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COASTAL BEND

NSIDE

MD

THE GIF T OF SIGHT

JUNE.JULY 2012

MIRACLES IN MOTION GLENOAK THERAPEUTIC RIDING CENTER

THE VALUE OF

VITAMIN D

DR. WALTER E. MOSCOSO

Meatless Monday: A HEALTHY NEW TREND

SHOULD YOU HAVE CATARACT SURGERY?

Raising the Bar

DIANA SCHULTZ N S I D E C O A S TA L B E N D M D

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Celebrating

25

years of emergency medical service

Our mission is to provide medical

Hillary Reyna Membership Director 361.265.0509

transport for critically ill or injured persons requiring medical or trauma facilities within our South Texas service area. Emergency assistance is provided to all persons regardless of their ability to pay.

This is our mission...

This is our promise...


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CORPUS CHRISTI PODIATRY -

DIABETIC FOOT CARE BUNIONS HAMMERTOES INGROWN TOENAILS PAINFUL NEUROPATHIC FEET

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2601 HOSPITAL BOULEVARD - SUITE 211 - CORPUS CHRISTI, TX 78405

361.883.5955

BOARD CERTIFIED IN FOOT SURGERY WITH THE AMERICAN BOARD OF PODIATRIC SURGERY FELLOW OF THE AMERICAN COLLEGE OF FOOT AND ANKLE SURGEONS MEMBER OF THE AMERICAN DIABETES ASSOCIATION AUTHOR OF “AN UNFORGETTABLE SALUTE,” AVAILABLE AT IUNIVERSE.COM AND BARNES AND NOBLE N S I D E

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Dear Doctor: Interim Homecare provides a comprehensive array of healthcare services in your patients’ home. Helping your patients with new medications, diabetes management, CHF and other related cardiac complications, COPD, wound care, helping regain strength and mobility or other services that will aid in your patients’ recovery process. We at Interim Healthcare look forward to serving all your needs.

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Interim Homecare 361.887.4850 Corpus Christi


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NSIDE Coastal Bend MD - June/July 2012

PUBLIC ATIONS publisher / Eliot Garza

eliot@nsidesa.com

co-publisher / corpus christi / adrian Garza

adrian@getnside.com

co-publisher / san antonio / joe cox

joe@getnside.com

co-publisher / austin / angela strickland

angela@getnside.com

staff editor

contributing writers

Erin O’Brien

Mandy Ashcraft Dr. Jesse G. Garcia Amanda Howeth Margo Hurdt Katy Kiser Lisa Maze Dr. Walter E. Moscoso Craig Myers Kimberly Suta Sarah Tindall

creative director Elisa Giordano

executive assistant Natalie Barton

photography Dustin Ashcraft Annette McPherson Photography and Design Bryan Tumlinson

editorial intern Desiree Johnson

NSIDE Coastal Bend Advisory Board J u d y L a p ointe and d r . c h a r les cam p bell

www.getnside.com For advertising information, please call 361.548.1044 or email adrian@getnside.com. For editorial comments and suggestions, please email joe@getnside.com.

PUBLIC ATIONS

18402 U.S. Highway 281 N, Ste. 201 San Antonio, Texas 78259 Phone: 210.298.1761

Copyright Š by NSIDE Magazine Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction without the expressed written permission of the publisher is prohibited.

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nsidethisissue june/july 2012

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cover story 18

Diana Schultz

The CEO of Kindred Healthcare makes a difference in the community by ensuring the long-term acute care hospital provides the highest quality care possible for people of all ages and walks of life.

profiles

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Dr. Walter E. Moscoso

The seasoned vitreous retinal specialist uses his expertise and unique vision to treat and manage retinal and allied diseases at South Texas Retina Consultants.

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Glenoak Therapeutic Riding Center

The volunteers and instructors at this local nonprofit organization dedicate themselves to helping disabled individuals of all ages take the reins and enjoy the many mental and physical benefits of equine-assisted therapy.

departments

cover story | diana schultz

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Feature Health & Wellness Patient MD

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Board certified in ophthalmology

56 years of combined surgical experience

Over 20,000 combined retina surgeries

Charles H. Campbell, M.D.,F.A.C.S. and Walter E. Moscoso, M.D. Diseases and surgery of the vitreous and retina.

5540 Saratoga Blvd. #200 361-993-8510 1-800-779-3482 with satellite offices in Kingsville, Beeville, Aransas Pass

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NSIDE feature

Taking the Lead CHRISTUS Spohn Hospital-South earns a Texas Ten Step nod for breastfeeding support in recognition of its commitment to providing breastfeeding mothers with exemplary care. By: [Katy Kiser]

As the number of women who intend to breastfeed continues to rise, CHRISTUS Spohn remains strongly committed to supporting and encouraging a mother’s decision to breastfeed. Recently designated a Texas Ten Step facility, CHRISTUS Spohn Hospital Corpus Christi-South is taking the lead in offering exemplary care to breastfeeding moms. The Texas Ten Step Program, developed by the Texas Hospital Association (THA) and the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS), encourages birthing centers to support and promote breastfeeding through policy development, maternity care practices and resources for breastfeeding mothers. “It is something we have strived for,” explained Kelly Welch, CHRISTUS Spohn’s director of women’s services. “We have policies in place that support breastfeeding moms. Our desire is to have moms be successful. We are a Women’s Center of Excellence, and this designation is just one more way we are living up to that name.” To acquire Texas Ten Step designation, CHRISTUS Spohn Hospital-South must promote healthy outcomes for newborns by training all maternity staff and offering them annual updates. In addition, associates must provide moms with resources for continued care after discharge. “We just encourage moms to keep trying. It is usually the first two weeks that are the hardest,” said Liza Naranjo, a registered nurse and CHRISTUS Spohn’s breastfeeding educator. “I advise moms to

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just have patience because breastfeeding is so beneficial to mom and baby.” Growing evidence supports breastfeeding as critical to the health of both mothers and babies.

Good for moms

• Saves money in formula and health care costs • Burns up to 600 calories a day • Releases helpful hormones to relax mom • Protects mom against cancer and diabetes

Good for babies

• Reduces the risk of allergic reactions, asthma, infections and stomach problems • Reduces risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) • Promotes healthy growth and brain development • Reduces risk of obesity and diabetes The objectives of the Texas Ten Step Program are to encourage hospitals to achieve the following goals: • To have 75 percent of its mothers breastfeeding at discharge • To support breastfeeding mothers before, during and after delivery • To identify breastfeeding resources for mothers after they are discharged

Texas Ten Step facilities like CHRISTUS SpohnSouth provide continuing resources for breastfeeding families that include: • Telephone counseling by a lactation consultant or a certified breastfeeding educator • Assistance in the hospital by a lactation consultant or a certified breastfeeding educator • Rental or purchase of high-quality electric breast pumps • Availability of breastfeeding-related equipment and nursing bras for purchase • Women, Infants and Children (WIC) nutrition services information Lactation consultant fees are based on length of visit and may be covered under your insurance. Call 361985-5284 for more information.

Katy Kiser is a communication specialist with CHRISTUS Spohn Health System. If you would like to learn more about the heart health-minded mission of the CHRISTUS Spohn Health System’s Cardiac Rehab facility, call 361-881-3633.


Recovery Isn’t Simply a Goal, It’s Our Mission.

Kindred Healthcare understands that when people are discharged from a traditional hospital, they often need continued care in order to recover completely. That’s where we come in.

Doctors, case managers, social workers and family members don’t stop caring simply because their loved one or patient has changed location. Neither do we.

Kindred offers services including aggressive, medically complex care, intensive care and shortterm rehabilitation.

Come see how we care at www.continuethecare.com.

Dedicated to Hope, Healing and Recovery

CONTINUE THE CARE 6226 Saratoga Blvd · Corpus Christi, Texas 78414 · 361-986-1600 www.khcorpuschristi.com N S I D E C O A S TA L B E N D M D

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NSIDE health & wellness

Meatless Monday: A Healthy New Trend Get a taste of something new and enjoy positive health benefits by replacing meat with savory vegetarian dishes just one day a week. By: [mandy ashcraft]

Here in South Texas, adding the word “meatless” to a meal is generally regarded with the same welcoming enthusiasm as suggesting that one should crack open a cold carton of milk at a barbecue or blow out candles on half of a birthday grapefruit. The health benefits of a vegetarian diet are substantial, but the idea of a meat-free lifestyle is unpopular, so what should you do when you want to (both literally and metaphorically) have your steak and eat it too? The same thing you’d do if you were learning to swim: Test the water and start at the shallow end. Taking the plunge into a completely vegetarian diet requires a lot of adjusting, but what about just one day? What if you could improve your health by simply making some (delicious) changes once a week? This crossroads of eating habits marks the birthplace of Meatless Monday. A little secret about Meatless Monday: You can do it any day of the week. If you’re death-gripping your Garfield “I Hate Mondays” coffee mug while you count down the seconds until you can leave work for a burger and a beer like a prisoner waiting to be paroled, maybe Mondays aren’t for you. Pick a day of the week when you have more time to enjoy exploring new options and really delve into the sampling of a new genre of food choices. It can be inspiring to look at the other side of the menu or wander down a different aisle in the grocery store. Never tried something before? Maybe now’s the time. This misconception that meatless food equals tofu is a bit caricaturized and leaves out roughly 99 percent of a vegetarian’s meal options. It turns out the media’s

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depiction of vegetarians being unshaven flower children sewing pants out of hemp and asking restaurants if their ice cubes are organic is inaccurate. These days, everyone from professional MMA fighters and famous chefs to former presidents has made the switch. Meatless Monday gives you a taste of something different, literally, and a positive new perspective. Predominately plant-based diets have long been shown to reduce the risk of cancer, prevent/ reverse Type 2 diabetes and dramatically reduce heart disease in both men and women. By simply rearranging your personal food pyramid, you could save your own life; simply move the green things to the bottom. A weekly one-day detox of animal fats and proteins helps cleanse your system and will give you energy you may have thought you’d only find in the consumption of meat products. If you were to cut 500 calories and six grams of fat from your typical diet each Meatless Monday, it would add up to 26,000 calories and 312 grams of fat you didn’t consume in one year. If you’re picturing yourself withered and starving in a corner with a celery stalk, throw giant Portobello mushrooms on the grill in your favorite barbecue sauce, or skewer a rainbow of produce for kabobs over rice.

There are meatless beer brats with a flavor and texture that would fool some of the most devoted beer-marinating carnivores, but with no cholesterol and one gram of saturated fat, so don’t steer away from the specialty veggie aisle too quickly. Scroll through websites that are specifically for new “Meatless Monday-ers” such as MeatlessMonday.com, for simple recipe ideas, health statistics and inspiration. A healthy trend is just what America needed – a breath of fresh air in a cloud of negative health statistics. No hemp clothing required. For more information, email Mandy Ashcraft at mandyashcraft341@gmail.com. For healthy vegetarian recipes, visit www.mandyashcraft.com.


When you think of physical therapy... you most likely think of our ability to

treat the standard musculoskeletal injuries or conditions such as strains, sprains, low back pain, neck, shoulder, elbow, hand, hip, knee, ankle, and foot pain, etc.,

...but did you know Humpal P.T. also has programs for:

• Pregnancy (Pre/Post Natal Care) • Diabetes • Fall Prevention • Neuropathy

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• Athletic Rehab (Sport Specific) • Thoracic-Outlet Syndrome • Orthotic Evaluation/Fabrication • Pre-Op/Post-Operative Therapy

We have a program for you if you are unable to perform your activities of daily living due to pain or limited range of motion.

We will put you back in the Game of Life!

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All 6 locations offer carefully designed and supervised exercise programs in State of the Art gyms and Large Indoor Heated Pools.

Medicare, Medicaid, Workers Compensation, and most insurances accepted.

If you have a condition that is causing you pain or concern, ask your Doctor for a prescription to Humpal P.T., or stop by any of our locations to request a FREE physical therapy Screening to determine if your condition can benefit from physical therapy.

Humpal Physical Therapy & Sports Medicine Centers

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NSIDE health & wellness

Speed and Agility Training vs. SportsSpecific Training Why children need both to meet their full potential

By: [Craig Myers and Margo Hurdt]

There is a saying: Practice makes perfect. But what if you aren’t practicing everything? Each sport has specific skills to practice. Football players need to practice catching passes, running routes and proper technique of blocking. Baseball and softball players have to practice batting, hitting and fielding. Volleyball players have to practice blocking, spiking and passing. All of this training is very specific and only can be applied to each individual task. But what about training for how fast you run to the ball to catch it, or training on the proper technique to jump so you can jump higher? That is where speed and agility training comes into play. Speed and agility training pertains to every sport, every athletic movement and every athlete. The training and muscle memory you receive from speed and agility classes can not only make athletes faster, but also increase their overall athleticism and reduce risk of injury. The four main areas of speed and agility training are running mechanics, coordination development, agility and total body strength. Speed is something every athlete needs. Whether it is a short distance like from home plate to first base or a 40-yard dash, all athletes need speed. Proper speed and agility programs include work on acceleration, deceleration and proper landing position.

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Acceleration starts with the initial first three steps and is an extremely important part of reaching top speed. Deceleration and body positioning are also important for athletes to execute successfully to pre-

how to move and run properly, he or she can apply it to agility training, where the athlete works on direction change, quick feet and specific skills of speed. Increasing total body strength is the last compo-

Speed and agility training pertains to every sport, every athletic movement and every athlete. vent injury, increase agility and improve reaction. Coordination development is another aspect of speed and agility training. This type of training includes reaction time, rhythm, body control, spatial awareness and balance. Applying these things to an athlete’s game not only helps him or her become more efficient with movement, but also helps that athlete prevent injury and become a well-rounded athlete. With young athletes under age 13, coordination development may be the most critical component of a successful training program. As an athlete improves coordination by learning

nent athletes should experience. Learning to control their bodies alone will make them stronger, but teenagers can begin to include proper weightlifting with a focus on technique and power. Both athletes and non-athletes of any age will benefit from experiencing a proper speed and agility program. Better coordination, quicker reaction, faster and safer: This is what makes the ultimate athlete.

For more information about speed and agility programs, please contact Jason Adams at Pro Performance Training Center by calling 361-806-2085.


Keep making memories.

We’ll take care of the rest.

Alice 361-664-4888 · Corpus Christi 361-882-5900 www.rivercityhospice.com N S I D E C O A S T A L B E N D M D 17


Setting the Standard for Quality Care With a number of past successes and big plans for the future, Diana Schultz keeps Kindred Healthcare growing. By: [Sarah Tindall] Photography: [dustin ashcraft]

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D

iana Schultz has been CEO of Kindred Healthcare for fourand-a-half years now. When asked what she does every day, she candidly responds that she is “responsible for everything that has to do with the hospital.” This means that everything from managing the finances and maintaining the quality of the outcomes for patients to making sure that hospital rating agencies continue to rate the hospital at the top of their scale is part of the job for Schultz. It’s a job that she loves to do, but she says the way she arrived in the CEO chair is a little unorthodox. She was hired at CC Specialty Hospital as the HR manager in 2005. During her first 60 days, the CEO resigned and was asked to help “babysit” the building while a replacement was found. In that time, the staff signed a petition requesting that Schultz be appointed the CEO, and the regional leadership approved. “On a Thursday, I was the HR manager, and on a Friday, I was CEO,” she says. “I skipped a lot of layers; usually the CEO is promoted from a VP position. So I had to take a crash course and learn as I went, but it has been a great experience. Now when I introduce myself and tell people what I do, they ask how old I am.” Kindred’s 74-bed hospital is undergoing growth under her leadership. The building began as a rehab facility years ago, but now serves as a long-term acute care hospital for people from all ages and walks of life. “People get confused and think we are a nursing home, but we are a hospital,” Schultz clarifies. She goes on to say that the bulk of their patients used to be hospitalized due to respiratory issues, and that continues to be a portion of those cared for, but increasingly, wound care has become a large portion of the treatment needed by patients. Whether it is patients recovering from motor vehicle accidents who are transferred from other area hospitals once they are stabilized for long-term care or diabetic patients suffering from complications of the disease, many of those in the hospital are there for the treatment of wounds. “I have folks that are in here for 15 days to 70, depending on what’s needed,” Schultz says, “and the facility that takes these patients must be able to deal with the specific issues associated with a long-term hospitalization.” She says the increasing number of diabetic patients in the area, especially younger patients, has meant that they are seeing younger patients at Kindred than they used to a decade ago, and it has given her the impetus to determine how the hospital must grow to meet these needs in the future. “There seems to be a lot of scary clinical things going on in younger people these days,” she says. “Just in my own personal friends and family, it just seems like every time I turn around, somebody is getting diagnosed with something.”

The hospital has operated in Corpus Christi for the past eight years, and Schultz has big plans for the next five. “We are looking at adding on different services. We would like to add outpatient wound care if it is feasible, and long-term, we are even considering an urgent diagnostics department.” The urgent care facility would be intended to meet a growing need Schultz sees in the community to avoid the long wait and expense that can accompany an ER visit. She also has personal goals for the next five years. She is in the final stages of application for advancement to fellow of the American College of Healthcare Executives, which requires at least five years of hospital management experience, as well as rigorous study and a test. “I want to keep going – to keep challenging myself,” she says, and hitting the books isn’t the only place that is happening. Once a month, she and her kids run a 5K together. “I want to encourage them to include physical activity in their lives so that when they grow up, it continues to be something they do. “I want them to see that there are always reasons not to exercise like being tired or too busy, but it’s important to work it in.” She and her girlfriends also recently have gotten very active in charity work. “It’s a philanthropic kick,” she says, “and I just do it with my friends. Once a quarter, we pick a charity to help out. This quarter, we collected suits for the women of the Corpus Christi Housing Authority, and next quarter, we are considering the food bank. It is just me and my friends working to make a difference.” She says she does it to give herself perspective. “So many people get wrapped up in drama – like, look at the ‘housewives’ on TV. It’s sobering to do something real for somebody who has real problems. I like to watch drama on television, but refuse to have it in my own life.” Schultz is a Corpus Christi gal, born and raised. She left town to attend college in San Antonio and moved back briefly before marrying her husband and going to live in New Mexico with him while he was in the military, but when it came time to decide where to live after he was finished, the choice was easy. “I knew I wanted to come back home right away,” she says. “Corpus Christi is a big small town and a great place to raise kids.” Now that she’s back home, she says she’s really enjoying her time here. “I really enjoy being in my 40s. I feel comfortable in my own skin, and don’t worry like I did when I was younger about what people are thinking about me. It’s really liberating.” It must be that confidence and “can do” spirit that her staff recognized when they asked her to be their leader, and that has helped Kindred continue to set the standard for quality care in Corpus Christi.

For more information about Diana Schultz or Kindred Hospital, call 361-986-1600 or go to www.khcorpuschristi.com.

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A Retina Specialist With a Unique Vision

A strong advocate of preventative health care, Dr. Walter E. Moscoso works to treat retinal and allied diseases and improve the vision of Coastal Bend residents at South Texas Retina Consultants. By: [Kimberly Suta] Photography: [Bryan Tumlinson]

Dr. Walter E. Moscoso, a retina specialist from Florida, is the newest addition to the esteemed South Texas Retina Consultants, which has offices in Corpus Christi, Brownsville, McAllen and other South Texas locations. Moscoso was born in South America, but grew up in the United States from the time he was 5 years old. Raised by a single mother in a financially disadvantaged household, he wasn’t afforded many opportunities, but he felt the calling to become a doctor early on in his adolescence. His uncle, also a doctor, encouraged him to pursue a career in ophthalmology because ophthalmologists are, as his uncle would say, “a bunch of happy doctors.” Still, it wasn’t until his second year in college that Moscoso chose to act on his instincts and follow his passion to become a doctor. He knew it would require much fortitude and dedication to a lifelong career. Twenty years later, after graduating from Seton Hall in New Jersey and working for 18 years with a multi-specialty group of ophthalmologists in Florida, it’s clear that Moscoso’s instincts served him well. He is now a seasoned vitreous retinal specialist whose field of study encompasses the human eye and the treatment and management of retinal and allied diseases. Moscoso explains that most retina specialists like to think the eye exists to provide a home for the retina. Certainly, numerous other structures are needed 22

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for a person to see, but the retina is the essential component of the eye and everything else simply supports the functions of the retina. In order to understand the function of the retina, Moscoso likens the retina to a layer of wallpaper. Retina, derived from the Latin word for net, is a lightsensitive tissue lining the inner surface of the eye. The optics of the eye create an image of the visual world on the retina, which serves much the same function as film in a camera. When light strikes the retina, it initiates a series of chemical and electrical events that trigger nerve impulses, which are then sent to various visual centers of the brain through the fibers of the optic nerve. This is what allows us to see. Not surprisingly, retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy are quite common in South Texas, where many Hispanics suffer from a very aggressive form of diabetes due to genetic predisposition, as well as cultural factors. As Moscoso lamented, “Texan food is largely Mexican food, and it’s not the healthiest.” Mexican food offers a lot of fried foods, which are high in fat, and tortillas and rice are carbohydrates, which are high in sugar. These are foods diabetics need to avoid, but as Moscoso points out, “it’s difficult to avoid food which is part of your culture and you live in an area that doesn’t offer a lot of alternatives.” South Texas Retina Consultants and Moscoso are

strong advocates of preventative health care, and their first medical service often lies in the form of education – teaching patients to use diet to manage their health. Moscoso sympathizes with his patients. “I tell them, ‘I know you like this food, but it’s poisonous to your body.’” He laughs good-humoredly as he continues: “I suggest they try thinking like a rabbit and eat more plants, more salads.” One of the other common retinal diseases Moscoso treats is macular degeneration. “The center of the retina which governs central vision is known as the macula,” he explains. “Imagine it as a bull’s-eye. It’s responsible for the ability to see fine detail work. Side vision is important, but not as important as what we see straight ahead, which is the job of the macula.” When there’s macular degeneration, it affects ac-


Moscoso emphasizes the importance of seeing an eye specialist every few years, especially as you get older.

tivities like driving and reading. This is a disease that primarily affects fair-skinned Caucasians 55 years of age and older. Women are also at a higher risk than men. The belief is that the disease is part genetics, affecting people of Northern European descent, and partly because fair-skinned people have much less melanin in their skin and macula tissues. Melanin acts as a protective structure which absorbs harmful ultra violet rays, something fair-skinned people have too little of. Macular degeneration comes in two forms: dry and wet. Dry is a much milder disease, while wet is aggressive and can cause patients to lose vision in months or even weeks. Over the last seven years, new treatments have been developed that have dramatically improved the health of patients suffering from

wet macular degeneration. Unfortunately, however, no specific treatment for dry generation exists. Again, Moscoso sites the importance of dietary modifications. He recommends vitamin supplements (ARDS) and a diet high in antioxidants such as leafy greens, dark berries and cold-water fish such as salmon and haddock, which are a great source of alpha omega fatty acids. Whether a person currently suffers from symptoms such as flashes and floaters, which may be indications of retinal problems such as a tear or detachment, Moscoso emphasizes the importance of seeing an eye specialist every few years, especially as you get older. “Think of our bodies as a piece of metal,” Moscoso illustrates. “Eventually, metal exposed to the elements will age, will rust. This oxidation accumulates over a

period of time, much like age accumulates, affecting our bodies. That’s why antioxidants are so effective.” Moscoso is thrilled to embark on this newest phase of his career: joining the 30-year veteran, Dr. Campbell, and the rest of the team at South Texas Retina Consultants. “Dr. Campbell is a very well-known physician in this part of Texas,” Moscoso proudly says. No doubt Moscoso’s own experience and life’s work will serve to broaden the already stellar practice, offering his own unique vision in managing and preventing retinal diseases.

For more information on South Texas Retina Consultants or to schedule an appointment with Dr. Moscoso, call 800-779-3482 or go to www.strc.cc. N S I D E C O A S TA L B E N D M D

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Changing Lives One Trot at a Time For the past 10 years, the folks at the Glenoak Therapeutic Riding Center have helped disabled individuals reach their greatest mental and physical potential through the practice of equine-assisted therapy. By: [Amanda Howeth] Photography: [Annette McPherson Photography and Design]

Winston Churchill once said, “There is something about the outside of a horse that is good for the inside of a man.” It’s a quote that speaks volumes at one local organization, especially through the efforts and actions of its volunteers. The Glenoak Therapeutic Riding Center sits in the heart of Flour Bluff and conducts weekly classes for more than 100 students enrolled in the Equine Sharing Program. The nonprofit program specializes in the rehabilitation of children and adults of all ages with physical, mental, emotional and learning disabilities. The program also wants to make sure that everyone who wants to attend classes can ride; the center holds fundraisers and offers scholarships to those in need. The center’s founder, Charlene Thomas, says she decided to start the program after she saw a real need to give back to the handicapped. “I have a degree in psychology, and I felt this community needed some type of activity for people with disabilities,” she said. Thomas is a certified instructor with the North American Riding for the Handicapped Association who has devoted herself to the success of the center for more than a decade.

Holding the reins

Often confined to wheelchairs or walkers, riders are given a whole new perspective from the saddle. The center’s unique form of therapy not only builds up muscles; it also builds up self-esteem. For some of the individuals who participate in the program, being able to act independently is quite an undertaking. Riding horses enables them to feel a sense of power over their bodies and allows them to

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be more independent. This provides riders with a refreshing experience that lets them feel free, relaxed and in control. “They’re on a 1,200-pound animal, and they’re in charge,” Thomas said. Not only is riding a horse a liberating experience, it also has both psychological and physical benefits. According to Thomas, horses rhythmically and naturally move the body in a manner similar to the human gait, improving posture, balance and muscle control. Horseback riding also promotes heart health: Riders gain cardiovascular benefits by raising heart rates. In addition to the physical benefits, the program helps riders improve their social and cognitive abilities. Riders gain increased concentration, spatial awareness and orientation, self-awareness and selfdiscipline – not to mention a major confidence boost. And the endless sea of smiles in the arena makes it evident that the students really look forward to the experience. Some of them have been coming to the ranch for several years to participate in weekly classes. Twelve-year-old Maggie McShane is one of them. “I think one of the biggest things is that she gets to be a kid,” said Debbie McShane, Maggie’s mother. “She has an activity that she gets to look forward to. It gets her outside and moving and doing things that kids like to do.” Maggie is just one of many students who ventures out to the center every week for therapy. Her mother says she has seen her daughter change for the better since she began riding. She says even though Mag-

gie has a hard time communicating, she knows she enjoys herself and is aware of her surroundings. “I think it’s a wonderful place. I think sometimes she’ll maybe not be happy on the ride here, and then when we get here and she realizes where we’re at, she’s as happy as a little lark.” Another caregiver, Sheila Stephens, says she’s noticed a positive change in Mark, a 32-year-old student impacted by autism. According to Stephens, Mark is now able to ride his horse alone and trot at a good speed, but this wasn’t always the case. “He just moved on up. He participates very clearly all the time and is just totally focused. And it was something he really wanted to do. You can tell it’s something he’s very interested in. It’s not just something we put him in. It’s something that Mark wants. It’s a big deal to him, and it means a lot to him.” After three years of hard work and determination, Mark is now participating in the program’s advanced riders’ class. It’s a feat that wouldn’t have been accomplished without the help of the center’s many dedicated volunteers and instructors like Donna Hamil. Hamil says serving as a volunteer and seeing the progress students make along the way is an extremely rewarding experience. “These kids come out here in walkers and wheelchairs, and they get on those horses and smile and have a good time. They give so much … I receive more than I give, and that’s why I stay. It’s a passion. I came for the horses, but I stayed for the kids.”

For more information about the Glenoak Therapeutic Riding Center or volunteering, visit www.reidbthomas. com/Glenoak_Program.html or call Charlene Thomas at 361-537-3495. If you’d like to visit the center, it is located at 1517 Glenoaks Drive, Corpus Christi, Texas 78418.


Riding a horse is a liberating experience, but it also has physical and psychological benefits. N S I D E C O A S TA L B E N D M D

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More than $43,000 granted for new, innovative programs in CCISD

classrooms this year, thanks to these Partners for World Class Schools

ARC (formerly Ridgeway’s) | AG|CM | Borden Insurance Gentry Company | Gignac & Associates, L.L.P. NSIDE Coastal Bend Magazine | ompson & Horton, LLP

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Therapy Promoting Healing and Wellness “Our mission is to return the injured patient to a productive lifestyle by offering individualized therapy promoting healing and wellness.” Jaime (Pato) Moreno, P.T. Certified in Spinal Manipulative Therapy Introducing: Witold Drozdowski, P.T. Certified in Spinal Manipulative Therapy

A revolutionary approach to rehabilitation and training, The AlterG Anti-Gravity Treadmill is the only “unweighting” device that allows you to exercise at a reduced body weight while maintaining normal running or walking mechanics.

Personalized Treatment Programs Pain Management Orthopedic Rehabilitation Post Lumbar Surgery Program Fibromyalgia

six points physical therapy 701 Park Ave - CC, TX 78401 O: 361.879.0006 / F: 361.879.0702 www.SixPointsPhysicalTherapy.com Se Habla Español

Neurological Programs Vestibular Program Peripheral Neuropathy Program Respiratory Therapy Work Conditioning & Hardening Program Functional Capacity Evaluation Prevention Fall Program Arthritis Program Hand/Elbow/Foot & Shoulder Programs

P P P P P P P P P P P P P

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NSIDE patieNT

The Value of Vitamin D From reducing the severity and frequency of asthma symptoms to lessening the risk of cancer, an adequate level of the vitamin provides invaluable services for the body. By: [Dr. Jesse G. Garcia]

Coastal Bend Primary Care is located at 4621 S. Staples, Corpus Christi, Texas 78411. For more information, contact Dr. Jesse G. Garcia at 361-654-0050, ext. 110, or coastalbendprimarycare@yahoo. com. You may also visit www. corpusmedicine.com.

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Vitamin D is a steroid vitamin, a group of fat-soluble prohormones, which encourages the absorption and metabolism of calcium and phosphorous. People who are exposed to normal quantities of sunlight do not need vitamin D supplements because sunlight promotes sufficient vitamin D synthesis in the skin. Vitamin D for humans is obtained from sun exposure, food and supplements. It is biologically inert and has to undergo two hydroxylation reactions to become active in the body. The active form of vitamin D in the body is called Calcitriol (1,25-Dihydroxycholecalciferol).

Why do we need vitamin D? • It is crucial for the absorption and metabolism of calcium and phosphorous, which have various functions, especially the maintenance of healthy bones. • It is an immune system regulator. • It may be an important way to arm the immune system against disorders like the common cold, say scientists from the University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Children’s Hospital Boston. • It may reduce the risk of developing multiple sclerosis. Multiple sclerosis is much less common the nearer you get to the tropics, where there is much more sunlight, accord-

ing to Dennis Bourdette, chairman of the Department of Neurology and director of the Multiple Sclerosis and Neuroimmunology Center at Oregon Health and Science University, USA. • Vitamin D may have a key role in helping the brain to keep working well in later life, according to a study of 3,000 European men between the ages of 40 and 79. • Vitamin D is probably linked to maintaining a healthy body weight, according to research carried out at the Medical College of Georgia, USA. • It can reduce the severity and frequency of asthma symptoms, as well as the likelihood of hospitalizations due to asthma, researchers from Harvard Medical School found after monitoring 616 children in Costa Rica. • It has been shown to reduce the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis in women. • A form of vitamin D could be one of our body’s main protections against damage from low levels of radiation, say radiological experts from the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. • Various studies have shown that people with adequate levels of vitamin D have a significantly lower risk of developing cancer, compared to people with lower levels. Vitamin D deficiency was found to be prevalent in cancer patients regardless of nutritional status in a study carried

out by Cancer Treatment Centers of America.

Vitamin D and nutrition Over the last few hundred years, human lifestyles have changed. The Industrial Revolution resulted in more indoor work and less exposure to sunlight. Many societies around the world wore more clothing over the centuries, further reducing skin exposure to sunlight. These changes have brought with them a significant reduction in the natural production of vitamin D and subsequent diseases. Countries responded to these changes by fortifying some foods with vitamins D2 and D3. Examples include breakfast cereals, bread, pastries, oil spreads, margarine, milk and other dairy products. Initially, some scientists complained that nutritional fortification and recommended supplementation doses were not making up for the shortfall. These people were ignored and sometimes ridiculed. However, over the last few years, studies indicate that they may have been right, after all. Not many foods contain vitamin D. Some fish such as salmon, tuna and mackerel, as well as fish liver oils, are considered the best sources. Some vitamin D is also present in beef liver, cheese and egg yolks. Most of these are vitamin D3.


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NSIDE patieNT

Should You Have Cataract Surgery?

Everything you need to know when it comes to going about the surgery By: [Dr. Walter E. Moscoso] Photography: [bryan tumlinson] Many patients develop cataracts related to aging or from drug side effects, diabetes or even trauma. Other less common causes include congenital (present at birth), ocular inflammation and genetic (enzyme deficiency) cataracts. A cataract, an opacification of the natural ocular lens, exists toward the front part of the eye and serves to focus images sharply for seeing. Yet, if you have or had other ocular disorders like suboptimal cataract surgery in the fellow eye, macular degeneration or systemic diseases such as diabetes or high blood pressure (hypertension), obtaining a second opinion as to the optimum timing of cataract surgery may be of paramount importance. It is often necessary to first address these other conditions prior to surgery in order to enhance the probability of having improved vision or at least to minimize the chances of sustaining visual loss. On the opposite end of the spectrum, in some individuals with certain other retinal conditions like a “macular hole” or “macular pucker” (aka epiretinal membranes), a retina specialist may recommend

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a cataract surgery be performed even in the setting of mild cataracts before the retinal condition is treated. Such instances arise when the retina specialist anticipates performing a surgery known as a vitrectomy subsequent to the cataract surgery. This team approach can yield optimal visual results for many individuals. Hence, it is important for the cataract surgeon to obtain a thorough medical history and perform a complete ocular exam of both eyes in all patients under normal circumstances. A referral to a retina specialist could be equally important.  The retina specialist will coordinate a patient’s care with the cataract surgeon as to the best time for the cataract surgery to occur. For example, if the one eye already had a complication after cataract surgery, there may be a higher than normal chance of the second eye also having a complication. Retinal conditions such as macular edema (swelling), retinal tears or detachments can be such complications. Retinal tears can create retinal detachments that

can lead to blindness after or during any cataract surgery. The risks are heightened by a variety of factors, including if the other eye already had or has a retinal detachment or tear, if the individual has a family history of tears or detachments, etc. It is imperative for people to consult a retinal specialist in such settings prior to surgery, as certain treatments such as a laser maybe employed to significantly lower the risk of such complications occurring. Beginning certain eye drops before and after the surgery may be indicated to reduce the risk of visual loss in certain forms of macular edema. In the case of diabetics or macular degeneration patients, laser treatments or injections may be indicated before and after surgery to eliminate or minimize the risk of these conditions from worsening after the surgery with a resultant reduction of vision. Diabetics are at significantly higher risk of having a variety of complications from cataract surgery than non-diabetics. Many, if not most individuals in this “at risk” population would stand to benefit from a second opinion regarding the optimum timing of cataract surgery. Diabetics should have good control of their blood sugars prior to cataract surgery. Hypertension should also be well controlled to reduce the risk of surgical complications or exacerbating coexistent diseases like diabetes and macular degeneration. A diabetic who has good control of sugar levels, but poor control of blood pressure may have progression of diabetic retinopathy regardless. Traumatic cataracts can be associated with an extremely complicated set of circumstances. Certain drugs such as steroids can cause or accelerate cataracts. Steroids are a mainstay of treatment for ocular trauma, and these may worsen traumatic cataracts, but still are often needed to reduce the attendant ocular inflammation. Also, trauma to the eye can weaken the structures that hold a cataract in its proper location.  These structures can later break during cataract surgery and may lead to significant complications that may require additional surgeries to repair them. Infrequently, a modified approach to cataract removal that is performed only by retinal surgeons may be preferable in these complicated cataract situations.  In such instances, the cataract surgeon may later surgically place an artificial lens implant in the traumatized eye. Cataract surgery is among the safest surgeries in medicine, and the visual outcome for the average person is exceedingly good. Yet, for those individuals who have risk factors that predispose to having complications during and/or after surgery, obtaining a second opinion from a qualified retina specialist is strongly recommended.

For more information on South Texas Retina Consultants or to schedule an appointment with Dr. Moscoso, call 800-779-3482 or go to www.strc.cc.


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NSIDE patient

From Our Family to Yours

By providing high-quality compassionate care for patients and families during the last phase of life, hospice care focuses on living, not dying. By: [Lisa Maze]

Hospice is a specialized form of care for patients and families facing a life-limiting illness. Hospice is all about living, not dying. Hospice allows patients and their families to add more life to their days, if not more days to their life. Hospice empowers and encourages patients to do the things they love – visit family, take a walk in the park or enjoy friends – for as long as they can. Hospice care helps patients and families focus on living and recognize that dying is a natural part of life, allowing each of us the right to die pain-free and with dignity. Hospice provides support and care for persons in the last phases of an incurable disease so that they may live as fully and comfortably as possible. Hospice exists in the hope and belief that through appropriate care and the promotion of a caring community sensitive to their needs, individuals and their families may be free to attain a degree of satisfaction in preparation for death. Hospice recognizes that human growth and development can be a lifelong process and seeks to preserve and promote the inherent potential for growth within individuals and families during the last phase of life.

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Hospice offers palliative care for all individuals and their families without regard to age, gender, nationality, race, creed, sexual orientation, disability, diagnosis, availability of a primary caregiver or ability to pay. Hospice offers high-quality, compassionate care to persons who can no longer benefit from curative treatment. Services are provided by a team of trained professionals, including physicians, nurses, counselors, social workers, therapists, chaplains, aides and volunteers. • Hospice offers palliative care rather than curative treatment, focusing on pain and symptom control that enable the patient to live as fully and comfortably as possible. • Hospice care is provided at homes, nursing homes and assisted living residences – wherever

home is. • Hospice is always on call for hospice patients and their families, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. • Hospice continues to care for the family even after the death of the patient by providing grief and bereavement counseling. • Hospice care is covered under Medicare, Medicaid, most private insurance plans, HMOs and managed care organizations.

River City Hospice believes that while each patient’s situation is unique, many of the problems, coping strategies and emotions are not. For more information on how River City Hospice can help you or your loved one, please contact Janet Montagne at 361-882-5900 or call 1-877-53-RIVER.


EYECARE FOCUSED ON YOU Bay Area Vision provides the latest in laser imaging technology to detect eye diseases such as Glaucoma, Macular Degeneration and Diabetic Retinopathy in their earliest stages. Laser Tomography delivers high definition images of the internal layers of the eye allowing the doctors an exceptional insight into the health of your eyes.

Dr. Tim Walz, Dr. Amber Jordon, Dr. John Gill BAY AREA VISION & CONTACT LENS CENTER Moore Plaza / 5425 South Padre Island Drive / Suite 119-B

361.993.7778 bayareavision.com

LIKE US

BayAreaVisionTX

St. Peter’s Home Health, Inc. Certified by Medicare in 2005 and accredited by Community Health Accrediation Program in 2010 Registered Nurse and Referral Intake available 24/7

SERVICES PROVIDED:

SKILLED NURSING / HOME HEALTH AIDE SPEECH THERPY / PHYSICAL THERAPY OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY / MEDICAL SOCIAL SERVICE

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LAB WORK / COLOSTOMY CARE / CATHETER CARE / WOUND CARE / INJECTIONS / PORTABLE X-RAYS INTRAVENOUS THERAPY / WOUND VAC THERAPY

1801 East Main St., Ste. A Alice, Texas 78332 Office: 361.664.7001 | 1.877.279.7710 | Fax: 361.664.7727 COUNTIES SERVED: Brooks, Duval, Jim Wells, Kleberg, Nueces, Bee, Hidalgo, Jim Hogg, Kenedy, Live Oak, Starr, Webb, Zapata, Cameron, Willacy, Aransas and San Patricio. N S I D E C O A S TA L B E N D M D

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NSIDE md

Future of Health Care Survey Conducted by The Doctors Company with over 5,000 physicians across the United States

Nine out of 10

physicians say they are unwilling to recommend the medical profession to family and friends.

A recent survey of over 5,000 physicians and surgeons on the Future of Health Care indicates that the anticipated shortage of health care professionals may be exacerbated by growing physician sentiment. The medical profession has been projecting a shortage for years, but the findings from this survey indicate two compounding factors. First, 43 percent of physician respondents indicated that they are contemplating early retirement within the next five years. Second, nine out of 10 are unwilling to recommend the health care profession to family and friends. In both instances, the responses were attributed to the transformative changes occurring within America’s health care system, more specifically as a result of health care reform. For those physicians considering early retirement, many cited the demands on their practices resulting from new legal requirements and continued reimbursement reduction as causes to inhibit

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practice growth, despite the anticipated influx of newly insured Americans into the health care system. In addition, 60 percent of respondents indicated that the pressure to reduce costs, increase volume, and improve quality will have a negative impact on patient care and how doctors practice medicine. Finally, the transformative changes that are causing practicing physicians to consider early retirement are also impacting their desire to recommend the health care profession, a career that is often viewed as a legacy being passed down from one generation to the next. “The physician sentiments expressed in the Future of Health Care Survey are deeply concerning and disheartening,” said Donald J. Palmisano, MD, JD, FACS, former president of the American Medical Association and member of The Doctors Company Board of Governors. “Today, we are perilously close to a true crisis as newly insured Americans enter the health care system and our population

continues to age. Unfortunately, we may be facing a shift from a ‘calling,’ which has been the hallmark for generations among physicians, that could threaten the next generation of health care professionals.” The survey, conducted by The Doctors Company, is the largest of its kind on the subject and includes responses from over 5,000 physicians and surgeons from across the United States. For more information about the study, please visit the Knowledge Center at www.thedoctors.com/future.

The Doctors Company is the nation’s largest insurer of physician and surgeon medical liability.

Note: This article was provided by The Doctors Company and edited according to the company’s policy and style.


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Coastal Bend Primary Care. Here you’re not just a patient... You’re family! ✚ Acute & Chronic Illnesses ✚ High Blood Pressure ✚ Diabetes ✚ High Cholesterol ✚ Allergy Testing & Treatment ✚ Aging Medicine ✚ Asthma ✚ Dermatology/Skin Cancer ✚ Pain Management ✚ Fibromyalgia ✚ Musculoskeletal Disease ✚ Medical Weight Loss

Program

BOARD-CERTIFIED IN FAMILY MEDICINE. FELLOW OF THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF FAMILY MEDICINE.

(361) 654-0050

Coastal Bend Primary Care Jesse G. Garcia, M.D.

4621 S. Staples Corpus Christi, TX 78411 www.CorpusMedicine.com N S I D E C O A S TA L B E N D M D

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NSIDE Coastal Bend MD June/July 2012  

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