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OC Today WWW.OCEANCITYTODAY.COM

MARCH 29, 2019

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Worcester Preparatory School spring sports teams kick off competition this week – Page 61

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Study OK’d for sports complex

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By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (March 29, 2019) The Ocean City Council took initial steps this week toward constructing an indoor athletic complex to attract amateur sports tournaments after voting unanimously to request the Maryland Stadium Authority approve a feasibility study and allocated $49,000 for the venture. Tourism and Marketing Director Donna Abbott told the council during its work session on Tuesday that Crossroads Consulting, which contracts with the Stadium Authority, has prepared a draft scope of services for a sports complex study. “The next step, should you agree today to this proposal, is to have the mayor send a letter requesting the study to the Maryland Stadium Authority and then their board would take that consideration at their next meeting,” she said. If the study request is approved, state statutes require the Stadium Authority to notify the General Assembly budget committees of the proposal. A 30-day review and comment period follows. Abbott said funds are available in the Tourism Advisory Board’s budget to pay for the Crossroads Consulting study. “They’ve done studies before on our convention center expansion,” she said. Abbott also reported that Crossroads worked with See SPORTS Page 7

By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (March 29, 2019) Maryland lawmakers approved an amended version of the “Fight for Fifteen” minimum wage bill last week, with several notable changes. The finalized language delays the onset of pay increases by six months and extends the target date for reaching the top rate until 2025, and also grants additional time for small businesses and retains the current tip credit for waitstaff. Despite the General Assembly failing to pass compaSee MINIMUM Page 6

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WHAT A VIEW Spring has sprung and the days are getting longer, as the sun sets after 7 p.m. earlier this week. A warm glow fills the sky, bayside, at Northside Park on 125th Street.

Gas conversion work goes year-round Sandpiper goes into neighborhoods with change to natural gas By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (March 29, 2019) Sandpiper Energy, now two years into the third phase of work to convert Ocean City from propane to natural gas, received permission this week from the City Council to keep crews on the job over the summer and continue yearround though 2020. Manager of External Affairs Steve Ashcraft said despite curtailing work during previous tourist seasons, the

GREG ELLISON/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Sandpiper Energy representatives Rob West, left, and Steve Ashcraft, receive permission from the City Council to continue its natural gas conversion project during summer months for the next two years.

timing is ideal to go yearround and shave months off the project, as it ventures into neighborhood areas. “Since we got to the state

line and we’re crossing over to the most densely residential potion of this whole project … we would like to request permission to work through the

summer months,” he said. By continuing labor throughout the year, the bulk of work could be completed by spring 2021, with the entire resort transitioned off propane by 2023, Ashcraft said. “Our intent to have natural gas to all properties in Ocean City,” he said. During the City Council work session on Monday, Ashcraft proposed servicing 350 residential accounts in the Montego Bay neighborhood this season. “We can do about 20 a week so that will take us through the summer season,” See NATURAL Page 56


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MARCH 29, 2019

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School, wage bills vetoed (March 29, 2019) The Maryland school starting date bill, minimum wage bill and legislation stripping the state comptroller’s office of the authority to regulate the sale of alcoholic beverages. Vetoed, vetoed, vetoed. Gov. Larry Hogan had a busy Wednesday, as the Republican chief executive of the state exercised his veto power to block major legislation produced by the General Assembly’s Democratic majority. The school calendar measure and legislation raising the state’s minimum wage incrementally to $15 an hour had major implications for Ocean City, while the other bill was viewed largely as the assembly majority’s punishment of Comptroller Peter Franchot, a Democrat, for acting against its wishes. See SCHOOL Page 7

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Parks policy aims for no-smoking By Greg Ellison Staff writer (March 29, 2019) Eliminating designated smoking areas in Northside Park, although not on the horizon for this year, was debated during a Recreation and Parks Committee meeting on Monday. Director of Recreation and Parks Susan Petito said when the city first enacted a smoking ban in 2015 it was limited to the beach and Boardwalk. “They overlooked the segment on parks,” she said. Although discussions surrounding updates to the smoking ordinance last year included recommendations to See PUBLIC Page 7

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Parks Master Plan focuses on pair of parks By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (March 29, 2019) Strategizing for potential revamping of the Downtown Recreation Complex on Third Street and the Dog Playground on 94th Street was the focus of discussions this week about updating the Parks Master Plan. Director of Recreation and Parks Susan Petito said the recent announcement about the “Woodward WreckTangle,” a proprietary obstacle course tentatively slated for the northwest corner of Philadelphia Avenue and Third street, has revived talks over long-term design plans for the recreation amenity. “It is an active … regional park for Ocean City and it’s also an event venue,” she said. “Potentially, with some modifications, we could do more events down there.” During the Recreation and Parks Committee meeting on Monday, Petito said the downtown location presents challenges such as parking, lighting, available space and the potential for flooding because of tidal issues “There’s so many wonderful things that people want to see, but we really just don’t have the space to do everything people would like to see in that park,” she said. Since prior meetings about the Parks Master Plan were last held, Petito said a number of updates were performed, including: demolishing the Third Street tennis courts this January; removing dugouts on the former little league field; repairing and repainting basketball courts; replacing siding at the Ocean Bowl Skate Park; and installing a water fountain. Petito said the Ocean City Council conducted a survey in 2017 surrounding park amenities to include in revitalization plans. “At the time, there was interest and discussion about having an architect come in and do some design work on the park,” she said.

Petito said previous concerns about re- Whiteside property on South First placing the tennis courts on Third Street, Street, which formerly housed Boardwhich were required to stay in place suf- walk trams and has been considered for ficiently long enough to satisfy Maryland use as a parking lot, might provide an Project Open Space grant program man- ideal location for future expansion of the WreckTangle concept. dates, have been subsequently satisfied. “Hopefully, WreckTangle is just enor“There is no requirement to replace tennis downtown, but I do believe there mously successful and perhaps we put is a need [and] finding a location for that that down there,” he said. “It’s probably is still something that’s important,” she a better location for them close to more attractions.” said. Councilman John Gehrig, who serves Echoing previous recommendations, as Recreation and Parks Petito proposed committee chair, agreed hiring an architect ‘There’s so many wonderful the topic could be revisto produce things that people want to ited after summer 2019 schematics highlighting potential see, but we really just don’t winds down. “Let’s see how development scehave the space to do WreckTangle does this narios. everything people would year and see what level “It’s a good idea like to see in that park of involvement they to have some conceptual drawings Director of Recreation and want to have moving forward,” he said. about what we Parks Susan Petito Petito also reviewed could do down at plans to maximize that park,” she said. “Even if we can’t do a complete ren- square footage at the Dog Playground in ovation … maybe we can start to piece- Little Salisbury Park on 94th Street, notmeal some improvements at that park.” ing the location is undersized for the apPetito also noted there are grant op- plication and presents maintenance portunities available to replace play- challenges. “Management practices are suited for ground equipment at the Third Street residents but they’re not really practical park. “When we talked with … the council for visitors,” she said. Petito said the fee-based facility rebefore we talked about the concept of doing … an all-inclusive playground quires users to acquire passes prior to which would provide a destination play- entrance. “The reason we have it set up that way ground for people with handicaps or disis because you need to show your dog abilities,” she said. While supportive of the introduction has all its appropriate shots,” she said. Technological challenges have also of the WreckTangle amenity at the park, Petito said any future expansions should plagued the facility, most notably probbe located elsewhere, potentially in mid- lems with gate locks, which have caused town, due to concerns over losing “green public relations nightmares, Petito said. “Technology at the park has been at space,” downtown. “I’m not sure Third or Fourth Street times unreliable,” she said. Petito said the minimum recomis the perfect place,” she said. “You need parking downtown, you need recreation mended space for a dog park is threeamenities [and] you need green space.” quarters of an acre, or roughly 36,000 City Manager Doug Miller noted the square feet.

“The absolute minimum size standards for any sort of even pocket dog park are half an acre, or 21,780 square feet,” she said. “We have 9,000 square feet of useable space.” Due to sizing issues, the facility was deemed a “Dog Playground,” Petito said. Despite being rejected for a Community Parks and Playground grant of $145,500 last year, Petito said the application was recently re-submitted. “We were not told whether it’s being considered this time around,” she said. “There is a plan … to reshape the space so it will have more useable space within the park.” If the grant request again fails to resonate, Petito suggested the city consider earmarking funds to reimagine the space. “We have a resort community here [and] we don’t allow dogs on the beaches at certain times,” she said. “We don’t have enough open park land.” Gehrig noted the ever-increasing propensity for tourists to travel accompanied by furry friends and suggested examining a policy revision to permit human-accompanied canines to inhabit the Boardwalk during morning hours when bikes are permitted. “People are crazy about their pets,” he said. Ocean City Council President Lloyd Martin, also a member of the Recreation and Parks Committee, said the reception was less than amicable after recently making a similar pitch to a downtown business merchant. “I said that to somebody and [they] beat me up down on the Boardwalk,” he said. Miller noted the proposal could provide a relief valve for Beach Patrol members. “It is a constant problem for Beach Patrol when they do their morning run that people, especially at the north end, take their dogs off the leash,” he said. “If we were to say dogs are fine [on the Boardwalk] until 10 a.m. … it might solve a lot of problems.”

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MARCH 29, 2019

Minimum wage increase clears legislature Continued from Page 1 rable minimum wage legislation every year since 2016, the push was renewed again this session by Del. Diana Fennell (D-47, Prince George’s) and Sen. Cory McCray (D-45, Baltimore) who sponsored cross-filed HB 166 and SB 280, which originally aimed to raise the minimum wage to $11 per hour later this year, and then add $1 each year until reaching $15 in 2023. After each chamber approved corresponding bills earlier this month, a Senate Conference Committee was formed to reach a compromise on language variations for a final vote, which resulted in House passage by a 94-43 margin and Senate approval by a 3213 tally last Wednesday. In the aftermath of passage, Del. Wayne Hartman (D-38C) this week reiterated that the wage increase bill is

wrong for Maryland “I was hoping the difference between the two bills would cause this to be delayed until next year,” he said. “This is definitely going to disadvantage our businesses and, I think, we will lose jobs as a result of this bill.” Hartman highlighted several alterations to the legislation, most notably retention of the state’s current tip credit, with the initial bill language seeking to increase wage rates for tip earners to $15 by 2027. “I think the biggest advantage to the shore was the change for the tipped employee credit,” he said. “There is another provision for some of the smaller employers, where things are going to take a little bit longer to kick in.” Maryland’s current minimum wage regulations exempt employees earning

at least $30 monthly in tips who are paid a $3.63 hourly rate that must combine to equal at least the current $10.10 scale. Under the new wage regulations, pay increases for businesses with less than 15 employees commence on Jan. 1, 2020, when the scale bumps up to $11 per hour, with annual growth of .60 cents per hour until reaching $15 on July 1, 2026. By comparison, businesses with at least 15 staff members, which also have to begin paying a minimum rate of $11 hourly starting on Jan. 1, 2020, are required to raise wages .75 cents per hour annually, ending with a $1 per hour increase on Jan. 1, 2025 to reach $15. Other changes of note drop the age to 18 for employees to be paid at 85 percent of the minimum wage rate,

which previously included staff under 20 years of age during their first six months on the job. “The original bill as it was drafted was to take it to $11 this year and then $1 a year each year until it reached its full effect,” Hartman said. “The amendments … offer some relief.” Ocean City Hotel-Motel-Restaurant Association Executive Director Susan Jones said although tipped waitstaff were excluded, the restaurant industry would still suffer a financial impact. “I’m happy that the tipped workers positions were preserved, however, restaurants will still be negatively impacted as the hostess, dishwasher, etc. will have wage increases,” she said. Based on the large youth demographic among seasonal employees, Jones said numerous resort businesses would likely utilize the option to pay staff members 18 or younger at 85 percent of the minimum wage rate. “Sadly, this legislation comes on the heels of the recent [wage] increase, so the result will be reductions in workforce, reduced hours and increases in pricing,” she said.

‘I think the biggest advantage to the shore was the change for the tipped employee credit.’ — Del. Wayne Hartman In 2014, the General Assembly approved legislation that raised the state minimum wage rate from $7.25 to $8 an hour, effective Jan. 2015, then to $8.25 in July 2015, followed by $8.75 in July 2016 and $9.25 in July 2017, before reaching the current $10.10 scale last July. Jones said among concerns voiced over the minimum wage legislation during a recent hospitality industry trade show were the potential for restaurant operators to source product lines, such as pre-cut produce or salads, to help eliminate labor needs. “For example, a hotel restaurant serving breakfast and lunch, which typically employs 18 people, will turn into a ‘grab and go’ area that only needs two people to open,” she said. Hartman said despite the bill passing with a veto-proof margin, Republicans asked Gov. Larry Hogan refrain from adding his signature. “The Republican Caucus did meet [last] Friday and unanimously voted to send a letter to the governor to ask him to veto it,” he said. “The Democrats will have enough time, even if the governor does veto it, to bring it back and still have it take effect,” he said. Jones concurred the bill passage is essentially a foregone conclusion. “While a veto would be wonderful, in reality there are enough votes to override … so our community will most likely be negatively impacted,” she said.


MARCH 29, 2019

Public parks could ease into full-blown no-smoking policy Continued from Page 3 make all the resort’s public parks smoke-free, Petito said the finalized language fell short of that mark. “We decided to leave smoking areas in Northside Park at the time because a lot of the softball players are used to smoking and we didn’t want to just cut them off,” she said. Petito said while the revised ordinance language does prohibit smoking or vaping in all public parks, excepting designated areas in Northside, it also specifies 10 different park areas that are included. “The hope was those would not be listed because, in fact, they were talking about segments, like playgrounds at Northside Park [or] the tennis courts at Third Street,” she said. “The truth is it’s the entire park area, not just segments, that are nonsmoking.” Petito recommended eliminating the Northside Park designated smoking areas. She added, “If you want to allow our participants one more season ... [that could] prepare them for the fact that at the end of the season we’re going to go no smoking,” she said. “I’m happy to bring this back to you at the end of the season,” she continued. “I do think it makes sense to be uniform nonsmoking in parks.” Ocean City Council President Lloyd Martin, also a member of the Recreation and Parks Committee, asked about efforts to strategically locate designated smoking areas in the park. “I know we had a discussion about

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Ocean City Today

moving them out away from the field,” he said. “Is it working at all?” “We’re still finding cigarette butts,” said Parks Superintendent Gary Collier. Martin advised against sudden change. “It’s kind of like the Boardwalk, we’ve got to ease into it,” he said. Along with exploring relocating designated tobacco consumption areas to the fringes of the park, Martin suggested better signs. “We put it on the pavement going in, ‘smoke-free park, enjoy the clean air,’ on the path so they don’t miss it,” he said. Petito said department staff regularly monitors the park to inform patrons who are smoking of the current restrictions, with many claiming to be unaware of the policy. “The challenge of having smoking areas in Northside Park, though it does provide a place for those who smoke to go, [is] where we have to locate it,” she said. Petito said experience has proven the most ideal locations to sequester smokers are at the initial entrance to the park, along with the front of the buildings. “You can’t really push that any farther from the front of the building, because people won’t go to it,” she said. In addition to retaining the smoking policy this year, Martin suggested maintaining the current designated smoking areas in Northside Park if people are conscientious enough to adhere to the policy.

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for vetoing the wage bill was that it offered no relief for businesses that employ seasonal and temporary workers, and did not recognize regional economic differences. Hogan’s vetoes aren’t expected to stand, as all the bills passed with majorities large enough to produce an easy vote to override. The legislature has until April 8 to do that.

Sports complex study approved Continued from Page 1 Worcester County several years ago on a comparable effort. “At the time, it was a professional ice hockey arena, in addition to some outdoor fields,” she said. “The result of that study was that the ice rink was not going to be feasible, but that the potential was there for athletic fields.” Abbott said at that time the county denied a request from Ocean City to amend the study to consider an indoor complex. Abbott said sports marketing gained fresh traction during recent discussions

about increasing room tax rates, with the council voting 5-2 during its work session on March 12 to seek approval from the Worcester County Commissioners for a half percent rate increase. Council President Lloyd Martin agreed conducting the study was a wise move. “I think it’s a good first step,” he said. Mayor Rick Meehan offered to lend support beyond the letter of request. “If we have to go up (to Annapolis) and make a presentation we can do that as well,” he said.

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School bill vetoed by Hogan Continued from Page 3 Franchot was a major promoter of the post-Labor Day school starting date for all Maryland schools that Hogan instituted via an executive order in 2016. He also angered the majority by pushing to lift restrictions on the craft brewing industry. Among the reasons Hogan cited

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Paid parking back in effect for April, runs until October (March 29, 2019) Ocean City’s paid parking season begins April 1 and will remain in effect until Oct. 31. Rates are $2 per hour on the street and in municipal parking lots and $3 per hour in the inlet parking lot. Handicapped vehicles (with a handicapped plate or visible placard) may park for up to one hour at no-charge on-street or in municipal lots only. Last year, the resort converted the old “Pay and Display” system to solar-powered kiosks with a “Pay by Plate” feature. With the current system, you must enter your license plate number before paying for your time. There is no need to place a receipt on the dashboard. In addition, time can be extended at the kiosk with your plate number. Enforcement for on-street and municipal lot parking and inlet lot parking vary. For inlet lot parking, visitors can pay for the desired amount of time when they park or before they leave their parking spaces by paying for the amount of time they stayed. First 30 minutes are free. You do not need to display a receipt on your dash. Instead, you enter See PAID Page 10

MARCH 29, 2019

Ocean City Today

Parking task force looks for data By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (March 29, 2019) Ocean City’s recently formed Parking Task Force held its third meeting this week, with consultant Dan Kupferman of Walker Parking providing suggestions based on earlier discussions about addressing paid parking inequities, while also examining potential parking revenue increases. Kupferman said the goal is to source increased parking revenue to cover a roughly $1.7 million budgetary shortfall. “The last meeting was eye opening,” he said. On Wednesday, Kupferman shared rough estimates for increasing parking prices at the inlet lot, other municipal lots and on-street metered spots. “The inlet lot is the cash cow,” he said. Kupferman said increasing the inlet lot rate by $1 on weekends would generate an additional $300,000 in revenue, while bumping prices up by 50 cents daily would net roughly $400,000 more profit. “We could examine data in the summer for more details, [but] I think it’s priced right,” he said. “I really think you’re hammering away at the inlet lot.” Raising the cost at other municipal parking lots by 50 cents would raise

about $225,000 more revenue, while adding $1 to weekend rates would bring in about $300,000 in additional funds, Kupferman said. On-street parking, if increased by 50 cents, would yield $320,000 in added funds, which doubles to $640,00 if the rates are boosted $1, Kupferman said. “That’s serious money but, again, that’s also a serious rate increase up to $3 and there might be some push back,” he said. “I think some people look at the reduced rate on street as relief compared to the inlet lot.” Kupferman said increasing all parking rates by 50 cents would net about $900,000 in additional revenue, with a 50-cent increase on all weekend parking rates netting about another $400,000. “Your combined increase is $1.3 million, so you’re very close to the shortfall with these increases across the board, [but] you’re hammering the same area and I don’t recommend it.” Of the roughly 6,500 parking spaces in Ocean City, more than 60 percent are free oceanside spots. “There’s almost 4,000 spaces that are unpaid,” he said. “That is the direction I think you should take, and that is expanding paid parking.” Kupferman acknowledged the topic was previously attempted and failed. “That has no bearing on my recom-

mendations,” he said. Extolling reason over emotion, Kupferman said his conclusions are based on data and current conditions. “I think you’ll see the numbers get a lot bigger this way, because you have a bigger parking supply, so you’re spreading it out over a greater number of spaces,” he said. Implementing paid parking at $2 per hour on ocean blocks from 11th Street to 33rd Street, with residents provided free permits, would raise about $600,000 in added revenue, Kupferman said. “This would bring in $600,000, and this is [with] residents still not paying for parking,” he said. That approach would allow the city to shift the cost burden currently shouldered by property taxes to “day trippers,” Kupferman said. “People … are coming in and aren’t paying taxes, and if they park for free aren’t really contributing to maintaining the beach and Boardwalk,” he said. While the ocean blocks from 11th Street to 33rd Street contain roughly 400 spots, Kupferman said the blocks from that point up to 146th Street contain almost ten times as many spaces. “This is largest area,” he said. This area could yield about $1.2 million in higher revenues, with half the spaces earmarked for residents to See FRESH Page 10

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Ocean City Today

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PAGE 10

Ocean City Today

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Continued from Page 8 use at no charge. “That is really having tourists, or day trippers, help support the beaches and the Boardwalk,” he said. “The permit is to give residents a break or discount. The supply and demand doesn’t change.” Kupferman stressed the need to obtain data to extrapolate more accurate financial numbers. “It’s not increasing your existing rates,” he said. “It just seems to me that it is more equitable, to spread it out then just keep raising those rates.” Other ideas Kupferman pitched included providing free shuttle service from the West Ocean City Park and Ride lot. “You call it a free lot, but if the only reason you’re parking there is to take the shuttle, it’s not free,” he said. “It cost $200,000 per year to provide shuttle service [and] it generates about $100,00 in revenue.” Other approaches mentioned included: increased marketing of the Parkmobile app; installing dynamic signage at the inlet lot to alert vehicles if they owe money when exiting; and introducing an E-Z Pass system for advanced payments. Kupferman also brought up staffing issues and proposed creating either a parking department or authority to provide a dedicated position for greater oversight. Councilman Dennis Dare said responsibilities for parking issues are divided among numerous city departments. “There isn’t that one person in charge of everything to make sure it’s coordinated, because each one of

those departments has other responsibilities,” he said. “It may be more efficient with one person in charge.” Whatever path is explored, there are inevitable bumps ahead with revised approaches likely, Dare said. “If there’s anything done, the one thing that we probably can agree on, is that it won’t necessarily be a homerun and perfect the first time through,” he said. Mayor Rick Meehan cautioned against implementing changes throughout the resort. “I’ve learned over the course of the years, if you try to solve the whole problem at once you usually fail,” he said. Meehan also suggested the free Park and Ride shuttle proposal is a first step the task force should consider. “That’s something we think would relieve some of the parking problems and encourage our city employees to [use] the Park and Ride,” he said. To help fund the additional cost to offer free shuttle service from West Ocean City, Meehan suggested adding 25 cents to the price for parking downtown outside of the inlet lot. “If you increase on street parking by 25 cents, that’s about $150,000,” he said. “Maybe those two hand in hand would create a positive effect we could build on.” Regardless of next steps, Kupferman reiterated the vital importance of compiling statistics to reach informed conclusions. “Data collection cost money, but it has tremendous value,” he said. “Data can inform your future decisions and look at your long-range plans.”

Paid parking in effect for April Continued from Page 8 your license plate at a nearby kiosk & the system will recognize your “paid time” based on your vehicle. (Note: You will need to know your complete license plate including letters). You may also pay with the ParkMobile App. A violation of inlet lot parking will result in a mailed bill of time spent in the lot at $3 per hour, plus a $25 administrative fee. This fee will escalate to $50 if not paid within 30 days. Patrons must pay for expired time prior to leaving the inlet lot to avoid being billed for additional administrative costs. For on-street or municipal lot parking, use on-street or municipal parking lot kiosks; park, walk to the nearest pay station, enter your license plate number (including letters), the length of time you wish to stay, and your payment. You may also pay with the ParkMobile App. Unlike the inlet parking lot, onstreet and municipal lot parking requires you to pay for your desired

amount of time when you park. Weekly parking paid at 100th Street lot does not apply to parking at the inlet, on-street parking, or other municipal lots. A violation of street parking and other municipal lot parking will result in a physical parking ticket ($50 fine), which can be voided if payment is made at a pay station for expired time within one hour of receiving the ticket. While the kiosks are new, the payby-cell parking system remains in place. This feature allows parkers to pay for their parking with the Parkmobile mobile parking app. The app can send text reminders when your parking time is about to expire and you can extend your time directly from the app. The Parkmobile app is available for download on the App store for the iPhone, the Google Play Store for Android devices, and the Microsoft store for Windows phones. More information can be found at https://oceancitymd.gov/oc/oceancity-parking/


MARCH 29, 2019

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Ocean City Today

Real estate presentation gives insight on Wor. market By Rachel Ravina Staff Writer (March 29, 2019) Realtor Cameron Drew, a member of the board of directors for the Coastal Association of Realtors, was cautiously optimistic as she presented an annual real estate report to the Worcester County Commissioners last Tuesday. “Worcester County is experiencing an inventory boost, which we saw throughout the tri-county area last year,” Drew said. “Although it’s a small boost, we saw more available units in 2018 compared to 2017.” There were 4,500 active listings in 2018 as compared to 4,332 in 2017, according to data from Bright Multiple List Service. Drew said fewer homes — 2,338 — were sold in 2018 than were in 2017, which saw closings on 2,885 residential properties. At the same time, total dollar volume was up from $653.7 million in 2017, to $664.8 million in 2018. The average sale price was $284,503 in 2018, as compared to $274,118 in 2017. They compare to the average price $392,050 in 2007, just before the market collapsed. When breaking down the trends town-by-town, Drew said Ocean City experienced a slight increase in inventory and average sales price, but “you can tell by the numbers that most of the real estate activity in Worcester County occurs in Ocean City.” While Berlin had “some similar inventory and trends,” Drew said the number of units sold in 2018 was slightly lower than 2017’s total, 315 to 327, but that dollar volume was up to $86.million in 2018, according to data. Ocean Pines, Pocomoke and Snow

Hill also saw increased inventory in 2018. Drew said she hoped for continued growth in the Worcester County market. As of March 14, she added the current 30-year mortgage rate is 4.31 percent, which is the “lowest rate since February of last year.” Freddie Mac also predicted 30-year mortgage rates for 4.6 percent in 2019 and 4.9 percent in 2020. However, Drew warned of possible instances of economic uncertainty. In addition there is a combination “of strong economic growth, expanding human capital shortfall [and] ongoing trade disputes.” “So it’s hard to tell what the year will bring,” Drew said. “Locally, we are hoping to keep property taxes at current levels, continue to encourage development and (promote) smart growth. Commissioner Joseph Mitrecic asked if the Realtors have seen decreasing home sales in Worcester County because of “the sprinkler issue and even energy management systems that have to be put in homes in Maryland?” He also noted how popular Sussex County, Delaware has become with homebuyers. Sarah Rayne, government and public affairs director for the Coastal Association of Realtors, replied that Sussex is much less expensive, adding, “It’s a lot more expensive to build in Maryland for all those reasons that you listed.” Drew also told the commissioners she got her Delaware real estate license because she was “losing so many clients wanting to go to Delaware.”

Health condo proposals OK’d By Rachel Ravina Staff Writer (March 29, 2019) Two items concerning an environmental health condominium were expedited last Tuesday during a Worcester County Commissioners meeting. The commissioners unanimously approved a lease agreement and cleaning contract for the condo on 43rd Street in Ocean City, used by visiting health officials. Stu White, food program supervisor for Environmental Health, said the program inspects various public pools, spas and restaurants. He added the visiting sanitarians help inspect restaurants. White said there are more than 700 restaurants in Worcester County. “Environmental Health uses the condo to house sanitarians that come from across the state to help during the busy tourist season in Ocean City,” Health Officer Rebecca Jones

said in a proposal. The $15,420 lease agreement with Triple D Rentals lasts from June 1, 2019 to May 31, 2020, according to a proposal. Jones said the health department has worked with Triple D Rentals for several years and “had a very good experience.” The cleaning contract is with OC Solutions LLC, which has a $61.20fee per cleaning, according to a proposal. The pricing remains the same from fiscal year 2019. Chief Administrative Officer Harold Higgins proposed both items be handled administratively in the future. “That sounded good,” Commissioner Chip Bertino said. Commissioner Joseph Mitrecic made motions to approve the lease agreement and cleaning contract. Commissioner Ted Elder seconded both motions.

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MARCH 29, 2019

Ocean City Today

Inlet parking lot rate $5 per hour on July 4 By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (March 29, 2019) Citing roughly $24,000 less revenue collected from the inlet parking lot last Fourth of July, compared to a tally of more than $82,000 in 2017, the Ocean City Council on Tuesday approved a $5 hourly rate at the inlet this Independence Day. City Engineer Terry McGean said the inlet lot pulled in roughly $58,000 from the $3 hourly rate set in 2018. “We did not do the all-day flat rate at the inlet lot last year because of the new [Parkeon pay-by-plate] system,” he said. McGean said July Fourth inlet lot rates were tiered previously, with $50 charged for vehicles entering from 6 a.m. until noon, and then dropping to $30 for arrivals up to 3 p.m. and finally to $20 for those parking after that time. “It was primarily done ... to eliminate the traffic backups,” he said. “We didn’t necessarily have that problem because of the new system, however, revenues were down considerably.” McGean said using the tiered approach based on time of entry would be difficult this year, because of programming challenges still being sorted out with the pay-by-plate parking system. “Our recommendation is a $40 allday flat rate,” he said. “That flat rate will encourage people to use the park and ride (in West Ocean City), and maybe

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lessen some of the traffic burden on the downtown area.” Council President Lloyd Martin concurred with increasing revenue for premium parking and noted statistics provided by McGean show the average time at the inlet lot doubles on the Fourth of July. “If you went to $5 an hour for that day can the machine do that?” he said. “You would actually make more money that way.” McGean confirmed the pay-by-plate system could be adjusted accordingly. “It would be easier for people to adjust to that, because everybody’s selling parking ... right around the corner,” Martin said. After making a motion to approve the

By Victor Fernandes Staff Writer (March 29, 2019) Eliminating Styrofoam products from his restaurant is merely the next step in a decade-long process for Fish Tales owner Shawn Harman. He has been at the forefront of the environmentally friendly campaign on many fronts — except for Styrofoam, he admits.

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“I’ve seen even more than $100,” he said. Councilman Matt James asked if the flat rate would impact daytime visitors on July Fourth. Mayor Rick Meehan said while a small percentage may leave during the afternoon, the majority was there for the entirety of the holiday. “They’re staying from the time they get there to go to the beach until the end of the fireworks,” he said. According to McGean, while vehicles typically stay at the inlet for shorter durations on July 4th that grows to over six hours. “It’s different on the Fourth of July. They do stay there for a much longer slug of time,” he said.

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$5 hourly scale, Councilman Mark Paddack expressed disappointment over the reduced revenue stream and questioned the source of continued backups for vehicles exiting the inlet lot. “It’s ... related to all the traffic that’s spilling out from the parking lots on Baltimore Avenue,” he said. Paddack said staggered rate schedules were used in the past to address infill challenges on the Independence Day holiday. “We would have 100-200 parking spaces open in mid-afternoon and charging $50 just didn’t seem appropriate,” he said. Private parking lot rates can average between $50-$100 on the Fourth of July, Paddack said.

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“We were slow on the Styrofoam containers. It was a cost issue and the quality of the product,” Harman said recently. But that soon will change, both because of necessity and the law of supply and demand. With a statewide ban on foam containers and cups expected to take effect early in 2019, Ocean City’s restaurant owners are looking for greener alternatives to offer customers. Harman has gone to great lengths in the past to find products that are safer for the environment while being suitable for their businesses. His belief in eliminating the use of straws led Harman to import more paper straws from China. Yet those same paper products, Harman said, don’t hold up well as carry-out containers for sandwiches such as cheesesteaks without using recyclable aluminum foil as an added layer. Still, Harman said, “It’s gotten better,” which should sway skeptics in favor of the high-profile bill, which only needs Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan’s signature for final approval. “Most people are reticent to do it, to go away from Styrofoam, because of the cost in the past,” Harman said. “Now, because of the demand, the cost has come down. It’s a straight-up market thing. It was a difference between a 30-

cent carry-out thing and a 3-cent carryout thing.” Ryan James, owner of Mother’s Cantina & Mother’s Taco Shop & Mother’s Catering Company in Ocean City, has said cost shouldn’t be a viable excuse for local business owners moving forward. “It’s very, very attainable to adapt your business to be Styrofoam-free and benefit the environment,” James said recently. Some products, he said, “are the same price if not cheaper than Styrofoam.” “Somebody is going to come up with a better idea or a plant-based carry-out container,” Harman said. “Styrofoam has been (around) 50 years. That was the thing (for many years). But we have to do something because (Styrofoam is) not good.” James pointed to the Ocean City government’s Green Team, a group of community leaders and officials who comprise the city’s Sustainable Ocean City program. He said the quasi-official entity will “start looking at ways to help businesses integrate into a foam-free facility now that the law will be in effect. The town as a whole is very supportive of the initiative.” James’ introduction of containers made of compressed sugar cane about a See OWNER Page 14

Realtors® to the Coolest Small Town in America 104 ESHAM AVENUE • BERLIN This home is walking distance to downtown Berlin. Cute as a button with hardwood floors throughout the home make this one hard to resist. Open concept floor plan with living room, dining area and kitchen. Tile counter tops, bar seating and a gas stove to cook on make this a cozy kitchen. Relax by the heat of the wood stove in the living room. Outside is a rear deck with a pergola and shed. Complete privacy as the backyard is totally fenced in.

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MARCH 29, 2019

PAGE 13

Ocean City Today

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MARCH 29, 2019

Ocean City Today

Ranck praised for handling of library rancor By Rachel Ravina Staff Writer (March 29, 2019) Worcester County Library Director Jennifer Ranck earned praise from the Worcester County Commissioners for her professionalism during recent events, even though her appearance before the commissioners last Tuesday was for an unrelated and routine matter. When Ranck approached the podium, her purpose was to request funding to buy audio-visual shelving for the county’s Ocean City Branch. Ranck said the old units were crumbling and added funding was in the library’s budget to cover the costs. She got that, with officials unanimously voting to approve the $19,247.32 request. She also received vocal support from Commissioners Joseph Mitrecic and Chip Bertino on her handling of an impeachment lecture at the Berlin branch that was scheduled to occur March 6, but later pulled. “Thank you for the handling of the situation down at the library,” Mitrecic said last Tuesday. Mitrecic added he’d “seen some of the [unsavory] emails” written following the lecture announcement and cancellation. Bertino also said he felt Ranck was “put in the crosshairs unnecessarily.” The lecture was part of a series on the U.S. Constitution hosted by Howard Sribnick, the president of the Worcester

County Library Foundation and a former Worcester County Democratic Central Committee chairman. The Main Street Patriots Eastern Shore, MD took to Facebook on March 1, posting a caption above an article entitled, “America’s Second Civil War Has Already Begun,” and wrote, “how many of you local folks will be at the Berlin library on Wednesday … for the primer (hosted by Democrats of course) on how to either impeach Trump or remove him from office via the 25th Amendment? They will collude and conspire to take away your vote (Trump won here in Worcester

County by almost a 2 to 1 margin), will you be there to stand up for the truth?” “Someone should take them out,” another person commented. The session was canceled and Ranck cited safety concerns on social media. “When people threatened to disrupt the presentation, we thought that would raise a safety issue for those who may be trying to attend the program, or just those who were using the library at that particular time on that particular day,” Ranck said in a previous interview. During Tuesday’s meeting, she said it was a “passionate topic,” to which Bertino

agreed, adding there was “a lot of energy.” Bertino said he also thought Ranck “handled [herself] professionally, as did the library board, and I thank you very much.” Vanessa Alban, a member of the Republican Women of Worcester County, on Tuesday expressed her own concern with what she contended was the partisanship of the lecture, referring to Sribnick’s previous affiliation with the Worcester County Democrats. “There was a lot of undue influences for them to put that on,” she said last Tuesday, and added others felt “it wasn’t appropriate.”

Carozza talks education funding By Rachel Ravina Staff Writer (March 29, 2019) There are several moving parts when it comes to the Kirwan Commission on Innovation and Excellence in Education as the saga continues. Sen. Mary Beth Carozza (R-38) said the three most important aspects of the Blueprint for Maryland’s Future, which is the legislative version of the Kirwan Commission’s recommendations, are legislation, funding and funding formula discussions. Some portions of those talks will carry on until the end of the year.

The Maryland House of Delegates passed $320.6 million to fund Kirwan, while the Senate passed $225 million as a “down payment,” according to Carozza’s office. Mary Beth “I think there are Carozza concerns about affordability,” Carozza said. In the passed Senate bill, Carozza said portions making up the funds include: $33.8 million for pre-k for-4 year-olds,

$33.3 million for special education grants, $54.6 million for poverty school grants, and $75 million for teacher salary incentive grants. Since Worcester County receives the second lowest amount of state funding, receiving $4,217 per student and more than $26.5 million overall in fiscal year 2019, there is some question how this county might be affected by a major increase in required spending if the funding formula in place now remains after Kirwan is in place. “They will not work on the funding forSee KIRWAN Page 18

Owner praises Styrofoam cuts Continued from Page 12 year ago has been both cost-effective and well-received. “We love it. The price difference is very, very nominal and it’s very affordable,” he said. “It’s had a positive response with our customers and even a better impact on the environment.” Local business owners also could see their new environmentally sound approach become a profitable marketing campaign. “That’s not why we did it. it’s the right thing to do,” James said. However, customers are impressed when they learn what his businesses do to preserve the environment. “How come do you don’t

do this?” customers have asked him. “We just point out what we do, and they (ask), ‘Why don’t you advertise that?’ It’s been very positive. … I think the consumers embrace it entirely.” So what products should be next to join the banned list? Plastic bags, diapers and water bottles are high on Harman’s priority list. “I’m not a big fan of government intervention, but it makes sense,” he said. “It’s going to continue. You’re going to have to do post-consumer recycled products. You’re going to try and recycle everything you can. There’s no reason to degrade the environment for the restaurant.”

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Ocean City Today

MARCH 29, 2019

Proclamation celebrates social work in Wor. By Rachel Ravina Staff Writer (March 29, 2019) The eight-hour workday doesn’t necessarily apply to social workers at the Worcester County Department of Social Services. “There [are] many sleepless nights,” said department Director Roberta Baldwin. “There [are] many days where they work beyond their eight-hour workday.” That effort was recognized during a ceremony in Snow Hill on March 5, when the Worcester County Commissioners issued a proclamation declaring March National Professional Social Work Month. Baldwin expressed her appreciation for the award, and credits the efforts of her staff. “They give so much to help and assist the families in our community that it is important for their work to be recognized and acknowledged,” Baldwin said. National Social Work Month aims to spread awareness about the profession, according to the National Association of Social Workers, and to help residents learn more about the value of the services these agencies offer. While Baldwin couldn’t be certain, she did have a theory as to why her profession is honored in March. “We as social workers try to bring about change,” Baldwin said. “Spring [is] associated with change and new beginnings.”

Baldwin said the department has myriad programs dedicated to serving Worcester County residents. Among these are services for people who need food or medical assistance, as well as providing homes for children through foster care and assistance to vulnerable adults. Typically, Baldwin said, the department conducts more than 500 investigations and about 88 home services cases on average in a given year. There are several reasons families find themselves needing assistance from the department. Baldwin said these issues range from financial to mental health, as well as other family matters. “There are many families that just need supportive assistance to be able to sustain their households, but there are families who experience some significant issues related to substance disorders and mental health, and it’s the services we’re able to provide that assist those families in being able to sustain and function and enhance their ability to meet the needs of their children,” Baldwin said. The unemployment rate was 11.5 percent in Worcester County for January 2019, as compared to the state’s unemployment rate of 4.3 percent, according to the Maryland Department of Labor Licensing and Regulation. Worcester County had the highest level of unemployment of all 24 counties in

PHOTO COURTESY KIM MOSES

The Worcester County Commissioners are joined by members of the county’s Department of Social Services after they received a proclamation during the March 5 meeting commending their work and dedicating March as National Social Work Month.

Maryland. As for helping the children in need, Trina Townsend, of the department’s foster care unit, said 31 children are in foster care in the county’s 16 licensed homes. “As foster care and social care workers, we’re able to bridge the gap between the department and the families

while they experience the hardship and challenge, and help to protect the safety barriers that are in place with the families,” Townsend said. To become foster parents, applicants must go through a three-step process. First, they must schedule an informational session, then complete 27 hours of Parents Resource for Information Development and Education training and give interviews and reference checks during a home study process. Townsend’s passion for social work follows the golden rule example. “It’s a heart thing. For me it’s always been a heart thing. I love the greatest joy is helping others,” she said. “That’s from my religious beliefs and just my family beliefs, my personal beliefs, what you give, you give back.” With 25 social workers on staff, Baldwin acknowledged that one of the obstacles facing her department is staffing. “We need social workers,” Baldwin said. “We struggle in finding social workers to come and do public child welfare work.” Baldwin called her department the “change agents of the community,” and said it’s imperative to continue working with other agencies, as well as local and state government, to gain resources and obtain monetary support. “And as … social worker[s], we’re advocates, so if we find that there’s a service gap in the community, it’s our voices that when we speak loud enough we’re able to bring those resources into the community, which creates a healthier more loving, caring environment,” Baldwin said. To schedule an informational session on foster care, email WilliamP.Smith1@maryland.gov, call 410-713-3959 or visit the “Respite Foster Adopt” Facebook page. For other information, call the department at 410-677-6800.


MARCH 29, 2019

Ocean City Today

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Ocean City Today

MARCH 29, 2019

County gets $25K grant for physical activity By Rachel Ravina Staff Writer (March 29, 2019) Get up, get out and get moving. It’s a mantra Crystal Bell, chronic disease supervisor at the Worcester County Health Department, said she hopes to continue to repeat after receiving a $25,000 grant to increase “walkability” and physical activity throughout the county. The grant came from the Maryland Department of Health Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control. “The goal of this project is to prevent chronic disease and injury, as well as improve overall health and enhance the quantity and quality of life for Worcester County residents,” Bell said. The state funding aims to help implement ventures in connection with the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Healthy People 2020 campaign, which offers objectives for improving health nationwide, according to a statement from the health department (see healthypeople.gov). Bell said the program’s funding runs from Feb. 25 to Sept. 30. The Office of the Surgeon General also stressed the need to promote walkability through Step It Up!, a program that works to increase physical activity statewide. Bell added the health department took a page out of the surgeon general’s book, and have “been encouraging peo-

ple to get up and to get moving.” The department is striving to cultivate a countywide network of supporters and work with people from Berlin, Ocean City, Crystal Bell Ocean Pines, Snow Hill, and Pocomoke, Bell said. “We’re tying to bring in a vast majority of representation from each local community so that we actually can come together and try and improve walkability in different communities,” Bell said. Having community members become walk leaders is another way the funding would be used, she said. “We really want to help give people

the resources, the knowledge the ability and support to go out there and become walk leaders in their own community,” said Public Information Officer Travis Brown. “So we’re really hoping to get everyone inspired and putting groups together and setting up their own walks and also taking part in the different walks that we have.” Bell said walk audits would also take place. They involve scouring places to walk in Worcester County to determine if there are measures in place such as adequate lighting and signage. “We definitely encourage any member of the community, whether you’re part of an organization or not, this is something that kind of affects everyone and everyone should have a voice,”

Brown said. Brown and Bell agree walking is accessible, easy and fun. “It’s free. It lets you explore your community. It improves your he[alth],” Brown said. “It’s a great social activity as well, so we just want to get that message out.” The county’s health department also holds events to encourage participation. The 22nd Annual Tortoise and Hare Dare 5k Walk/Run is scheduled for 9 a.m. on April 6 at the Pocomoke River State Park-Shad Landing on Worcester Highway in Snow Hill. Registration begins at 8:30 a.m. Anyone interested in learning more about the program, or becoming a walk leader can visit justwalkworcester.org or call 410-632-0056.

Kirwan funding formulas unknown Continued from Page 14 mulas until after session,” Carozza said. Carozza also said she met with the Eastern Shore Superintendents Association and that the group is “putting forward [recommendations to the commission that] would benefit the entire group not at the expense of any one county.” Dr. Jon Andes, former superintend-

ent of Worcester County, is the association’s executive director. “So that is a real benefit to Worcester County, since he understands how these funding formulas will impact Worcester County,” she said. For Carozza, she said it’s crucial to fight for “fair funding” for her constituents in Somerset, Wicomico and Worcester counties.

“My first focus is to make sure that any funding formulas that go forward are fair for the shore,” Carozza said. “And second, I absolutely agree with Gov. [Larry] Hogan that before we go forward and spend billions of dollars in new education spending, we have to place real education accountability measures in place.” Hogan sent a letter on March 14 to the Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, Jr., and House of Delegates Speaker Michael E. Busch discussing the need for accountability in education funding. “Without strong accountability, we’ll be doomed to experience the same failures of the Thornton initiative – dozens of highly funded but still failing schools across the state and no mechanism or will to change the situation,” Hogan said. Hogan said former commission increased funding by 121 percent from $3.1 billion to $6.9 billion annually from fiscal year 2003 to fiscal year 2020. He added eighth grade math proficiency only increased by 3 percent – from 30 to 33 percent. Hogan strived for increased accountability measures to raise academic standards and mitigate corruption. “I think Thornton failed to deliver the improvement in student performance that its authors envisioned because no one was held accountable,” Dr. Marc Tucker, consultant to the Kirwan Commission said during an Oct. 10 meeting. “I conclude Kirwan will fail if the same mistakes are made again.” Hogan also introduced legislation, which several senators including Carozza co-sponsored, to create a bipartisan appointment for an independent Education Inspector General position. “This new position … would increase accountability in our schools by allowing Maryland citizens to report potential cases of wrongdoing, abuse and unethical conduct, and would create a fair and transparent system to evaluate these cases,” Hogan said in a statement.


MARCH 29, 2019

Ocean City Today

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Ocean City Today

MARCH 29, 2019

Ocean City man faces eighth DUI since 1989 By Victor Fernandes Staff Writer (March 29, 2019) Ocean City resident Stephen Sawka won’t drive a vehicle for at least the next two months. Sawka, 57, was arrested last Friday night for driving under the influence, among other charges. His eighth DUI arrest in Maryland occurred at approximately 7 p.m. that evening in the area of Route 707 and Keyser Point Road near Route 50 in West

Ocean City. A police officer following a GMC box truck with a headlight out reported having seen a driver reading and sending text messages while stopped Stephen Sawka at a red light. Upon approaching the vehicle, the police report states, the officer suspected the operator had been drinking. Sawka told the officer he

hadn’t been drinking since he was heading home from work, as the officer discovered a 12-ounce bottle of beer laying in the front passenger seat. Sawka refused to conduct a field sobriety test after exiting the vehicle. Sawka was arrested, according to the report, and a subsequent search of the vehicle uncovered more alcohol. Police said Sawka’s drunk-driving record began with his first DWI on

1st State Detachment Marine Corps League Invite interested Marines and family/guests to join them on a bus trip to the

Marine Corps Museum at Quantico, Va. Saturday April 27, 2019 @ 0700 We will leave from the American Legion Post 166 on 24th st. in Ocean City. Snacks and drinks will be provided on the bus. The bus will return to the American Legion by approximately 11:00pm.

Marines that join us will be asked to join the Marine League. If they accept they may use a portion of their bus ticket toward their 1st year payment into the league. The cost of the trip is $33.00. Please contact Rick Pounsberry at email: 0311chief@gmail.com You may also contact Frank Del Piano, Commandant at 571-332-8263

April 21, 1989, and included his most recent arrest on Nov. 24, 2016. He was convicted after his seven previous arrests. Police also reported that Sawka had a revoked license in Maryland and Pennsylvania. He faces 11 different charges, including two counts of drunk driving, one count apiece of reckless driving and negligent driving, and three counts of driving on a revoked or suspended license. His trial is set for May 7.


Business

Ocean City Today Mar. 29, 2019

Page 21 REAL ESTATE REPORT

‘More control over loans,’ bring back non-QM mortgages

Thousands of seasonal and full-time positions from 106 employers are waiting to be filled during Ocean City’s 34th annual job fair on Saturday at the 40th Street convention center, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Ocean City Job Fair this Saturday More than 100 businesses looking to fill thousands of full-time, seasonal positions By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (March 29, 2019) Thousands of seasonal and full-time positions from more than 100 employers are waiting to be filled during Ocean City’s 34th annual job fair, this Saturday at the 40th Street convention center inside the upstairs bayfront ballroom, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. “Come out to the job fair because, if you’re seeking employment, it is one stop shopping,” Lisa Layfield, events director for the Ocean City Chamber of Commerce, said. “This is the only place that you will find this many employers all in one place at one time. It makes it so convenient for people to apply at a variety of places and have a great variety of employers. We have been bringing employers and job seekers together successfully for 34 years.” There is no fee for job seekers to attend. Employers include restaurants, hotels, construction companies, the Town of Ocean City, retail sales, lifeguard positions, beach jobs, office professionals, police departments, correctional facilities and employment agencies that hire for a variety of companies.

“Bring anything to secure employment and dress like you are coming to a job interview,” Layfield said. “For those that are coming to apply for jobs … come prepared. Come early, bring your resume and identification, dress for success and always bring a pen.

‘There are 12,000 jobs available in Ocean City each season...That does not count all of the other companies that hire for permanent year-round employment.’ Lisa Layfield, events director for the Ocean City Chamber of Commerce The staffing agencies hire for all types of work and a variety of employers.” There will also be free industry and job-training seminars, such as alcohol awareness for bartenders and servers. Information on seasonal housing will be available as well. In addition, the Resume Doctors are back and there will be information on obtaining health insurance, seasonal housing and safety in Ocean City. “There are 12,000 jobs available in Ocean City each season,” Layfield said.

“That does not count all of the other companies that hire for permanent year-round employment.” The annual Ocean City Job Fair grows every year and at least 2,500 people are expected on Saturday, Layfield said. Last year, more than 2,000 people attended the event. LaserTone Business Systems will return once again to provide complimentary resume copies for both job seekers and prospective employers. From 1-2 p.m., employers will hold interviews with applicants. “Your skillsets can be anything, [from] someone who has never had a job, to people who have years of experience,” Layfield said. “There is something for everyone.” Prior to the event, job seekers can visit www.oceancity.org and click on the Ocean City Job Fair graphic to find a generic job application. Organizers suggest attendees fill out job applications in advance and make copies when they arrive to make the process run smoother. “Having those to take around the fair with them can often save time, as many employers will use those applications and theirs will be completed and ready to go,” Layfield said. For more information, call the Greater Ocean City Chamber of Commerce at 410-213-0552, or visit www.oceancity.org.

By Lauren Bunting Contributing Writer (March 29, 2019) Just like ocean waves, the mortgage finance industry has crests and valleys as it relates to accessibility. But in the past few years, the accessibility is reaching a crest, for example, with the resurgence of NonQualified mortgages (non-QM). Non-QM is any home loan that doesn’t comply with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s existing rules on Qualified Mortgages. In other words, non-QM is a designation given to loans that fall outside the guidelines of Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, or Ginnie Mae. In a Qualified Mortgage, there are well-defined requirements and these government agencies protect the lender when a borrower becomes unable to afford their mortgage payments. Non-QM loans are designed to help a group of people achieve homeownership where they otherwise could not. Some alternative Non-Qualified loans available now include: •Loans that give the options for primary home buyers to purchase a home using 100 percent financing through a conventional loan program with no monthly mortgage insurance or funding fees •Loans where bank statement deposits can be used as income and where the investment income on rental properties can be used to qualify buyers for that specific property.   There are still restrictions and credit requirements, but not aggressive ones, for example the minimum credit score for the 100 percent conventional financing program is 660.   Now, before you get too nervous, we are heading down the same road as before the real estate market crashed, there are more protocols in place this go-around.   “This time around, there is more control over the loans and they are being directed to investors who are knowingly and willingly investing in this type of loan and buyer,” said Jason Cook, Eastern Shore manager of Embrace Home Loans out of Ocean City. See LOANS Page 22


PAGE 22

MARCH 29, 2019

Ocean City Today

Taco Junction serves Mexican cuisine in WOC By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (March 29, 2019) A once abandoned storefront has been transformed into a Mexican food carryout in West Ocean City, at 9935 Stephen Decatur Highway, on the corner of routes 50 and 611. Taco Junction was created by Rod Vara, owner of Trader Lee’s House of Rock in the same shopping center, and had a soft opening in late February. “We felt as though there was a need in West Ocean City for a Mexican carryout versus just sitting down at a traditional restaurant,� Vara said. “We try to give people that authentic Mexican food experience.� He also wanted to extend a carryout location, which would be available for part-time workers in the summer. “We see a lot a lot of need, especially being at the bar, and the bar’s typically open till 2 a.m.,� Vara said. “What would happen is all these kids that are down here for the summer who are working and the [J-1] students that are here, they all live out here and they don’t get off work until 10:30-11 p.m. They’re looking for places to go.� The menu offers Mexican food staples such as nachos, guacamole, quesadillas, burritos and, of course, tacos. Customers can select from beef, chicken, fish and vegetarian options, along with a variety of toppings like cilantro, onions, lettuce and tomatoes. Side dishes include bowls of chili,

chips and salsa, stuffed jalapeĂąos, refried beans and bowls of rice. The storefront, which used to be a consignment shop, took around three weeks of construction time over the span of three months for Vara and coowner Joel Watsky to renovate to their liking, spending six hours a day on average remodeling the interior. “We did it all ourselves,â€? Vara said. “Every week me and [Joel] literally came in on Sundays and Wednesdays ‌ the two days that we really ever had off, we just kept coming in here. Little by little, one day we fixed the floor, the next we did the drywall then it did the wood and so on.â€? Vara, who began renting the property around a year ago, initially struggled with what he wanted to use the facility for, until he visited his daughter in Florida. “I went to visit my daughter down in St. Augustine, Florida, and we were trying to come up with an idea to have food for the bar,â€? Vara said. “I was visiting her on a break and we’re sitting out in this little courtyard area ‌ kind of like the Boardwalk but a lot smaller, but there was a lot of cool shops and I happen to look over and see this little taco shop. It just kind of clicked.â€? The restaurant prides itself on its fresh ingredients and especially on its convenience. “You can grab something quick going to Assateague, or when you get off the

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icans that come in here, and it reminds them of home.� Vara is still experimenting with his new carryout and has put some thought into extending into the morning, with breakfast burritos and other morning specials. He also plans to implement outdoor seating once the weather gets warmer. An official grand opening for the eatery will take place on Cinco de Mayo, See EATERY’S Page 23

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Taco Junction is located in the shopping center on Stephen Decatur Highway, on the corner of routes 50 and 611, in West Ocean City.

REAL ESTATE REPORT

Loans given through protocol Continued from Page 21 The market for this type of loan typically includes individuals experiencing one or more of these unique circumstances: •Self-employed for less than two years •Self-employed and not showing a great amount of income on tax returns •High debt ratio yet plenty of reserves to make up for the debt ratio

•Blemished credit due to unforeseen circumstances during the downfall of the economy Given the proper protocols, guidance and care, these loans will be a valuable asset to those just on the fringe of qualifying for your traditional mortgage programs. – Lauren Bunting is an Associate Broker with Bunting Realty, Inc. in Berlin.

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PAGE 23

Ocean City Today

Eatery’s grand opening to take place Cinco De Mayo Continued from Page 22 with tents and a large grill set up outside. Vara plans to rope off the parking lot for the grand opening and serve Mexican cuisine all day, while live entertainment from a local band will perform from around 1-8 p.m. As the summer season approaches, Taco Junction will be need of kitchen

staff, as there are only three employees at the moment; Vara, Watsky and one cook. Taco Junction is open every day from noon to 8 p.m. on the weekdays and noon to early morning hours on the weekend, which could vary during the summer season. For more information about Taco Junction, call 443-664-8640. MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

BUSINESS BRIEFS

Promotions Coastal Hospice recently announced the promotion of several employees. Susan Olischar has been promoted to vice president of finance. She is responsible for optimizing the financial performance of the organization, providing accurate and timely Susan Olischar reporting, financial planning and forecasting, and managing cash flow to ensure that the organization meets its financial commitments. She has worked for Coastal Hospice for 12 years. During her time with the agency, she has assembled a talented team in the finance department and demonstrated her dedication to the overall mission of the agency. She received her bachelor’s degree in accounting from Salisbury University and is a licensed CPA with over 20 years of experience. Staff member Stacy Cottingham has been S. Cottingham tapped as the new senior director of Strategic Initiatives. Cottingham has been with the agency for five years. She originally started as manager of Quality/Performance Improvement and Education.

Taco Junction co-owners Joel Watsky, left, and Rod Vara, are open for business with their Mexican carryout location in West Ocean City.

Before joining Coastal Hospice, she was a case manager at a regional hospital and worked in management in both the cardiac and oncology departments. During her time with Coastal Hospice, she has grown staff in their education and was tasked with ensuring all regulatory requirements were met. Cottingham is a nurse with over 25 years of experience and is certified in hospice and palliative nursing. She has a doctorate in Organizational Leadership from UMES. Bob Miller will now serve as the senior director of Business Development. Miller has been with Coastal Hospice for over five years. He worked as a chaplain Bob Miller and in bereavement services. Afterwards, Miller moved into provider relations as an associate and eventually managed the department. He has successfully established and strengthened relationships with the community through effective education and outreach of Coastal Hospice services and programs. Miller has a successful entrepreneurial background and holds a master’s degree from Eastern University and a B.A. from Lee University. Lauren Blair was promoted to Provider Relations manager after having been with Coastal Hospice since last fall.

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Prior to joining the Coastal Hospice team, Blair worked at Salisbury Rehabilitation and Nursing Center for over nine years, where she most recently served as the Memory Support Program director. She attended Salisbury University, where she received both a master’s degree in SoLauren Blair cial Work as well as a bachelor of arts in Social Work.

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She is a licensed master social worker in Maryland and a licensed clinical social worker in Delaware. Founded in 1980, Coastal Hospice is a nonprofit health care organization that cares for individuals facing life-limiting conditions but who want to remain as active and engaged as possible. Coastal Hospice cares for patients in their home, nursing home, assisted living facility or at Coastal Hospice at the Lake. The organization serves Wicomico, Worcester, Dorchester and Somerset counties.

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Ocean City Today Arts, Calendar, Crossword, Dining, Entertainment, Events, Features, Music

Mar. 29, 2019

Page 25

Worcester Teacher of the Yr. final four to be announced By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (March 29, 2019) Four finalists will be announced for the Worcester County Teacher of the Year, tonight, Friday, during the 32nd annual banquet at the Clarion Resort Hotel on 101st Street in Ocean City. “We’ve changed the entire format this year, which includes how we are announcing the winner,” said Carrie Sterrs, coordinator of the event and spokesperson for Worcester County schools. “At this Friday’s gala, we will be announcing the four finalists for the Worcester County Teacher of the Year, with the winner being surprised at his or her school the following week.” In past years, the overall winner was announced during the banquet. Teachers are nominated each year through a ballot process by a student, parent, colleague, administrator or community member. “There is a selection committee comprised of our former Teacher of the Year, representation from our higher education partners and the county government,” Sterrs said. “They score the candidates’ portfolios blindly, and then all 14 candidates are interviewed by the panel. Those two components make up the criteria by which the Teacher of the Year is chosen.” The educator who receives the highest combined score on their portfolios and interviews wins the Worcester County Teacher of the Year title and advances to the state competition. After county awards are presented, the 24 teachers, representing each of the school systems in Maryland, will have their portfolios judged by the Maryland State Department of Education and the field is narrowed down to seven finalists. “Typically, MSDE announces the seven finalists for Maryland Teacher of the Year in early September, with the winner being named at its gala in October,” Sterrs said. Worcester County earned the state title once, in 2007, when seventh grade English Language Arts teacher, Michelle Hammond, of Stephen Decatur Middle School, took home the honor. Last year, Karen Holland, a special education teacher at Cedar Chapel Special School, was named Worcester County Teacher of the Year. Holland will be the keynote speaker for the gala, following a 32-year long tradition. “This year is a celebration like no other, as we are also celebrating 150 years of excellence in education for

Caitlin Bunting

Michael Anne Bunting

Brandi Casteneda

Anne Cook

Jessica Curtis

Lavonya Dashiell

Zac Johnson

Angie Rankin

Gina Russell

Heather Shockley

Sharon Smith

Jen Spicer

Richard Stephens

Ashley Streebig

Worcester County Public Schools,” Sterrs said. “Our program has been completely changed, and we look forward to sharing in this celebration with those attending.” The banquet honors current teachers while also providing a reunion for retired teachers, who return each year to the ceremony, which began in 1988. “This is a big departure from what we have traditionally done. We’re very excited,” Sterrs said. The 2019 Worcester County Teacher of the Year candidates are: Caitlin Bunting, Buckingham Elem. School Caitlin Bunting graduated from Stephen Decatur, attended Loyola University earning a B.A. in Public Relations, and later received her Masters of Education in Elementary Education from Wilmington University in 2009. She is currently in her ninth year at Buckingham Elementary School where she teaches fourth grade. Bunting believes that students learn best when they are having fun. She incorporates music, movement, technology and hands-on experiments in her lessons to engage her students. Bunting is a mentor teacher to Salisbury University interns, a member of the Parent Advisory Committee, and part of the Reading School Improvement Team. Michael Anne Bunting, Berlin Intermediate School Michael Anne Bunting graduated from Stephen Decatur, and attended Salisbury University, where she received a Bachelor’s degree in Elementary Education with a Psychology minor, Reading Specialist Master’s degree, and certification in Special Education and Math 4-9. Currently in her 15th year, Bunting teaches sixth grade math at Berlin Intermediate School, building a community of learners where everyone enters her class knowing that they are loved and re-

spected and that they have value is her passion. Bunting is on the PBIS team, the One School One Book Committee, PLC Leadership, After School Academy teacher, and coaches and assists with youth sports. Brandi Castaneda, Pocomoke High School Brandi Castaneda believes in a world driven by digital influence, stating ‘It is imperative that we encourage and teach students to become creators rather than consumers of technology.’ With a Bachelor of Arts in Graphic Design from Salisbury University and Masters of Education from the University of Phoenix, Castaneda teaches computer science, digital arts & photography, yearbook and publications at Pocomoke High School. As field hockey coach, she has established a mentoring program for student athletes to guide and motivate younger students because she believes students should remain connected with youth to encourage perseverance and success while inspiring community connections. Anne Cook, Stephen Decatur Middle School Anne Cook earned her BA from Salisbury University and holds a Master’s Equivalency. In her 11th year of teaching, she currently instructs seventh grade World Geography. Her passion for community engagement drives her instruction in and outside of the classroom. She is an advisor for Builders Club and recently launched an equine program. She is a Service-Learning Fellow and member of the Ed Camp Delmarva Organizing Committee. Cook was Maryland History Day Teacher of the Year in 2017 and received the Celebrating Innovation Award in 2018. An active member of the community, Cook serves on the board for the Ocean City Surf Club.

Jessica Custis, Pocomoke Middle School Jessica Custis earned her Bachelor of Arts at the University of Virginia and her Master of Teaching degree in Elementary Education from UVA’s Curry School of Education. Custis has taught for 20 years and is currently in her 10th year at Pocomoke Middle School. She serves as the fourthgrade team leader, teaches in the afterschool program, and serves as a mentor teacher. Custis strives to help her students build a conceptual understanding of mathematics through movement and hands-on learning. She holds high expectations for her students, while building positive relationships and fostering a love of learning. Lavonya Dashiell, Pocomoke Elementary School Lavonya Dashiell earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Elementary Education from Salisbury University and a Masters of Education in School Leadership from Wilmington University. Dashiell is currently pursuing a Doctorate in Educational Leadership from Wilmington University. This is her 18th year at Pocomoke Elementary School, currently as a firstgrade teacher. She believes that in a nurturing and caring environment all students can grow and become successful. Dashiell has also served as a mentor See WINNER Page 26


PAGE 26

Ocean City Today

MARCH 29, 2019

Winner will be unveiled at his or her school next week E AT S + D R I N K S

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Continued from Page 25 teacher to university interns and co-advisor to the Kiwanis Kids After-School Academy. Zachary Johnson, Cedar Chapel Special School New Jersey native, Zachary Johnson spent his undergraduate education studying theater, music, professional and creative writing. After migrating to the oasis of Ocean City, he substitute taught in Wicomico and Worcester counties, served as an educational assistant, classroom teacher, and he is now lucky enough to educate students through Adapted Physical Education in his 10th year at Cedar Chapel Special School. He coaches the school’s basketball and soccer clubs, helps choreograph music performances, and practices sound therapy. Johnson’s most treasured moments are with his family, but he also enjoys playing music, skateboarding and surfing. He takes having fun very seriously. Angela Rankin, Showell Elementary School Angela Rankin graduated from Salisbury University earning a Bachelor of Arts degree in elementary education. She is currently pursuing a Master’s Degree in Curriculum and Instruction, also through Salisbury University. Rankin is in her sixth year of teaching first grade at Showell Elementary and has three children in Worcester County schools. She believes in providing a quality classroom where all students feel safe, valued and free to make mistakes from with they learn and grow academically, emotionally and socially. Rankin is Showell’s teacher champion, yearbook coordinator and mentor to new teachers. She is a warm, accessible, loving and enthusiastic teacher. Gina Russell, Snow Hill Elementary School Gina Russell, earned a Bachelor of Science in Biology from Salisbury University and a Masters of Special Education from Wilmington University. In her eighth year at Snow Hill Elementary School, Russell currently teaches the new Pre-K Three inclusion classroom and services Pre-K Four students in the afternoon. She believes every student has the right to an appropriate education; one that inspires all students to communicate, grow, feel safe and have a voice. Russell serves as the team leader for Special Education, a mentor teacher for Salisbury University interns, and evaluates for the Infants and Toddlers team in the summer. Heather Shockley, Snow Hill Middle School Heather Shockley earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Salisbury University, and a Masters of Arts in Teaching from the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. In her 11th year of teaching visual art,

she inspires students, grades four through eight, at Snow Hill Middle. Art is a universal platform for all to learn and Shockley works tirelessly to build positive relationships that fosters rich discussion and creativity. She is a team leader, a member of the School Improvement team, a yearbook advisor, advisor for the National Junior Arts honor Society, and an artist. Sharon Smith, Stephen Decatur High School Sharon Smith graduated from Penn State University with a Bachelor of Science degree. After two years gaining experience in industry, she began a career in education in a charter school in Florida. Upon returning to Worcester County in 2003, she enrolled and graduated with a Masters in the Art of Teaching degree. She has been in the science department at Stephen Decatur High School since 2004. She strives to reach every student’s passion and is invested in building trust to motivate them to excel. Her efforts continue with curriculum planning, Star Student Committee, and Adult Education Program in the community. Jennifer Spicer, Ocean City Elementary School Jennifer Spicer is committed to providing all students with a strong educational foundation for a lifetime of learning. With a great passion for teaching, Spicer works hard to ensure that all students feel cared for and understand their full potential which will help guide their future. She received her teaching licensure from Salisbury University, as well as a Master’s degree in Applied Technology from Wilmington University. After three years as a Kindergarten teacher at Ocean City Elementary School, she has now transitioned to third grade, where she works with a group of amazing and creative teachers. Richard Stephens, Worcester Technical High School Richard Stephens graduated from Snow Hill High School. This is his 35th year teaching welding along with computer-integrated manufacturing at Worcester Technical High School. Stephens believes in focusing on individual needs, and involving students in the process of their learning. As a teacher, he strives to adapt to the learning styles of each student. In his 18th year as the SkillsUSA lead advisor at Worcester Tech, he has increased the student membership from 80 members to over 350 members. For the past nine years, Stephens has served on the SkillsUSA Maryland Board of Directors and is the current chair. Ashley Streebig, Snow Hill High School Ashley Streebig earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology and a Masters See WINNER Page 27


MARCH 29, 2019

PAGE 27

Ocean City Today

Vote for favorite restaurants in annual contest by April 1 By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (March 29, 2019) April 1 is the last day to cast a vote in the Restaurant Association of Maryland’s 65th annual Stars of the Industry Awards, which recognizes the best establishments in the state. Four resort restaurant groups were nominated in three different categories. Lisa and Brian Bolter of the Red Red Wine Bar on 48th Street, and Jay Taustin from Embers Restaurant/BLU Crabhouse & Raw Bar on 24th Street and Mad Fish Bar & Grill in West Ocean City, are finalist in the Restaurateur of the Year Award category. Tom Ogilvie from the Hooked Restaurant Group is a finalist for the Heart of the Industry Award, and Marlin Moon, located inside the Hilton on 33rd Street, is up for Maryland’s Favorite New Restaurant. The Bolters opened their first restaurant in Annapolis, the original Red Red Wine Bar, eight years ago. Today, they own four restaurants, including Dry 85 and Red Red Wine Bar locations in both Annapolis and Ocean City. “We’re really excited about [the nomination],” Lisa Bolter said. “We have been up for a couple of awards in the Restaurant Association in years past … when we got this call, we were really humbled and surprised, and just very excited.” Red Red Wine Bar and Dry 85 both offer a relaxing atmosphere to enjoy wine or bourbon, Bolter said. “[Brian’s] passion was wine and that’s where we started with this. We were both just really involved with wine and the whole experience behind it,” Bolter said. “We just thought, ‘wouldn’t it be nice to have a place that you can go, drink good wine [and] listen to good music?’ We felt like combining basically all of our favorite things and that’s what we’ve done here.” Taustin said he is humbled to be a finalist for Restauranteur of the Year. He has worked in the restaurant business since the 1950s, when Embers first opened on Ninth Street. “I think that it’s fantastic that people acknowledge that someone has been in the industry for as long as I have been, and it’s kind of cool,” Taustin said. “I’m proud of my accomplishments. I’m proud of my son, [who’s] taking over the range of the business right now. I’m proud of our director of operations, which has been taking a lot of leadership roles in the restaurant as well. “What makes me the proudest of the organization is the team that we have today…” he added. Ogilvie has been working in the restaurant industry for nearly 19 years and described it as his passion. “Coming out of college, I didn’t know what I wanted to do. I started working for a company and I just realized that, [this] was my passion,” he said. “Here I am, 19 years later, and it’s all coming together and it’s a privilege and an honor to be a finalist.”

Primarily working at Tailchasers on 123rd Street since opening last year, Ogilvie is the director of operations for the Off the Hook Restaurant Group, which consists of five restaurants spanning from Ocean City to Bethany Beach, and also includes a catering company. “I’m the kind of guy who goes in and jumps on the line and cooks during the rush, or helps out on the floor and goes around and talks to our guests,” he said. “I’d rather work with my employees than just tell them what to do.” Marlin Moon is not a new name for the Ocean City area. The restaurant was originally located inside the Francis Scott Key Hotel in West Ocean City from 2002-2009. Co-owner and head chef Gary Beach, who had a dream of owning a restaurant since he was 14 years old, credits the nomination to his team. “I have a good crew. We get better every day,” Beach said. “I’m very humbled and very, very proud of our team.” Food served at Marlin Moon is inspired by original recipes from Beach’s grandmother. His cuisine is also influenced by his experiences in Florida and from other travels, he said. “I’m grateful for the Harrison Group,” Beach said. “It took a lot of people to get [Marlin Moon] off the floor.” Winners will be announced on Sunday, May 5 at the Restaurant Association of Maryland’s Stars of the Industry Awards Gala at the Renaissance Baltimore Harborplace Hotel in Baltimore. To the see the full list of nominees or vote, visit www.marylandrestaurants.com/ gala, or vote on Facebook at facebook.com/marylandrestaurants.

Winner will move on to state level, representing Wor. Continued from Page 26 in teaching secondary science education from Salisbury University. She is currently in her 10th year of teaching at Snow Hill High School, where she teaches biology, Environmental Science and AP Environmental Science. She prides herself in fostering ownership of learning as well as challenging her students to make real world connections to science. She has served a vital role in her department planning PLC; founder of the GREEN Eagles club and is a Science Teacher Leader at the county level. “I think we have an outstanding group of teachers this year to represent each school,” Superintendent Lou Taylor said during a January Board of Education meeting. “These teachers are truly shining examples of the high-quality teaching occurring in classrooms across this county.”

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MARCH 29, 2019

Ocean City Today

Handy to kick off retirement with fundraiser celebration By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (March 29, 2019) Al “Hondo” Handy has been a pillar at the Ocean City Recreation and Parks Department for nearly 40 years. After close to four decades of working at the department, located at Northside Park on 125th Street, Handy has decided to end this chapter of his life and start a new one in retirement. Handy already has some plans for his retirement, such as writing books about his experiences, particularly about his favorite basketball player, John “Hondo” Havlicek, who inspired his love of sports. Before he enjoys that chapter of retirement, however, Handy wants to raise money and awareness about can-

cer for the John H. “Jack” Burbage Regional Cancer Center in Berlin. “Everybody’s affected by cancer,” Handy said. “My mother had cancer, a few of my really close friends that worked with me here had cancer, a number of family members had cancer. I said when I do retire, I’m going to try and do some kind of cancer fundraiser. We just recently got this facility here in AGH and I’m like, ‘This is the perfect timing for me.’” An Eastern Shore resident for most of his life, Handy attended Stephen Decatur High School, where he was a member of the 1970 state championship basketball team. He studied physical education at Salisbury University. During his college years, he played basketball, base-

HOROSCOPE ARIES – Mar 21/Apr 20 You might have to make a few concessions in the short-term if you are eager to make real progress in the long-term, Aries. Eventually all things will even out. TAURUS – Apr 21/May 21

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Recreations Manager Al “Hondo” Handy will celebrate his retirement from the Recreation and Parks Department with a fundraiser at Seacrets on 49th Street, Friday, April 5.

ball and soccer. After suffering an injury, he decided to become a student assistant director, where he discovered his love for managing sport clubs and activities. “I’ve been here for a long while. I See RETIREMENT Page 29

Put exercise to the forefront of your list of things to do, Taurus. If you have not been physically active lately, work slowly and diligently to build up your endurance. GEMINI – May 22/Jun 21 Important decisions cannot be made in a matter of minutes, Gemini. You really have to work through all the angles. Seek opinions from trusted friends. CANCER – Jun 22/Jul 22 Make a list of things you need to accomplish this week, Cancer. If you let it all sit in your head, you are bound to get overwhelmed and forget something. LEO – Jul 23/Aug 23 Leo, there are a few ways a situation at work can go. Not every path may meet with your utmost approval. But you may have to swallow your pride and compromise. VIRGO – Aug 24/Sept 22 If illness has been going around, Virgo, do your best to avoid getting sick. Be diligent in handwashing and other preventive measures. LIBRA – Sept 23/Oct 23 Even the most doting parents can use some down time once in a while, Libra. Plan an adults-only date night and enjoy some well-deserved conversation. SCORPIO – Oct 24/Nov 22 Scorpio, illnesses or medical obstacles can have many sources — from the foods you eat to your emotional wellness. Start jotting things down in a journal to figure out how to feel and look your best. SAGITTARIUS – Nov 23/Dec 21 Your perseverance is a source of inspiration to others, Sagittarius. Don’t be bashful when others share these thoughts with you. Accept their well wishes and give thanks. CAPRICORN – Dec 22/Jan 20 Hold tight to those friends who have your best interests at heart through happy and trying situations, Capricorn. These are the people you can call upon this week. AQUARIUS – Jan 21/Feb 18 For so long you have been doling out advice to other people and helping them improve their lives, Aquarius. Now you are the one who could benefit from some counsel. PISCES – Feb 19/Mar 20 Pisces, a recent birthday celebration could have you feeling like you need to make drastic changes. But small ones can fit the bill as well.


MARCH 29, 2019

Ocean City Today

PAGE 29

Retirement party held April 5 Continued from Page 28 have a lot of friends [and] a lot of kids that I started with now have their kids and they’re coming back to the program and they’re coaching for us,” Handy said. “They knew our philosophy and I was just hoping that this would be an opportunity for not just me to give back, but everybody that’s been touched with cancer to give back too.” For Handy, working at the Recreation and Parks Department didn’t feel like work because he loved the job so much. “Sports has always been a part of my life. If you love it, it seems like you’re not working,” Handy said. “It feels like there’s not enough time in the day. That’s what happens because you’re always trying to make things as perfect as you can.” Over the years, Handy has been recognized with many awards, including the Citation Award by the Maryland Recreation & Parks Association, Best Youth Organization Director by Coastal Style Magazine, and Ocean City Citizen of the Year in 2015 by the Ocean City Chamber of Commerce and the Ocean City Elks Lodge. Handy will officially retire from his position on Sunday, March 31, after 39 years and three months of service, and will host a retirement party next Friday. Tickets are available to celebrate Handy as he prepares for retirement with a fundraiser for cancer in Morley Hall at Seacrets on 49th Street, Friday, April 5, from 6-9 p.m. The event will include music by DJ Tuff, food provided by Seacrets and comments from several guest speakers from the Recreation and Parks Department, including past directors. Susan Petito, director of the Ocean City Recreation and Parks Department said Handy has positively impacted the lives of thousands of people. “His charismatic smile and bubbly laugh draws people in, and you just can’t help but to love him right away,” she said. “He has been our liaison to the community for most of his career, and his outreach has brought tremendous goodwill and support to the department. He has embraced this community as his family, and I believe the community has embraced him in the same way.” Petito said Handy has taken the lead role in bringing recognition and substance to the spirt of good sportsmanship, implementing the department’s Sportsmanship Counts program and Sportsmanship Recognition Ceremony, which has been renamed the “Al ‘Hondo’ Handy Sportsmanship Counts Ceremony.” He has served on the board of the National Alliance of Youth Sports, bringing coaches trainings to the department and spearheading a Global Gear Drive to collect sports equipment to send to underprivileged children around the world, Petito said.

He has been the department liaison to the Ocean City Drug and Alcohol Committee since its inception, and has been a key player in the Play It Safe program offered to high school graduates each June in Ocean City. “Hondo has been the face of our department for many, many years. He’s been an excellent representative of what’s great about recreation and parks, and he will be dearly missed,” Petito said. Handy wants people to know the April 5 event is not just a retirement party, it is a celebration. “I’m calling it a celebration because it is going to be a celebration,” Handy said. “So just come and have fun. Help me celebrate my new chapter of my life and wish me well.” Tickets cost $40. To purchase a ticket, text OCHONDO to 41444, or visit www.atlanticgeneral.org/ ochondo.

GREG ELLISON/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Al "Hondo" Handy was honored with a retirement ceremony and awarded a key to the city after 39 years with the Ocean City Recreation and Parks Department during the City Council meeting on Tuesday.


PAGE 30

Ocean City Today

MARCH 29, 2019

OUT & ABOUT

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Joy and Mark Daly, of New Jersey, stop by Johnny’s Pizza and Pub on 56th Street, Saturday, March 23.

Enjoying the weekend at Johnny’s Pizza and Pub on 56th Street, Saturday, March 23, are Shayne Adams, left, and Scott Sinclair, of Baltimore.

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Frog Bar bartender Chris Dietz has a fantastic view of the ocean as he serves drinks at the inlet shopping center location, Saturday, March 23.

Lance Kellam and Shana Merrill traveled from Pennsylvania to enjoy some drinks at the Frog Bar at the inlet Saturday, March 23.

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Gathering in Ocean City for a weekend of fun at Coins on 28th Street, Saturday, March 23, from left, are Kaysie Solomon and Francis Bowman, of Pennsylvania, Towson resident Hailey Elias, and Steve Blevins, of Pennsylvania.

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Reenie and Bill Dukes, of Ocean Pines, have a few drinks at the bar at Coins on 28th Street, Saturday, March 23.


MARCH 29, 2019

PAGE 31

Ocean City Today

Food highlight of ninth annual St. Joseph’s Festival By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (March 29, 2019) The Sons and Daughters of Italy of Ocean City Lodge #2474 invite residents and visitors to the ninth annual St. Joseph’s Festival, inside St. Andrew’s Hall on Sinepuxent Avenue at 144th Street, this Saturday, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. “We want to honor St. Joseph, the patron of workers, which we do every year,” said Al DiOrio, the festival’s publicity chair. Admission is free with the highlight being the Italian specialties available for purchase including raviolis, meatballs, sausage, subs, salads, minestrone soup, zeppole, cannoli, gelato and fried dough. There will also be a number of homemade desserts provided by members of the lodge available for purchase. Drinks include beer, wine, coffee and sodas. “Us Italians, we like to have a good time,” DiOrio said. “We like to eat, listen to music, talk to people and all that together ... we get people of Italian descent to come for the first time. “The food, music, camaraderie ... everybody that goes away that I talk to say, ‘You guys are really fun to be with,’” DeOrio added. The Mario Monaldi Band of Baltimore will return this year to play traditional Italian favorites as well as a variety of other genres and music. “The whole day is pretty active,” DiOrio said. “People love to sit and listen to the music and eat and enjoy camaraderie with family and friends.” There will be complimentary face painting and crafts for children. Clothing, wine, homemade pasta, rosaries and St. Joseph statues are a few of the items for sale at the event. A silent auction and chances to win raffle items will also take place during the feast. Items were donated by several local organizations. Since the festival’s inception, Lodge #2474 has donated over $16,000 to local and national charities in addition to awarding $25,000 in scholarships to area high school students of Italian descent from Indian River and Sussex Central in Delaware as well as Stephen Decatur in Berlin. Last year, $1,500 in scholarships were provide to each school. “Giving back to the community is a big deal [for] us,” DiOrio said. “We take pride in providing funds for different organizations. We have fun, but the bottom line is it helps people.” Money has also been donated to help fund Alzheimer’s research, to Atlantic General Hospital, the Worcester County Humane Society, Diakonia, Worcester G.O.L.D, Justin’s Beach House, Relay for Life, See OCEAN Page 33

Sons and Daughters of Italy of Ocean City Lodge #2474 take lunch orders during the eighth annual St. Joseph’s Festival, inside St. Andrew’s Hall on Sinepuxent Avenue at 144th Street, last year. Pictured, from left, are JoAnn Ward, Dorothy Lee Tumminello, Pat D’Annunzio, Ethel Jacobs, Sherry Carstairs, Mike Jacobs and Dee Matthews.

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Ocean City Today

MARCH 29, 2019

NOW PLAYING BJ’S ON THE WATER 75th Street and the bay, Ocean City 410-524-7575 www.bjsonthewater.com March 29: Full Circle, 9 pm. March 30: Bird Dog and the Road Kings, 9 p.m. April 3: Ricky LaRicci, 6 p.m. BOURBON STREET ON THE BEACH 116th Street, behind Fountain Head Towers Condominium, Ocean City 443-664-2896 www.bourbonstreetonthebeach.com March 29: Ricky LaRicci, 7 p.m. March 30: Baltimore Boyz, 8 p.m. March 31: Bob Hughes, 6 p.m. April 3: Reform School, 6 p.m.; Open Mic, 9 p.m. April 4: Chris Button, 7-10 p.m. CAPTAIN’S TABLE 15th St. & Baltimore Ave. Ocean City 410-289-7192 www.captainstableoc.com Every Friday & Saturday: Phil Perdue, 5:30 p.m. DUFFY’S TAVERN 130th Street in the

Montego Bay Shopping Center 410-250-1449 www.duffysoc.com March 29: Bob Hughes, 5-8 p.m. March 30: Karaoke w/DJ Chuck D, 8 p.m. to midnight

410-524-3535 www.clarionoc.com Every Friday and Saturday: DJ Dusty, 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. March 29-30: First Class, 9:30 p.m. to 2 a.m.

HARBORSIDE BAR & GRILL

PICKLES

12841 S. Harbor Road West Ocean City 410-213-1846 www.ocharborside.com March 29: DJ Billy T, 4 p.m. to 2 a.m. March 30: DJ Billy T, all day; DJ Jeremy, 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. March 31: Opposite Directions, 2-6 p.m.; DJ Billy T, 4 p.m. to 2 a.m. April 4: Dust N’ Bones, 6 p.m.

706 Philadelphia Ave. Ocean City 410-289-4891 www.picklesoc.com March 29: Beats By Jeremy, 10 p.m. March 30: Rogue Citizens, 10 p.m. April 1: Beats by Jeremy, 9 p.m. April 4: Beats by Wax, 9 p.m. PURPLE MOOSE SALOON

12513 Ocean Gateway West Ocean City 410-213-1841 www.hootersofoc.com March 29: DJ BK, 4 p.m.

108 S. Atlantic Ave. Ocean City 410-289-6953 www.purplemoosesaloon.com March 29: Sonic Daze, 10 p.m. March 30: CK the DJ/VJ, 2 p.m.; CK the VJ/DJ, 9 p.m.; Sonic Daze, 10 p.m.

OCEAN CLUB NIGHTCLUB

SEACRETS

In the Horizons Restaurant In the Clarion Fontainebleau Hotel 101st Street and the ocean Ocean City

49th Street and the bay Ocean City 410-524-4900 www.seacrets.com

HOOTERS

March 29: DJ Tuff, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; Event Horizon, 10 p.m. to 1:50 a.m. March 30: The 19th Street Band, 59 p.m.; DJ Bobby-O, 6 p.m. to 1:50 a.m.; DJ Cruz, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; Flowers for Taco, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.’ Gypsy Wisdom, 10 p.m. to 1:50 a.m. April 4: Opposite Directions, 5-9 p.m. SKYE RAW BAR & GRILLE 66th Street, bayside Ocean City 410-723-6762 www.skyebaroc.com March 29: Marky Shaw, 4-8 p.m. March 30: Aaron Howell, 4-8 p.m. TRADER LEE’S LIVE 9935 Stephen Decatur Highway West Ocean City 443-614-4119 March 31: Sunday Jam Sess, 7 p.m. April 3: Open Mic Night, 7 p.m. WHISKER’S BAR & GRILL 11070 Cathell Road, Suite 17 Pines Plaza, Ocean Pines 410-208-3922 www.whiskersbar.com March 29: Karaoke w/Donnie Berkey

OUT & ABOUT

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Johnny’s Pizza and Pub employees Hunter Hoffman, left, and Harry Vercoe serve pizza and cold beers at the 56th Street establishment, Saturday, March 23.

Enjoying a meal at Coins on 28th Street after participating in the cheerleading nationals’ competition, Saturday, March 23, are Tabatha Sayre and her daughter, Madison, 9, of Clarksburg, West Virginia.

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Chad Roads and Judy King, of Ocean City, grab a bite to eat at Frog Bar at the inlet shopping center, Saturday, March 23.

George and Sandy Kyle, of Bel Air, Maryland, have some cocktails at the Frog Bar in the inlet shopping center, Saturday, March 23.


MARCH 29, 2019

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Ocean City Today

Ninth annual Taste of Finer Things event set for April 3 By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (March 29, 2019) Guests can sample a selection of food and wine provided by 16 area restaurants during the ninth annual Taste of Finer Things at Harrison’s Harbor Watch in Ocean City, Wednesday, April 3, starting at 6:30 p.m. “It is just a fun event,” Stephanie Meehan, Taste of Finer Things chairperson, said. “When you get there, that’s it. You paid for your ticket, you get there and you just enjoy the evening. There’s no 50/50, silent auction ... there’s nothing else but to have a good time.” Participating restaurants include Atlantic Hotel, Barn 34, Captain’s Table, Crabs to Go, Desserts by Rita, Embers/Blu/Mad Fish, Harrison’s Harbor Watch, Hooked, Macky’s Bayside Bar & Grill, OC Wasabi, Red Red Wine, Seacrets, Sunset Grille, Sweet Disposition, Touch of Italy and Wockenfuss. “Each menu selection will be paired with a different wine,” Meehan said. “You can drink your favorite wines or you can drink the wine that pairs with each food.” The event raises funds for the capital campaign to build the Macky & Pam Stansell House, a hospice residence and outreach center that will serve the Lower Shore. This home is for hospice patients who can no longer manage safely at home. It will open to patients later this year in Ocean Pines. Since the event’s inception, over $200,000 has been raised for the hospice residence. “We raised money for nine years to help with the progress of the building, and now that the building will soon open, we’re hopefully raising money toward maintaining the building,” Meehan said.

ESSAY CONTEST Worcester Prep third grader Sarah Williams of Pittsville, placed second and third grader Lexi Davis of Berlin, finished third, in the American Legion Auxiliary Americanism Essay Contest for students in grades 3-8. This year’s essay contest topic was, “How can we address and prevent veteran homelessness in our communities?”

Meehan is also a Taste of Finer Things committee members with Macky Stansell, Pam Buckley, Karen Cramer, Madalaine How, Marsha Howarth, Donna Leiner and Gayle Widdowson. Lauren Glick will provide musical entertainment during the event. “I have to give a shout out to Harrison Harbor Watch, because not only do they donate their food for the event, they are donating the use of their beautiful restaurant and their staff, which is wonderful,” Meehan said. The entertainer and restaurants involved have donate their time and resources each year, Meehan added. “It is a great way to start out the season,” Meehan said. “You can see all your friends you may not have seen over the winter, friends who are back from [traveling] that have been away … All of our great friends will be there.” The cost to attend is $100 per person. To order tickets in advance, visit CoastalHospice.org/taste or call 410742-8732. The event usually sells out so it is encouraged to purchase tickets in advance. Founded in 1980, Coastal Hospice is a nonprofit health care organization that cares for individuals facing life-limiting conditions but who want to remain as active and engaged as possible.  Coastal Hospice cares for patients in their home, nursing home, assisted living facility or at Coastal Hospice at the Lake. The organization serves Wicomico, Worcester, Dorchester and Somerset counties.

Ocean City lodge to host annual St. Joseph’s Festival Continued from Page 31 Ocean City Parks and Recreation, St. Luke’s Catholic Church, the 9/11 Memorial in New York City, Star Charities, the Home of the Brave and Ocean Pines Armed Forces Day Memorial. In honor of March 19 being the Feast Day of St. Joseph, Italian families throughout the United States celebrate annually because he is the patron saint of workers and the universal church. Former Sons and Daughters of Italy of Ocean City Lodge #2474 president Sal Castorina created the St. Joseph’s Festival nearly 10 years ago and it takes dozens of volunteers and three months of preparation to pull off, DiOrio said. For more information, visit www.sonsofitalyoceancity.com

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PAGE 34

Ocean City Today

MARCH 29, 2019

COMMUNITY/SCHOOLS

MUSICAL GUESTS Berlin Intermediate School welcomed members of the Ocean City Pipes and Drums to Lisa Adams’ fourth grade music class, Feb. 27. Pictured, are students Grant Stephan and Jillian Donahue, with, from left, Jean Feltes, Dr. Jon Andes, and Dr. Laurie Andes.

TOP PRIZE Anne Carroll won first place in the "Come Together" group art show that opened on First Friday, March 1, at the Ocean City Center for the Arts on 94th Street. The show will run through March 30.

PHOTO COURTESY D.J. LANDIS, SR.

LANDIS HONORED Kiwanis Club of Greater Ocean Pines-Ocean City President Dick Clagett, right, re-instituted the Kiwanian of the Month to recognized member efforts. On Feb. 27, he presented the award to January's recipient, Dave Landis for publicizing 2018/2019 Kiwanis activities.

MBS GALA Most Blessed Sacrament Catholic School held its 15-year gala celebration fundraiser at the Residence Inn in Ocean City, March 2. Pictured, from left, are Kelly Stanislav, Kim Martin, Anne Vogel Flaherty, Heather Marinelli, HSA vice president, and Nichole Behornar, HSA president.

NATIONAL AWARD The American Cancer Society's Relay For Life of North Worcester County was recently honored with a national award for 2018. The Nationwide Per Capita Award is presented to the top five per capita counties in one of 16 different population size range categories based on net income from American Cancer Society records and county population of all the Relay events in each county. Displaying the award banner from left, are Relay For Life of North Worcester Chair Dawn Hodge, ACS Senior Community Development Manager Debbie White, PRMC Richard A. Henson Cancer Institute Executive Director Joan Mischtschuk and AGH John H. "Jack" Burbage, Jr. Regional Cancer Center Director Patricia Marks. PRMC is the Luminaria Sponsor and AGH is the Presenting Survivor Sponsor for Relay For Life of North Worcester.

DONATION Lion Ben Dawson, left, receives a $10,000 contribution from Pam and Macky Stansell to the Ocean City Lions Charities which supports U.S. wounded military heroes. The Stansells have supported this program for many years. The OC Lions Charities contribution for wounded warriors rehabilitation now exceeds $401,000.


MARCH 29, 2019

Ocean City Today

Evelyn Hartman, left, and Velda Henry, member of the Art League Board of Directors, serve soup during a previous Empty Bowl Soup Dinner at the Ocean City Center for the Arts on 94th Street.

Empty Bowl Soup Dinner to benefit Diakonia, Art League By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (March 29, 2019) The Art League of Ocean City and Diakonia have teamed up again this year to fight hunger and it will culminate with the fifth annual Empty Bowl Soup Dinner at the Ocean City Center for the Arts, Friday, March 29, from 4:30-8:30 p.m. Attendees can bring the bowls they made during classes held at the Ocean City Center for the Arts on 94th Street, or purchase one for $25. “It’s a very simple dinner so that other people can simply eat,” Rina Thaler, executive director of the Art League, said. “People can come in, have dinner, purchase a bowl, and the restaurants have really gotten behind it this year. We’re going to have a great selection of soups.” Proceeds from the dinner will benefit Diakonia, a nonprofit based in West Ocean City that has been helping individuals and families in Worcester County and the Lower Shore for more than 40 years by providing shelter, food, clothing, and the resources to rebuild their lives. Proceeds also benefit the community programs of the Art League of Ocean City. Last year, 200-300 bowls were made and the event raised approximately $10,000. In the five years the Art League and Diakonia have partnered on this project, the organizations have raised more than $39,000. This year, around 400 bowls were made in anticipation of the event. One hundred of them will be available for purchase during the dinner.

“People who have already made a bowl can come and have a dinner and have a fun night,” Thaler said. “The people who haven’t made bowls can still come out and pick out a bowl, have some soup and enjoy the evening and know they are helping a good cause.” Eight restaurants will provide soup. Embers/BLU Crabhouse/MadFish will serve cream of crab and corn chowder; Off the Hook, corn and crab jalapeno bisque; Liquid Assets, Wagyu beef chili; Mother’s Cantina, roasted tomato; Ocean 13, chicken and dumpling; The Original Greene Turtle, beef chili; Seacrets, creamy tomato basil; and Sunset Grille, chicken tortilla. “What we try to do at Diakonia is help people who don’t have anything or are food insecure. That’s such a large part of what we do,” Allyson Church, chair of Diakonia’s board of directors, said. “This is a great event for the community to support and enjoy the Art League at the same time.” The dinner will feature live music by artists who perform during the Art Center’s Originals Only monthly event: Lily Carolina, DomtheGonzo, Josh Miller, Sad Napkin, and EyeCan’tSeeI’mDeaf. A cash bar, a soup-to-go station, a 50/50 auction and live music will also be included. Guests are asked to keep the bowl as a reminder of all of the empty bowls in the world. “We appreciate the Art League and our supporters that year after year support us in a big way,” Church said. See EAT Page 36

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MARCH 29, 2019

Ocean City Today

Eat soup from handmade bowls Continued from Page 35 “We can’t do the work that we do without [contributions] from the community.” Sponsors for the 2019 Empty Bowl Project include Bayside Liquors, Buxy’s/Dry Dock 28, Dunes Manor Hotel, Embers/BLU Crab House/Mad Fish, Fager’s Island, Irish Penny Pub & Grill, Liquid Assets, Mother’s Cantina, Ocean 13, The Original Greene Turtle, West-O Bottle Shop, Seacrets, Sunset Grille, and Touch of Italy. The cost of the dinner is $25 and includes soup, bread, soft drink and a handcrafted ceramic soup bowl. The event is free to attend for those who made a bowl during one of the classes. Guests can purchase an additional bowl of soup for $5. Seating is continuous from 4:30-8:30 p.m. Reservations are not required. The facility can accommodate seating for 100

guests at a time. Seating will be available on a first-come first-serve basis. “It has been a great collaboration between Diakonia and the Art League of Ocean City … two nonprofits that are so different have been able to work together,” Thaler said. “The idea of creating art for a good cause is something that we are passionate about at the Art League. Art has a way of bringing people together but here we have the added benefit of supporting a good cause.” The project was founded by Michigan residents Lisa Blackburn and art teacher John Hartom in 1990-91 when they joined a drive to raise charitable funds in their community. Hartom’s idea was to organize a charitable event to give artists and art students a way to make a personal difference. For more information, visit www.artleagueofoceancity.org or call 410-524-9433.

Time to Design Spring Is Here! Your New Beach Home!

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

INSTALLATION Kurt Leinemann spent nearly three weeks restoring a WWI statue for his Eagle Scout project. It was installed in front of American Legion Post 166 on 24th Street, March 15. He is pictured with Scoutmaster Ken Nichols, left, and Post Commander Tom Wengert.

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Walker provides tips for perfect blooming onion By Deborah Lee Walker Contributing Writer (March 29, 2019) Subordination is the act of giving someone or something less importance or power. I cannot help but think about the unassuming “onion.” How many times do you walk past the produce section and do not give them a passing thought? But at the same time, they are a vital component of cookery. But do onions have the complexity to be the star of a dish? A blooming onion is not only mouth-watering but also a show stopper. The gorgeous, crispy onion petals that “bloom” on the plate are always a great crowd pleaser. Following are some useful tips that will ensure a perfect blooming onion. But before we get started, let us review the science of frying for further clarity. The definition of frying is very simple, it is any food that is cooked in hot fat. When the food is added to hot oil (usually 350 to 375 degrees), its surface dehydrates which facilitates the browning process. In the initial moments of frying, as See MAINTAINING Page 38


MARCH 29, 2019

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Ocean City Today

Believe in Tomorrow gala to take place April 13 in resort dren visiting the House by the Sea. He By Morgan Pilz also offers the families staying at the Staff Writer (March 29, 2019) The Believe in To- 66th Street Believe in Tomorrow house morrow Children’s House by the Sea free access to the hotel’s swimming pool will host its 18th annual gala and pres- and magic shows during the summer. ent its Hero by the Sea award on SaturGulshen was a Believe in Tomorrow day, April 13. prom king participant four years ago The event will take place from 5:30- and raised $18,000 for the organiza10:30 p.m. at the Holiday Inn Ocean- tion. front on 67th Street. Doors will open at Gulshen said he is “very honored, 5:30 p.m. in the second-floor ballroom humbled and surprised” to receive the of the hotel with a cocktail hour kicking “Hero by the Sea” award. off festivities and music by Joe Smooth. “The list of recipients is very presti“Out of all the events we do gious, very established people this is my favorite. This is the in the town,” he said. “It’s nice first one I ever started here,” to be included among those said Wayne Littleton, coordinapeople who have done a lot for tor for the Believe in Tomorrow the community.” Children’s Respite Housing Gulshen said he was inspired Program. “The difference beto work with Believe in Tomortween the [other] events and row when the hotel became part this event … this is strictly about Jason Gulshen of an initiative to help the comBelieve in Tomorrow. munity around 10 years ago. “I find everybody who attends this “We’re looking for what can we do event is there because they support Be- and right next door was Believe in Tolieve in Tomorrow,” he continued. “I morrow,” Gulshen said. “I walked over feel like everybody there cares so much. one day and about the same time they It’s just a great event.” actually were headed in our direction During the cocktail hour, guests can and they were asking about a child who enjoy tenderloin sliders with a choice of because of their treatment, couldn’t be sauces from Longboard Café. Seacrets in the sun for an extended period of will provide jerk chicken and Sunset time, so they were asking about using Grille will have a raw bar selection com- the pool. We came up with an agreeplete with oysters, shrimp and ahi tuna. ment so they could come use the indoor Ocean 13 will provide some appetizers. pool during the daytime. In addition, Touch of Italy will fea“It started out that way; very small, ture its antipasti and pizza in addition little deeds,” he continued. “Overtime it to a mozzarella maker. became, ‘What can we do for you’ and Sweet Disposition will provide ‘How can we be more involved with the desserts and Believe in Tomorrow will organization’ and we just built a relaset up a chocolate fountain. Compli- tionship from there.” mentary beer and wine will be proTo end the evening, Littleton will anvided. nounce the 50/50 winner. Tickets costs Tickets to the black-tie optional $50 each and only 100 will be sold. The event generally cover gala expenses, winner will take home $2,500. which makes the evening’s activities The Michael G. Mann Foundation and auction vital to the organization. once again is the title sponsor of the This year, attendees can purchase gala. mystery boxes for $10 or wine glasses “We have different sponsorship levwith a hidden gem for $25, courtesy of els and are always looking for more,” Park Place Jewelers. One of the wine Littleton said. “The levels are $1,500, glasses will hold a diamond, and the $3,000 and $5,000.” rest will have another gems hidden inThe event program will also feature side, such as topaz and pearls. ads. A full page costs $125, half a page There will also be an ice luge with is $75 and a business card is $35. PaSeacrets spirits, a deejay and a silent tron ads cost $10. auction featuring sports memorabilia, The deadline to purchase an ad is restaurant gift cards, baskets, beauty April 3, April 5 for sponsorships. products and weekend getaways. Only 200 gala tickets will be sold. Each year since 2004, Believe in To- The cost is $75 per person or $150 per morrow gives out its “Hero by the Sea” couple. award. Jason Gulshen, general manFor more information or to buy tickager of the Holiday Inn Oceanfront in ets and inquire about sponsorships or Ocean City, will be honored at the gala ads, call Littleton at 410-723-2842. this year. The Believe in Tomorrow facility on “Jason just typifies what a Believe in 66th Street is open year-round to proTomorrow volunteer is,” Littleton said. vide a free getaway to the beach for crit“He just constantly looks out for us. ically ill children and their families He’s just got a heart of gold and I’m very whenever they may need to escape the pleased to announce him as our winner stresses of their child’s illness. this year.” Families can also vacation at the BeGulshen goes out of his way to con- lieve in Tomorrow House in Fenwick tact the pilots during the Ocean City Air Island and House by the Bay on 28th Show so they can meet with the chil- Street.

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PAGE 38

Ocean City Today

MARCH 29, 2019

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Maintaining correct oil temp key when frying, Walker says Continued from Page 36 the surface dehydrates, it forms a crust which inhibits further oil consumption. More specifically, through a series of Maillard reactions (named after the chemist Louis Camille Maillard), the sugars and proteins break down to create complex flavors and golden-brown color. Maintaining the correct oil temperature is key to frying. If the temperature drops too low, the crust forms slowly, allowing the food to absorb more fat and become greasy. If the oil gets too hot, the food burns on the surface before it cooks through. Specifics add to the success of a blooming onion. To help breadcrumb coatings dry and adhere, allow the raw bread crumbs to rest for at least 15 minutes before frying the onion. Once the blooming onion is fried, place it on a cooling rack as opposed to a plate lined with paper towels. There is nothing worse than developing a beautiful crust and have it resting on soggy paper towels. Season the blooming onion immediately after frying, this step helps the salt stick to the fried coating. If you decide to prepare several blooming onions, do not overcrowd the pan. Adding too many onions at one time will cause the temperature of the oil to drop. The next time you entertain and want a unique dish to dazzle your guests, consider a blooming onion. This recipe is not difficult and is sure to make a quite an impression on your guests. Enjoy!

For the Dipping Sauce: 3 tablespoons mayonnaise 1 tablespoon sour cream 1 ½ teaspoons ketchup ½ teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 1 tablespoon drained horseradish ¼ teaspoon paprika ¼ teaspoon garlic powder ¼ teaspoon onion powder one to a few pinches’ cayenne pepper kosher salt and freshly ground pepper 1. Combine all the ingredients in a bowl, cover and refrigerate. * The dipping sauce is adapted from the Food Network website.

For the Blooming Onion: 1 large sweet onion 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour ¾ cup unseasoned panko breadcrumbs 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper 2 tablespoons paprika ½ teaspoon dried thyme

½ teaspoon dried oregano ½ teaspoon garlic powder ½ teaspoon crushed rosemary 1 teaspoon black pepper 1 tablespoon kosher salt 2 large eggs 2 teaspoons water 1 cup whole milk 1 cup buttermilk canola oil for frying 1. Onion preparation – cut off ½inch from the pointy stem end of the onion, then peel the entire onion. Place the onion cut-side down. Starting ½-inch from the root of the onion, make a downward cut all the way down through the entire onion. Repeat to make four evenly spaced cuts around the onion. Continue slicing between each section until you have 16 evenly spaced cuts. Carefully turn the onion over and use your fingers to gently separate the outer pieces. 2. Whisk the flour, panko, cayenne pepper, paprika, thyme, oregano, garlic powder, rosemary, black pepper and salt on a pie plate. 3. In a small deep bowl, whisk the eggs, water, milk and buttermilk. 4. Place the cut onion in the egg mixture, using a spoon make sure the entire surface area is covered. Allow excess to drip off. 5. Place the onion into the flour mixture. Again, using a spoon, make sure the entire surface is coated with the flour mixture. 6. Repeat dipping the onion in the egg mixture and flour mixture. The onion will be dipped a total of two times. Refrigerate while the oil is heating. 7. Heat enough canola oil to almost cover the onion in a large deep pot over medium-high heat until a deep-fry thermometer registers 375 degrees. If you do not have a thermometer, take a tiny piece of batter and place it in the pot of oil. If it instantly starts to sizzle, the oil is ready for frying. 8. Using a large slotted spoon or Chinese wire skimmer, carefully lower the onion into the oil, cut side down. Adjust the heat so the oil temperature stays close to 350 degrees. Fry for 3 to 4 minutes or until the onion is golden brown and turn the onion to get the other side golden brown. 9. Place on a cooling rack for 1 minute, lightly dust with kosher salt, and serve immediately with dip. – Secret Ingredient – Tears. “Delicious tears! The heart’s own dew.” – Letitia Elizabeth Landon

www.oceancitytoday.com

CROSSWORD

Answers on page 41


Ocean City Today

MARCH 29, 2019

PAGE 39

Dining Guide ■ PRICE RANGE: $, $$, $$$ ■ RESERVATIONS: Reservations accepted ________________________________

DOWNTOWN

South end to 28th Street ■ CAPTAIN’S TABLE RESTAURANT 15th Street and the Boardwalk, Ocean City 410-289-7192, www.captainstableoc.com $$-$$$ | Reservations | Kids’ menu | Full bar Family-owned, serving fine seafood, steaks and poultry on the third floor of the Courtyard by Marriott. ■ COINS 28th Street and Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-524 3100, www.coinspub.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Casual dining atmosphere for families. Crab cakes, hand-cut steaks, fresh seafood. Everything home-made. Happy hour 3-6 p.m. and early bird 4-6 p.m. Daily specials. ■ THE CORAL REEF CAFE / HEMINGWAY'S RESTAURANT 17th Street, in the Holiday Inn Hotel & Suites, Ocean City 410-289-2612, www.ocsuites.com/dining $-$$ | Reservations | Kids’ menu | Full bar Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner. Fourstory atrium cafe and an elegant dining room, Floridian/island-style cuisine, fresh seafood, fresh cuts of meat, farm-to-table produce, artisanal desserts, hearty sandwiches and much more. ■ VICTORIAN ROOM RESTAURANT Dunes Manor Hotel, OCEANFRONT at 28th and Baltimore Ave, Ocean City 410-2891100, www.dunesmanor.com $$ - $$$ | Reservations | Kids’ menu | Full Bar Open year round. Oceanfront dining atmosphere with local, farm to table/sea to table cuisine. Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. (Friday and Saturday, till 10 p.m.). Also Zippy Lewis Lounge with happy hour from 4-7 p.m., featuring Craft Beer selections and appetizer menu; Milton’s Out Door Cafe; and the Barefoot Beach Bar in season.

MIDTOWN

29th to 90th streets ■ 32 PALM 32nd Street, in the Hilton Suites, Ocean City 410-289-2525, www.oceancityhilton.com/dining $$ | Reservations | Kids’ menu | Full bar Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner. Western Caribbean cuisine, Eastern Shore favorites, extensive wine list and gourmet desserts. ■ BJ’S ON THE WATER 75th Street, Ocean City 410-524-7575, www.bjsonthewater.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Entire dining menu served 11 a.m. to 1:30 a.m., seven days a week, year-round. Daily specials, daily duck feeding. Entertainment every Wednesday, Friday and Saturday. No cover. Available for parties and banquets. Indoor and outdoor dining. ■ DOUGH ROLLER 41st Street and Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-524-9254; 70th Street and Coastal Highway 410-524-7981, www.DoughRollerRestaurants.com $ | Kids’ menu Ocean City’s favorite family restaurant for more than 35 years. Great kid’s menu. Order online for carryout at both Coastal Highway locations. ■ DRY 85 OC 12 48th Street, Ocean City 443-664-8989, www.DRY85.com $$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Steps from the beach. Gourmet “stick to your ribs” home cooking. A made-fromscratch kitchen with every sauce and every dressing hand crafted. It’s that attention to detail that takes the concept of burgers, fries, pork chops and wings and turns them completely on their head. Late night bar. Seasonal outdoor seating.

■ HIGGINS CRAB HOUSE 31st Street, Ocean City 410-289-2581, higginscrabhouse.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full Bar Known for all-you-can-eat crabs, crab legs, fried chicken, steamed shrimp, and baby back ribs. ■ JOHNNY’S PIZZA PUB 56th Street, Ocean City 410-723-5600, www.johnnyspizzapub.com $ | Kids’ menu | Full Bar Featuring homemade pizzas, 18 gourmet pizzas, a variety of calzones, subs, burgers, sandwiches and jumbo wings with 20 different sauces. Carry out, delivery or dine in. ■ LONGBOARD CAFÉ 67th Street Town Center, Ocean City 443664-5639, www.longboardcafe.net $$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Serving lunch and dinner. Lite fare to dinner entrees offering a variety of burgers, paninis, sandwiches and salads. The "veggies" menu features wrinkled green beans. Signature house libiations and signature entrees made with ingredients from local farms and fisheries. A family restaurant. ■ MARLIN MOON 3301 Atlantic Ave., in the DoubleTree Ocean City 410-280-1201, www.marlinmoonocmd.com $$ | Full bar Featuring Executive Chef Gary Beach. Fresh cuisine featuring locally sourced seafood, steaks and vegetables. Small plate appetizers, fresh salads. Local craft beers and cocktails. Open for lunch and dinner, 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. ■ RED RED WINE BAR OC 12 48th Street, Ocean City 443-664-6801, www.RedRedWineBar.com $$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Steps from the beach. Coastal cuisine with a focus on local seafood and hand tossed pizzas plus artisanal cheeseboards. 35+ wines By the Glass, 120+ By the Bottle. Flights. Luxurious colors and custom built couches. Late night bar. Seasonal outdoor seating. ■ SEACRETS 49th Street, Ocean City 410-524-4900, www.seacrets.com $$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Island atmosphere. Soups, salads, Jamaican jerk chicken, appetizers, sandwiches, paninis, pizza and fresh seafood. ■ SKYE RAW BAR & GRILLE 66th Street, Ocean City 410-723-6762, www.skyebaroc.com $-$$ | Reservations | Full bar Lunch, dinner, raw bar or lite fare, at the top of 66th Street and Coastal Highway. Happy hour, 3-6 p.m. with food and drink specials.

UPTOWN

91st to 146th streets ■ ALBERTINO’S BRICK OVEN EATERY 13117 Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410250-2000, www.albertinosoc.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Lunch and dinner daily. Open Wednesday and Thursday, 4 p.m. and Friday through Sunday, 11 a.m. Homemade pizza and pasta, seafood, steaks. Daily specials and happy hour. ■ BLUE FISH JAPANESE & CHINESE RESTAURANT AND SUSHI BAR 94th Street, Ocean City 410-524-3983, www.bluefishocmd.com $-$$ | Reservations | Full bar Japanese and Chinese restaurant and sushi bar with beer, wine and cocktails. Dine in, take out and delivery available. ■ BOURBON STREET ON THE BEACH 116th Street & Coastal Hwy., (Behind Fountain Head Towers Condominium), Ocean City 443-664-2896, www.bourbonstreetonthebeach.com $$-$$$ | Reservations recommended for large parties | Kids’ menu | Full bar Eastern Shore fare with a New Orleans Flare. Seafood, steaks and pasta dishes. Specializing in Jambalaya, Creole, & Gumbo. Home of the Ragin’ Cajun Bloody Mary. Happy Hour 4-

7 p.m. Weekly entertainment. ■ THE CRAB BAG 130th Street, bayside, Ocean City 410-2503337, www.thecrabbag.com $-$$ | Full bar Dine in and carryout. Open 7 Days a week, 11 am til late night. Hot steamed crabs, world famous fried chicken, ribs, burgers, barbecue, pasta, seafood, steaks, sandwiches and more. Lunch and weekly carryout and dinner specials. Happy hour at the beach with drink and food specials. ■ DUFFYS 130th St., in Montego Bay Shopping Ctr. & Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-250 1449, www.duffysoc.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Casual dining, indoor or outdoor seating. Irish fare and American cuisine. Appetizers, soups, salads, sandwiches, steaks and seafood. Second season and daily dinner specials. Dine in, carry out. Happy Hour, daily, noon to 6 pm. ■ HIGGINS CRAB HOUSE 128th Street, Ocean City 410-289-2581, higginscrabhouse.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full Bar Known for all-you-can-eat crabs, crab legs, fried chicken, steamed shrimp, and baby back ribs. ■ HORIZONS OCEANFRONT RESTAURANT 101st Street, Ocean City 410-524-3535, www.clarionoc.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Serving beach-inspired dishes in our oceanfront restaurants, Horizons and Breakers Pub. All-day menu, available 11:30 a.m. to 11 p.m. Deluxe Sunday breakfast buffet, open year-round and AUCE prime rib, crab legs and seafood buffet available Friday and Saturday, 5-9 p.m. ■ NICK’S HOUSE OF RIBS 144th Street & Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-250-1984, www.nickshouseofribs.com $$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Casual, family friendly with upscale atmosphere. Extensive menu from our famous baby back ribs, fresh seafood, black angus steaks. ■ NORI 11403 Coastal Highway (Gold Coast Mall), Ocean City 443-880-6258 $$ | Reservations accepted | Kids’ menu | Full bar Open 7 days serving lunch and dinner. Our creative menu features hand-cut steaks, grilled fish, crab cakes, sushi and sashimi. Dine-in or carry-out. ■ REEF 118 118th Street, in the Carousel Oceanfront Hotel and Condos, Ocean City 410-5241000, www.carouselhotel.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Open seven days a week. Oceanfront dining in a casual atmosphere. Serving breakfast from 7-11 a.m., featuring a breakfast buffet or special order from the regular menu. Dinner served from 4-9 p.m., seafood, ribs, steaks, pasta and prime rib. Join us for family theme night dinners. ■ WHISKERS PUB 120th Street, OC Square, Ocean City 410524-2609, www.whiskerspub.com $ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Certified Angus®burgers and casual fare. Call for hours.

DELAWARE ■ FOX’S PIZZA DEN 31225 American Parkway, Selbyville, Del. 302-436-FOXS, www.foxspizzade.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Sit-down bar and restaurant. Full menu includes pizza, pastas, salads, sandwiches and more. Specializing pizza and chef specials. Open daily for lunch and dinner at 11 a.m. Take out and delivery.

WEST OCEAN CITY ■ ALEX’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT

Route 50, West Ocean City 410-213-7717, www.ocitalianfood.com $-$$ | Reservations | Full bar Serving homemade Italian cuisine, steaks, seafood, chicken, pork and pasta. Elegant dining room. Early bird specials every day from 5-6 p.m. ■ FOX’S PIZZA DEN 11328 Samuel Bowen Blvd., West Ocean City 410-600-1020, Foxpizzamd.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full Bar Enjoy a brand new spacious dining room. Happy hour every day from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. with $5 food specials. Full menu includes appetizers, salads, stromboli, hoagies and wedgies, pizza, spaghetti and more. Open every day from 11 a.m. to midnight. ■ HARBORSIDE BAR AND GRILL 128741 S. Harbor Road, West Ocean City 410-213-1846, weocharborside.com $-$$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Home of the Original Fresh Squeezed Orange Crush! Open every day, 11 a.m. to 2 a.m. Appetizers, fresh seafood, steak and pasta. Live entertainment Thursday through Sunday. ■ HOOTERS Route 50 & Keyser Point Road, West Ocean City 410-213-1841, www.hootersofoc.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu and game room | Full bar New smoked wings with half the calories. Traditional wings, burgers, quesadillas, tacos and healthy salads. Seafood selections with raw bar and crab legs. Sports packages and live entertainment. Large parties welcome. ■ PIZZA TUGOS Routes 50 and 611, West Ocean City 410524-2922; 114th Street and Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-524-2922, www.pizzatugos.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Serving lunch and dinner. Open 7 days. Pizza Tugos is a family-friendly dining restaurant that features award winning pizza, pasta, craft burgers, sandwiches, subs, appetizers and salads. Great happy hour and football specials with full bar and 54 craft beers. ■ POPEYE’S LOUISIANA KITCHEN Route 50, West Ocean City 443-664-2105 $ | Kids’ menu Family restaurant. Eat-in, carry out or drivethru. Open seven days, year-round. Every Monday and Tuesday, two-piece chicken for 99 cents. Every Wednesday, free kids meal with purchase of combo.

OCEAN PINES ■ OCEAN PINES YACHT CLUB 1 Mumford Landing Road, Ocean Pines 410641-7222, www.OPyachtclub.com $$-$$$ | Full bar Amid a bay front setting, the Ocean Pines Yacht Club offers dining selections for lunch and dinner. Fresh seafood and signature drinks. Open Thursday-Sunday, 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. ■ TERN GRILLE 100 Clubhouse Drive, Ocean Pines 410641-7222, oceanpinesgolf.org/dining $$ | Full bar The Tern Grille serves freshly-prepared breakfast and lunch items. Open 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily, weather permitting.

BERLIN ■ OCEAN DOWNS CASINO, POSEIDON’S PUB 10218 Racetrack Road, Berlin 410-6410600, www.oceandowns.com $-$$$ | Full bar House soups, small plates, sandwiches, burgers and entrees including steaks, chicken, veggie and Eastern Shore favorites. Dining room hours: Sunday, Wednesday and Thursday, noon to 10 p.m.; Monday and Tuesday, noon to 8 p.m.; and Friday and Saturday, noon to 11 p.m. Pub open late.


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Ocean City Today

Calendar Submit calendar items to: editor@oceancitytoday.net. Submission deadline is 5 p.m. Monday, the week of publication. Local submissions have priority. Area event listings are subject to space availability.

Fri., March 29 FIBER FRIENDS Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 10:00 AM. Bring your lap work to this informal get-together. Knitters, crocheters, embroiderers, etc. welcome. Victoria Christie-Healy, moonlightknitting@gmail.com, 703507-0708, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

RAG RUG WITH UPCYCLED FABRIC Berlin library, 13 Harrison Ave., 2:00 PM. Learn how to make a rug out of left over bits and pieces of fabric, old sheets, shirts or dresses. Register: 410-6410650. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

HOMESCHOOL MEET-UP Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 2:00 PM. The library will provide craft items, toys and building materials. All aged homeschoolers and their caregivers welcome. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

MAKERSPACE Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM. Use the 3D printer and learn about StudiOC, a digital media lab. Users can explore virtual reality, podcasting, stop motion animation and green screen video production. Note that some of the equipment is for ages 13 years and older and requires parental permission. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

ART COMPETITION DEADLINE The Worcester County Arts Council invites all interested artists to participate in a juried art competition and exhibit to be presented during the month of April at the WCAC Gallery in Berlin. Open to all artists, 18 years and older, professional or amateur with work in photography and digital media. All work must be original and completed within the last three years. Entries will be accepted March 27-29, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Entry guidelines: www.worcestercountyartscouncil.org.

WOMEN IN ART PART III: 20TH CENTURY Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM. In the final part of this series, examine the changes during the 20th century and seek to understand the role of women within this modern art world. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

5TH ANNUAL EMPTY BOWL PROJECT SOUP

DINNER Ocean City Center for the Arts, 502 94th St., 4:30 PM - 8:30 PM. The project begins with bowl-making sessions and culminates in a soup dinner. The dinner will feature soups, breads and desserts. A cash bar, a soup-to-go station, a silent auction and live music are also included. Guests are asked to keep the bowl as a reminder of all of the empty bowls in the world. Guests do not need to have previously made a bowl to attend, but can purchase a bowl and soup for a $25 donation at the door. Proceeds benefit Diakonia. Open to the public. 410-524-9433, http://www.artleagueofoceancity.org

WOMEN IN ANIMATION: PART THREE Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, 5:30 PM. A program featuring celebrated animated shorts from female animators, from the dawn of film to the Internet age. Viewer discretion advised. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

Sat., March 30 FLEA MARKET AND FARMERS AND ARTISANS MARKET Ocean Pines Community Center, 239 Ocean Parkway, 8:00 AM - 12:00 PM. The flea market will feature gently used clothing, children’s items, household items, collectibles, delectable food and more. Admission is free and open to the public. Visit the Ocean Pines Farmers and Artisans Market, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., located at White Horse Park. Featuring fresh produce, baked goods, meats and gourmet pantry and artisan-crafted items. Ocean Pines Recreation and Parks Department, 410-641-7052

11:00 AM. Ocean Pines residents will get a chance to weigh in on current projects and community matters at the meeting. The Ocean Pines Communications Advisory Committee will host the event. Residents are encouraged to submit questions and comments to the Ocean Pines Board of Directors and the committee in advance via email to townhall@oceanpines.org by March 27 at 5 p.m. The meeting may be viewed at www.OceanPines.org or on Mediacom channel 78. Denise Sawyer, dsawyer@oceanpines.org, 410-641-7717, Ext. 3006

COMMUNITY ACCESS TO RESOURCES EXPO Berlin Intermediate School, 309 Franklin Ave., 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM. Worcester County CARE will provide answers to questions such as how to get utility or food assistance, child or adult care, help with health concerns, educational resources and more. There will be community service providers, educators and area businesses on hand. Debbie at Worcester Youth and Family, 410-6414598

MD CHIP PROGRAM Berlin Intermediate School, 309 Franklin Ave., 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM. The Maryland Child Identification Program is provided free of charge by the Freemasons of Maryland. The program records all vital statistics of children and vulnerable adults. Participants are photographed, video recorded, digitally fingerprinted and a cheek swab of DNA is collected. Everything is then sealed in an envelope and given to the participants caregiver for safekeeping. A military sweep is done of the information after every participant. Pete Jones, gjones21811@verizon.net, 410-726-3269

FREE TAX PREPARATION Ocean City Senior Center, 104 41st St., 9:30 AM - 3:00 PM. Call for an appointment: 443-373-2667. The service is open to all ages and non AARP members.

FOLLOW THE DREAM LUNCHEON 2019 JOB FAIR Ocean City convention center, 4001 Coastal Highway, 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM. Employees are needed in almost every business. Dress for success. Be prepared with pen, ID, resume, etc. No pre-registration required. 410-213-0552, http://www.oceancity.org

CRAFTY SATURDAY MAKE & TAKE ‘KEVIN HENKES’ Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM. Show off your creativity with this weekly themed craft. For all ages. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

OCEAN PINES TOWN HALL MEETING Ocean Pines Yacht Club, Ballroom, 1 Mumford’s Landing Road, 9:00 AM -

Tyree AME Church, 9004 Germantown Road, 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM. This is about women and the challenges they have had to overcome to achieve their dream. The keynote speaker is Mayor Victoria Jackson-Stanley. Guest speakers include Rev. Dr. Roxie Dennis-Acholonu, Dr. Annette Wallace, Dr. Barbara Dezman, Kristin Heiser and Karen Holland. Admission is free but donations are welcomed. Sponsored by Worcester County NAACP in honor of Black Women’s History Month. Laurie Brittingham, 410831-8926

ages. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

9TH ANNUAL ST. JOSEPH’S FESTIVAL St. Andrew’s Hall, 205 W 145th St., 11:00 AM - 6:00 PM. Admission is free and attendees can expect traditional Italian specialties for sale, such a ravioli and meatballs/sausage, subs, salads, minestrone soup, zeppole, cannoli, gelato, fried dough, homemade baked goods and a cheese and salami tray. The Mario Monaldi Band will provide music. There will be basket and silent auctions along with children’s games, Italian speciality items and St. Joseph and other religious articles for sale. Al DiOrio, 302-4301004, http://www.sonsofitalyoceancity.com

POCOMOKE AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AWARDS DINNER Pocomoke Community Center, Grand Ballroom, 1410 Market St. Cocktails served at 6 p.m., buffet dinner at 7 p.m., awards presented at 8 p.m. and ‘50s theme band follows until 11 p.m. Featuring photo props and cash bar. Prizes for best male and female costumes. Tickets prices are $45 for chamber members, $50 for non-members, $85 for couples and $345 for full table of 8. Tickets available at the Chamber office, Woodforest National Bank and via online registration. 410-957-1919, http://pocomokechamber@gmail.com

QUARTER AUCTION FORGE Youth and Family, 7804 Gumboro Road, 6:30 PM. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. Paddles cost $10 for the first and $5 for each additional paddle. Refreshments will be available. To contribute or info: Tara, 443-513-1048, info@forgeyouth.org.

Sun., March 31 PAUL BOLEN GOSPEL MUSIC CONCERT Makemie Memorial Prestyterian Church, 103 W. Market St., 5:00 PM. Snow Hill native, Paul Bolen, bring his unique style of gospel music back to his hometown. The concert is free, but a free-will offering will be taken. Refreshments and reception to follow.

Mon., April 1 CPAP MASK FITTING Atlantic General Hospital Sleep Disorders Diagnostic Center, 9733 Healthway Drive, 12:00 AM. Free mask fitting clinic for patients who are having trouble adjusting to their CPAP equipment. By appointment only: Robin Rohlfing, 410-641-9726.

SATURDAY STORY TIME

FREE TAX PREPARATION

Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 11:00 AM. Featuring books, singing, dancing and fun. Stay to do the Saturday Make and Take craft afterwards. For all

Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM. Call for an appointment: 443-373-2667. The service is open to all ages and non AARP members.


MARCH 29, 2019

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Ocean City Today

CALENDAR HYPERTENSION CLINIC Apple Discount Drugs, 314 Franklin Ave., #600, 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM, Sponsored by Atlantic General Hospital and takes place the first Monday of every month. Free blood pressure screening and health information. Michelle, 410-641-9268

MOTHER GOOSE ON THE LOOSE Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 10:30 AM. A 30-minute, interactive session that uses rhymes, songs, puppets, musical instruments and more to stimulate the learning process of babies and toddlers. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

‘CHOOSING CIVILITY: THE TWENTY-FIVE RULES OF CONSIDERATE CONDUCT’ Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, 2:00 PM. Discuss P.M. Forni’s book on living a considerate and civil lifestyle. Books are available in advance at the library. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

FAMILY TIME ‘CRAFTS’ Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, 3:00 PM - 6:00 PM. Join the group for crafts and activities. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

DIABETES SUPPORT GROUP Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM. Sponsored by Atlantic General Hospital, the group is open to the public and meets on the first Wednesday of each month. AGH Diabetes Outpatient Education program, 410-208-9761

KIWANIS CLUB OF GREATER OP/OC Wednesdays - Ocean Pines Community Center, 235 Ocean Parkway, 8:00 AM. Doors open at 7 a.m., meeting begins at 8 a.m. 410-641-7330, http://www.kiwanisofopoc.org

DELMARVA HAND DANCE CLUB LAP TIME

TED TALK ‘JUST A LITTLE NICER’

Snow Hill library, 307 N. Washington St., 10:30 AM - 2:00 PM. Children, under 2 years old, will be introduced to songs, stories, games and finger plays. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM. The first of the series explores compassion as a universal virtue. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY MEETING TWEEN AND TEENS SPA DAY Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM. Make bath bombs and lip balm. There will be different essential oils and dyes to customize your products, music and snacks. For 6th12th graders. Reserve your spot: 410-5241818. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

Tuesdays - Worcester County Health Center, 9730 Healthway Drive, 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM. TOPS is a support and educational group promoting weight loss and health lifestyle. jeanduck47@gmail.com

Wed., April 3

GREAT BOOKS DISCUSSION

WITTY KNITTERS

Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 2:30 PM. The group meets twice a month to discuss both classic and modern reading selections recommended by the Great Books Foundation. Lisa Harrison, 410-632-3970, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

Berlin library, 13 Harrison Ave., 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM. Knitters, crochet enthusiasts and needle artists of all skill levels are encouraged to join this casual morning of sharing. Work on your favorite patterns and exchange ideas. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

LAP TIME

STEAM STORY TIME ‘KINDNESS CRAFTS’

Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, 4:30 PM. Children, under 2 years old, will be introduced to songs, stories, games and finger plays. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, 10:30 AM. Stories and crafts for your children. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY MEETING Atlantic General Hospital, Conference Room 1, 9733 Healthway Drive, 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM. TOPS is a weekly support and educational group promoting weight loss and healthy lifestyle. Berlin group No. 169. Rose Campion, 410-641-0157

Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM. A four-week initiative held March 20 through April 10. Make lap quilts to deliver to those living in local nursing homes. Bring a sewing machine if you have one. All fabric and materials will be provided. Attend as many as possible. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

HYPERTENSION CLINICS Sponsored by Atlantic General Hospital and takes place at Rite Aid, 10119 Old Ocean City Blvd., Berlin and at Rite Aid, 11011 Manklin Creek Road, Ocean Pines, 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM. Free blood pressure screening and health information. Michelle, 410-641-9268

DELMARVA A CAPELLA CHORUS Mondays - Ocean Pines Community Center, 239 Ocean Parkway, 7:00 PM. All levels of singers and drop-ins welcome. Carol, 410-641-6876

Tues., April 2 STORY TIME ‘BUNNY TIME’ Berlin library, 13 Harrison Ave., 10:30 AM. For 2 to 5 year old children.

OC/BERLIN ROTARY CLUB MEETING Wednesdays - Captain’s Table Restaurant in the Courtyard by Marriott, 2 15th St., 6:00 PM. 302-540-2127

Thurs., April 4 PLAY TIME Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 10:30 AM. Children, infant to 5 years old, learn the meaning of words, how to express themselves and other early literacy skills by playing with educational toys. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

FREE HEALTHCARE LECTURE Ocean Pines Community Center, 239 Ocean Parkway, 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM. The Live Well Academy is a free, year-long lecture series on a wide range of healthcare topics. This month’s topic will be Fighting Cancer with Immunotherapy. The lecture is open to the public. Advance registration is required: Ocean Pines Recreation and Parks Department, 410-641-7052.

GRIEF SUPPORT Thursdays - Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 11:00 AM. Coastal Hospice provides grief support and education. Participants work together to help each other navigate through grief at their own pace. Free and open to the public. Nicole Long, 443-614-6142

ONGOING EVENTS GARDEN TOUR The Ocean Pines Garden Club presents a garden tour on June 13 from 9 a.m. to noon. For those interested in showcasing their garden, large or small: Patti, 410973-1243 or plookner@gmail.com.

BUS TRIP TO BRANDYWINE RIVER MUSEUM The Art League of Ocean City is sponsoring this trip to the Brandywine River Museum in Chadds Ford, Pa on April 22, 8:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. On the way home, the bus will make a one-hour stop in Newark, Del., and guests can choose shopping at Jerry’s Artarama or eating dinner. The cost is $70 and includes the bus, admission to the museum, plus water and snacks. Lunch is available at the museum or visitors can bring their own. Info: www.artleagueofoceancity.org or 410524-9433. Open to the public.

BOOK A LIBRARIAN STORY TIME ‘HEALTHY EATING’ Snow Hill library, 307 N. Washington St., 10:30 AM. For 2 to 5 year old children. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

COZY LAP QUILTS

AGH DIABETES SUPPORT GROUP St. Paul United Methodist Church, 405 Flower St., 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM. Open to the public and meets the first Monday of each month. Speaker and education related to diabetes is provided. AGH Diabetes Outpatient Education, 410-208-9761

Wednesdays - Ocean City Elks Lodge, 13708 Sinepuxent Ave., 5:30 PM - 9:00 PM. Dance to the sounds of the ’50s and ’60s music. A $5 donation to benefit Veterans and local charities. Members and their guests welcome. dance@delmarvahanddancing.com, 410-208-1151, http://delmarvahanddancing.com

Coastal Highway, 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM. Beach Singles 45-Plus meets for happy hour. Info: Arlene, 302-436-9577 or Kate, 410-524-0649. BeachSingles.org, http://www.BeachSingles.org

WOMEN’S CLUB’S FASHION SHOW Bayside Skillet, 7701 Coastal Highway, 11:30 AM - 2:00 PM. For $35 enjoy a lunch, fashions by Chico’s of West Ocean City and raffles. Price includes soda, coffee, tea, a dessert, tax and gratuities. Reservations: Kay Hickman, 410-6000552, soonerkay@gmail.com no later than March 29. There are three choices for entries. Proceeds benefit the Women’s Club of Ocean Pines.

FREE SCREENING OF ‘EATING ANIMALS’ The Globe, 12 Broad St., 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM. Featuring a Telluride International Film Festival 2017 Selected Film and Sundance Selects film, presented with the Lower Eastern Shore Engagement Network (LESEN). A meet and greet, with film stars Craig Watts, Rick Dove and Larry Baldwin, will take place from 6-6:30 p.m. The screening begins at 6:30 p.m. followed by dessert, coffee and film discussion at 8 p.m. The Globe is donating a portion of the evening’s dining receipts to LESEN, so join the group for dinner from 4:30-6 p.m.

BEACH SINGLES Thursdays - Ropewalk Restaurant, 8203

Any branch, through April. Need some one-on-one help with your resume, job application, eReader or basic computer skills? Contact your closest library branch to schedule a personal appointment. www.worcesterlibrary.org

NATIONAL PRESERVATION MONTH VOLUNTEER TRANSCRIPTION Snow Hill library, 307 N. Washington St., throughout April. Help transcribe records into digital format to help researchers find them and learn something new about the library’s collection at the same time. Records for transcription will include cemetary records and obituaries. This program is suitable for teens and adults. 410-632-3495

Crossword answers from page 38


42

MARCH 29, 2019 Classifieds now appear in Ocean City Today & the Bayside Gazette each week and online at oceancitytoday.com and baysideoc.com.

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Help Wanted

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Comfort Inn Gold Coast

HOTEL MAINTENANCE We are seeking to fill a hotel Maintenance position, full time, year round. Experience in hotel or condo maintenance preferred. Competitive pay and excellent benefits. Please apply in person at The Comfort Inn Gold Coast on 112th Street Ocean City, next to the Gold Coast Mall No phone calls please

Must have Experience for the following positions:

•HVAC •Project Managers • Carpenters •Loss Mitigation Specialist •Carpet Cleaners •Carpet Cleaning Foreman

JOB FAIR!

Apply in person at 9939 Jerry Mack Rd., Suite 100, OCMD Or email resume to: breck@royalplus.com 410-251-5264

March 30 | 4-6pm 33260 Coastal Highway, Bethany Beach, 19930

SATURDAYS ONLY

Awesome People

• HOUSEKEEPERS: $18 •ROOM CHECKERS: $15/hour • HOUSEKEEPERS: $25-$65/unit

Apply Every Day Now through March 11am-2pm

Successful Applicants must be able to pass a criminal background check. ResortQuest is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Holding Open Interviews For:

Work in Ocean City, MD WORKon ONthe THEBeach BEACH THIS SUMMER

• Servers • Bus Staff •Host/Hostess •Kitchen Staff •Security

•• Now Rent Hiring Umbrellas & Chairs to Beachgoers Students for Over 80 Positions •• Provide Now Hiring Students for Over 80 Postitions Exceptional Beach Service to Visitors •• Make Make Lifelong Friends Friends & Memories & Memories •• Prepare Earn Valuable SalesSales & Customer Service Skills to Sharpen & Customer Service Skills • Vibrant Energetic Individuals Wanted & Energetic Individuals Wanted • Hourly ++ Commission Commission++Tips Tips

Come by and join our 2019 family! 54th Street, OCMD (Behind Chauncey’s Surf Shop) 410-723-5565

Come See Us at Ocean City Job Fair on April 15 from 9A-2P

Apply at EightyFiveAndSunny.com/Employment

NOW W HIRING NG FOR F SUM MMER 20 201 019! 019! Ocean City C Career Fair at the Conventio vention en Center Saturd day March 30th, 9:00 - 1:0 :00 pm HIRI RING FOR ALL POSITION ONS Regi Regist egister at our o table ffo or your chanc ce to win n 1 of 3 $ $50 amazon gift cards! ards!

OCE CEANFRON ONT - ON THE BOARD DS S

Apply online beffo ore the event:

www.realhospitality p ygroup.c g p om/c / areers

Online

106 32nd St., Ocean City

NOW HIRING!

• Housekeeping •Maintenance •Laundry •Front Desk Positions, full-time, part-time, seasonal or year-round. Must have hotel experience. Apply within, or call 410-289-5762 Make sure to check out our job postings on Indeed.com!

Property Management Assistant Needed

302.541.9675 reserves YOUR spot for an immediate Job Offer!

NOW HIRING

ssifieds la C r u o Y r e Ord

HELP WANTED

Hot e l

&

Su i t e s

We have a busy rental department. We are looking for someone to assist in organizing maintenance calls, dispatching vendors, and helping in the office. Maintenance knowledge a plus. q Professional/Friendly q Must travel to properties mostly in Ocean Pines and Ocean City. q Must work most weekends as needed q Minor maintenance abilities a plus. q Good clear handwriting Please fax resumes, letters, references & inquiries to

Hileman Real Estate, Inc. Attn: Chris to fax # 410-208-9562

Accounting Clerk Wanted Full Time - $14-$15 per hour Responsible for providing accounting support to accounting supervisors and other managers within the department. Keys daily worksheets to the general ledger system, ensures files are complete and maintained as needed, handles accounts payable duties, and assists accounting personnel. Job Tasks and Responsibilities: Perform accounting and clerical functions to support supervisors. Research, track, and resolve accounting problems. Compile and sort invoices and checks. Issue checks for accounts payable. Record business transactions and key daily worksheets to the general ledger system. Record charges and refunds. Support accounting personnel. Input type vouchers, invoices, checks, account statements, reports, and other records. Provide front desk customer service. File and tally deposits. Work with adding machines, calculators, databases and bank accounts. Match invoices to work orders. Process bills for payment. Open mail and match payments to invoices. Arrange for money to be delivered to bank. Utilize computer systems to run databases, pay bills and order supplies. Contact individuals with delinquent accounts. Ensure customers accept payments or refunds. Email Resume to: dunkindonutjobs@gmail.com Subject Line: Accounting Clerk or Apply in Person @ 9919 Golf Course Rd., Ocean City, MD Serious inquiries only, must live within a 30 minute radius of West Ocean City Maryland.

www.oceancitytoday.com

Convenient, quick, no waiting, no calls ~ Days, nights and weekends


MARCH 29, 2019

PAGE 43

Ocean City Today

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

ARK Systems

Holiday Inn Oceanfront 6600 Coastal Highway Ocean City, MD 21842 Now hiring for the following full-time, year-round positions for our Resort Hotel to join our busy and professional team: - Front Desk - Maintenance Please stop by the Front Desk to complete an application.

is looking for a Technical Manager for the Ocean City branch to manage installations and service projects. Ideal candidate: 5+ years of supervisory experience and electronic/electrical systems background. For more info and to apply go to: http://hrstrategygroup.com and click on Careers, then click on the Technical Manager job posting.

Classifieds 410-723-6397 Fullll-Tiim Fu me/P e//PPaart-Tiim me

• Recreation Attendants • Housekeeping Staff • Membership Coordinator Please apply in person at the new Health and Aquatic Club at Bayside 31264 Americana Prkwy., Selbyville, 19975 Call: 302.988.2315, x 0; or email: BaysideRecreation@troon.com

FT/YR SOUS CHEF

Apply to Greg Fiore: GFiore@troon.com

Work At The BEACH... Work With The BEST!! Top wages, excellent benefits package and free employee meal available to successful candidates.

Employment Opportunities: Year Round, Full/Part Time: Pool Manager, Server, Bartender, Hostess/Host, Busser, Maintenance, Room Attendant, Painter, Housekeeping Housestaff, Income Auditor

Free employee meal and excellent benefits.

Clarion Resort Fontainebleau Hotel Attn: Human Resources Dept. 10100 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD 21842 Phone: 410-524-3535 Fax: 410-723-9109 EOE M/F/D/V

Come Join Our Winning Team! Now accepting applications for the following positions! Reservations Front Desk Recreation Room Inspector Room Attendant Maintenance Painter Server Barista Hostess Line Cook Looking for experienced personnel with customer service skills. Must be flexible with hours. Email resume to jobs@carouselhotel.com or stop by and complete an application at the Front Desk. We require satisfactory pre-employment drug testing and background check. Carousel Resort Hotel & Condominiums 11700 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD 21842 EOE

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED Hiring ALL Positions!!

HIRING ALL POSITIONS!! Full time & Part time Stop by our location on 52nd street! or call 443-664-2825

is now accepting applications for the following positions:

Hostess, Cooks, Boutique Sales, A/V Staff, EMT, General Maintenance, Painter & Boat Mate For more details or to apply, please go online to www.seacrets.com/employment

Full time & Part time To apply go to: www.mygcjob.com

NOW HIRING!! Production Crew for our WOC kitchen facility Up to $16/hr. Apply online at: www.delmarvadd.com

Classifieds 410-723-6397 FT EXPERIENCED POOL TECHNICIAN

for the Pool Management Division for the 2019 summer season. Certification card not required. Must have a good driving record. May 1 - Labor Day.

POOL ATTENDANTS No certification required. LIFEGUARDS Certification required. for community pools in the Bethany Beach and Long Neck areas. Must be self-motivated & responsible, with good communication skills. FT and PT opportunities available. Excellent salary & pleasant work environment. EOE

Email resume to: Jodi@wilgusassociates.com - WATER DAMAGE RESTORATION TECHNICIANS & MANAGERS (IICRC certifications a plus)

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

2 Years Experienced Cleaner. Reliable w/own transportation, cleaning supplies, trustworthy & dependable. Email resume to Tessasnyder@gmail.com. Any questions call 443-614-3777.

CASHIER/STOCKER. PT, YEAR-ROUND. Earn extra $$$ working 2-3 evenings a week. Apply in person. Strawberry Liquors, Selbyville, DE.

Now Hiring DELIVERY DRIVERS Make $12-$16 per hour. Flexible Hours, Great Working Atmosphere. Apply within downtown location, 710 Philadelphia Ave., OC 410-289-1200

SALES SECRETARY Busy Hotel is seeking, a year round full time Sales Secretary. Must have hotel sales experience. Applicant must be detail oriented and computer literate, proficient in Excel, Word & Publisher. Sales CRM experience a plus. Exceptional people skills, professional phone & email etiquette a must. Excellent benefits, working conditions and salary (commensurate with experience). Qualified applicants only, forward resume with salary requirements to: Sales Secretary P.O. Box 3500 Ocean City, MD 21843 EOE M/F/D/V

- DECK COATING APPLICATORS - LEAD CARPENTERS/FRAMERS - INTERIOR REMODELING PROFESSIONALS Please apply in person: 12905 Coastal Hwy, Ocean City MD, online at https://oceantowerconstruction.com/careers/ or call 443-366-5556 during regular business hours

2 15th Street Ocean City, MD 21842

Full-Time, Seasonal Positions Available • AM/PM Server Position • AM Line Cook • PM/Overnight Houseperson • Bartender • Host/Hostess • Room Attendant Apply in person or email resume to: duran.showell@marriott.com All candidates must go through a satisfactory background check.

www.courtyardoceancity.com ~ No phone call please.

NOW HIRING SUMMER 2019 • Make Lifelong Friends • Housing Assistance & Paid Internships Available • Live & Work At The Beach APPLY TODAY MyTelescopePictures.com/ Employment

Full Time Customer Service Associate (Bank Teller and Desk Duties) If you are looking for an amazing opportunity in the banking industry at a company with a great reputation then consider this position. Taylor Bank is seeking individuals that thrive in a team-focused, variablepaced, and supportive work environment. Our employees want to make a positive impact in their community and strive to put extraordinary into everything they do. Branch staff refer products and services, if these meet the needs of our customers, which supports our relationship banking philosophy. This is a year-round, variable hourly (30-40 hours) position. Branch locations include our Worcester County and Chincoteague, Virginia markets. Banking experience not required. Come join our team! To apply for available positions and learn more about our amazing benefits and culture, please go online to taylorbank.com, click on about us and visit our career page. Calvin B. Taylor Bank is an Equal Opportunity Employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to their status as protected veterans or individuals with disabilities, their race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or national origin.

PAPA JOHN’S Now Hiring All Positions for the Ocean City area. Call Jeff: 410-524-1300. MED. TECH. CPR, first aide certified. Must be able to pass background check. Drug free facility. Full time position 7pm-7am, and every other weekend. Email resume to truittsandy@yahoo.com or apply in person. 10602 Friendship Rd., Berlin, MD 21811.

Yard Work Full Time, year round position. Berlin-West Ocean City area private residence. Responsibilities include mowing, trimming, weeding, pruning, errands and light handyman chores. Valid driver's license and reliable transportation required. Must be experienced, dependable, trustworthy, and have excellent references. Call for interview Monday - Friday, 9am-5pm 410-289-4444 Ext. 119

Come be a part of our family! HIRING FOR THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS: • Housekeepers • Houseman • Laundry Attendants • Room Inspector • Front Desk Associates • Lifeguards • Concession Worker/ Bartender All positions are required to work weekends. Interested applicants can apply in person or submit resume to: info@fskfamily.com 12806 Ocean Gateway Ocean City, MD 21842

AUTOMOTIVE GREAT OPPORTUNITIES! In business for 35 yearsWe have Auto / Marine parts stores, Service Centers and Used Car Dealership and still growing! Due to some recent retirements along with expansion, we are hiring for additional: - Exp. Technicians - Up to $27.00 hr. - Oil Lube - Tire Techs - Maryland State Inspector - Exp. Tow Truck DriversVery competitive pay!! - Auto Parts and Service Counter Associates Come grow with us Plenty of room for advancement!! Locations in the Bethany Beach, Rehoboth Beach and Ocean City Maryland areas. Company matched retirement plan and much more!! Call: 443-373-1324 or 443-497-0465


PAGE 44

HELP WANTED HELP WANTED ALL POSITIONS! Immediate openings. Apply in person at Billy’s Sub Shop, 140th Street, OCMD. PGN Crabhouse, 29th Street & Coastal Hwy. PGN Crabhouse Help Wanted Waitstaff, Kitchen Help Apply Within after 11:00 am. Busy Dental Office looking for Dental Assistant with Radiology Cert., good clinical & keyboard skills. Also, Front Desk position. Dental knowledge and good keyboard skills required. M-F, FT w/many benefits. Email: contact@atlanticdental.com or fax 410-213-2955

NOW HIRING • PM Restaurant Manager • AM Cook • AM Dishwasher Year-Round Position Inquire within at 32 Palm at Hilton Suites 3200 Baltimore Ave Ocean City, MD

Chairside

DENTAL ASS’T. Experience Preferred Ocean View, DE

RENTALS WEEKLY • SEASONAL

R E N TA L S

Maryland 800.633.1000 Delaware 800.442.5626 VA C AT I O N S

cbvacations.com OPERATED BY A SUBSIDIARY OF NRT LLC

Yearly & Seasonal Rentals We Welcome Pets 7700 Coastal Hwy 410-289-8888 www.holidayoc.com DOWNTOWN OCEAN CITY Immaculately clean 2BR apartments. Each sleeps 5 people with single beds. May 1 to September 2. Price is $2,250 per person or $11,250 per apartment, including utilities, plus deposits. No smokers, parties, or pets. All male or all female in each unit. Taking applications. Call or text 410-422-2100 Steger Seasonal Apartments

RENTALS

REAL ESTATE

COMMERCIAL

YARD SALE

Summer Bayside Condo near Jolly Rogers. 2BR, 2BA, W/D & AC, cable, Wi-Fi, fully furnished. Sleeps 6-8. 2 units available. May-Sept. $13,750. Call Mike at 410-603-6120. MBJCPROPERTIES@GMAIL .COM.

DRASTICALLY REDUCED WATERFRONT LOT, Bishopville. $99,000. Howard Marin Realty, 410-352-5555.

2 Office/Retail Spaces & 3 Warehouse Units available in West Ocean City. Call 443-497-4200.

Moving-Yard Sale. Sat., March 30. 7am-12pm. 134 Sandyhook Rd., Ocean Pines. Collectables, tools, fishing & misc.

Year-Round House Share. Ocean Pines. Furnished. Private bedroom and bath. Washer/dryer. $800/month plus security. Includes utilities. 443-996-4466. Text for photos.

RAMBLER MOTEL 9942 Elm Street, WOC (Behind Starbucks) Sleeps 4, $250 per week Manager onsite 410-213-1764

REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE Have A Home Business! 3BR, 2BA THOROUGHLY RENOVATED HOME. 8 Miles to the Beach. Ready to move into! Great School District. VETERAN or USDA FUNDING AVAILABLE. $249,000. Call Howard Martin Realty, 410-352-5555.

Classifieds 410-723-6397

Email Resume:

molarbiz@yahoo.com NOW HIRING AM Cook/Server Apply in person: Atrium Café inside Quality Inn 54th

Become a Better You in 2019! To Order Product Call Christine 443-880-8397 or email: snowhillavon@ comcast.net To Become an Avon Representative Sign Up at www. ChristinesBeautyShop.com

Classifieds 410-723-6397 www.baysideoc.com www.oceancitytoday.com

MARCH 29, 2019

Ocean City Today

2BR, 1BA starting at $1250 Utilities 3BR, 2BA Starting at $1100 4BR, 2.5BA Starting at $2500 Includes

Available Summer Seasonal Rentals @ www.hilemanrealestate.com

CALL US TODAY! 410-208-9200

COMMERCIAL COMMERCIAL Berlin: Atlantic Business Center. Office space 350 sq. ft. for rent. Utilities incl. $400/ month. Also, several storage units available $95/month. Call 410-726-5471 or 410641-4300.

AUCTIONS The contents of mini storage units will be sold at public auction. Units to be auctioned; B7, B11, B12, B52, B55, B97, O29, O115, O164, O55, O69, O134, O165, S69, S73, S110, S117, S119, S152, S180, S185, S405, S713, S776. Units are being sold due to non-payment of rent. Common items in units are, household items, furniture, tools, fishing equipment, paintings, antique and vintage items. Date: Saturday, March 30th Time: NEW TIME 10 AM #1 Starts at Berlin Mini Storage: Route 346 #2 Continues at OC Mini Storage: Route 50 #3 Finishes at OC Mini Storage: Route 611 Terms: CASH ONLY! Auctioneer: Tom Janasek

Classifieds 410-723-6397

Open 6 Days A Week Mon.-Sat., 9-5 * Berlin * Ocean City * * Ocean Pines * * Snow Hill *

REAL ESTATE Deeply Discounted Below Market Foreclosure -1BR 1 BATH 2 LEVEL CONDO 123 Street Jockey Beach Club, Unit #325 $99,900.00!!!!!! BELOW MARKET FORECLOSURE WITH PRICE APPROVED AS AN ASSIGNMENT OF BANK CONTRACT. SOLD AS IS. THIS 1BR 1 BATH 2 LEVEL CONDO AFFORDS PRIVATE 2ND LEVEL BEDROOM 1ST FLOOR KITCHEN AND LIVING SPACE STEPS TO THE BEACH. END UNIT WITH EXTRA WINDOW BOAT SLIPS AVAILABLE FOR RENT FIRST COME FIRST SERVE BASIS, ADD PAINT, CARPET, APPLIANCES & GAIN IMMEDIATE EQUITY, great rental potential and or a very affordable vacation getaway. BEST BUY IN OC! Email Seller For Special Assignment Documents at: jamessapia1@gmail.com or call Jim Sapia at 443-745-6905 ~ Licensed Maryland Agent -------------------------For other foreclosure opportunities please visit our website at marylandforeclosures.net

SERVICES SERVICES

DONATIONS DONATIONS

Interior/Exterior Painting & Interior Specialist - Stained ceilings? No Problem! FREE Estimates. Prompt Service. Talk directly to the painter who does the work! Call Don 443-373-1540. House and Rental Clean Out, small and local moving, and removal of junk and furniture. Also, will clean out garages/ sheds. 302-222-7297, 302422-9390 Leaf Removal and Yard Clean Up all winter long. Please call Tyler Layton. 410-920-4292

Do you have an old bicycle not being used? It could mean a world of difference to a hard-working international student. We are looking to get as many bikes as possible. Your donation will be taxdeductible. Contact Gary at 443-975-3065.

Classifieds 410-723-6397 By Monday, 5 p.m.

FURNITURE

JUMPIN’ JACK FLASH FURNITURE WAREHOUSE -- NEW AND USED Pick-Up & Delivery Available

410-250-7000 146th Street, Ocean City

SERVICES

BUDGET MOVERS 443-664-5797 LOCAL & EAST COAST MOVING Full Packing Service Piano Movers - Full Service www.facebook.com/OCBudgetMovers

CLASSIFIED AD NETWORK Serving the Newspapers of Maryland, Delaware and the District of Columbia since 1908.

EDUCATION/CAREER TRAINING AIRLINE MECHANIC TRAINMARYLAND STATEWIDE ING-Get FAA certification to fix CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING planes. Financial Aid if qualified. Approved for military benNETWORK efits. Call Aviation Institute of AUTOMOBILE DONATIONS Maintenance 866-823-6729. DONATE AUTOS, TRUCKS, FOR SALE RVs Lutheran Mission Society of MD. Compassion Place Privacy Hedges – SPRING ministries help local families BLOWOUT SALE 5ft Leyland with food, clothing, counseling Cypress or Green Giant ArTax deductible. MVA licensed borvitae, now only $49 each. #W1044. 410-636-0123 Beautiful, Nursery Grown. FREE Installation/FREE delivwww.CompassionPlace.org ery. Limited Supply! BUSINESS SERVICES ORDER NOW: 802-922-6947 Place a business card ad in www.discounttreefarm.com the Regional Small Display 2x2/2x4 Advertising Network – Let MDDC help you grow your business! Call TODAY at 410-212-0616 to increase your customer base and get results.

REAL ESTATE Delaware New Move-In Ready Homes! Low Taxes! Close to Beaches, Gated, Olympic pool. Homes from low $100's, No HOA Fees. Brochures Available 1-866--629-0770 or www.coolbranch.com SERVICESMISCELLANEOUS Increase your customer base and get great results by placing your ads in the MDDC – Classified Advertising network! Call today 410-2120616. Ask for Multi-Media Specialist - Wanda & watch your results grow.

Advertise in MDDC 410-723-6397

Print • Web oceancitytoday.com baysideoc.com


MARCH 29, 2019 BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE

OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 5735 CASTLE HILL RD. SNOW HILL, MD 21863 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated August 7, 2002 and recorded in Liber 3401, Folio 488 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, with an original principal balance of $88,000.00, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on APRIL 9, 2019 AT 3:30 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $8,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or assess-

PAGE 45

Ocean City Today / Public Notices ment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or insurable title. If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 330246-1) PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING SALES Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-3/21/3t _________________________________ McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC 312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800 Laurel, MD 20707 www.mwc-law.com

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE

OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 209 TEAL CIR. BERLIN, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Perry Masciana, dated March 23, 2007 and recorded in Liber 4902, folio 519 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof and at the request of the parties secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale at public

auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on APRIL 8, 2019 AT 3:05 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON situated in Worcester County, Maryland and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier’s or certified check, or in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their sole discretion, for $57,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived. Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate of 5% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes, ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, and front foot benefit charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser. Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #15-615103). Laura H. G. O’Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD.,

TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-3/21/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE

OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 103 FOURTH ST. A/R/T/A 103 4TH ST. POCOMOKE A/R/T/A POCOMOKE CITY, MD 21851 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated February 17, 2011 and recorded in Liber 5670, Folio 356 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, with an original principal balance of $247,500.00, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on APRIL 2, 2019 AT 3:30 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $17,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost during construction of public water or wastewater facilities


PAGE 46 constructed by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or insurable title. If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 330368-2) PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING SALES Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-3/14/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE 10148 GERMANTOWN RD. BERLIN, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated March 2, 1989 and recorded in Liber 1530, Folio 18 among the Land

Ocean City Today / Public Notices Records of Worcester County, MD, with an original principal balance of $37,839.00, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on APRIL 2, 2019 AT 3:33 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $5,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the

loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or insurable title. If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 320149-1) PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING SALES Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-3/14/3t _________________________________ James E. Clubb, Jr., Esq. 108 N. 8th Street Ocean City, Maryland 21842 JEFF HURLEY 10225 Silver Point Lane Ocean City, MD 21842 Plaintiff vs: JOHN MARSHALL.(Deceased) c/o Paul A Marshall 999 Waterbury Heights Drive Crownsville, MD 21032-1434 and THE TESTATE AND INTESTATE SUCCESSORS OF JOHN MARSHALL, DECEASED, AND ALL PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, OR UNDER THE DECEDENT and WORCESTER COUNTY c/o Maureen Howarth, Esq. 1 West Market Street Room 1103 Snow Hill, MD 21863 and ALL PERSONS THAT HAVE OR CLAIM TO HAVE ANY INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY described as Lot South Side Pocomoke Road Stockton, Maryland 21864 Defendants IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-19-000031

ORDER OF PUBLICATION

The object of this proceeding is to secure the foreclosure of all rights of

MARCH 29, 2019 redemption from the tax sale on the following property located in Worcester County, Maryland; sold by Phillip G. Thompson, Collector of Taxes for the State of Maryland and for Worcester County, to the Plaintiff, the parcel of land described as follows: Lot South Side Pocomoke Road, Stockton, Deed Reference 1650/541, Account Number 08005052. The property is an improved lot, and is assessed to John Marshall. The Complaint states among other things that the amount necessary for redemption has not been paid. The sale was held on May 18, 2018, and more than six (6) months has passed since that date: It is thereupon this 25th of February, 2019, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, ORDERED, that notice be given by the insertion of a copy of this Order in some newspaper having a general circulation in Worcester County once a week for three (3) consecutive weeks, warning all persons interested in the property to redeem the property or answer the Complaint by 4th of May, 2019, or thereafter a final judgment will be entered foreclosing all rights of redemption in the property and vesting in the Plaintiff title to said property, free and clear of all liens and encumbrances. Brian D. Shockley Judge True Copy Test: Susan R. Braniecki Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD OCD-3/14/3t _________________________________

NOTICE

Disposal of Surplus Vehicles and Equipment to be Auctioned on GovDeals.com “Disposition of County Personal Property no longer used by the County” The following described personal property, including vehicles, furniture and equipment, have been determined to be no longer required for County use by the County Commissioners of Worcester County, Maryland and deemed to be surplus property: SURPLUS VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT Surplus vehicles, listed by make and model (with model year), as follows: Chevrolet Blazer (2004); Chevrolet C-1500 (2004); Chevrolet Cavalier (2004); Chevrolet G3500 Van (2004); Chevrolet S-10 (1996, 2003); Chevrolet Silverado 1500 (1991, 2002, three 2004, two 2005, three 2006); Dodge Charger (2007); Dodge Ram 1500 (2007); Dodge Ram 1500 4x4 (2007); Dodge Stratus (2005, 2006); Ford Crown Victoria (two 2006, 2008, two 2011); Ford Expedition (2006); Ford F-150 (1988, 2007, 2008, 2009); Ford F-250 (2002); Ford F-350 (2000); Ford F-800 (1992, 1997); and Ford Ranger (1992, 1997, 2001). Surplus equipment, including: CASE 580 Super K Backhoe (1992);


MARCH 29, 2019 JCB 930-2 Forklift (1998); John Deere 670B; Kohler 30KW Generator; Pequea TR616 Trailer (1995); and Powergard DLC20 Generator. Surplus furniture and miscellaneous equipment, including: Aluminum Tool Box (Truck); Lot of Spare Wheels and Tires; Electric Tabletop Drill Press; Trico Wiper Blade Display Cart; Rotary SM12 Vehicle Lift (12,000 lbs.); Bucket of Used Wheel Weights; Miscellaneous Shop Tools; Craftsman Rolling Tool Box with Top Box; Conference Table; Leaf Blowers (2); 400 Watt Hanging Shop Lights (2); Bicycles (2); PL920 Subsurface Camera; 5-foot Tractor 3Point Scraper Blade; 6-foot Tractor 3-Point Scraper Blade; Garage Doors and Tracks; Portable Air Compressor; Robinair A/C Machine Model34800; Refrigerator; Gas Auger with 8 Bits; Steel Angle Iron; Homelite Gas Operated Trash Pump; Full Length Truck Beacon Lights (2); Steel Concrete Curb Forming Boards (2); Wooden Tables (4 at 6-feet, 1 at 5-feet); McCullough Mite-E-Lite Generator, Small; Small Mountable Traffic Arrow; Safco Mobile Blueprint Rack (2); Old Style Bridge Nails; Kids Table and 4 Wooden Children’s Chairs; Piano with Bench; PA System; Filing Cabinets (2); Coffee Pots and Miscellaneous Office Equipment; Dell Optiplex Computers (40); iPhone 5S; iPhone 6S (2); Tables - Folding Card Tables (3), Regular Table, Foldable Rolling Table; Filing Cabinets - 5-Drawer, 2Drawer (2), 4-Drawer (7); Wooden Storage Cabinet on Wheels; Leather Chairs (2); Wood Coffee Table; John Deere SX85 30-inch Riding Lawnmower; 3.5 HP 22-inch Push Lawnmowers (2); Trash Receptacle Holders for 50-Gallon Receptacles (2); Rolling Trash Receptacles - 64 Gallon (6); and Stainless Steel 3Sink Food Prep Table. TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF SALE AND CONVEYANCE: The County Commissioners propose to solicit competitive bids via an Internet-based auction system operated by GovDeals, Inc. for which the winning bidder pays a buyers premium of twelve and one-half percent (12.5%) of the winning bid for each transaction so that there is no net cost to the County. All of the above referenced surplus property will be offered for sale “AS IS, WHERE IS.” The County Commissioners make no warranty, guaranty or representation of any kind, expressed or implied, as to the merchantability or fitness for any purpose of the property offered for sale. The County Commissioners warrant to the buyer that the property offered for sale will conform to its description. The County Commissioners reserve the right to reject any and all bids as they see fit and to withdraw from sale any of the items listed. Payment in full by successful bidders shall be made to Worcester County Commissioners. OPPORTUNITY FOR OBJECTIONS: Anyone objecting to the proposed conveyance of the above surplus vehicles and equipment shall do so in writing prior to 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, March 28, 2019, or in person at the regularly scheduled meeting of the County Commission-

PAGE 47

Ocean City Today / Public Notices ers to be held at 10:00 a.m. on April 2, 2019 in the County Commissioners Meeting Room, Room 1101 - Government Center, One West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863. WORCESTER COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OCD-3/14/3t _________________________________ BUONASSISSI, HENNING & LASH, P.C. 1861 WIEHLE AVENUE, SUITE 300 RESTON, VIRGINIA 20190 (703) 796-1341 RICHARD A. LASH Substitute Trustee, et al, Plaintiffs, v. JERRY COLLINS CATHELL, et al., Defendants. IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Case No. C-23-CV-18-000209

NOTICE

Notice is hereby issued this 11th day of March, 2019, that the sale of the property in this case, 11185 Racetrack Road, Berlin, MD 21811 reported by Robert E. Kelly, Substitute Trustee, be ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary be shown on or before the 15th day of April, 2019, provided a copy of this Notice be inserted in The Ocean City Digest, a newspaper published in Worcester County, Maryland, once in each of three (3) successive weeks on or before the 8th day of April, 2019. The report states the amount of sale to be $205,200.00. Susan R. Braniecki Clerk True Copy Test: Susan R. Braniecki Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-3/14/3t _________________________________ DAVID W. SIMPSON JR, ESQ PO BOX 3496 OCEAN CITY, MD 21843

NOTICE

OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Estate No. 17754 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF ETHEL HINES Notice is given that Sherry J. Cooper, 634 Chestnut Street, Camden, AK 71701, was on March 07, 2019 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Ethel Hines who died on October 21, 2018, without a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 7th day of September, 2019. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with

the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Sherry J. Cooper Personal Representative True Test Copy Terri Westcott Register of Wills for Worcester County One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: March 14, 2019 OCD-3/14/3t _________________________________ FRANK, FRANK & SCHERR, LLC ALEXANDER J. ZARZECKI ESQ. 1400 FRONT AVENUE, SUITE 200 LUTHERVILLE, MD 21093

NOTICE

TO CREDITORS OF APPOINTMENT OF FOREIGN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE ESTATE NO. 17750 Notice is given that the Register of Wills court of Lancaster County, PA appointed Bradley Hauck, 683 Florin Avenue, Mount Joy, PA 17552; Gregory Hauck, 1712 Billview Drive, Lancaster, PA 17601 as the Executors of the Estate of Glen D. Hauck who died on September 12, 2018 domiciled in Pennsylvania, USA. The Maryland resident agent for service of process is Alexander J. Zarzecki Esq. whose address is 1400 Front Ave., Ste. 200, Lutherville, MD 21093. At the time of death, the decedent owned real or leasehold property in the following Maryland counties: Worcester County. All persons having claims against the decedent must file their claims with the Register of Wills for Worcester County with a copy to the foreign personal representative on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the foreign personal representative mails or delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Claims filed after

that date or after a date extended by law will be barred. Bradley Hauck Gregory Hauck Foreign Personal Representative Terri Westcott Register of Wills One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of Newspaper: Ocean City Digest Date of first publication: March 14, 2019 OCD-3/14/3t _________________________________

NOTICE OF SALE COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND $45,975,000* CONSOLIDATED PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT BONDS, 2019 SERIES Electronic bids via PARITY will be received for the above-captioned issue of general obligation bonds (the “Bonds”) of the County Commissioners of Worcester County, Maryland (the “County”) by the Finance Officer of Worcester County at the offices of the Finance Officer, Worcester County Government Building, Room 1103, One West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland, 21863, until 10:00 a.m. (E.D.T.) on Tuesday, April 2, 2019. Dated Date and Interest Payment Dates. The Bonds will be dated as of the date of delivery of the Bonds (the “Dated Date”). Interest on the Bonds will be payable on February 1, 2020 and semiannually thereafter on August 1 and February 1 until maturity or earlier redemption. Principal Amounts and Principal Payment Dates. The Bonds will be issued in serial form, as described below. The Bonds will be issued in the aggregate principal amount of $45,975,000* and will mature on August 1 in the following years and in the following amounts: Year of Principal Amount* Maturity 2020 . . . . . . . . . . . $2,190,000 2021 . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,255,000 2022 . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,345,000 2023 . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,465,000 2024 . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,595,000 2025 . . . . . . . . . . . 2,725,000 2026 . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,865,000 2027 . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,015,000 2028 . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,165,000 2029 . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,330,000 2030 . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,500,000 2031 . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,680,000 2032 . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,830,000 2033 . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,945,000 2034 . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,070,000 ____________ *Preliminary, subject to change. General Obligations. The Bonds will be the unconditional general obligation of the County and will be issued upon its full faith and credit, which will be irrevocably pledged to the prompt payment of the principal of and interest on all of the Bonds as the same become due.


PAGE 48 Book Entry Form; Payment. The Bonds will be issued in book-entry form by issuing a single bond for each maturity registered in the name of Cede & Co. as nominee for The Depository Trust Company or its successor (“DTC”) and immobilized in its custody under DTC’s “FAST” system (provided that if DTC so requests or if DTC is replaced as the depository for the Bonds, replacement bonds will be issued in the denominations of $5,000 or any integral multiples thereof). Principal of the Bonds will be payable at maturity to DTC or its nominee as registered owner of the Bonds. Transfer of principal and interest payments to participants of DTC will be the responsibility of DTC, and transfer of principal and interest payments to beneficial owners of the Bonds by participants of DTC will be the responsibility of such participants and other nominees of beneficial owners. The County will not be responsible or liable for such transfers of payments or for maintaining, supervising or reviewing the records maintained by DTC, its participants or persons acting through such participants. The principal of the Bonds will be payable at the designated corporate trust office of Manufacturers and Traders Trust Company (the “Bond Registrar”), initially in Buffalo, New York, upon presentation and surrender of the Bonds. Payment of interest on the Bonds, at the rates specified by the successful bidder in its bid via PARITY, shall be made by the Bond Registrar on each interest payment date to the person appearing on the registration books of the County maintained by the Bond Registrar as the registered owner thereof, by check of draft mailed to each such registered owner at his, her or its address as it appears on such registration books on the record date for the Bonds, which shall be the fifteenth day of the month next preceding each interest payment date. Notwithstanding the foregoing, while the Bonds are registered under DTC’s book-entry only system, payment of the principal of and interest on the Bonds shall be made by the Bond Registrar to DTC or its nominee in accordance with the procedures of DTC. Authorization and Use of Proceeds. The Bonds are being issued pursuant to the authority of Sections 11-401 and 19-501 to 19-510, inclusive, of the Local Government Article of the Annotated Code of Maryland, Sections 9-601 to 9-699, inclusive, of the Environment Article of the Annotated Code of Maryland, PW-5-204 of the Code of Public Local Laws of Worcester County, Maryland (the “Code of Public Local Laws”) and Appendices NN (Bill No. 18-8), OO (Bill No. 18-9) and PP (Bill No. 18-10) of the Code of Public Local Laws, and pursuant to Resolution No. 19-7, adopted by the Board of County Commissioners of Worcester County, Maryland (the “Board”) on March 19, 2019 (the “Resolution”). The proceeds of the sale of the Bonds are being used to finance (a) the construction, installation and equipping of (i) a new Showell Elementary School facility, (ii) a new turf athletic

Ocean City Today / Public Notices field and track at Stephen Decatur High School, and (iii) the Central Landfill Site Cell No. 5 construction project, and (iv) various water and wastewater infrastructure projects in the Ocean Pines and Riddle Farm Service Areas, and costs of issuance and other related costs of the Bonds. Redemption. The Bonds maturing on or after August 1, 2030 shall each be subject to redemption prior to their respective maturities, at the option of the County, on or after August 1, 2029, as a whole or in part at any time, but only upon payment of a redemption price equal to 100% of the principal amount of the Bonds to be redeemed, together with accrued interest thereon to the date fixed for redemption at the rate or rates stated in the Bonds to be redeemed. Notice of and Procedure for Redemption. The procedures for redemption of the Bonds, including the requirements for giving notice of such redemption, are described in the Preliminary Official Statement (hereinafter defined) and are incorporated herein by reference. Adjustments. The aggregate principal amount of the Bonds and the principal amount of each maturity are subject to adjustment by the County, both before and after the receipt of bids for their purchase. Changes to be made prior to the sale will be through TM3 News Service not later than 9:30 a.m. (E.D.T.) on the date of sale (or as soon thereafter as is reasonably practicable) and will be used to compare bids and select a winning bidder. Changes to be made after the sale and the maturity amounts for the Bonds will be communicated to the successful bidder by 5:00 p.m. (E.D.T.) on the date of the sale, and will not reduce the aggregate principal amount of the Bonds by more than the premium amount of the bid. In addition, the final maturity schedule for the Bonds will be communicated to the successful bidder by 5:00 p.m. (E.D.T.) on the date of the sale. The dollar amount bid for principal and any amount bid for premium by the successful bidder will be adjusted proportionately to reflect any reduction or increase in the aggregate principal amount of the Bonds, but the interest rates specified by the successful bidder for all maturities will not change. The successful bidder may not withdraw its bid as a result of any changes made within these limits. TERMS OF SALE Electronic Bids. Electronic bids will be received via PARITY pursuant to this Notice of Sale until 10:00 a.m. (E.D.T.), but no bid will be received after the time for receiving bids specified above. To the extent any instructions or directions set forth in PARITY conflict with this Notice of Sale, the terms of this Notice of Sale shall control. For further information about PARITY, potential bidders may contact PARITY (212) 849-5021. Bidders may only submit bids electronically via PARITY. Each prospective bidder shall be solely responsible to submit its bids via PARITY as described above.

Each prospective bidder shall be solely responsible to make necessary arrangements to access PARITY for the purpose of submitting its bid in a timely manner and in compliance with the requirements of this Notice of Sale. Neither the County nor PARITY shall have any duty or obligation to provide or assure access to PARITY to any prospective bidder, and neither the County nor PARITY shall be responsible for proper operation of, or have any liability for delays or interruptions of, or any damages caused by, PARITY. The County is using PARITY as a communication mechanism, and not as the County’s agent, to conduct the electronic bidding for the Bonds. The County is not bound by any advice and determination of PARITY to the effect that any particular bid complies with the terms of this Notice of Sale and in particular the bid parameters set forth herein. All costs and expenses incurred by prospective bidders in connection with their submissions of bids via PARITY are the sole responsibility of the bidders; and the County is not responsible, directly or indirectly, for any of such costs or expenses. If a prospective bidder encounters any difficulty in submitting, modifying or withdrawing a bid of the Bonds, it should telephone PARITY (212) 849-5021 and notify the County’s Financial Advisor, Davenport & Company LLC by facsimile at (410) 296-8517 and by telephone at (410) 296-9426. Electronic bids must be submitted for the purchase of the Bonds (all or none) via PARITY. Bids will be communicated electronically to the County at 10:00 a.m. (E.D.T.), on April 2, 2019. Prior to that time, a prospective bidder may (1) submit the proposed terms of its bid via PARITY, (2) modify the proposed terms of its bid, in which event the proposed terms as last modified will (unless the bid is withdrawn as described herein) constitute its bid for the Bonds, or (3) withdraw its proposed bid. Once the bids are communicated electronically via PARITY to the County, each bid will constitute an irrevocable offer to purchase the Bonds on the terms therein provided. For purposes of the electronic bidding process, the time as maintained on PARITY shall constitute the official time. Bidding Constraints. Each bidder shall submit one bid via PARITY at a price of not less than par, based on the aggregate principal amount of the Bonds, on an “all-or-none” basis. Each bid must specify the rate or rates of interest to be paid on the Bonds, in multiples of one-eighth or one-twentieth of one percent (1/8 or 1/20 of 1%). Bidders may specify more than one rate of interest to be borne by the Bonds; but all Bonds maturing on the same date must bear interest at the same rate. Bidders may not specify (1) any interest rate for any Bonds which exceeds the interest rate stated in such bid for any other Bonds by more than 3.00%, (2) any interest rate that exceeds 5.00%, or (3) a zero rate of interest. Bidders are requested to specify the true interest cost (computed in accordance with the terms of this Notice of Sale) in their bid for

MARCH 29, 2019 the Bonds. A bid for the purchase of the Bonds at a price of less than 100% of par, or a bid for the Bonds that specifies split or supplemental interest rates, will not be considered. The County will also not consider and will reject any bid for the purchase of less than all of the Bonds. All bids must be unconditional. By submitting a bid for the Bonds, the bidder agrees, if it is the successful bidder for the Bonds, to (1) provide full and complete pricing information with respect to the Bonds to the County in a timely manner so that the County may fulfill its obligation relating to the delivery of the Official Statement to the purchaser of the Bonds within seven business days following the award, including, without limitation, the offering price(s), interest rate(s), selling compensation, delivery dates and other similar information; (2) comply with the requirements of SEC Rule 15c2-12 (the “Rule”), applicable federal and state securities laws and the applicable rules of the Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board (the “MSRB”) in connection with the offer and sale of the Bonds; (3) furnish to the County before the delivery of the Bonds such information as shall be necessary to enable the County to determine the “issue price” of the Bonds in accordance with the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended; and (4) within three business days after the final Official Statement becomes available, cause copies thereof to be filed with the MSRB. Good Faith Deposit. A good faith deposit (the “Deposit”) is required in connection with the sale and bid for the Bonds. The Deposit shall be provided in the form of (i) a federal funds wire transfer in the amount of $459,750 to be submitted to the County by the successful bidder not later than 4:00 p.m. (E.D.T.) (the “Deposit Deadline”) on the date of sale as described in more detail below. The Deposit of the successful bidder will be retained by the County to be applied in partial payment for the Bonds and no interest will be allowed or paid upon the amount thereof, but in the event the successful bidder shall fail to comply with the terms of its bid, the proceeds thereof will be retained as and for full liquidated damages. The County shall distribute wiring instructions for the Deposit to the successful bidder upon verification of the bids submitted by the bidders and prior to the Deposit Deadline. If the Deposit is not received by the Deposit Deadline, the award of the sale of the Bonds to the successful bidder may be cancelled by the County in its discretion without any financial liability of the County to the successful bidder or any limitations whatsoever on the County’s right to sell the Bonds to a different purchaser upon such terms and conditions as the County shall deem appropriate. Award of Bonds. The County will not consider and will reject any bid for the purchase of less than all of the Bonds. THE RIGHT IS RESERVED TO REJECT ANY AND ALL BIDS AND TO WAIVE ANY IRREGULARITY OR NON-CONFORMITY IN ANY BID. Bids will


MARCH 29, 2019 be opened promptly after 10:00 a.m. (E.D.T.) (as determined in accordance with the time as maintained on PARITY) on April 2, 2019. The award, if made, will be made as promptly as possible after the bids are opened to the bidder offering the lowest interest rate to the County. The lowest interest rate shall be determined in accordance with the true interest cost (“TIC”) method by doubling the semiannual interest rate (compounded semiannually) necessary to discount the debt service payments from the payment dates to the date of the Bonds and to the price bid, excluding interest accrued to the date of delivery. If two or more bidders have made bids, each of which represents the lowest true interest cost to the County, then the Bonds shall be awarded to the bidder offering the highest premium and, if the highest premium is offered by two or more such bidders or if no premium is bid by any such bidders, then the Bonds may be awarded, with their consent, in a ratable portion among such bidders, or the County, in its discretion, may award all of the Bonds to one bidder. The judgment of the County shall be final and binding upon all bidders with respect to the form and adequacy of any bid received and as to its conformity to the terms of this Notice of Sale. THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER SHALL MAKE A BONA FIDE PUBLIC OFFERING OF THE BONDS AT THE INITIAL REOFFERING PRICES AND SHALL PROVIDE THE RELATED CERTIFICATION DESCRIBED UNDER “DELIVERY OF BONDS” BELOW. Change of Date or Time of Sale; Change in Bidding Constraints. The County reserves the right to change, from time to time, the date or time established for the receipt of the bids. Any such change will be announced by TM3 News Service by notice given at or before the time for submission of the bids. If any date fixed for the receipt of bids and the sale of the Bonds is postponed, any alternative sale date will be announced via TM3 News Service at least 48 hours prior to such alternative sale date. In addition, the County reserves the right, on the date established for the receipt of bids, to reject all bids and establish a subsequent alternative sale date. On any such alternative sale date, any bidder may submit a sealed bid or electronic bid via PARITY for the purchase of the Bonds in conformity in all respects with the provisions of this Notice of Sale except for the date of sale and except for the changes announced by TM3 News Service at the time the sale date and time are announced. CUSIP Numbers. CUSIP numbers for the Bonds will be applied for by the Financial Advisor, but the County will assume no obligation for the assignment or printing of such numbers on the Bonds or for the correctness of such numbers, and neither the failure to print such numbers on any of the Bonds nor any error with respect thereto shall constitute cause for a failure or refusal by the successful bidder to accept delivery of and make payment for the Bonds.

Ocean City Today / Public Notices Legal Opinion. The issuance of the Bonds will be subject to delivery of the approving opinion of Miles & Stockbridge P.C., Baltimore, Maryland, and copies of their opinion shall be substantially in the form set forth as an exhibit to the Preliminary Official Statement referred to below. The opinion will be delivered upon request, without charge, to the successful bidder for the Bonds. Delivery of Bonds. The Bonds will be delivered on April 16, 2019, or as soon as practicable thereafter, at the expense of the County, for the account of the successful bidder, through the facilities of DTC in New York, New York, upon payment of the amount of the successful bid (including any premium), less the deposit theretofore made. Payment for the Bonds shall be made in federal funds. The Bonds will be issued by means of book-entry system with no physical distribution of bond certificates made to the public. The successful bidder for the Bonds, as a condition to delivery of the Bonds, shall be required to deposit the bond certificates with DTC, registered in the name of Cede & Co., its partnership nominee. Certification as to Issue Price. The successful bidder shall assist the County in establishing the issue price of the Bonds and shall execute and deliver to the County on or before the Dated Date, as applicable, an “issue price” or similar certificate setting forth the reasonably expected initial offering price to the public or the sales price or prices of the Bonds together with the supporting pricing wires or equivalent communications as described herein. All communications under this Official Notice of Sale relating to issue price of the Bonds may be taken on behalf of the County by the County’s municipal advisor identified herein and any notice or report to be provided to the County relating to issue price may be provided to the County’s municipal advisor. The County intends and expects that the provisions of Treasury Regulation Section 1.148-1(f)(3)(i) (defining “competitive sale” for purposes of establishing the issue price of the Bonds) will apply to the initial sale of the Bonds (the “competitive sale requirements”) because: (i)  the County shall disseminate this Official Notice of Sale to potential underwriters in a manner that is reasonably designed to reach potential underwriters; (ii)  all bidders shall have an equal opportunity to bid; (iii) the County may receive bids from at least three underwriters of municipal bonds who have established industry reputations for underwriting new issuances of municipal bonds; and (iv) the County anticipates awarding the sale of the Bonds to the bidder who submits a firm offer to purchase the Bonds at the lowest true interest cost, as set forth in this Official Notice of Sale (a “Qualified Competitive Bid”). If a bid qualifies as a Qualified Competitive Bid, the successful bidder shall be required to provide to the County a certificate acceptable to Bond Counsel, on or before the Dated Date of the Bonds, substantially in the form attached as Exhibit I to the Notice of

Sale included as Appendix C to the Preliminary Official Statement (hereinafter defined), and incorporated herein by reference, with such modifications as may be appropriate or necessary, in the reasonable judgment of the successful bidder, the County and Bond Counsel. In the event that a bid fails to satisfy the requirements of a Qualified Competitive Bid (an “Alternate Competitive Bid”), the County shall so advise the successful bidder. The County may determine to treat (i) the first price at which 10% of a maturity of the Bonds (the “10% test”) is sold to the public as the issue price of that maturity and/or (ii) the initial offering price to the public as of the sale date of any maturity of the Bonds as the issue price of that maturity (the “hold-the-offering-price rule”), in each case applied on a maturity-by-maturity basis (and if different interest rates apply within a maturity, to each separate CUSIP number within that maturity). Bids will not be subject to cancellation in the event that the County determines to apply the hold-the-offeringprice rule to any maturity of the Bonds. Bidders should prepare their bids on the assumption that some or all of the maturities of the Bonds will be subject to the 10% test and/or the hold-the-offering-price rule in order to establish the issue price of the Bonds. Bidders should note that an Alternative Competitive Bid may require the successful bidder and, if applicable, other underwriters of the Bonds to the hold the initial offering prices for certain maturities of the Bonds for up to 5 business days after the sale date of the Bonds. If a bid is an Alternate Competitive Bid, the successful bidder shall be required to provide to the County a certificate acceptable to Bond Counsel, substantially in the form attached as Exhibit II to the Notice of Sale included as Appendix C to the Preliminary Official Statement and incorporated herein by reference, with such modifications as may be appropriate or necessary, in the reasonable judgment of the successful bidder, the County and Bond Counsel. Any bid submitted pursuant to this Official Notice of Sale shall be considered a firm offer for the purchase of the Bonds, as specified in the bid. All bids shall include a representation that the underwriters have established industry reputations for underwriting new issuances of municipal securities. Closing Documents. The Bonds will be accompanied by the customary closing documents, including a no-litigation certificate, effective as of the date of delivery, stating that there is no litigation pending against the County affecting the validity of the Bonds, and a Tax Certificate and Compliance Agreement signed by the Finance Officer of the County. It shall be a condition to the obligation of the successful bidder to accept delivery of and pay for the Bonds that, simultaneously with or before delivery and payment for the Bonds, such successful bidder shall be furnished a certificate or certificates of the President of the Board and the Chief Administrative Officer of the County

PAGE 49 to the effect that, to the best of their knowledge and belief, the Official Statement (hereinafter defined) (and any amendment or supplement thereto) (except for the any information furnished by the successful bidder, as to which no view will be expressed) as of the date of sale and as of the date of delivery of the Bonds does not contain any untrue statement of a material fact and does not omit to state a material fact necessary to make the statements therein, in light of the circumstances under which they were made, not misleading and that between the date of sale and the date of delivery of the Bonds there has been no material adverse change in the financial position or revenues of the County, except as reflected or contemplated in the Official Statement (and any amendment or supplement thereto). Preliminary Official Statement. The Preliminary Official Statement of the County concerning the Bonds (the “Preliminary Official Statement”) is in a form “deemed final” by the County for purposes of SEC Rule 15c2-12(b)(1) (the “Rule”) but is subject to revision, amendment and completion in the final Official Statement. Official Statement. As soon as practicable after the award of the Bonds to the successful bidder therefor on the day of sale, the County will authorize the final Official Statement for the Bonds (the “Official Statement”). By submitting its bid for the Bonds, the successful bidder agrees to provide the County with pricing information and such other information as the County may require in order that the County may provide the successful bidder with a final Official Statement in compliance with the Rule. Whether or not any such information is included in the Official Statement (and any amendment of supplement thereto), such successful bidder shall be responsible to the County and its officials in all respects for the accuracy, fairness and completeness of such information, and for all decisions made with respect to the use or omission of such information in any re-offering of the Bonds, including the presentation or exclusion of any such information in any documents, including the Official Statement. Within seven (7) business days after the award of the Bonds to the successful bidder, the County will deliver to the successful bidder an Official Statement, which is expected to be substantially in the form of the Preliminary Official Statement. The successful bidder will also be furnished, without cost, with up to 100 copies of the Official Statement and any amendments or supplements thereto. The successful bidder may obtain additional copies at such successful bidder’s own expense. The County will undertake to provide the successful bidder with further additional information to be included in the Official Statement, when in the opinion of the County or of Bond Counsel, such additional information constitutes a material change to the Official Statement. The County will take such steps as


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Ocean City Today / Public Notices

are necessary to arrange for amending and supplementing the Official Statement in connection with the disclosure of such additional information; provided, however, that the County shall have no obligation to provide such additional information after the date which is 25 days after the “end of the underwriting period”, as such term is defined in the Rule. Continuing Disclosure Agreement. In order to assist bidders in complying with the SEC Rule 15c212(b)(5), the County will execute and deliver a continuing disclosure agreement on or before the date of issuance of the Bonds pursuant to which the County will undertake to provide certain information annually and notices of certain events. A description of this agreement is set forth in the Preliminary Official Statement and will also be set forth in the Official Statement. Additional Information. The Preliminary Official Statement of County Commissioners of Worcester County, Maryland, concerning the Bonds, and copies of this Notice of Sale may be obtained from Mr. Phillip G. Thompson, Finance Officer, Worcester County Government Building, Room 1103, Snow Hill, Maryland, 21863, or from the County’s Financial Advisor, Davenport & Company LLC, The Oxford Building 8600 LaSalle Road, Suite 618, Towson, Baltimore, Maryland, 21286 (410-296-9426). COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND By: Diana Purnell President of the Board of County Commissioners OCD-3/21/2t _________________________________

NOTICE

OF PUBLIC HEARING WORCESTER COUNTY BOARD OF ZONING APPEALS AGENDA

ing park model in the A-2 Agricultural District, pursuant to Zoning Code Sections ZS 1-116(c)(4), ZS 1202(c)(19) and ZS 1-318(d)(1)B. located at 458 Timberline Circle, approximately 328 feet northwest of Dolphin Drive, Tax Map 16, Parcel 94, Lot 458 of the White Horse Park Campground Subdivision, in the Third Tax District of Worcester County, Maryland. 6:40 p.m. Case No. 19-4, on the application of Mark Cropper, Esquire, on the lands of Gregory & Nancy Britt, requesting a variance to the Atlantic Coastal Bays Critical Area setback from 50 feet to 35.6 feet (an encroachment of 14.4 feet) associated with a proposed pool, patio and fence in the R-2 Suburban Residential District, pursuant to Zoning Code Section ZS 1-116(m)(1) and Natural Resources Sections NR 3-104(c)(4) and NR 3-111, located at 13016 North Shore Road, approximately 324 feet east of Golf Course Road, Tax Map 22, Parcel 367, Lot 26 of the Captain’s Hill Subdivision, in the Tenth Tax District of Worcester County, Maryland. 6:45 p.m. Case No. 19-20, on the application of Hugh Cropper, IV, Esquire, on the lands of Ocean Tower Investment LLC, requesting a special exception to allow for contractor shops in the A-2 Agricultural District, pursuant to Zoning Code Sections ZS 1116(c)(3), ZS 1-202(c)(14), ZS 1-305, ZS 1-322 and ZS 1-325, located at 11912 St. Martins Neck Road, on the southerly side of the intersection with Industrial Park Road, Tax Map 10, Parcel 27, Lot 1, in the Fifth Tax District of Worcester County, Maryland. ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS OCD-3/28/2t _________________________________

NOTICE

OF PUBLIC HEARING Town of Berlin Board of Zoning Appeals

THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 2019 Pursuant to the provisions of the Worcester County Zoning Ordinance, notice is hereby given that a public hearing will be held before the Board of Zoning Appeals for Worcester County, in the Board Room (Room 1102) on the first floor of the Worcester County Government Center, One West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland. 6:30 p.m. Case No. 19-18, on the lands of William Burbage, requesting a special exception to locate an offpremise directional sign in the A-1 Agricultural District, pursuant to Zoning Code Sections ZS 1-116(c)(3) and ZS 1-324(d)(2)A, located on the east side of Worcester Highway (US Route 113), ½ mile north of Hayes Landing Road, Tax Map 32, Parcel 22, in the Third Tax District of Worcester County, Maryland. 6:35 p.m. Case No. 19-21, on the lands of Dominique Sessa, requesting an after-the-fact variance to the Ordinance prescribed front yard setback from 10 feet to 9.4 (an encroachment of 0.6 feet) associated with an exist-

Pursuant to the requirements of §108-191 of the Code of the Town of Berlin, notice is hereby given that a public hearing will be conducted by the Berlin Board of Appeals in the Mayor and Council Chambers of Berlin Town Hall, 10 William Street, Berlin, Maryland on WEDNESDAY, April 3, 2019 6:30 PM A Request for Conditional Use within the M-1 Light Industrial Zoning District to allow three apartments over a controlled storage unit located at 305 Washington Street, Unit 1 received from Mr. Duane Maddy. Any questions regarding the above agenda items shall be directed to the Berlin Department of Planning and Zoning at 410-641-4143. Any persons having questions about the above-referenced meeting or any persons needing special accommodations should contact Dave Engelhart at 410-641-4143. Written materials in alternate formats for persons with disabilities are made available upon request. TTY users

dial 7-1-1 in the State of Maryland or 1-800-735-2258 outside Maryland. OCD-3/28/1t _________________________________

PLANNING AND ZONING COMMISSION

MARCH 29, 2019 Community Development, Room 242, City Hall, 301 Baltimore Avenue, Ocean City, MD 21842. Phone 410-289-8855. PLANNING AND ZONING COMMISSION PAM GREER BUCKLEY, CHAIRPERSON WILLIAM E. ESHAM, III, ATTORNEY OCD-3/28/2t _________________________________

NOTICE

OF PUBLIC HEARING Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 110, Zoning, of the Code of the Town of Ocean City, Maryland, notice is hereby given that a public hearing will be conducted by the Planning and Zoning Commission in the Council Chambers of City Hall located at 301 Baltimore Avenue in the Town of Ocean City, Maryland on: TUESDAY, APRIL 16, 2019 at 7:00 PM Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 110, Division 6. Changes and Amendments, Section 110-143. Procedure for map amendments, of the Code of the Town of Ocean City – an application has been filed for a change in zoning classification for properties listed below that are zoned LC-1, Local Commercial, Zoning District, with a P/G-1, Public/Governmental Overlay Zone, to BMUD, Bayside Mixed Use, with no overlay. The property is located on the north side of 66th Street and south side of 67th Street, locally known as 118-66th Street, owned by the Mayor and Council of the Town of Ocean City, Maryland, and a portion of 108-66th Street, owned by Wenzlaff Family LLLP. This property is described as Tax Map 114, Parcel 6680, Lots 11 and 12; Parcel 6679, Lot 13; and a portion of Parcel 6678, which includes a 7’ wide portion of Lot 14, the westernmost alley running north to south between 66th and 67th Streets, the entire alley midblock that runs west to east from the aforementioned north-south alley, following the property lines of aforementioned lots to the easternmost limit of the 7’ portion of Lot 14, also running from the westernmost alley to the center of 66th Street to the easternmost limit of the 7’ portion of Lot 14, Block 117 of the Isle of Wight Plat, dated 1914; in the Town of Ocean City, Maryland. APPLICANT: MAYOR AND CITY COUNCIL OF OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND C/O DOUGLAS R. MILLER, CITY MANAGER (FILE #19-14100001) No oral or written testimony will be accepted after the close of the public hearing. Public hearings that are not completed at one meeting may be continued without additional advertised notice provided the Commission Chairman announces that the hearing will be continued and gives persons in attendance an opportunity to sign up for written notice of the additional hearing dates. For further information concerning this public hearing, please contact the Department of Planning and

NOTICE

OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING APPEALS TOWN OF OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 110 of the Code of Ocean City, Maryland, hereinafter referred to as the Code, same being the Zoning Ordinance for Ocean City, Maryland, notice is hereby given that public hearings will be conducted by the Board of Zoning Appeals for Ocean City, Maryland in the Council Chambers of City Hall located on Baltimore Avenue and Third Street, in the Town of Ocean City, Maryland on: THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 2019 at 6:00 p.m. Pursuant to the provisions of Section 110-93(2), Powers, of the Code, an appeal has been filed pursuant to the provisions of Section 110-94(2)(b) requesting a special parking exception to waive six (6) parking spaces to build a swimming pool. The site of the appeal is described as an unnumbered lot, Parcel 9135 of the Bayside Keys Plat, further described as located on the south side of Rusty Anchor Road, and known locally as Sunset Cove Condominium, 701 Rusty Anchor Road, in the Town of Ocean City, Maryland. APPLICANT: SUNSET COVE CONDOMINIUM – (BZA 2524 #19-09400001) at 6:10 p.m. Pursuant to the provisions of Section 110-93(2), Powers, of the Code, an appeal has been filed pursuant to the provisions of Section 110-94(2)(b) requesting a special parking exception to waive a maximum of 25 parking spaces in order to improve site conditions, design flexibility and to address concerns of Caine Woods Neighborhood Association. The site of the appeal is described as Lots 215, Block 52 of the Fenwick Plat, Revised 1965; further described as located on the west side of Coastal Highway and the east side of Sinepuxent Avenue, between 138th and 139th Streets, and known locally as The Fenwick Inn, 13801 Coastal Highway, in the Town of Ocean City, Maryland. APPLICANT: PETER KARTANOS, GENERAL MANAGER FOR THE FENWICK INN – (BZA 2525 #19-09400002) Further information concerning the public hearings may be examined in the office of the Department


MARCH 29, 2019 of Planning and Community Development in City Hall. Alfred Harrison, Chairman Heather Stansbury, Attorney OCD-3/28/2t _________________________________ IN THE ORPHANS’ COURT FOR (OR) BEFORE THE REGISTER OF WILLS FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND IN THE ESTATE OF: GLORIA MARY DONELSON ESTATE NO. 17757

NOTICE

OF JUDICIAL PROBATE To all Persons Interested in the above estate: You are hereby notified that a petition has been filed by Thomas J. Kokolis, Esq., 110 North Washington Street, Suite 500, Rockville, MD 20850 for judicial probate and for the appointment of a personal representative. A hearing will be held at Worcester County Court House, Court Room 4, One W. Market Street, Snow Hill, MD 21863 on 04/16/2019 at 10:00 a.m. This hearing may be transferred or postponed to a subsequent time. Further information may be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills. Terri Westcoott Register of Wills One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Phone: (410) 632-1529 Newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Publication Date: 03/21/2019 OCD-3/21/2t _________________________________ REGAN J.R. SMITH ESQ. WILLIAMS, MOORE, SHOCKLEY & HARRISON LLP 3509 COASTAL HIGHWAY OCEAN CITY, MD 21842

NOTICE

OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Estate No. 17771 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF MARGARET ELAINE MCINTOSH Notice is given that Amy McElrath, 5029 Creswell Drive, Leland, NC 28451, was on March 18, 2019 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Margaret Elaine McIntosh who died on March 7, 2019, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 18th day of September, 2019. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of

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Ocean City Today / Public Notices the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Amy McElrath Personal Representative True Test Copy Terri Westcott Register of Wills for Worcester County One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: March 21, 2019 OCD-3/21/3t _________________________________ TOWN OF BERLIN ADVERTISEMENT OF

INVITATION TO BID GRAHAM AVENUE SUBMERGED GRAVEL WETLANDS TOWN OF BERLIN, MARYLAND

Sealed proposals will be received by the Mayor and Council of Berlin, Worcester County, Maryland, at Town Hall, 10 William Street, Berlin, Maryland 21811 until 2:00 p.m., on Friday May 3, 2019, for the GRAHAM AVENUE SUBMERGED GRAVEL WETLANDS located within Nelson Street to its intersection with Graham Avenue and continuing into vacant lands to the north at which time the proposals will be opened publicly and read aloud. Potential bidders are encouraged to attend the non-mandatory PreBid Meeting which will be held on Tuesday April 9, 2019, at 11:00 a.m. at Berlin Town Hall, 10 William Street, Berlin, Maryland. Bid documents are available from DiCarlo Precision Instruments, Inc., 2006 Northwood Drive, Salisbury, Maryland 21801 (410-749-0112). All inquiries shall be directed to Darl Kolar, P.E., Project Manager, EA Engineering, Science, and Technology, Inc., PBC at 410-641-5341. OCD-3/28/1t _________________________________ SUSAN K. ADOROTY KUWAMURA LAW GROUP, P.A. 11140 ROCKVILLE PIKE, SUITE 50 ROCKVILLE, MD 20850

NOTICE

OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Estate No. 17784 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF DAVID M. STEVENS

Notice is given that Jennifer L. Austin, 8801 Cardinal Forest Circle, Laurel, MD 20172 was on March 25, 2019 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of David M. Stevens who died on February 19, 2019, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 25th day of September, 2019. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Jennifer L. Austin Personal Representative True Test Copy Terri Westcott Register of Wills for Worcester County One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: March 28, 2019 OCD-3/28/3t _________________________________

Town of Ocean City

BID SOLICITATION Solid Waste Buildings’ Gutters and Downspouts

The Town of Ocean City is seeking bids from qualified and experienced vendors for Solid Waste Buildings’ Gutters and Downspouts and to be in conformity with the scope of work detailed in the Bid Documents. Bid Documents for Solid Waste Buildings’ Gutters and Downspouts may be obtained from the Town of Ocean City’s Procurement Department by either e-mailing the Purchasing Associate, Leila Milewski, at lmilewski@oceancitymd.gov or by

calling 410-723-6643 during normal business hours, or via the Bid tab on the Town’s website. Vendors are responsible for checking this website for addenda prior to submitting their bids. The Town of Ocean City is not responsible for the content of any Bid Document received through any third party bid service. It is the sole responsibility of the vendor to ensure the completeness and accuracy of their Completed Bid Documents. A Pre-Bid meeting will be held on Thursday, April 04, 2019 at 1:00 p.m. in the Purchasing Department, located at 204 65th St, Building A, Ocean City, MD 21842. Sealed Bid Documents are due Thursday, April 18, 2019 by 1:00 p.m. at which time they will be opened and read aloud. Bids are to be submitted to the Town of Ocean City, Attn: Procurement Manager, 204 65th Street, Bldg. A, Ocean City, MD 21842. Late Bid Document will not be accepted. Minority vendors are encouraged to compete for award of the solicitation. OCD-3/28/2t _________________________________ IN THE ORPHANS’ COURT FOR (OR) BEFORE THE REGISTER OF WILLS FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND IN THE ESTATE OF: KATHLEEN J. SYKES ESTATE NO. 17770

NOTICE

OF JUDICIAL PROBATE To all Persons Interested in the above estate: You are hereby notified that a petition has been filed by Martin S. Goldberg, Esq., P.O. Box 59837, Potomac, MD 20859 for judicial probate for the appointment of a personal representative. A hearing will be held at Worcester County Court House, Court Room 4, One W. Market Street, Snow Hill, MD 21863 on 05/07/2019 at 10:00 a.m. This hearing may be transferred or postponed to a subsequent time. Further information may be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills. Terri Westcott Register of Wills One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Phone: (410) 632-1529 Newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Publication Date: 03/28/2019 OCD-3/28/2t _________________________________

LEGAL ADVERTISING Call: 410-723-6397 Fax: 410-723-6511 or E-mail: legals@oceancitytoday.net


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Ocean City Today / Public Notices

NOTICE

OF PUBLIC HEARINGS BOARD OF PORT WARDENS Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 106, ”Waterways,” Article II – “Shoreline Development” of the Code of the Town of Ocean City, Maryland, hereinafter referred to as the Code, same being the Port Wardens Ordinance of Ocean City, Maryland, notice is hereby given that public hearings will be conducted in the Council Chambers of City Hall located at 301 Baltimore Avenue, Ocean City, Maryland. Thursday, April 11, 2019 at 2:00 p.m. A request has been submitted to build an 8’ x 12’ platform along the bulkhead, maximum channelward distance 6’; construct (1) 3.5’ x 42’ pier, maximum channelward distance 50’; replace existing boat lift and piling in kind, maximum channelward distance 50’; install (1) PWC lift with associated piling, maximum channelward distance 20’. The site of the proposed construction is described as being located at 506-32nd Street, Unit 14 Parcel # 4454 -14 in the Town of Ocean City, Maryland. APPLICANT: MCGINTY MARINE CONSTRUCTION C/O HEATHER SCHLEUPNER OWNER: KEVIN & JACQUELINE SIEJACK (PW19-027) A request has been submitted to replace one (1) boat lift in-kind with associated piling, maximum chan-

nelward distance of 36’; and install one (1) PWC lift with associated piling, maximum channelward distance of 30’. The site of the proposed construction is described as being located at 631 Bayshore Drive Unit A Parcel # 5277-2809 in the Town of Ocean City, Maryland. APPLICANT: MCGINTY MARINE CONSTRUCTION C/O HEATHER SCHLEUPNER OWNER: WESLEY J. DIETZ (PW19-028) CONTINUED FROM MARCH 14, 2019 MEETING A request has been submitted to remove and dispose of existing parallel platform/perpendicular pier/ boat lift/PWC lifts and associated poles, and to install 170+/-‘ of replacement vinyl bulkhead 18” channelward with engineered batter pile system, to install a new 5’ x 30’ parallel platform, a new 5’ x 30’ perpendicular pier, and four (4) new associated mooring piles, (2) two boat lifts, and (2) PWC lifts. All construction a maximum distance channelward of MLW line 37’. The site of the proposed construction is described as being located at 199 Pine Tree Road Parcel # 8020A-1304B in the Town of Ocean City, Maryland. APPLICANT: OCEAN SERVICES OF DE, INC. C/O ERIN ROGERS (PW19-029) OWNER: THOMAS B. JONES A request has been submitted to remove existing 4’ x 27’ pier and replace with a 4’ x 42’ pier. Build an 8’ x 16’ parallel platform along the bulkhead, and install one (1) boat lift with associated piling. Maximum channelward distance of 50’. The site of the proposed construction is described as being located at 506-32nd Street, Unit 15, Bay Cove Parcel # 4454-15 in the Town of Ocean City, Maryland. APPLICANT: MCGINTY MARINE

CONSTRUCTIONI C/O HEATHER SCHLEUPNER (PW19-030) OWNER: LEE DAVIS A request has been submitted to install one (1) boat lift with associated piling, maximum channelward distance 18’. The site of the proposed construction is described as being located at 2815 Tern Drive, Unit 211 Parcel # 4755-211 in the Town of Ocean City, Maryland. APPLICANT: MCGINTY MARINE CONSTRUCTION C/O HEATHER SCHLEUPNER (PW19-031) OWNER: KURT KOENNECKE A request has been submitted to install one (1) 9’-8” X 18’ double PWC float with all associated poles. Maximum channelward extension of 20’. The site of the proposed construction is described as being located at 67494th Street, Slip 154, Parcel # 9650154 in the Town of Ocean City, Maryland. APPLICANT: HIDDEN OAK FARMS, LLC C/O RON FREUND (PW19-032) OWNER: NANCY SEILER A request has been submitted to install one (1) boat lift with poles into slip, maximum channelward distance 22’. The site of the proposed construction is described as being located at 735 Bradley Road, Unit 301, Slip 22, Parcel # 9271-301 in the Town of Ocean City, Maryland. APPLICANT: OCEAN CITY BOATLIFT & MARINE CONSTRUCTION INC., C/O PERMIT INK (PW19-034) OWNER: ROGER & JILL LEWIN A request has been submitted to install one (1) 10’ x 12’ double floating jetport or a 4-pole double jetski lift, and install one (1) boat lift with associated poles, maximum channelward extension of 19’. The site of the proposed construction is described as being located at 307 Old Landing

MARCH 29, 2019 Road, Parcel # 1754A-9 in the Town of Ocean City, Maryland. APPLICANT: OCEAN CITY BOATLIFT & MARINE CONSTRUCTION INC., C/O PERMIT INK (PW19-035) OWNER: MARK & LESLIE REEVES A request has been submitted to install 170’ of replacement bulkhead and two (2) PWC lifts, a maximum channelward distance of 8’. The site of the proposed construction is described as being located at 323 S. Heron Gull Court, Parcel # 6069A-93 in the Town of Ocean City, Maryland. APPLICANT: HIDDEN OAK FARM, LLC C/O RON FREUND OWNER: PATRICK COOK (PW19-037) A request has been submitted to install one (1) boat lift with all associated poles to an existing pier with one existing boat lift, a maximum channelward extension of 32’. The site of the proposed construction is described as being located at 613 Gulfstream Drive, Parcel # 8020A – 1479B in the Town of Ocean City, Maryland. APPLICANT: HIDDEN OAK FARM, LLC C/O RON FREUND OWNER: KIM HARDY (PW19-038) Board of Port Wardens Blake McGrath, Chairman Valerie Gaskill, Attorney OCD-3/28/2t _________________________________ McCabe, Weisberg & Conway LLC 312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800 Laurel, Maryland 20707 301-490-3361 Laura H.G. O’Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs vs. John W. Russell and Jennifer M. Russell Defendants IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Civil No. 23C16000317

NOTICE

LEGAL ADVERTISING 410-723-6397 legals@oceancitytoday.net

ORDERED, this 21st day of March, 2019 by the Circuit Court of WORCESTER COUNTY, Maryland, that the sale of the property at 4004 Jones Road, Pocomoke City, Maryland 21851 mentioned in these proceedings, made and reported by Laura H.G. O’Sullivan, et. al, Substitute Trustees, be ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 22nd day of April, 2019 next, provided a copy of this notice be inserted in some newspaper published in said County once in each of three successive weeks before the 15th day of April, 2019, next. The report states the amount of sale to be $248,000.00. Susan R. Braniecki CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND True Copy Test: Susan R. Braniecki Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD OCD-3/28/3t _________________________________


Commentary

Ocean City Today Mar. 29, 2019

Page 53

Little things come back to haunt you “The law of unintended consequences” is not just an expression. One day’s moderately trivial circumstance can turn out to be something much different later. In August 2016, for instance, a resort police officer saw a beer in the cab of a truck parked uptown. The officer waited for the driver to return and enter the vehicle before arresting him for driving while impaired. The suspect, Richard Impallaria of Essex, Maryland was tested for alcohol consumption and posted numbers higher than the state’s .04 DUI limit. In January the next year, Impallaria was convicted, with sentencing to follow in April. At the sentencing hearing, the prosecution told Judge Thomas Groton (now retired) the usual sentence for a DUI offense was 10 days, but that a longer sentence would be acceptable given the defendant’s bad driving record. Groton ordered 60 days in jail, but then walked it back to just two days, because, the judge said, the officer was lying in wait for the driver, when he should have stopped him from getting in the car if he suspected the man had been drinking. Impallaria served his two days and left, but apparently took with him some resentment toward Ocean City. Flash forward to March of this year, and it’s Delegate Rick Impallaria, a Republican representing parts of Baltimore and Harford counties, who’s sitting in the House Economic Matters Committee in the Maryland General Assembly. At issue was the Clean Energy Jobs Act, which Democratic leaders thought might be too ambitious to pursue this year, while virtually all Republicans opposed it outright. One part of the bill called for greatly expanded offshore wind turbine development, which Ocean City opposes if turbines can be seen from shore. Before the committee was a motion to kill the bill. It had the support of four Democrats and all the Republicans … except Impallaria. He broke with his party to keep the bill alive in an 11-10 vote. Was it payback to Ocean City? Maybe. Should he have been arrested, absolutely, but perhaps as Groton suggested. Even so, conservative groups now want Impallaria out of office, and that would be a consequence that’s fully intended.

Ocean City Today P.O. Box 3500, Ocean City, Md. 21843 Phone: 410-723-6397 / Fax: 410-723-6511.

EDITOR ............................................ Stewart Dobson MANAGING EDITOR................................ Lisa Capitelli ASSOCIATE EDITOR .................................. Josh Davis STAFF WRITERS .................. Greg Ellison, Morgan Pilz, ................................ Rachel Ravina, Victor Fernandes ASSISTANT PUBLISHER .......................... Elaine Brady ACCOUNT MANAGERS ........ Mary Cooper, Shelby Shea CLASSIFIEDS/LEGALS MANAGER ...... Nancy Hawrylko SENIOR DESIGNER ................................ Susan Parks GRAPHIC ARTISTS ................ Kelly Brown, Kyle Phillips PUBLISHER ...................................... Christine Brown ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT ...................... Gini Tufts Ocean City Today is published weekly by FLAG Publications, Inc. at 8200 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, Md. 21842. Ocean City Today is available by subscription at $150 a year. Visit us on the Web at www.oceancitytoday.com. Copyright 2019

PUBLIC EYE

The sun comes up ...

By Stewart Dobson Editor One of my favorite commercial jingles is the bluegrass-style tune done for YellaWood: “The sun comes up, the sun goes down. Work awaaaay, work awaaaay.” I’ve always been a big fan of bluegrass, but I began thinking about this specific ditty this week, when I was prodded into wondering what if the sun doesn’t come up as scheduled? Will I still have to work awaaaay or will I get some time offff? I say this after watching an area television station treat viewers to a unique shot of the sunrise as seen on its beach cam 26 miles up the coast in Delaware. Sure, you say, sunrises are hardly unique, since the sun has been coming up in the morning on a fairly regular basis for a while now. Or so we have been led to believe. Not to get all metaphysical, but I have no proof of what the sun did before I came along. It’s all hearsay evidence, as in having to take my parents’ word for it when they said, yes, the sun rose in the morning for them as well. But before that, who knows? Things have changed quite a bit over the years, so it could be that sunrises were more of a cosmic luckof-the-draw thing in the past. For all we know, the line in a description of the Civil War Battle of Antietam might have been changed by history revisionists and “The crack of rifled muskets … as dawn broke over the farm fields outside of Sharpsburg, Maryland,” might have been, in actuality, “rifled muskets dawned at the crack of noon.” Understandably, many readers may have abandoned this column by now, having concluded that I have finally taken up full-time

residence in Kablooeyville, instead of making the occasional commute. But consider this: It’s 6 a.m., I’m watching the news and wondering what I can write about that might be marginally entertaining. I discard the idea of going on about the cancellation of the two-woman spacewalk after NASA realized it has only one size 4 space suit in stock and the other’s on back-order. I then reject the notion of holding forth on whether starting schools before Labor Day will produce generations of students who are a week smarter, and if this intellectual difference might cause civil unrest between the know-it-alls and the know-it-somes. That’s when the newscaster says, “Let’s look at the sunrise from our beach cam in Rehoboth.” Now, someone must have forgotten to mention this was not an actual live shot or — either Rehoboth or my neighborhood has been sent to a different time dimension, or my block has been physically relocated to Indiana, or this beach cam has special properties of which most of us were unaware. It has to be one of the above because it’s still dark outside my window and yet there it is on screen, a big yellow ball rising above the horizon in Rehoboth a full 52 minutes before Ocean City’s 6:52 a.m. March 24 sunrise. Of course, Delaware does many things before we do: slots, then table games, online betting and now it either has its very own sunrise or a future-gazing beach cam. It is possible someone at the station made a mistake and I’m making too much of it, but the odds of that happening would be, well, the same as the sun not coming up tomorrow morning. Or so we would assume.


Letters OC man grows tired of town overspending Editor, The mayor and City Council of Ocean City continue to overspend taxpayer money. Just recently, we learned that the $34.4 million convention center expansion is now going to cost $37.5 million. Originally, the town was to contribute $14 million; now, it is $15 million. Earlier, the state was to contribute $20.4 million; now, it is over $22 million. Two years ago, the town announced plans to spend $25.4 million on the Public Works and Transit Facility Upgrade Plan at 65th Street. The town was to contribute $10.2 million, and the Maryland Transit Authority was to add another $15.2 million. A year ago, when the bids were opened, the total cost rose to $35.8 million, a 41 percent increase over previous estimates. Apparently to contain costs, the M&CC scrapped plans for the $10.6 million employee parking garage, which was 34 percent over an earlier

Ocean City Today Mar. 29, 2019

to the editor

estimate. In place of it, they decided on a $1.3 million ground level parking lot and gatehouse. There should have been additional reductions in the project. For example, the bids revealed that the bus storage structure increased from $3.4 million to $5.4 million, up over 58 percent. Further, the bids revealed that the new administration building increased from $4.8 million to $7.8 million, up over 62 percent. Finally, the bids revealed that the service building and accessory structures increased from the original $2.2 million estimate to at least $8.1 million, up an astounding 268 percent. This particular service building with accessories was originally to cost the town approximately $212,000. Now, it is to cost over $3.2 million, apparently due to a change in the funding formula between the town and the MTA. The MTA portion of the total project increased from $15.2 million to $18 million, up over 18 percent. Why doesn’t the M&CC abandon these projects when the costs rise so dramatically? More importantly, when is the M&CC going to stop over-

spending?

Vincent dePaul Gisriel Jr. Ocean City

Art League of OC thanks supporters Editor, On behalf of the Art League of Ocean City, we would like to thank everyone who supported and made this year’s Ocean City Film Festival a huge success. We welcomed nearly 1,500 Film Festival attendees, a record-breaking crowd. The 100 films we screened came from 80 filmmakers, 12 different countries, and 20 different states, with 40 films produced in Maryland. The festival showcased industry professionals as well as university students, young filmmakers, and local talent, and gave them an opportunity to network with others who share their passion. While the event is only in its third year, the overwhelming response will ensure its growth in future years. Our gratitude goes out to the venues who screened the films: Clarion Resort, Princess Royale Hotel, Fox

Page 54 Gold Coast Theater, Carousel Hotel, Francis Scott Key Resort, and the Ocean City Performing Arts Center. The weekend began with a reception at the Princess Royale and culminated with an award ceremony and reception at Seacrets. We are grateful to both venues for their wonderful hospitality. The highlight of the festival for many was the Delmarva premiere of “The Biggest Little Farm,” a film that chronicled the lives of John and Molly Chester and their odyssey to bring harmony to both their lives and their land. Thank you to director John Chester and executive producer Erica Cramer Messer, both Stephen Decatur High School alumni, for sharing this beautiful film and for coming home to join us for the premiere. Thank you to our judges: John Sisson, Allen Cramer, Don Lehman, Gwen Lehman, Julian Sidur, Marlon Wallace, Dave Messick, Simona Calin, and Jonathan Pippin. Thank you to our committee members who worked many months to coordinate the event: Ruth Waters, Katie Brown, Elaine Bean, Debbi Dean-Colley, and Continued on Page 55


MARCH 29, 2019

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Continued from Page 54 Ryan Wilde. Our appreciation also goes out to the volunteers who staffed the screenings and helped at the filmmaker reception. Special thanks to our lead sponsor, the Town of Ocean City. We are grateful to all of our sponsors and advertisers: Ward Museum, Maryland Film Office, Seacrets, Carousel Hotel, Harrison Group Hotels, Hotel Motel Restaurant Association, Ocean City Chamber of Commerce, Residence Inn Marriott, Seacrets, Shore Craft Beer, Worcester County Tourism, The Original Greene Turtle, Jolly Roger Amusement Parks, Dunes Manor, Shenanigan’s, Sun & Surf Cinema, Fager’s Island, and D3 Corp. The festival would not have been a success without our valued media partners who helped us get the word out: Ocean City Today, Maryland Coast Dispatch, Delmarva Public Radio, Ocean 98, and WBOC/WRDE. Thank you to the festival’s workshop instructors: Rob Waters, Rob Bell, and Jack Gerbes and the team from the Maryland Film Office who explored topics like screen writing, shooting in Maryland, and networking opportunities. Finally, to our audiences, who laughed, shed a tear, asked insightful questions, and enthusiastically applauded, we appreciate you choosing to spend your time with us. Mark your calendars for the fourth annual Ocean City Film Festival in March 2020. In the meantime, experience independent film screenings year round by joining us for our $5 Film Nights on the third Saturday of every month at the Ocean City Center for the Arts on 94th Street, bayside. Rina Thaler, Executive Director – Art League of Ocean City B.L. Strang-Moya, Festival Director Kristin Helf - Festival Co-Director

Ocean City Today

Mathias works new post at UMES By Rachel Ravina Staff Writer (March 29, 2019) Former District 38 State Sen. Jim Mathias recently earned a new title: government relations director for the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. “I am very proud to be part of the team,” Mathias said on Monday. “I look forward to working to achieve the goals of the team, and it feels good.” The government relations director represents the school’s interests with governmental factions, according to a university spokesperson. Mathias, 67, started the job roughly two weeks ago. Mathias has an office in Princess Anne, and said he’s been recently been commuting from Annapolis as the state’s legislative session nears its end. He aims to effectively work as a liaison, using his past governmental relationships to benefit the university’s objectives. “I was integral in procuring the funding for both the engineering aviation building, and also [getting] the seed money [for] the new building for the pharmacy program,” Mathias said. Mathias said he’s “been fortunate to build a trusting working relationship[s] with” many elected officials, including Maryland’s U.S. Senators, congressional representatives, state senators and delegates, and Gov. Larry Hogan. He’s also developed rapports with local municipalities. He hopes to utilize that experience while working with UMES President Heidi M. Anderson and other university personnel to communicate the school’s objectives on a larger scale. “My first-place role is to be a very effective part of … that leadership team,” he said. Mathias is taking over for the former government relations director, Kimberly Dumpson, who resigned last summer to become the chief

fundraiser for Rhode Island College, according to a university spokesperson. David Balcom, vice president for institutional advancement for UMES, said MathJim Mathias ias’ previous political experience makes him a good fit for the position. “Clearly, his deep roots in Eastern Shore political circles, particularly in the state legislature as well as Ocean City, made him an ideal candidate,” Balcom said in a statement. “He’s well connected in state government.” Mathias’ political background on the Eastern Shore began as a member on Ocean City’s Board of Zoning Appeals, followed by his service on the Ocean City Council and as Ocean City’s mayor. He served the resort for 10 years before making the leap to the state level, where he held this district’s seat in the Maryland House of Delegates for several years before becoming the state senator for District 38. He lost his senate seat to Republican Mary Beth Carozza during the 2018 election. In his new role, Mathias hopes to showcase many of the university’s programs, including physician’s assistant, criminal justice, social sciences, physical therapy, business management and accounting, as well as the school of pharmacy. He stressed the importance of the university’s aviation program and its proximity to the NASA Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. “I think it’s about broadening our horizons. Number one is growing our campus,” Mathias said. “[It’s about] growing programs at UMES and strengthening them for our students’ bright future … but also they find that when they come and study with us

BoB Willey fo for Choopptank el electri riicc Cooopp Boarrdd of Dirreectors • CP PA A sin nce 1977 • Choptan nk member since 1970s • Choptan nk auditor in 1980-90s • Private P i t sector, nonprofit and governm ment experience • Active in n community / civic organizations • Endorse ed by 2 former CEC directors

Pllease vote – Bob Willey Bob W Wiilley

PAGE 55

here on the Eastern Shore, that this is where they want to call home.” UMES is a part of the Historically Black Colleges and Universities collective defined in the 1965 Higher Education Act as “any historically black college or university that was established prior to 1964, whose principal mission was, and is, the education of black Americans.” It is one of four in Maryland, with Bowie State University, Coppin State University and Morgan State University. Mathias emphasized the need to make “sure that we protect that land grant institution and grow it forward.” He also cited agriculture and tourism as priorities. “Our university has exemplary programs of both, and we want to make sure that as the 21st century brings as we have technological developments that our students are there,” Mathias said. “They understand it, and they’re taking our farms forward, and our tourism forward on the shore.” For Mathias, it’s simply about giving students the tools to keep them on the shore. “I want to do everything we can do to provide them that vocational opportunity, that technological opportunity to be able to be here, to thrive here, to grow their families here and to grow our campus here,” he said.

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PAGE 56

Ocean City Today

MARCH 29, 2019

Natural gas project work goes to year-round Continued from Page 1 he said. Since this section does not require underground work, Ashcraft said the presence of workers during warm weather should be less intrusive. “It would really expedite the process because one of the main things when you’re dealing with a huge residential neighborhood is getting access to that person’s property,” he said. The project’s previous phases included connecting gas main lines in West Ocean City to First Street via 3,200 feet of 10-inch steel pipe submerged 90-feet below the channel. “This all began when we put the bay crossing in and that was no simple task,” he said. After beginning the underwater segment in September 2016, the bay-

crossing portion was not wrapped up until April 2017, Ashcraft said. “Originally, we thought it would be done in December of 2016,” he said. “It took twice as long and cost twice as much money … but we did get it done.” Ashcraft said when natural gas began flowing underneath the bay on April 4, 2017, months later than expected, the initial five-year franchise agreement between Sandpiper and the city was extended until April 2042. “This was not only was a milestone for the overall conversion process, it also triggered an automatic extension of the franchise agreement by an additional 25 years,” he said. The target area for summer 2020 would be between Northside Park and 112th Street, Ashcraft said. “We project the last section, which

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is 542 residential accounts, will be about 27 weeks work,” he said. Rob West, Sandpiper natural gas conversion manager, said project areas are divided into groupings of 100-200 customers, with Ocean City consisting of 20 total sections. West said residents would be contacted when their neighborhood is nearing the conversion process. “We send out postcards 4-6 weeks prior to conversions,” he said. Council President Lloyd Martin concurred with the argument for the summer extension. “It does make sense to have you work through the summer because all the residents will be available at that time,” he said. “In the winter, as we know, … some of the people aren’t there.” Councilwoman Mary Knight noted

the economic benefits of hastening reduced utility rates by having the conversion completed faster than anticipated. “Right now it’s a combination of natural gas and propane,” she said. “At the end of this project it will be 95 percent natural gas, so our residents and non-residential taxpayers, hopefully, will experience a decrease in their cost sooner than originally projected.” Besides economic perks, Ashcraft said natural gas provides environmental advantages through reduced carbon footprints. “When Ocean City is fully switched to natural gas over 3.5 million gallons of propane will be displaced reducing the CO2 emissions by over 3,700 tons,” he said. “It’s going to be the emissions equivalent of taking 1,200 cars off the road when we finish.”

WORLD WAR II

Slovak Republic, Hungary enter into their ‘Little War’ By Peter Ayers Wimbrow III Contributing Writer (March 29, 2019) This week, 80 years ago, the new Slovak Republic and its neighbor, the Kingdom of Hungary, executed a treaty in Budapest ending “The Little War.” It hadn’t lasted long, and not many people were killed. Hungary achieved a border with Poland, which both countries had desired since the end of The Great War. British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain observed that it was but a part of, “...the readjustment of frontiers laid down in the Treaty of Versailles.” He speculated that the Treaty’s drafters expected, “... that from time to time the frontiers would have to be adjusted.” The Slovak Republic had only been an independent state less than 10 days when it was attacked, without a declaration of war, by its much larger neighbor, the Kingdom of Hungary. On March 14, the Slovak Parliament proclaimed Slovakia’s independence. The next day, Hungary, following Germany’s lead, recognized its independence. However, it had already begun preparations for war with the fledgling country. The VII Hungarian Army Corps, commanded by Lt. Gen. András Littay, was moving into position to attack Slovakia. Gen. Littay later served as the deputy minister of Defense for Hungary. On May 1, 1943, Gen. Littay retired. After the war, he emigrated to Australia and died in Melbourne in 1967. On March 17, the Hungarian Foreign Ministry informed Germany that Hungary wanted to negotiate its

boundary with the Slovak Republic. The next day, Slovakian representatives traveled to Vienna to execute a treaty of protection with the German Reich. However, it would not be effective until March 23, when it was to be signed by Joachim von Ribbentrop, reichsminister of foreign affairs, in Berlin. The Treaty extended German protection to the Slovak Republic. Knowing that, Gen. Littay launched his forces against SloLt. Gen. András Littay vakia at dawn on March 23, six hours before the reichsminister executed the treaty of protection in Berlin. The Slovakians were caught flatfooted. First, they had not expected an attack from their neighbor. They had just completed, in November 1938, an Arbitration — “The First Vienna Diktat” — which awarded Hungary significant amounts of Slovakian territory. The Slovakians thought that was it. In addition, they had only recently separated from the Czech portion of Czecho-Slovakia. Their forces were being realigned. In other words, Czech soldiers were leaving Slovakia, and returning to the Czech Protectorate, while Slovakian soldiers were leaving the Czech Protectorate, and returning to the new Slovak Republic. A third reason for Slovakian unpreparedness was that some of the Czechs had sabotaged some of the Continued on Page 57


MARCH 29, 2019

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PAGE 57

WORLD WAR II Continued from Page 56 equipment, which was being left to the Slovak Republic. Fourth, the Slovaks, thought that with the German Protection, they had nothing to fear from anyone. Slovakian forces facing the invaders were under the command of Lt. Gen. Augustíne Malár. Although Germany would award him the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross for his service during the war with the Soviet Union, he ended the war at the Sachsenhausen Concentration Camp where he died after a severe case of interrogation. The next day, the Slovaks, counterattacked with armored cars and in-

fantry near the 600-year old village of Závadka and drove the invaders back to the River Okna. However, at about 11 p.m.s, the Slovaks ran into an artillery barrage, which knocked out a couple of their armored cars. The infantry panicked and retreated over nine miles to the small city of Michalovce, located on Lake Šírava, on the Ukrainian border. Today, the city has a population of 40,000. For the prior 1000 years, until the Treaty of Trianon, it had been a part of Hungary. At Michalovce, the Slovaks received reinforcements of four more armored cars, three light tanks, and a 37mm anti-tank cannon. The follow-

ing day, the reinforced Slovaks headed east, toward the Hungarians, once again. Just about the time that Slovaks did deliver their blow, a cease fire was announced. The Hungarians had suffered 8 military and 15 civilian deaths, and 55 injured, while the Slovaks had suffered 22 military and 36 civilian deaths, along with 360 captured. Additionally, there were 311 Czech prisoners. For this, the Slovak Republic was forced to cede a strip of its territory in the eastern part of the country, in a treaty signed on April 4, 1939, in Budapest. The lost territory contained 69,930 inhabitants, in 386 square miles. The

Hungarians also acquired three rail lines connecting it with its new neighbor, Poland. Within two years, the two countries would be allied with Germany, Italy and Romania in their assault on the U.S.S.R. In December 1941, all would join the Japanese Empire and declare war on the United States. Next week: Conquest of Albania Mr. Wimbrow writes from Ocean City, Maryland, where he practices law representing those persons accused of criminal and traffic offenses, and those persons who have suffered a personal injury through no fault of their own. He can be contacted at: wimbrowlaw@gmail.com.

A Memorial Service will immediately follow in the Fellowship Hall beginning at noon. We welcome all who knew and loved her to join us in celebrating the life of Frieda Anna Bruce.

After graduating from Davis and Elkins he immediately joined the U.S. Marines and spent 17 months in Okinawa, Japan. He received an honorable discharge John Niblett from the Marines and met and married the love of his life, Kathryn Ann Schaube. They moved to Bloomfield, New Jersey, where he took a teaching job at North Junior High School where he taught physical education and

health. He coached the varsity soccer team and basketball teams during his tenure at NJHS. He then moved to the Bloomfield High School, where he taught and coached the varsity basketball team. He retired in 1991. Dick also coached baseball for the Verona Recreation Department for many years after moving to Verona in 1965. His coaching days in Verona continued to be a highlight of his summer away from teaching. Upon retirement, Mr. Niblett Continued on Page 58

OBITUARIES FRIEDA A. BRUCE Ocean Pines Frieda A. Bruce, age 102, of Ocean Pines and formerly of Baltimore, passed away on Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019. Born in Baltimore, she was the daughter of the late Frederick and Anna (Schultz) Sadofsky. Frieda was a secretary at United Iron Frieda Bruce and Metal before retiring to the Eastern Shore in 1975 alongside her husband of 51 years who proceeded her in death, Gifford H. Bruce. Frieda loved spending time with her family and always looked forward to her weekly visit with her dear friend, Joel Gorgodian, who shared in her passion for singing, laughter and good wine. Frieda had lost her eyesight and become housebound during her final years but always remained a devoted member of Atlantic United Methodist Church of Ocean City. In addition to her parents and her husband, she was proceeded in death by her sons, Wayne and Larry. She is survived by her daughter, Linda Bruce of Ocean Pines. She was an adored grandmother to Kim Armstrong of York, Pennsylvania, Kieth Nicholls and his wife, Bonnie, of Westminister, and Ryan Bruce and his family of Wilmington, Delaware. She was great-grandmother to Brendan Byrne and his fiancé, Brittany Wilkerson, of Ocean Pines, Zachary Armstrong and his fiancé, Alisa Markley, of York, Pennsylvania, Faye Holland and her husband, Daniel, of Pittsville, and AJ Armstrong and his wife, Noel, of Glen Burnie, and great-great-grandmother to Kylie, Addison, Natalie, Layne, Trace and Cadence. Please join our family on Sunday, March 31, 2019, in attending the Traditional Worship Service from 10:3011:30 a.m. at Atlantic United Methodist Church, Fourth Street, Ocean City, Maryland.

JOHN R. NIBLETT Berlin John R. (Dick) Niblett grew up in Salisbury, Maryland. He was a basketball standout at Wicomico High School and went on to attend Davis and Elkins College in Elkins, West Virginia, on a basketball scholarship.


PAGE 58

Ocean City Today

MARCH 29, 2019

OBITUARIES Continued from Page 57 moved with his wife, Kathryn, to Ocean Pines, Maryland, where he continued his love of sports and focused on golf. He played golf with his new friends and enjoyed retirement to the fullest. Dick is survived by his wife Kathryn (nee Schaube); daughters, Kimberly (Paul Heverly) Basko and Pamela Alstede; and grandchildren, Alyssa Basko, Breanne Basko Smith (Charles) and Justin Alstede. He is preceded in death by his parents, Flora M. Newton and John Sidney Niblett; and sibling, Norman Niblett. A gathering will be held on Saturday, March 30, 2019 at the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin, Maryland from 2-4 p.m. Letters of condolence may be sent to the family at www.burbagefuneralhome.com. EDWARD LINSKILL WARREN EHART Salisbury Edward Linskill Warren Ehart, age 76, died on Monday, March 18, 2019, at Coastal Hospice at the Lake in Salisbury, Maryland. Born in Wilmington, Delaware, he was the only child of the Rev. Dr. Edward H. Ehart, Jr., and Grace Holden Ehart. He is survived by his court–appointed guardian, the Rev. Nathaniel W. Pierce of Trappe, Maryland, and his good friend of 25 years, Mr. Robert K. Sellers of Cambridge, Maryland. Ed Lin graduated from the Lenox School for Boys (Lenox, Massachusetts) in 1960. He was the entertainment editor of the school newspaper, Pen and Scroll, worked in the “Tuckshop,” and in his senior year was appointed a Prefect (student leader). He was known among his friends as “someone who always looked for the best in everything and was sel-

dom disappointed.” After he completed his freshman year at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut, he was struck by a hitand-run driver at 19 years of age. Subsequently, he spent much of the rest of his life in various institutions for the disabled. Ed Lin often expressed a desire to become a teacher. He studied the Bible and the works of Shakespeare and Thoreau, often quoting passages from memory. He found many colorful ways to express himself to others. As he lived with his difficulties, he taught those around him to live each day with grace. A graveside service was held on Sunday, March 24, 2019 at the St. Paul’s Episcopal Churchyard in Berlin, Maryland. The Rev. Michael Moyer officiated. A donation in his memory may be made to: St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, P.O. Box 429, Berlin, Maryland, 21811, or to Berlin Paramedics, 214 Main St., Berlin, Maryland, 21811. Letters of condolence may be sent via: www.burbagefuneralhome.com. Arrangements have been entrusted to the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin. SHEILA MARIE HODGES Ocean Pines Sheila Marie Hodges, age 80, passed away peacefully with her family gathered around her on Wednesday, March 20, 2019, at her home in Ocean Pines, Maryland. Born in Washington, D.C., Sheila was the daughter of the late Wilfred D. and Patrice Rice Howell. She is survived by her beloved husband of 60 years, Leonard F. Hodges; daughters, Sharon Repass (Matt), Helen Croghan, Joan Bauk (Daniel), Carolyn Bergamini (Peter) and Maureen Slay (Alan); and son, Brian (Michele); grandchildren, Megan and Michele Repass, Riley and Marie

Croghan, Lauren, Colleen, Patrick and Christine Bauk, Christine and Paul Bergamini, Ryan and Katie Slay, Joe and Johnny Hodges. Her sister, Karen Sheila Hodges Ehlerman, preceded Sheila in death. She is survived by her siblings, John Dennis Howell (Linda), Damien Howell (Lynn), Patrice Howell, and Gael Weiss (Alan). As a young girl, Sheila was a competitive swimmer and spent her summers on the Severn River with the Sherwood Forest Club. She was a graduate of The Academy of the Holy Cross High School on Upton Street, NW (1956) and The Washington School for Secretaries (1957). While raising six children, Sheila began a successful career in real estate in 1972 in Montgomery County. She continued to enjoy her career in Ocean Pines, Maryland when she relocated there in 2000. Sheila was employed with Shamrock Realty, Berlin, Maryland, until her passing. Sheila was passionate about helping others. Over the years, she was a Eucharistic Minister of St. John Neumann Catholic Church in Berlin, Maryland, and a volunteer for Meals on Wheels and AGH Hospital. Sheila initiated an annual coat drive to ensure that warm coats were collected and given to those in need. Sheila had a passion for gardening and you could find her planting flowers and vegetables as spring arrived each year. Friends and relatives were received at Holy Savior Catholic Church in Ocean City, Maryland on Wednesday, March 27, 2019, followed by a Mass of Christian Burial. Interment in Garden of the Pines Cemetery was private for the family.

Melson’s Funeral Services & Cremation Services

Frankford Chapel

Long Neck Chapel

Ocean View Chapel

43 Thatcher Street Frankford, DE

32013 Long Neck Road Millsboro, DE

38040 Muddy Neck Road Ocean View, DE

302.732.9000

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A donation in her memory may be made to: Little Sisters of the Poor, 4200 Harewood, Rd., NE Washington, D.C., 20017-1554; Diakonia, 12747 Old Bridge Rd., Ocean City, Maryland 21842; or Coastal Hospice, P.O. Box 1733, Salisbury, Maryland 21802 (www.coastalhospice.org). Please sign the family online guestbook: www.burbagefuneralhome.com. BETTY LOIS MEADOWS Ocean Pines Betty Lois Meadows, 90, of Ocean Pines, Maryland, died Sunday, March 24, 2019, at home following a sudden illness. She was a lifelong Christian and a retired Librarian Assistant of the West Virginia Library Commission. Betty graduated Summa Cum Betty Meadows Laude from West Virginia State University with a Bachelor of Arts. She was the daughter of Samuel B. Clark and Verna Hood Clark, of Beckley. She was preceded in death by her parents; her beloved sisters and brothers; a son, Philip Kaye Meadows, of Beckley; and a former husband, Willie Kenneth Meadows, of Daniels. She is survived by a daughter, Sharon Meadows Santacroce, of Ocean Pines, Maryland, and her husband, Greg Santacroce; a son, Michael Keith Meadows, of Charleston, and his wife, Kathy Barnett; a grandson, Philip Keith Meadows, of Hurricane, and his wife, Dr. Shannon Carpenter; two greatgranddaughters, Charlotte Meadows and Samantha Meadows, both of Hurricane; several nieces and nephews including special nephews, William Hartley, of Beckley, and Steve Clark (wife Teresa) of Proctorville, Ohio. Funeral arrangements are pending with services to be held at Melton Mortuary in Beckley, West Virginia and burial at Sunset Memorial Park of Beckley, West Virginia. Letters of condolence may be sent to the family at www.burbagefuneralhome.com. EDWARD THORNTON DREW Bishopville Edward “Eddie” Thornton Drew, of Bishopville, Maryland, died peacefully in his home on Wednesday, March 20, 2019. Edward was born on Nov. 2, 1949 in Millville, Delaware, to the late Orlando M., Sr. and Eleanor C. (Thornton) Drew. He received his formal education at William C. Jason Comprehensive High School in Georgetown, Delaware. Eddie met the love of his life, Gracie Ann Dennis, during his senior


MARCH 29, 2019

Ocean City Today

PAGE 59

OBITUARIES year of high school and on March 25, 1967. The two sealed their love and would have been married for 52 years. He had a 34-year career with the State Edward Drew of Maryland and Wicomico County Department of Corrections along with Homeland Security. He was preceded in death by his loving wife, Gracie Ann (Dennis) Drew. He leaves to cherish his memory, his son, Leonard E. “Lenny” Drew, of Bishopville, Maryland; one grandson, Michael Drew, of Princess Anne, Maryland; two great-grandsons, Mahki and Roman Drew, of Salisbury, Maryland; two sisters, Catherine Walters and Rev. C. Claudia (Morris) Waters, both of Clarksville, Delaware; two brothers, Dr. Martin (Sharon) Drew, of Smyrna, Delaware and James (Vanessa) Deloach, of Millsboro, Delaware; one aunt, Loretta Chaudry, of Dover, Delaware; mother and father-in-law, Audrey and Leonard Smith, of College Park, Maryland; one sister-in-law, Cynthia Drew, of Dover, Delaware; two brothers-in-law, Morrison (Beverly) Dennis and Monroe Dennis, both of College Park, Maryland, and a host of nieces, nephews, cousins and friends. A funeral service was held on Monday, March 25, 2019 at Union Wesley Church in Clarksville, Delaware. Burial followed in Evergreen Cemetery in Berlin, Maryland. Electronic condolences via www.watsonfh.com. SALLY LEE FILLING (KLEMM) Ocean City Sally Lee Filling (Klemm), age 71, of Ocean City, Maryland, passed away peacefully on March 18, 2019, surrounded by her three children in her eldest son’s home in The Plains, Virginia. She was born to the late Ernest and Norma Klemm on June 25, 1947 in Baltimore. Sally graduated from Eastern High School in Baltimore before attending the Community College of Baltimore where she received her Associates Degree in Art. She was a very talented artist. Some of the ways she expressed herself artistically were through designing hats and floral arrangements, creating unique Halloween costumes for her children and grandchildren, planning special events, and her penmanship was beautiful. Sally lived a full life being a wonderful homemaker and raising her children. After her children were grown, she worked as a floral designer at Forthubers, Flowers by Jane, and Windsor’s Flowers. OC Sal had strong ties to Ocean City, Maryland, spending each summer vacation there as a child. Loving

the beach so much she continued the tradition with her own family. As she got older, Sally’s dream of living at the beach came true. She socialized Sally Filling with wonderful friends, played cards and pickle ball, line danced, and smelt the salty air with her toes in the sand. Sally was an amazing cook teaching all three of her children to follow in her footsteps. Friends and family were Sally’s delight. She threw her children the most wonderful birthday parties, made every holiday special with close family and friends, and loved entertaining guests. Sally is survived by her eldest son, Scott Filling and his wife Cindy, The Plains, Virginia; her youngest son, Josh Filling, his wife, Rosie, and their two daughters, Marlee and Chloe, Chester Springs, Pennsylvania; and her daughter, Kimberly Tobat, her husband, Kevin, and their twin daughters, Julieanne and Madison, East New Market, Maryland. Sally is also survived by her younger brother, Phillip Klemm, and his wife Debbie, and nephew, Christopher. She was preceded in death by her nephew, Kyle. A memorial service will be held on

Saturday, April 6, 2019 at 11a.m. at St. Matthews by the Sea United Methodist Church, located at 1000 Coastal Hwy, Fenwick Island, Delaware 19944. Immediately following the service and luncheon there will be a celebration of Sally’s life at Northside Park Recreation Center located bayside at 125th Street, Ocean City, Maryland 21842. The family asks that in lieu of flowers, donations be made to provide financial medical support for Ernie Perryman, Sally’s childhood friend, who cared for Sally two different times during her recovery and is now battling similar cancers herself. Josh Filling, will be collecting funds for Ernie and donations can be mailed to: 2555 Veronica, Dr., Chester Springs, Pennsylvania 19425. Donations in Sally’s memory can also be made to St. Matthew’s by the Sea. ROBERT JOHN BIGLER Ocean Pines Robert John Bigler, “Bob,” age 71, died on Thursday, March 14, 2019 at Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury. Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, he was the son of the late Cloyd M. and Hazel Rickards Bigler. He is survived by his wife of 50 years, Beverly Lawton Bigler. Also surviving is a brother, Roland Allen and several nieces and nephews.

After college graduation, Mr. Bigler was employed as an audit supervisor for the Department of Defense.(DCAA) Drafted in 1969, he joined the Air Force, Robert Bigler and was stationed at four different bases all over the U.S. After four years of service, he returned to his job at DCAA until he retired. During his years there, he and his family lived in Crofton where he and a friend established the Crofton Jaycees and staged many events throughout the years, notably, bathtub races, and softball games on old Hardy Field. He was also an avid bowler. After retiring, he and Beverly moved to Ocean Pines, where he enjoyed working in his yard and gardens. A funeral service will be held on Friday, March 29, 2019 at 2 p.m. at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Berlin. Rev. Michael Moyer will officiate. Interment will follow in the Churchyard. A donation in his memory may be made to: Worcester County Veteran’s Memorial Fund, 11144 Cathell Rd., Berlin, Maryland 21811. Letters of condolence may be sent via: www.burbagefuneralhome.com. Arrangements are in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin.


PAGE 60

MARCH 29, 2019

Ocean City Today

REAL ESTATE MARKETPLACE THE HOME YOU’VE BEEN LOOKING FOR

WHEN ONLY THE BEST WILL DO!!!

407 SANDY HILL DRIVE

7001 ATLANTIC AVE. UNIT #102

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You can stop looking after you see this 2-bedroom, 2-bath vacation getaway. Located in one of the best communities in Ocean City, offering 3pools, 2-tennis courts, 2-shuffleboard courts and a miniature golf course. You can relax and unwind on the large porch after a day at the beach . The yard is the perfect place for summer time BBQ’s while you enjoy family and friends. Offered at JUST $154,900. Don’t wait. Now for a L@@K today.

BEST VIEW AND LOCATION At The Beach! Enjoy the sounds of the ocean from your balcony while having coffee or tea in the morning or a relaxing glass of wine in the evening from the first floor DIRECT OCEAN FRONT private balcony. It will be love at first sight and it is Movein Ready. It was not Rented out but you can if you want to. There is plenty of room for family and friends to enjoy. It has been completely redone with repainted walls, new carpet, new stainless steel frost free refrigerator, new stainless steel built-in microwave oven, new stainless steel electric radiant range with self cleaning oven, new stainless steel dishwasher, Garbage disposal and full size washer & dryer. It will be your perfect getaway, just steps to the beach. Sold furnished in excellent condition. The building has a very strong condo association. Assigned Parking Place. SOLD FURNISHED FOR $224,750!! Take A Look At This Property Before You Make Your Final Decision To Buy Your Castle In The Sand!!!

Larry Holdren Real Estate, Inc©

Larry Holdren Real Estate, Inc©

13901 Coastal Hwy., Suite 8, Ocean City, MD

13901 Coastal Hwy., Suite 8, Ocean City, MD

For More Information Call 800-252-2223 • 410-250-2700

For More Information Call 800-252-2223 • 410-250-2700

www.larryholdrenrealestate.com • email: ocmdhre@gmail.com

www.larryholdrenrealestate.com • email: ocmdhre@gmail.com

BAYSIDE CONDO

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This 2BR/2BA condo is just 3 years old and is steps away from the beach and busline. Features include a porch offering views of the bay, an open floorplan, a large breakfast bar, a fully equipped kitchen and central heating & cooling. Amenities include an outside pool, boat slips, a boat ramp, a private bayfront beach and an abundance of off-street parking. Listed at $239,000.

Call Michael “Montego Mike” Grimes

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This residential buildable lot is located in the Montego Bay community in N. Ocean City. It is one of the largest lots in the community and is zoned for mobile, modular or stick-built construction. Community amenities include pools, tennis, shuffleboard, min. golf, a bayfront boardwalk and more. HOA dues are just $247.50/yr. Listed at $143,500.

Montego Bay Realty

Call Michael “Montego Mike” Grimes

montegomike@verizon.net www.montegobayrealty.com

108 S. Ocean Drive • Ocean City, MD

108 S. Ocean Drive • Ocean City, MD

800-745-5988 • 410-250-3020

401 SANDY HILL DRIVE

Montego Bay Realty montegomike@verizon.net www.montegobayrealty.com

Mar. 28 - Apr. 4 DAY/TIME Daily Sat-Mon, 11-4pm

ADDRESS

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Assateague Point., Berlin

1BR/2BR/3BR

Mobile

From $100,000

Tony Matrona/Resort Homes

Condo, Towns & SF

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Heron Harbour, 120th St., Bayside 1BR/2/BR/3BR/4/BR+

Sat. & Sun. 11-2pm

Muirfield Lane., River Run

3-4BR/2-3.5BA

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$399,900–$479,900

Ed Wehnert/Coldwell Banker

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From $299,900

Kathleen Clark/Monogram Realty

Saturday 11-1pm

120 70th St., 1 Bruff Isle

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$465,000

Lauren Waesche/Century 21 New Horizon

Saturday 12-3pm

2 Bimini Lane, Ocean Pines

4-5BR/2.5BA

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$357,900

Billy Barr/Keller Williams

Sunday 11-2pm

84th St #6, Surfside 84-2C

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Billy Barr/Keller Williams

Saturday 11-2

28 Grand Port Rd., Ocean Pines

3BR/2BA

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$499,500

John Houk/Berkshire Hathaway PenFed

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132 Park Side Crl., Ocean Pines

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LaTerra Wise/Berkshire Hathaway PenFed

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827 Little John Dr., Salisbury

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Mark Decker/Berkshire Hathaway PenFed

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710 94th St. #106, .Ocean City

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Dan O’Hare/Berkshire Hathaway PenFed

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2 Burlington Ct., The Parke – OP

2BR/2BA

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Cameron Drew/PO2-Hileman

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20 Sandyhook Rd., Ocean Pines

3BR/BA

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Anna Spann/PO2-Hileman

Presented free as a courtesy to Licensed REALTORS® who are regular Ocean City Today & Bayside Gazette Advertisers. For all other REALTORS®, there is a weekly charge of $10 per listing.


Sports & Recreation

Ocean City Today Mar. 29, 2019

Page 61

www.oceancitytoday.com

WORCESTER PREP SPRING SPORTS PREVIEW

Worcester Prep tennis teams experienced, deep with talent (March 29, 2019) The Worcester Prep boys’ and girls’ tennis teams both went undefeated in 2018 and swept the Eastern Shore Independent Athletic Conference championship tournament singles and doubles competitions. Both squads have a good chance to be just as successful this year with the talent each group has. Ten of the 16 girls on Coach Cyndee Hudson’s roster competed last season, when the team went 16-0. Junior Annika Larsen is a two-time Cyndee Hudson ESIAC singles champion. With those victories, she was named Conference Player of the Year in 2017 and 2018. She will be playing in the second singles position this season. “I’m extremely excited. I really like tennis, [but] I don’t get to play a lot throughout the year because I do other activities,” Larsen said. “I’d like to be undefeated. I tried T. Underkoffler last year and I was close. I lost only two times, and hopefully making my way back to the ESIAC [championship finals].” Larsen said she will use her experience to help the underclassmen learn the game and improve their skills, as well provide moral support and cheer them on. “We all kind of give each other tips and advice,” she said. “A lot of new people tried out this year. We have to teach them a lot of rules and general stuff, because a lot of them haven’t played a ton, but are already getting better.” Juniors Saylar McGuiness and Mesa Cammack are two-time ESIAC doubles champions. This will be their third season as doubles partners. They received All-ESIAC honors last season, along with Larsen and Abi Plylar. Plylar, a junior, will play first singles for Worcester. Sophomore Summer Walker also returns and will take the court at No. 4 singles. Freshman Sumira Sehgal is new to the team and will compete in the third singles spot. Maya Natesan is the only senior on

the team. She will play fifth singles. A member of the team since she was a freshman, Natesan said as a captain she plans to get everyone pumped up for the matches, and to always have a positive attitude. “It’s all about having a good mindset when playing,” she said. “Everyone is getting excited with matches coming up, and I think that’s just motivating us to improve. “I’m looking forward to the season,” she continued. “It’s been a great time. Ms. Hudson and Ms. [Debbie] Speier have been incredible coaches throughout the four years I’ve been playing, and I wouldn’t have become a tennis player without them.” Hudson, now in her 19th season coaching the girls, said many of the players have been in starting spots for several years. “Our strength is definitely in their experience. A number of girls this is their third year in starting positions,” she said. “The girls are eager and they want to improve and learn, but in game situations they’re already experienced.” Hudson said the new players are improving their skills and adjusting to the team nicely. The goals, Hudson said, are to be competitive in every match and continue to improve as the season goes on. The Lady Mallards are also shooting for another ESIAC title. Coach Terry Underkoffler has 16 players on his roster this year. Fourteen of them competed in 2018, when the team went 12-0. “We have a lot of depth,” Underkoffler, who has led the boys’ team for five seasons, said. “We’re good all-around. We have a good balance with singles and doubles. I really don’t see a weakness.” The team also has strong senior leadership, he said, as just about all have been playing for Worcester for four years. Senior Dominic Anthony captured the ESIAC singles title last year and was named Player of the Year. He and senior Will Todd, who was runner-up, will again battle for the No. 1 position on the court this season. Both are captains and have been on the team since they were freshmen. They will use their experience to lead the group and help the younger players. “We have a lot of freshmen on our team and what’s going to be key is keeping a level head in a match. That’s something I’ve learned from coach,”

LISA CAPITELLI/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Worcester Prep junior Annika Larsen, a two-time ESIAC singles champion, and senior captain Will Todd are both back to compete and help lead their respective teams.

Anthony said. “I think we’re coming along really well. I think this is one of the strongest teams we’ve had. “I want to thank Coach Underkoffler and [Assistant] Coach [Tim McMullen]. They’ve really helped me grow throughout my tennis years,” he added. Todd also thinks the players are doing well so far. “I think, with my experience on the team, I should be able to guide some of the younger players and hopefully lead the team to a successful year,” he said. “I think we’re looking really good this year. I wouldn’t be surprised if we had another undefeated year.” Anthony and Todd will play first or second singles, and senior Graham Hammond, also a captain, will be in the No. 3 spot. Sophomores Ryan Brafman and Ben Brandt were doubles teammates last year. They will play fourth and fifth singles, respectively, this season. Senior captain Colin Miller will team up for doubles competition with senior Cameron Hill. Miller won the ESIAC double title in 2018 playing with his brother, Brendan, who graduated. Anthony, Todd, Miller, Hammond and Hill received All-ESIAC honors for their performance during the 2018 season. Underkoffler said his four captains are good role models for the younger players and they work hard. They also conduct themselves exemplary off the court. Junior Frank Carter and sophomore Joe Schwartz will take the court as second doubles. Underkoffler said the goals are to

improve throughout the season, which should be easy because they are playing against strong competition during practice. Worcester opened its season on Wednesday against the Indian River Indians in Ocean Pines. All home matches will be played in Ocean Pines this season. The Lady Mallards won 6-1. Plylar shut out her first singles opponent, 8-0. Sehgal (8-3), Walker (8-3) and Natesan (8-0) scored victories at third through fifth singles, respectively. McGuiness and Cammack shut out their first doubles competition, 8-0. Indian River forfeited the second doubles match. “It was a great match to start out the season,” Hudson said. It was a chance to get the kinks out and for the new players to see how a tennis competition runs, she added. The boys’ team also won 6-1. Several Mallards trailed during their matches, but battled back and were successful. “They adjusted and played their game,” Underkoffler said. “They were resilient. Overall, I was very pleased with how the guys adapted.” Anthony (8-1), Todd (8-0) and Hammond (8-6) earned victories at first through third singles, respectively. Hammond was trailing 2-5, but prevailed. Schwartz also came from behind to win 8-5 at fifth singles. Trailing 3-4, Miller and senior Parker Brandt battled back and took the next four games to win 8-4 at first doubles. Carter and senior Alex Canakis outscored their second doubles opponent, 8-3.


PAGE 62

Ocean City Today

MARCH 29, 2019

WORCESTER PREP SPRING SPORTS PREVIEW

Moeser takes over Worcester Prep boys’ lacrosse program By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (March 29, 2019) John Moeser had a successful season leading the Worcester Prep varsity boys’ basketball program for the first time this winter. He is also the new coach of the school’s boys’ lacrosse team. After 23 years as a teacher and coach at Calvert Hall in Baltimore, Moeser made the move to the Eastern Shore. When he interviewed for the boys’ lacrosse head John Moeser coach position, he learned the basketball coach job was open as well. He was hired for both. A handful of the boys on the lacrosse team played basketball for Moeser over the winter, which made the transition from one sport to the next a little smoother, because they knew what to expect from the new coach. He also knew some of the boys from subbing at Worcester. “They know how I operate,” Moeser said. “They bought into the system and they’re playing well. They’re very coachable.” Worcester alums Garvey Heiderman and Stephen Pappas, as well as Tom Incontrera, join him. “It’s an experienced staff that’s been around the game,” Moeser said. “They know the game from the player and coaches perspective.” Moeser said they are focusing on paying attention to detail and fundamentals and working to break bad habits. “It’s the little things that will help you win games,” Moeser said. “There’s new drills and a new approach to things and they’re handling

it well. We’re trying to maintain intensity in practice.” Moeser has 26 players on his roster. Nineteen of them are veterans and are joined by seven freshmen this season. Worcester went 6-6 last year. The Mallards earned the Eastern Shore Independent Athletic Conference regular-season title. There was no ESIAC championship game last year. Worcester also competes in the Metro Independent Lacrosse League. The team’s season ended in the MILL semifinals. Moeser said the team has experience in the starting lineup, as five of the 10 are seniors. “We’re going to depend on the upperclassmen,” he said. The attack will be led by seniors, Moeser said, which includes Alec Dembeck, a captain, Owen Tunis and Jay Gosnear. Dembeck finished second in scoring last year, with 22 goals. He also had nine assists. Dembeck received All-ESIAC honors. Tunis earned honorable mention accolades. Sophomore Graham McColgan and the Moore brothers Dakin, a senior, and Brugh, a sophomore, will play in the midfield. Moeser said the team is solid in the defensive end backed up by a strong goalie, sophomore Hunter Gentry. “We have a lot of returning defensemen with field experience,” he said, including senior captains Cole Berry and Cooper Richins (long stick midfield). Freshman Brice Richins will also play defense. “I feel like I’ve become a pretty good voice for the defense and our younger goalie, helping him step up See SMOOTH Page 64

LISA CAPITELLI/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Worcester Prep senior Cooper Richins, a long stick midfielder, will help lead the team as one of four captains this season.

Worcester Prep junior captain Carly Hoffman scored 42 goals in 2018 and was named ESIAC co-Player of the Year. She scored three of Worcester’s eight goals on Wednesday. LISA CAPITELLI/ OCEAN CITY TODAY

Williams new WP girls’ lax coach By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (March 29, 2019) Chris Williams was the coach of the Worcester Prep Middle School program for three seasons and this year he has taken over the girls’ varsity team. He has coached most of the girls’ on his squad before, which made the transition from middle school to varsity go smoothly. “I’m beyond excited to have the chance to Chris Williams coach these girls,” he said. “I want these girls to have their best season of lacrosse ever, beyond wins. I want them to get better at something every day and have no regrets at the end of the season.” Williams said his core values are the same, he just had to change his style a bit. Last year he was named a national finalist for the Positive Coaching Alliance Double-Goal Coach Award. He was selected from nearly 800 nominations nationwide. Williams won the Mid-Atlantic level award. Positive Coaching Alliance honors youth and high school coaches annually who embody the ideals of Double-Goal Coach who strive to win while also pursuing the goal of teaching life lessons through sports. “That’s my core belief as a coach,” Williams said. “It’s a balance of the de-

sire and need to win, with also the goal to develop players into the best they came be. It’s not about winning at all cost, although it is important [to win]. We’re trying to make them better people through the game of lacrosse.” Williams is also a Beach Lacrosse and Saltwater Lacrosse Club coach. He is the director of girls’ lacrosse and on the board of directors for both organizations. Kip Koolage, who was with the team last year, assists him. Kyra Gangemi is the JV head coach and will also assist with varsity. Eleven of the 23 players on Williams’ roster competed in 2018, when the team went 13-3. The Lady Mallards captured their sixth Eastern Shore Independent Athletic Conference tournament title in 2018. Williams said the team is deep with talent and a close-knit group. The girls are supportive of each other, he added. “Mistakes are OK,” he said, but he wants the girls to learn from them. “We’ve got some great senior leadership. Some of them have been playing a long time and they’re very skilled players,” Williams said. “We have a strong junior class as well. The upperclassmen are the strength of this team. We’ve got skill and leadership across the board.” There are captains on the attack, midfield and defensive lines. “We have leadership at every position,” Williams said. “The captains are an See WILLIAMS Page 63


MARCH 29, 2019

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Ocean City Today

Williams ‘blown away’ with development so far Continued from Page 62 extension of the coaching staff on and off the field.” Leading the team as captains are seniors Chloe Ruddo (defense), Gracie Gardner (attack) and Delaney Abercrombie (midfield), and junior Carly Hoffman (midfield). “We have a lot of returning varsity players, which is exciting. Hopefully I’ll be in good enough shape to help out on defense and offense, and get the ball up the field,” Abercrombie said. She has been a member of the team since she was a freshman. “I think we definitely want to become really close as a team,

that’s always a goal, and just being able to improve and have fun.” Ruddo has also been on the team since her freshman year. She will help lead the group with her experience and her voice. “I’m more of a talkative leader,” Ruddo said. “We lost a lot of players last year, especially on defense, so it’s kind of a learning period for us. “I like playing low [defense] because I’m very educated in the game and, playing so far back, I can see the whole field and help direct [teammates], and kind of help the goalie,” she added. “It might take us a little bit to get into a rhythm but, when we do, I think it will be good.”

Hoffman scored 42 goals and had nine assists last year. She won 96 draws and scooped up 26 ground balls. She was named ESIAC co-Player of the Year. Hoffman, Abercrombie and Gardner received All-ESIAC accolades for their performance last year. Ruddo earned honorable mention distinction. Junior Madison VanOrden also returns and will play in the midfield. She took home All-ESIAC honors last season. Juniors Abbi Nechay and Aly Matha will play on the attack and Quinn McColgan in the midfield/defense. Senior Clare DeMallie and sophomore CC Lizas will split time in the goal.

“Both have played phenomenally well,” Williams said. “We’re equally confident in both of them.” Freshman Myranda Beebe is new to the team, but she will contribute in the midfield and on the attack. Beebe played for Williams last year. She was the middle school team’s leading scorer (46 goals and 23 assists) and MVP. Team goals this year include winning another ESIAC championship. “That’s always the goal and just to get closer as a team,” Ruddo said. “I’ve been blown away with the development so far. They’ve really bought into what we’re trying to do,” Williams said. “I’m confident we’re going to surprise a lot of teams this year. I wouldn’t take our team lightly.”

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Ocean City Today

MARCH 29, 2019

WORCESTER PREP SPRING SPORTS PREVIEW

Smooth transition for Moeser

LISA CAPITELLI/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Stephen Decatur sophomore Micah Bourne (82) and senior Sofia Gordy (8-1) both won their third singles matches on Tuesday against Wicomico in Berlin.

Continued from Page 62 and giving him and the younger kids some confidence in their game,” Berry said. “I’m able to see everything and communicate with the rest of the team on what’s happening, who’s going to slide [and] who’s going to guard who.” Both Berry and Richins have been on the team since they were freshmen. “I think I’ll be able to lead by example. Being around here four years, I know what it takes to win our conference, win games, and I think I’ll be able to help our team,” Richins said. “On the field my role as a long sticky middy, I’m playing a little bit of offense and a little bit of defense as well. I’ll be able to help out on both ends of the field, talking to our defenders, talking to our goalie and being able to communicate and work with our offense and face-off group as well.” Richins, Berry, Gentry and McColgan were presented All-ESIAC hon-

ors for their performance during the 2018 season. Richins was also named to the AllMILL First Team. Berry took home a Second Team award. Gentry and Dembeck received MILL honorable mention distinction. Worcester gets into the swing of things fast a furious, with three games a week over the next few weeks. “It’s been a good transition. It’s been fun,” Moeser said. “I’m fortunate to have the opportunity to coach here. I’m looking forward to [the season].” The Mallards hope to lead the ESIAC this year and advance to the MILL championship game, which they have yet to accomplish. “Getting a MILL championship, that would be a cool experience to be the first team to do that,” Berry said. “I’m really excited. I think it will be a great year,” Richins added.

Decatur tennis teams start season with wins By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (March 29, 2019) The Stephen Decatur tennis teams opened the season with victories over two Bayside Conference opponents. The Decatur boys’ squad shut out the Wicomico Indians on Tuesday in Berlin, 7-0. Earning first through four singles wins were freshman Noah Fisher (8-2), senior captain Jonathan Petito (8-0), sophomore Micah Bourne (8-2) and junSteve Berquist ior Austin Marple (80). Senior Aaron Campbell and sophomore Aaron Cohen outscored their first doubles opponent, 8-4. Senior Omar Omar and sophomore Jarrett Humphress topped their second double competition, 8-0. Freshmen Ethan Hansford and Jonathan Brandhuber won 8-0 at third doubles. Five out of the 10 players in the starting lineup are new to the squad. After getting some first-match jitters out of the way, the new players settled down and played well, Coach Steve Berquist said. “The veterans were excited to compete and really played well,” Berquist added. “As a captain, Jonathan Petito did a great job getting everyone focused and excited. “Out of 56 games, we only lost eight,” he continued. “It was a great way to start the season. I was really happy.” The Lady Seahawks won 7-1 over

the Indians. Senior captain Grace Beres edged out her first singles opponent, 8-4. Junior Laura Meadows scored an 8-2 victory at second singles and senior Sofia Gordy took her third singles competition, 8-1. Beres and Meadows won 8-1 at first doubles. Gordy and sophomore Kaitlyn Mourlas came out on top, 8-4, at second doubles. Sophomores Emily Stitely and Melis Unal outscored their third doubles opponent, 8J. Greenwood 1. “For match No. 1, I thought they did well,” Coach Jamie Greenwood said. “It took us a couple games to start clicking and just get into the flow of things, but after that we played well. I was pleased.” Decatur took a trip to Salisbury to play the Parkside Rams on Wednesday. The Lady Seahawks won 5-2. Beres (8-6) and Meadows (8-5) earned victories at first and second singles, respectively. Junior Sarah Haskell outscored her fourth singles opponent, 8-5. Beres and Meadows shut out their first doubles competition, 8-0. Stitely and Unal edged out their third doubles opponent, 8-4. “[Tuesday] seemed like a good warm-up. They had some tough matches that the girls powered through,” Greenwood said. “Much fewer unforced errors [against Parkside]. I was very happy to win against Parkside. They are always a formida-

ble opponent.” The Decatur boys’ team won all seven of its matches. “They remember we split with them last year and they wanted to beat them twice this year,” Berquist said. “That’s one of our goals, to beat Parkside twice. We’re halfway there.” Fisher (8-1), Petito (8-4), Bourne (8-5) and Cohen (8-6) took their first through fourth singles matches, respectively. Fisher and Bourne topped their first doubles opponent, 8-5. Petito

and Cohen battled at second doubles. The duo trailed most of the match, but fought back and won, 9-7. “They took control and ended up winning,” Berquist said. Omar and Campbell were victorious, 8-4, at third doubles. “They stepped up and played great. They were excited to play Parkside, knowing they’re one of the better teams in the Bayside South,” Berquist said. Decatur will go to Pocomoke on Tuesday to play the Warriors at 4 p.m.

SD baseball wins 3-1 over Wi-Hi By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (March 29, 2019) The Stephen Decatur baseball team pulled out a 3-1 victory over the Wicomico Indians in the season opener on Monday in Salisbury. “We pitched and played good defense, [but] offense struggled,” Decatur Coach Rich Ferro said. “Fifteen out of the 21 outs were strikeouts.” To cut that number down, Ferro said the Seahawks must work on timing and have more live reps. Wicomico put one run on the board in the first inning. Senior Hayden Snelsire’s solo home run evened the score in the fourth inning. Decatur tacked on another run in the fifth inning and made it 3-1 in the seventh. Decatur tallied five hits in the game. Snelsire (one RBI), junior Noah Ager, and seniors Dawson Delaney, Jack Rosenberg and Ridge

Watson (one RBI) each had one hit. Decatur’s pitchers held Wicomico to one hit. Senior Alex Gaddis started on the mound for Decatur. He struck out two, allowed one hit and walked three in one and one-third inning. Watson threw one and two-third inning. He struck out one and walked one. Sophomore Evan Truitt took the mound for the final four innings. He struck out eight. Decatur will play the Northampton Yellowjackets today, Friday, at 4:30 p.m. in Eastville, Virginia. On Monday, the Seahawks will host the Colonel Richardson Colonels at 4 p.m. in Berlin. Decatur will then travel to Ridgley, Maryland, to face the North Caroline Bulldogs the next day at 4 p.m. The squad’s third game in three days will be at home against the Parkside Rams at 3 p.m. on Wednesday.


MARCH 29, 2019

Decatur softball squad scores 16 in first, wins 25-3 By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (March 29, 2019) The Stephen Decatur softball team kicked off the 2019 season with an impressive 25-3 victory over the Wicomico Lady Indians on Monday in Salisbury. The Lady Seahawks went through the lineup nearly two and a half times in the first inning. Decatur had 21 atbats in the first inning and put 16 runs on the board. The Berlin squad recorded 10 hits and was walked seven times in that inning. “It’s not how I expected to start the season, with a 16-0 lead. It was nice, but unexpected,” Decatur Coach Scott Kurtz said. Both teams scored three runs in the third inning. Decatur tacked on five additional runs in the fourth and one in the fifth. The game ended in the fifth inning because of the 10-run slaughter rule. “They chose their pitches well, we were making good contact and we were hitting the ball hard,” Kurtz said. “We were aggressive when we were hitting. They were disciplined at the plate.” Senior captain Lexi Black went 2for-3. She hit a three-run home run in the first inning and also had a base hit in the game. On the mound, Black struck out two, walked one and allowed five hits in three innings. Freshman Abby Wesche faced three batters in the fourth inning. The Decatur defense got them out one, two, three. Freshman Skylar Griffin struck out one in the fifth inning. Junior Amber Whittaker went 2for-2, scored four runs and had one RBI. She also stole five bases. Freshman Alexa Eisemann was 2for-2 with two RBIs and three runs scored. Sophomore Katie Wrench also had two hits. She tallied four RBIs and stole three bases. “It was a great way to start the season. I was definitely happy with the results,” Kurtz said after his first game as head coach of the Seahawks. “Overall, it was a solid team win. We’re going to get back to work and see if we can keep the trend going. We have some little things to work on, to clean up, because we’ll be in some close games real soon.” Decatur will take a trip to Eastville, Virginia, to play the Northampton Yellowjackets today, Friday, at 4:30 p.m. The Seahawks will host the Colonel Richardson Colonels on Monday at 4 p.m. in Berlin. The next day, Decatur will travel to Ridgely, Maryland, to face the North Caroline Bulldogs at 4 p.m. Then, on Wednesday, the Parkside Rams will come to Berlin to take on Decatur at 3 p.m.

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Drummond, Janney rack up points By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (March 29, 2019) The Stephen Decatur boys’ outdoor track team came in second and the girls’ squad placed fourth during Tuesday’s six-school meet in Salisbury. “I thought we did well for the second meet (first full meet). I am starting to learn where I think each athlete fits in best to help the team,” Decatur Coach Jody Stigler said. “I thought the standouts were [sophomores] London Drummond and Jessica Janney. Both scored a lot of points for us in the jumping events and one running event each. Hopefully, we will continue to see some improvement as the season progresses.” James M. Bennett won the boys’ competition with 178.5 points. Decatur scored 126, good for second place and Wicomico finished in third with 105.5 points. Decatur athletes who scored points for the team for placing sixth or better were: Drummond (high jump, first, 6 feet 2 inches; long jump, first, 19 feet 2.5 inches; triple jump, first, 40 feet 1.5 inches; 200-meter dash, sixth, 24.2 seconds), seniors Chad Fischer (400-meter dash, fourth, 57.4 seconds; 800-meter run, second, 2:17.1), Theo Hobbs (high jump, fourth, 5 feet 6 inches; triple jump, sixth, 34 feet 2 inches) and Daletez Smith (discus,

first, 102 feet 5 inches; shot put, third, 37 feet 3 inches), juniors Sam Rakowski (1,600-meter run, third, 5:18), George Cheynet (1,600-meter run, fourth, 5:20; 3,200-meter run, fourth, 12:34), Matt Brown (1,600meter run, fifth, 5:21), Richard Poist (800-meter run, third, 2:18.8) and Eric Bontempo (discus, 95 feet 7 inches), sophomores Sam Oates (110meter hurdles, fourth, 18.8 seconds; 300-meter hurdles, fifth, 50.7 seconds), Liam Foley (3,200-meter run, sixth, 12:40) and Noah Selt (pole vault, fourth, 8 feet 6 inches), and freshman Justin Hicks (pole vault, sixth, 7 feet 6 inches). Rakowski, Cheynet, Fischer and junior Carter McLendon won the 3,200-meter relay race (9:03.8). Hobbs, sophomore Cameron Smith and seniors Daquon Collick and Jonathan Santana finished third in the 400-meter relay race (51.3 seconds). Rakowski, Brown, sophomore Maddox Bunting and freshman Elijah Wiltbank came in fourth in the 1,600meter relay event (4:11.7). The 800-meter relay team of Santana, Wiltbank, Smith and senior Cameron Bradshaw took fourth (1:45.3). Cambridge was victorious in the girls’ competition, racking up 149.5 points. Bennett was second with 147

points, followed by Wicomico (100) and Decatur (87.5). Scoring points for Decatur were: Janney (high jump, second, 4 feet 8 inches; long jump, second, 13 feet 2.25 inches; triple jump, second, 29 feet 7.5 inches; 400-meter dash, fourth, 1:10.5), seniors Margie Rayne (discus, first, 107 feet 5 inches; shot put, first, 34 feet 3.5 inches) and Dori Krasner (800-meter run, third, 2:53.1), sophomores Reaghan Flynn (100-meter hurdles, sixth, 19.7 seconds; 300meter hurdles, fifth, 1:06), Devon Kramer (1,600-meter run, sixth, 6:52), Ashley Nauschuetz (300-meter hurdles, third, 1:01.5), Giana Cauble (300-meter hurdles, sixth, 1:10.7) and Jacelyn Clapsadle (high jump, fifth (tie), 4 feet 2 inches), and freshmen Zoriah Shockley (shot put, third, 28 feet 3 inches) and Avery Braciszewski (3,200-meter run, sixth, 14:21.9). Krasner, Braciszewski, Kramer and junior Mikayla Denault took third in the 3,200-meter relay race (11:52.9). Flynn, senior Jenna Banks and freshmen Erin Riccio and Emily Magee finished third in the 1,600meter relay event (5:16.1). Flynn, sophomore Jabria Lewis and freshmen Amelia Easton and Imani Walker placed fifth in the 800meter relay race (2:10.5). The next track meet will take place, Tuesday beginning at 4 p.m. in Berlin.

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MARCH 29, 2019

‘Strong’ Lady Seahawks top Mallards, 15-8 By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (March 29, 2019) The Stephen Decatur girls’ lacrosse team battled its crosstown rival, Worcester Prep, on Wednesday in their annual competition. Decatur won 15-8. “They played great. They came out strong and they finished strong,” Decatur Coach Sara Braniecki said. “They were super excited. It’s always a little bit of rivalry, a friendly rivalry. A lot of them are best friends with some of the

girls on the team.” The Lady Seahawks led 8-3 at halftime, playing on Worcester’s field in Berlin. They maintained at least a four-goal lead in the second half. “Our offense was looking really good from the start. Our defense, I think, improved throughout the game. It was a good day for us,” Braniecki said. The Seahawks won a majority of the 50/50 balls, they scooped up ground balls, they did well on the

draws and communicated with each other, Braniecki said. Junior Alyssa Romano, sophomore Brittyn Leonard and freshman Darby Moore scored three goals each for Decatur. Romano also won five draws. Juniors Sarah Engle and Elizabeth Dutton and sophomore Victoria Mueller netted two goals apiece. Junior Isy Kristick stopped four Worcester shots. Junior captain Carly Hoffman and freshman Myranda Beebe tallied three goals each for the Lady Mallards. Hoffman also won four draws. Senior captain Gracie Gardner and

junior Abbi Nechay had one goal each. Sophomore CC Lizas recorded seven saves in goal for Worcester. Decatur will host the Saints Peter & Paul Sabres today, Friday, in Berlin at 4 p.m. “I think a lot of what we did [against Worcester] is going to work and help us be successful on Friday,” Braniecki said. “We’re going to keep improving our communication, keep improving our feistiness on defense and I think well be good to go.” Worcester will go to Lewes, Delaware, to take on the Cape Henlopen Vikings today, at 4:45 p.m.

Decatur boys’ lax team pulls out 5-4 win over Worcester

LISA CAPITELLI/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Stephen Decatur sophomore Julianna Fohner carries the ball out of the defensive end during Wednesday’s game against Worcester Prep in Berlin. Decatur won 15-8.

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By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (March 29, 2019) The last time the Stephen Decatur boys’ lacrosse team beat Worcester Prep was in 2015. On Wednesday, the Seahawks ended their losing streak with a 5-4 victory over the Mallards. “I think they played great. It’s extra special for me, being that I was on the other side of it last year and I’m able to get the victory for the boys this year over at Decatur,” said Decatur Coach Merle “Hoffy” Hoffman. Hoffman was on the Worcester Prep coaching staff the last two years before taking over Decatur’s varsity program this season. “Our defense was great and we capitalized when we needed to,” Hoffman said. “We played disciplined. Sure there’s areas we still need to improve on, but … It’s our first game of the year.” Worcester led 2-1 at the end of the first quarter on its home field in Berlin, with goals by senior captain Alec Dembeck and senior Owen Tunis. Decatur tallied two goals in the second quarter

to pull ahead 3-2. Senior captain Chase Porter, sophomore Tiernan Weinstein and freshman Austin Airey scored first-half goals for Decatur. After three quarters, the Seahawks were on top, 5-3, with goals from Airey and junior captain Eric Gwin. Sophomore Graham McColgan tallied Worcester’s goal. Senior captain Cole Berry netted the Mallards’ fourth goal with 18 seconds remaining in the game. Decatur junior Tony Scafone stopped 11 shots. Sophomore Hunter Gentry recorded 12 saves in goal for Worcester. “It’s the in-town rival. All the guys are friends and the week leading up to the game is always good also,” Hoffman said. “They wanted it. It was will and heart. That’s what it came down to.” Worcester’s next game is today, Friday, at 6:30 p.m. in Lewes, Delaware, against the Cape Henlopen Vikings. Decatur will go to Georgetown Delaware, to play the Sussex Central Golden Knights, today, at 5:30 p.m.

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Stephen Decatur senior captain Kevin Beck controls the ball during Wednesday’s game against Worcester Prep in Berlin. Decatur won 5-4.


MARCH 29, 2019

Ocean City Today

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Profile for ocean city today

3/29/19 Ocean City Today  

Ocean City Today is the newspaper for Ocean City, Md. and the Maryland beach resort area, including West Ocean City, Berlin and Ocean Pines,...

3/29/19 Ocean City Today  

Ocean City Today is the newspaper for Ocean City, Md. and the Maryland beach resort area, including West Ocean City, Berlin and Ocean Pines,...