school reunion block party! This year’s block party will be hosted by St. Mary’s International School (http://www.smis.ac.jp) on Sunday, June 7, 2015.  This is a chance to catch up with all of your friends from the various international schools while enjoying food, live music, and fun activities throughout the day! For more information, check the IACJ website at: http://iacjapan.com/iacjWP/category/events


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The Internationalist Spring 2015

2014 Walkathon and Runathon for Outreach Scholarship Mayumi Nakayama ’90 Alumni Officer

Thank you to all the alumni who came out to support Nishimachi Outreach Scholarship program’s walkathon and runathon on Saturday, November 15, 2014, and In Concert!3—Let’s Dance—on Saturday, March 14. (For more on In Concert!3, please see pp. 8-9, this issue.) A big thank you to alumni parents and to alumni who participated in the walkathon and runathon: Jeff Hsu ’77; Nancy Hashima ’83; Junko Sumiya ’83; Toyoko Tasaki ’83 and her daughter; David De Graw ’85; Kiki JiangYamaguchi ’87; Lalaka (Ogawa) Fukuma ’90; Morgan Baxter ’13; and Sally Maeda ’14; and to those who participated in In Concert!3: Noriko Kawai ’80; Haruko (Kawai) Kohno ’85; Lalaka (Ogawa) Fukuma ’90; Chris Hathaway ’90; Michio Montgomery ’99; Shinnosuke Yokota ’99; Marie Kuroda ’01; Mai Matsubara ’01; Yu Kawasaki ’11; and Kawasaki-sensei. We hope to see more alumni join us for these events next year!

In Concert! 3 -Let’s Dance- for Outreach Scholarship


The Internationalist Spring 2015

Food Fair 2014

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Lalaka (Fukuma) Ogawa ‘90 Director, Nishimachi-Kai

Nishimachi-Kai’s café and booth at Food Fair 2014 was another great success—thanks to the many who supported us by donating or helping out (or both!) and making it all possible. At the café, we sold iced coffee, bottled soft drinks, red and white wine, popcorn, Mako’s baked goods, and Nishimachi-Kai merchandise, including T-shirts and mugs. At the Nishimachi-Kai booth nearby, we sold falafels and wine.

Some dedicated alumni also came out to help us run the café and the booth. Thank you all for your precious time and effort! Every year, we are amazed and touched to see how many alumni (as well as their parents) and former faculty still carry with them a strong school spirit. We look forward to seeing many of you at our Food Fair 2015!

We would like to express our sincere appreciation for the generous contributions of food and drink Nishimachi-Kai received this year from loyal and dedicated donors. We couldn’t have done it without you. This year the weather was perfect with lots of sunshine and a pleasantly cool breeze blowing through the campus. We believe the weather contributed to increased sales of wine— we were sold out way before the fair came to a close. The new “black pepper” flavored popcorns were also a hit among the adults. As usual, many friends of the Nishimachi community dropped by the café to say hello.

Upcoming Anniversary Decade Reunions Class of 1984 - 36th Reunion in Tokyo (with class of 1985) November, 2015 Class of 1985 - 35th Reunion in Tokyo - November, 2015 Class of 2005 - 10th Reunion in NYC - July OR August, 2015 Contact the alumni office (alumni@nishimachi.ac.jp) for more details


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The Internationalist Spring 2015

Faces from Food


The Internationalist Spring 2015

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Fair 2014

Were you at Food Fair 2014 but donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see yourself in any of the photos? That can be remedied. For Food Fair 2015, look for me! Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be wearing my white Nishimachi-Kai T-shirt (see photo above). Please feel free to stop me and get me to take a quick photo of you! Mayumi


ARE YOU A GOLFER?

Outreach Scholarship 12th Annual Golf Tournament Chiba Birdie Club Saturday, May 16, 2015 ‘I-golf-once-a-year-at-Outreach-golf golfer’ to ‘I-golf-every-weekend golfer’ Please e-mail: development@nishimachi.ac.jp to sign up or for more information.

GRILLERS AND PREP CREW WANTED FOR BBQ! Nishimachi-Kai Seeking: BBQ prep crew (morning) Novice to expert grilling crew (day-time) Nishimachi-Kai needs your help to make the upcoming BBQ event on Saturday, June 13th a success! Please e-mail: alumni@nishimachi.ac.jp to sign up for shifts.

Upcoming Events Mark Your Calendars

Nishimachi Annual Fund

Community Service Flea Market/Bazaar - Saturday, May 9th, Nishimachi International School Outreach Scholarship 12th Annual Golf Tournament - Saturday, May 16th, Chiba Birdie Club Nishimachi Symposium - Saturday, May 23rd, Nishimachi International School Graduation - Friday, June 12th, Nishimachi International School Nishimachi-Kai BBQ - Saturday, June 13th, Nishimachi International School See Upcoming Events at www.nishimachi.ac.jp!

Nishimachi International School inspires many of us, students and parents alike, with its dedication to educating responsible world citizens. Your continued support of Nishimachi is greatly appreciated. Support the Nishimachi Annual Fund. < http://www.nishimachi.ac.jp/giving >

DID YOU KNOW THAT NISHIMACHI HAS AN OUTREACH SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM, THE GOAL OF WHICH IS TO PROMOTE DIVERSITY AT THE SCHOOL? Please contact us if you know of a student who might qualify or if you would like to make contributions to enhance the program. (Office of Admissions / Development Office)

Nishimachi International School - www.nishimachi.ac.jp, development@nishimachi.ac.jp

The Internationalist Spring 2015 vol 54 abridged  
The Internationalist Spring 2015 vol 54 abridged  
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