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extraordinary papers

Jeffrey Ruddel


extraordinary papers new dimensions in paper quilling

jeffrey rudell


contents INTRODUCTION __________________________________ 4 On the differce between craft and crafty____________ 11 TOOLS, MATERIALS, AND TECHNIQUES______________ 12 Tools and Materials_____________________________ 13 Basic Tools and Materials___________________ 23 A Wealth of Choices____________________________ 25 Optional Tools and Materials_________________ 35 A Note About Safety____________________________ 36 Craft Knives_______________________________ 37 Scissors _________________________________ 38 Selecting Paper_______________________________ 41

Useful Types of Paper______________________ 44 Paper Weights and Uses____________________ 45 Paper Grain_______________________________ 46 White on White_________________________________ 47 Hand-Coloring Paper____________________________ 48 Basic Techniques ______________________________ 56 How to Hold a Craft Knife____________________ 57 How to Cut Using a Straightedge_____________ 58 How to Cut Shapes Freehand with a Craft Knife__________________________________________ 60 Scoring_______________________________________ 62 Bending_______________________________________ 64 Gluing_________________________________________ 67 Crumpling, Puckering, and Tearing___________ 70 Crafting on an Assembly Line_________________ 71

THE PROJECTS_________________________________ 74 Traditional Quilling______________________________ 75 Tweaking the Traditional_________________________ 76 Fringe Flowers_________________________________ 77 No Rules______________________________________ 78 Progressive Flowers_____________________________ 79 Beautiful Loops (or Pear-Shaped Petals)____________ 80 A Bouquet of Roses_____________________________ 81 Making Peace with the Crease (or Foliated Petals)____ 82 A Little Left of Center (or Crescent-Shaped Petals)____ 83

Helix Blossoms_________________________________ 84 A Vase Full of Daisies or Gardenias________________ 85 Daisies________________________________________ 86 Gardenias________________________________ 87 Sweet Peas_______________________________ 88 Cosmos and Cornflowers____________________ 89 Cosmos_______________________________________ 90 Cornflowers_______________________________ 91 Ranunculus______________________________ 92 Secondhand Roses________________________ 93 Detailing Your Work__________________________ 94 Foliage________________________________________ 95 Traditional Quilled Foliage for Flat Applications___________________________________ 96

Solid and Folded Scored Foliage _______________ 97 Two-Dimensional Background Foliage___________ 98 Assembling a Paper Picture___________________ 99 Flower Centers_______________________________ 99 Narrow Roll Center________________________ 100 Wide Roll Center_________________________ 102 Fringed or Looped Centers_________________ 104 Stems for Freestanding Flowers____________ 104 Stems Glued to the Back of the Blossom_____ 105 Stems for the Sweet Pea and Other Cup-Shaped Flowers_________________________________ 106 Stems for Secondhand Roses and Ranunculus_____________________________ 107 Adding Leaves to Stems___________________ 108 Buds and Partially Opened Flowers and Other Details________________________________________ 120

Styling Your Work______________________________ 122 ABOUT THE AUTHOR____________________________ 124 A Life in Paper________________________________ 126 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS___________________________ 127 INDEX_______________________________________ 128 co n t en t s

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introduction My interest has always been in creating paper projects that leap off the page. I love making beautiful shapes that arc and twist and fan out in graceful and delicate forms. While it may be true that some of the more advanced projects I’ve taken on have been quite complex in the way they were constructed, my favorite work has always relied upon simple techniques and simple tools to create extraordinary results. Judging from the craft section of my local bookstore, I am not alone in liking projects that are both beautiful and easy to make. There is a plethora of titles available that offer either easy projects or extraordinary-looking projects, but far fewer books available to guide a reader who is interested in extraordinarylooking projects that are also easy to make. All too often, the choice falls between books that offer simple techniques but underwhelming results and books that offer incredible projects but require an engineering degree to complete. This book attempts to offer projects that are both simple and gorgeous. Much of the work featured in this book grew directly out of my early interest in paper quilling, sometimes referred to as paper filigree. Quilling is a craft that dates back at least to medieval Europe. Given the fragility of paper (compared to stone or bronze, at least) and its impermanence when subjected to the harsh effects of water, light, and mold, it is possible that the craft actually had its origins centuries earlier, perhaps in China during the Han Dynasty, 202 BCE. to 220 CE, or even as far back as 3050 BCE, when papyrus, paper-like writing material made out of reeds, was first put to use by the ancient Egyptians.. There is evidence to suggest that medieval French and Italian nuns and monks, taking their inspiration from metal filigree designs, may have practiced the art of paper quilling. At the time, convents and monasteries were known as places of learning and repositories scrolls and manuscripts. Paper was a precious and

CaptionTK veliquat, sequis nosto consequis at, sit vulpu 6

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expensive material at the time. It is thought that even the trimmings left over from the production of books and manuscripts would have been recognized and saved as something of value. Somewhere along the line, some imaginative and enterprising postulant may have happened upon the idea of using the trimmings to embellish and decorate a book cover, an icon, or a reliquary. England’s first paper mill began in 1495, and the craft of quilling spread to England. By the 18th century, the craft had spread widely in Europe, beyond its religious connections. Given the expense associated with obtaining paper and the timeconsuming nature of the art, it was likely to have been practiced mostly by the wealthy nobility of the time and women in royal households. By the Victorian era (1837–1901), paper had become more readily available and was inexpensive enough that quilling could become a favorite pastime of women of social standing. At the time, housework and other menial tasks (such

CaptionTK veliquat, sequis nosto

as sewing) were thought to be the purview only of the servant class. Higher education was reserved almost exclusively for men, and mercantile pursuits were out of the question for any woman interested in preserving and protecting her honor and the value of her name. For women of high birth, there were a limited number of pursuits deemed appropriate by society with which she might pass her days: music, reading (though not too much of that), needlepoint, and paper quilling. Quilling as a decorative art was particularly well suited to this period, which so valued floral motifs, swags, and elaborate borders on everything from picture frames to boxes and book covers. Jane Austen even makes reference to filigree at the end of Chapter 23 of Sense and Sensibility, when Lucy Steele draws her worktable near her and begins making a small quilled basked for the spoiled Annamaria small quilled.

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“I am glad,” said Lady Middleton to Lucy, “you are not going to finish poor little Annamaria’s basket this evening; for I am sure it must hurt your eyes to work filigree by candlelight. And we will make the dear little love some amends for her disappointment to-morrow, and then I hope she will not much mind it.” This hint was enough, Lucy recollected herself instantly and replied, “Indeed you are very much mistaken, Lady Middleton; I am only waiting to know whether you can make your party without me, or I should have been at my filigree already. I would not disappoint the little angel for all the world: and if you want me at the card-table now, I am resolved to finish the basket after supper.” Interest in paper quilling faded in the late 1800s, and it wasn’t until the 1950s and 1960s that there began to be renewed interest in the craft. In the 1990s, with the interest in paper crafts in general and in scrapbooking in particular enjoying a period of ascendency, quilling has been taken up by amateur crafters and professional paper artists alike. Although the finest examples of paper filigree are spectacular objects to behold, many people seem to prefer dabbling with the craft. I, of course, am a great fan of dabbling, but never more so than when such play is allowed to germinate and develop and grow into something unexpected and unique. This brings us to the projects in our book. For many projects, the technique comes directly from paper quilling, but with a distinctly modern twist. Although any of these pieces might be used discreetly on a greeting card or as an ornament on a small gift package, they are better suited for an application that allows them to stand up and stand out. Each project will yield a beautiful paper object that can be worn, framed, hung on a wall, placed on a table, or given as a gift. I’ve tried to hew to very straightforward techniques, steps that can easily be learned and mastered in an afternoon. The projects themselves may take longer than a day to complete, but this would be due to their size, the dimensions you choose to cut them to, and the number of items you decide to make. However, even the most timeconsuming project among them is no more complicated than the quickest one. With a few tools, some paper, and a few hours of work, you’ll be. i nt r o d u ct io n

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tools, materials, and techniques


tools and materials

Basic Tools and Materials Scissors: A sharp pair with pointy ends. Scissors should be sized so that they fit comfortably in your hand. Craft knife: A tool with a replaceable blade, such as an X-Acto brand knife. Craft knives are used for a variety of craft applications, including cutting paper. Your craft knife

The slot accommodates the end of a strip of quilling paper and holds it in place while it is wound into a roll. Beginning quillers often prefer the slotted quilling tool to the quilling needle (see opposite).

should be comfortable to hold in your hand, much as you

Creasing tool: Known by various of names including

would a pencil or pen. Larger, bulkier tools such as utility

bone creaser, paper creaser, bone folder, burnisher, and

knives are not recommended for these projects.

stylus, a creasing tool is a handheld tool that comes to a

Knife blades: X-Acto #11 blades or something similar. Safety goggles: Should be worn when using a craft knife. Self-healing cutting mat: A synthetic cutting surface used to protect your work table while you cut paper with a craft knife or rotary cutter. They are available in green, black, and gray and in a wide range of sizes. Metal straightedge ruler with nonskid cork backing: The nonstick backing helps to keep your ruler from moving while you are cutting. Pencil and eraser.

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rod protruding from one end.

distinct yet dull point. It is useful for debossing (indenting) fold lines and designs into a sheet of paper. White craft glue: Choose one that is easy to use, dries clear, and doesn’t take a long time to dry. I recommend Lineco Neutral pH Adhesive; you can also use Elmer’s craft glue. Hot glue gun with glue sticks: For attaching wire or heavier things. Needle-nose pliers (with wire-cutting edge, if possible): For bending floral wire. Floral wire: Thin flexible wire, usually sold in 18” inch lengths or on a spool. It can be used as stems for these projects. Floral wire is available in several thicknesses or

Quilling tool: One of two types of tools used for winding

gauges. The higher the number, the thinner the gauge. For

long, narrow strips of paper into tiny rolls. The quilling tool

our projects, 22-gauge is a good medium weight to begin

consists of a small metal handle with an even smaller slotted

with. Any gauge wire that is easy to and bend will suffice if

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floral tape

X-Acto knife

bone creaser

quill tool

needle-nose pliers

straight-pins

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On the Difference Between Craft and Crafty

floral wire is unavailable at your local craft or floral supply store. Floral wire is available with a green coating. The 18”

Crafty, as many readers will no doubt recognize, is a term

lengths are easier to use than the spooled wire, because

often leveled (in the pejorative) at the work of those who

they are already straight.

love to make things by hand. It is often deployed as a way of suggesting that something looks unsophisticated, unprofessional, or unfinished.

Craft, on the other hand, usually suggests a certain mas-

Floral tape: Also known as stem wrap or waterproof tape, this is a low-tack green adhesive tape for wrapping around floral wire in order to give it the matte appearance of

tery of a skill, or the deployment of a technique at a high

actual flower stems. Used to secure flower heads and leaves

level of excellence. The real difference between something

to stems as well.

being craft or crafty may lie in the perceived value one can assign to the end result. Luckily, the difference between the two is somewhat more

¼"-thick wooden doweling: For Roses and Ranunculus projects.

easily navigated than one might think. Often it is only a matter of scale that transforms something from crafty into

Various dowels, pencils, and rods for winding: 1/4” thick is a

craft. For example, some of the flower projects that follow

basic thickness.

entail cutting paper in very narrow strips of fringe. Part of the appeal of these designs is the extreme narrowness of the paper and the number of cuts required to create each blossom. This is a matter of scale (albeit very small scale), coupled with repetition. The exact same flower, created on a larger scale, would not look nearly as delicate or graceful or charming or appealing. Scale and repetition are often key to transforming simple techniques into complex-looking results. Don’t be afraid to

Toothpicks: For applying small amounts of glue. Straight pins such as quilter’s or corsage pins: To hold parts of quilled assemblies together while they dry. Also for centers of some flowers. Work board with acetate or wax paper cover: To hold glued work while it is drying, so that the

take things to extremes, to invest a little extra time in your

glued work doesn’t stick to the work surface. A cork or

projects, to make them a little bit larger or a little bit smaller

Styrofoam board is nice as you can tack pins into it easily if

than you might otherwise go. The extra work required is not

necessary.

hard; it merely requires a little more commitment of time. I sometimes suggest to those who admire my work that

Quilling needle: Consists of a wooden or plastic

what I do is closely akin to crocheting; only I use paper

handle out of which protrudes a pointed needle about 3”

instead of yarn. Instead of using a hook and yarn to make

long, around which you can wind long, narrow strips of paper

individual knots, I use a knife and paper to make individual

into tiny rolls, coils, and scrolls.

cuts. Unlike origami, these projects are not a series of unique or complicated steps that build, one upon another, to a final result. Our work is more about simple operations (cutting, folding, and creasing) that accrue. The impact comes not from the complexity of the work, but from the commitment and duration of the work. By themselves, each cut is rather unexceptional, but taken in combination with

Optional Tools Circle template board: Often made of cardboard or plastic, a circle template board is used to create uniformsized quilling rolls. The board has several circle spaces of

hundreds of other cuts, the end results are often breathtak-

each size. After a strip of paper has been wound on a quilling

ingly beautiful.

tool, it is removed from the tool and placed within one of the circles on the template. The roll will then unwind to the exact

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circle template board

quilling needle PHOTO TK

paper craft edge punches

narrow nosed glue bottle

circle punch???ok ?

floral punch

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Caption TK for image below Lessecte dolore faccum nostrud eugait, on ero odoloreet auguer sim qui ercidui bla. floral wire is unavailable at your local craft or floral supply store. Floral wire is available with a green coating. The 18” lengths are easier to use than the spooled wire, because they are already straight. Floral tape: Also known as stem wrap or waterproof tape, this is a low-tack green adhesive tape for wrapping around floral wire in order to give it the matte appearance of actual flower stems. Used to secure flower heads and leaves to stems as well.

Work board with acetate or wax paper cover: To hold glued work while it is drying, so that the glued work doesn’t stick to the work surface. A cork or Styrofoam board is nice as you can tack pins into it easily if necessary. Quilling needle: Consists of a wooden or plastic handle out of which protrudes a pointed needle about 3” long, around which you can wind long, narrow strips of paper into tiny rolls, coils, and scrolls.

¼”-thick wooden doweling: For Roses and Ranunculus projects.

Optional Tools

Various dowels, pencils, and rods for winding: 1/4” thick is a

Circle template board: Often made of cardboard

basic thickness.

or plastic, a circle template board is used to create uniform-

Toothpicks: For applying small amounts of glue.

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sized quilling rolls. The board has several circle spaces of each size. After a strip of paper has been wound on a quilling

Straight pins such as quilter’s or corsage

tool, it is removed from the tool and placed within one of the

pins: To hold parts of quilled assemblies together while

circles on the template. The roll will then unwind to the exact

they dry. Also for centers of some flowers.

loral wire is unavailable at your local craft or floral supply

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store. Floral wire is available with a green coating. The 18” store. Floral wire is available with a green coating. The 18” lengths are easier to use than the spooled wire, because they are already straight. Floral tape: Also known as stem wrap or waterproof tape, this is a low-tack green adhesive tape for wrapping around floral wire in order to give it the matte appearance of

Scale and repetition in Different Techniques Crafty, as many readers will no doubt recognize, is a term often leveled (in the pejorative) at the work of those who love to make things by hand. It is often deployed as a way of suggesting that something looks unsophisticated, unprofessional, or unfinished.

Craft, on the other hand, usually suggests a certain mas-

actual flower stems. Used to secure flower heads and leaves

tery of a skill, or the deployment of a technique at a high

to stems as well.

level of excellence. The real difference between something

¼"-thick wooden doweling: For Roses and Ranunculus projects.

being craft or crafty may lie in the perceived value one can assign to the end result. Luckily, the difference between the two is somewhat more easily navigated than one might think. Often it is only a

A Note About Safety

matter of scale that transforms something from crafty into craft. For example, some of the flower projects that follow

One of the most attractive qualities of paper is its

entail cutting paper in very narrow strips of fringe. Part of

accessibility to all, children and adults alike. However, the

the appeal of these designs is the extreme narrowness of

projects featured in this book are easiest to create using a

the paper and the number of cuts required to create each

craft knife (such as X-Acto) and consequently are intended specifically for adult crafters who have some familiarity with such tools. Children should never be allowed to use an openblade craft knife. Many of the projects included here might be adapted for children and their child-friendly tools such as snub-nosed

blossom. This is a matter of scale (albeit very small scale), coupled with repetition. The exact same flower, created on a larger scale, would not look nearly as delicate or graceful or charming or appealing. Scale and repetition are often key to transforming simple techniques into complex-looking results. Don’t be afraid to take things to extremes, to invest a little extra time in your projects, to make them a little bit larger or a little bit smaller

scissors, but this task is left to the reader. Children should

than you might otherwise go. The extra work required is not

always be supervised when using cutting tools.

hard; it merely requires a little more commitment of time. I sometimes suggest to those who admire my work that

Below are a few precautions (and reminders) to aid you in

what I do is closely akin to crocheting; only I use paper

safely undertaking these projects.

instead of yarn. Instead of using a hook and yarn to make

Scissors

individual knots, I use a knife and paper to make individual cuts. Unlike origami, these projects are not a series of

• T here are times when a sharp pair of scissors will be of

unique or complicated steps that build, one upon another,

great service to you in crafting these projects, but care

to a final result. Our work is more about simple operations

should be used with them.

(cutting, folding, and creasing) that accrue. The impact

• Scissors should be sized so that they fit comfortably in your hand. • Keep fingers away from blade edges. • Avoid using only the tip of your scissors when cutting. Using the full length of the blades wherever possible.

comes not from the complexity of the work, but from the commitment and duration of the work. By themselves, each cut is rather unexceptional, but taken in combination with hundreds of other cuts, the end results are often breathtakingly beautiful.

a bou t t h e au t h o r

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project 1

traditional quilling Traditional Quilling Template (Project 1) Direction of Paper Grain

TEMPLATE: caption TK Ugait alit la con ut lore dolorerci tet praestrud dequat.

Progressive Flower Template (Project 2) To begin your project, you’ll need strips of

paper. Precut strips of quilling paper are available online

The roll should be snugly wound, with each of its concentric layers aligned.

at many local craft stores. I prefer to cut my own strips, approximately 1/8” wide and 9” long. If you like, you may cut

step 4

When you reach the end of your paper strip,

your strips wider (to a recommended maximum of 3/8”).

grasp the top and bottom of your roll with you thumb and

The length of the strips should align with the grain of the

forefinger and gently ease it off the end of the quilling tool.

paper (see page TK for determining the paper grain). The illustration (top) shows the grain alignment.

step 5

Place your roll into one of the precut openings of

your circle template. The roll will unwind until it fully fills the

step 2

Hold your quilling tool in one hand while you in-

opening in your template.

sert the end of one of your strips into the slotted tip. Try to keep the quilling tool as close to the end of the strip as possible.

step 6

Repeat this process until you have eight identi-

cal rolls, placing each in the circle template as you work.

step 3

Slowly wind the strip of paper onto your tool,

while guiding the paper with your other hand (photo 849).

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step 7

Using a fine-tipped glue applicator, a glue stick,

Direction of Paper Grain

step 1


Cut thin strips of paper with a craft knife and straightedge. Secure the paper strip in the quilling tool.

Secure the paper strip in the quilling tool. Cut thin strips of paper with a craft knife and straightedge.

Wind the strip around the quilling tool. Cut thin strips of paper with a craft knife and straightedge.

Let the roll expand in the quilling circle template to make a loose roll. Cut thin strips of paper with a craft knife.

pr o j ect 1

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or a drop of paper adhesive on a toothpick, glue the loose

roll, you would simply repeat the process, pinching the roll

end of each of your rolls in place, returning it to the circle

on the opposite side also).

template hole to dry completely (photo 859).

step 8

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step 9 For this project, we need to shape 7 of our rolls

When all 7 your rolls have been shaped,

arrange them in a pleasing way around the round center roll

into teardrop shapes. We will leave one as a loose circu-

and glue them to each other, using a few dots of adhesive

lar roll for the center. To make the teardrop shape, simply

spread on the touching edge of each roll (photo 871A, 871B).

hold your roll between thumb and forefinger and firmly

A cork work board, with a nonstick cover such as acetate, and

pinch one side of it with the other hand. This will result in a

straight pins will help you to hold your work together until it

teardrop-shaped roll (photo 865A). (For a marquise-shaped

dries (photo 874A).

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Glue the end of the loose roll closed and let it dry. Cut thin strips of paper with a craft knife and straightedge.

Pinch one end of the roll to create a teardrop shape.Secure the

Secure the paper strip in the quilling tool.

B. The assembled teardrop shapes, glued around the loose roll.

C. Caption TK

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project 10

daisies

Helix Template (Project 9) CORNER “A”

For the very first of these quick and easy designs, we turn to the

humble daisy. Common as it may be, what it lacks in sophistication it makes up for by being endlessly cheery. For this project, a 3” circle

Direction of Paper Grain

SCORE AND FOLD ALONG DOTTED LINE

Direction of Paper Grain

Daisy 10) punch would be helpful,Template in addition to(Project the basic tools.

AFFIX “A” HERE

CRIMP ALONG DOTTED LINE (No Scoring Necessary)

TEMPLATE: caption TK Ugait alit la con ut dolorerci praestrud dequat.

step 1

Begin with a lightweight paper stock (50 to 90 g/

m2). Decorative vellums and certain light or semi-transpar-

length. Note: Since this project was intended to be both easy

ent drawing papers work especially well. Use a large circle

and fast, and since you will be using lightweight paper stock,

punch (such as are available from Fiskars or Marvy) to

you may wish to consider cutting 3 to 6 disks at a time. Be cer-

punch out two 3” circles in the paper of your choice (photo

tain your paper is held firmly in place if using a craft knife, or

1321), or cut more if you wish. You can use a circle template

use a scissors. In our photo (photo 1326), a coin is being used

or compass to mark the circles and cut the circles with a

to keep the cutter from starting too far in. You can see the radial

craft knife or scissors if you don’t have a circle punch.

cuts in photo (photo1331.

step 2

Make 8 equally spaced radial cuts in your circles,

as indicated by the white lines on the template illustration

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[Template_Pg_5.ai, right]. Each cut should be about 1” in

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step 3

Next, partially fold each petal in half lengthwise,

beginning at the tip of each, as indicated by the dashed


Cut thin strips of paper with a craft knife and straightedge. l.

Secure the paper strip in the quilling tool.

Wind the strip around the quilling tool..

Let the roll expand in the quilling circle template to make a loose roll. Cut thin

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daisy variations Variation 1 By modifying the manner in which you crease these pieces, you can achieve a great deal of variation in the final results. Try soft creases or partial creases at just the tips of the petals or even hand-shaping each petal to enhance the organic look of your Daisy, Variation 2 Create more radial cuts to have narrower petals. You can make 12 or 16 cuts or more,

A. soft creases B. partial creases

D. 12 radical cuts C. 16 radical cuts

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p roj e c t 1 0 : da i s y var iat io n s

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extraordinary papers  
extraordinary papers