NRV Magazine May-June 2022

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NRV’s Premier Lifestyle Magazine

New River Valley nrvmagazine.com May/June 2022

Welcome Summer


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Search. See. Love.

Find a place to hang your heart. Explore all homes on the market today and leverage the insight of our agent network.

Darin Greear REALTOR®

Kerry Gillispie REALTOR®

540.320.5859 Darin@RinerVa.com www.RinerVa.com

540.320.1684

kerryggillispie@gmail.com www.longandfoster.com/KerryGillispie

of Long & Foster Real Estate

Mike Weber REALTOR®

540.250.6727

MikesYourRealtor@gmail.com www.longandfoster.com/MikeWeber

Brenda Woody REALTOR®

540.257.0281

Brenda.Woody@LongandFoster.com www.longandfoster.com/BrendaWoody

Wendy Swanson REALTOR® 540.797.9497

swansonwm@gmail.com www.wendymswanson.com

Long & Foster was named “America’s Most Trusted Residential Real Estate Brokerage” by Lifestory Research.

Priscilla Morris REALTOR® 540.320.3586 Priscilla@PriscillaMorris.com www.PriscillaMorris.com

Visit www.longandfoster.com or download our mobile app today!

3601 Holiday Ln. Blacksburg, VA 24060 | 540.552.1010

Trust. Family. Excellence. NRVMAGAZINE.com

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SPOT A STROKE Learn the Warning Signs and Act FAST

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BALANCE

EYESIGHT

FACE

ARMS

SPEECH

TIME

UNSTEADY

CHANGES

DROOPING

WEAK/NUMB

DIFFICULTY

CALL 911

Act FAST in response to any of these signs to improve your chances for recovery. If you get help within three hours of the first symptom, the advanced interventional treatments and fast-track Stroke Alert program available at Carilion Clinic can lessen or even eliminate the effects of a stroke. If you or someone else has any of the BE FAST symptoms, call 911 immediately.

Certified as a Stroke Center by The Joint Commission, Carilion Roanoke Memorial Hospital’s Stroke Alert program treats all levels of stroke victims. We believe health care should be about one thing: getting you back to living your life.

CarilionClinic.org/BeFast 4

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Fri., June 10, 7:30 PM

RANKY TANKY Fri., July 8, 7:30 PM

THE CROOKED ROAD’S MUSIC AND DANCE SPECTACULAR

Celebrating Southwest Virginia’s Heritage Music NRVMAGAZINE.com

May/June

PERFORMANCES | EXHIBITIONS | EXPERIENCES 190 Alumni Mall, Blacksburg, VA 24061

artscenter.vt.edu

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CONTENTS May/June

2022

Past ure Talk

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Hammo c ks 10

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Te e n E nt re p re ne u r 14 S p eakeasi e s 18 Hal l m ar k N e i g hb or ho o d 24 Vac at i on on Whe e l s 28 Co ok i ng at Hom e 32 N ew Tai l g ate s 3 6

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Montg om e r y Muse um 3 8 Drama Camp 40

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Ti re S afety 42 Ad ve r t i se rs Ind ex 46

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Ryan Stenger

Steven Bowman

Deanna Dickerson

NMLS 568834

NMLS 914459

NMLS 712947

(540) 375-7780

(540) 266-3248

(540) 266-3423

Meet Your Mortgage Loan Officers. Freedom First has been serving the Roanoke and New River Valleys since 1956, and we recently grew our Mortgage Team in the NRV! If you’re looking to buy a home or refinance your current mortgage, our expert Mortgage Team is ready to help you. Contact them today for more information on how to get started, or visit www.freedomfirst.com/mortgage to check today’s rates and get pre-qualified.

Federally insured by NCUA. 8

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Pasture Talk

NEW RIVER VALLEY M

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P. O. Box 11816 Blacksburg, VA 24062 o: 540-961-2015 nrvmagazine@msn.com www.nrvmagazine.com

PUBLISHER Country Media, Inc. Phillip Vaught MANAGING EDITOR Joanne Anderson ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Kim Walsh

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DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Dennis Shelor WRITERS Joanne Anderson Karl Kazaks Emily Alberts Jo Clark Becky Hepler Nancy Moseley Kameron Bryant

PHOTOGRAPHERS Kristie Lea Photography Kevin Riley Tom Wallace Billy Bowling Photography Nathan Cooke Photography

© 2022 Country Media, Inc. Country Media, Inc. will not knowingly publish any advertisement that is illegal or misleading to its readers. Neither the advertiser nor Country Media, Inc. will be responsible or liable for misinformation, misprints, or typographical errors. The publisher assumes no financial liability for copy omissions by Country Media, Inc. other than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Corrections or cancellations to be made by an advertiser shall be received no later than 5 p.m. the 20th of each publishing month. No claim shall be allowed for errors not affecting the value of the advertisement. Paid advertising does not represent an endorsement by this publication. Content cannot be reproduced without written consent from Country Media, Inc. All rights reserved. Real Estate advertised in this publication is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968.

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When you sell something, like a house, business, vehicle, you invariably drive by again some day, look for it or keep tabs on how things unfold. It is incredibly heartwarming for me - who owned, expanded and improved Clay Corner Inn from 1994 to 2011 - to see it in the professional hands of Josh Roseberry. He is a natural visionary and has modernized much of the lodging – in both décor and practical, functional investments. The back decks, poolside and outdoor spaces are very inviting. And now, he’s operating a full restaurant and bar, with brunch on weekends, and dinner five nights a week. What has not changed at Clay Corner Inn since my days is its attraction as a locally-owned and operated small business which evokes a sense of the NRV community and offers gracious hospitality to guests from around the world. Our MayJune issue – the one you are reading - used to be focused on fairs and festivals which had the lid on them for two years. Most have returned this year, but we’ve covered them already in depth. Sort of by accident with this issue, we morphed into a food theme and a family angle. At least we are keeping with alliteration – Fairs, Festivals, Family, Food - one of my Favorite word sequence styles. One of the most exciting events coming our way is the Brick Road Drama Camp – please read all about it on page 40. Volunteer. Offer materials. Get your kids to assist. And most of all, to anyone with a socially or communication-challenged child age 4 to 18 or up, please sign up. This is a unique opportunity to send your

beloved special needs kid to camp, take a break and enjoy the blessing. CORRECTION: One of our readers from the time of Wally Thrasher (MarchApril article) submitted the following information regarding the story having reported that Thrasher played football with the Pulaski Cougars: Pulaski County High School dates to the 1970s so Wally Thrasher probably played football for the Pulaski Orioles. PHS and Dublin High School, with its Dukes [state champions in the ‘50s], were consolidated in the 1970s. The idea that he could be hiding in plain sight is a better tale than being burned to ashes on a mountain side. That legend still fuels dinner table conversations when others of that era gather. I must introduce my most recent horse acquisition, new trail steed and riding partner. Remington is a magnificent 14-year-old OTTB – Off the Track ThoroughBred – almost black with a white diamond and one white sock. He raced a few years, hung around movie sets a few more years, then came to me. He is a calm, reliable, well-trained and well-mannered horse, and we’ve been riding at Pandapas many times already. I did not grow up with horses, in fact, my first horse came late in life. While I could not have imagined having horses, I now cannot imagine life without them. He and Boaz are great pastures buddies. Happy Trails!

Joanne Anderson ManagingEditor

jmawriter@aol.com

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Tree Breeze

swing – and sleep - through summer

Text by Nancy S. Moseley

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Perhaps there is nothing that symbolizes a life of lounge-y leisure more than someone swaying away the day in a hammock. Even better, add in a book, perhaps splayed open face down, because its reader fell asleep. In our lifetime, a hammock has been consistently synonymous with relaxation; however, its origin suggests anything but. The earliest hammocks were woven out of tree bark or palm fronds and were widely used in Central and South America as protection from crawling insect bites, disease transmission or deadly animals, like venomous snakes. The Native Americans of El Salvador believed that hammocks fended off earthquakes. And in the late 16th century, the suspended beds were adopted by the United Kingdom's Royal Navy as space savers and because they kept sailors safe - not thrown onto the floor - from the ocean's capriciousness. Likewise, it provided a more comfortable, balanced slumber than a rigid bed while at sea. Even astronauts, from the Apollo 12 lunar mission forward, slept in hammocks because contact with the cabin floor was far too cold. Now, evolutionarily, we seem to only associate hammocks that comfortable, balanced slumber. The main thing to consider when looking to purchase a hammock is how you plan to use it. This will get you started on the right track of research, reviewing specs like weight capacity, material, portability and pack size.

Backyard If you are simply wanting a hammock to enjoy in your backyard, first evaluate if you have trees that will accommodate such or if your purchase requires a stand. The benefit of a stand allows you to enjoy a certain amount of portability while still maintaining location permanence. This is ideal if you want to follow the shade (or sun) around your yard. While a bit more expensive than NRVMAGAZINE.com

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cloth, a rope hammock will provide that classic look to your landscaping, not to mention they are weather- and rust-resistant and extremely durable. To avoid those pesky waffle prints on your legs, go for a cloth version instead, one that's a cotton-polyester blend. It's quick-drying, easy-to-clean, and the color and comfort options grow exponentially with this choice, as they often come with a bit more padding than their rope cousin. A fun addition to backyard leisure are tent hammocks. Its teardrop, enclosed shape is eye-catching, and it functions as a chair, a tent and a hammock all at once. A final popular stationary option is the chair hammock. Great for porches, these provide the utmost in comfort and cushiness. Think of it as a suspended rocking chair.

Parks Let's say you prefer to stretch out outside the boundaries of home or you're a city dweller, and the only option for a relaxing swing is to pack up a hammock and head to the nearest public park. Portable hammocks are also great for college students who enjoy a "backyard" the size of an entire campus. Weight is the biggest factor to consider here. And pack-size. ENO is a leading brand and offers the SingleNest Hammock for such uses. It weighs only one pound (yet can hold 400) and packs down to the size of a softball. The nylon material is smooth and silky and may result in unintended napping. College students are likely the most at-risk for this side effect.

Camping Weight and pack-size, again, are the name-ofthe-game with hammocks you intend to take on camping or hiking trips. Accessories to consider when hammock 12

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camping are rainfly or bug nets and perhaps even a sleeping pad, to keep your backside warm-n-toasty. Also handy for camping purposes is one that comes with storage pockets. If you prefer your overnights in the elements with a loved one, ENO makes a DoubleNest, suitable for two. Sure, our ancestors' ancestors slept in hammocks for practical reasons, but is spending an entire night strung up really OK for your body? Sleeping cocooned certainly seems more appealing than sleeping on hard ground, and many tout that a hammock nap is far superior to one in an actual bed, the tossing and turning fundamentally curtailed. Ergonomically, it's best for your back to pick a size that is at least two feet longer than your height. This will allow you to stretch out diagonally across the hammock and mitigate the amount of "droop."

~~~ It's important to note that most hammocks don't come with straps. This will allow you to research different suspension systems according to your advanced (or novice) scout skills or how versatile you want your ensemble to be. Go ahead and conduct research on the following buzz words: guy lines, carabiners, tree straps, daisy chain suspension and whoopie sling suspension. No matter your preference, the golden rule of hammock hanging is always be as tree friendly as possible. Choose healthy, hardy trees and use a tree strap at least 3/4 inches wide, upwards of two inches is even better. Knowing you are protecting the prosperity of the canopy above will assure ease into a breezy, guilt-free - and conveniently snakefree(!) - dreamland. Someone should've tipped off Adam and Eve. Nancy S. Moseley is a Blacksburg-based freelance writer who has never slept, or even lounged, in a hammock. Though she considers herself fairly adept at scout-like skills, she, much to her chagrin, lacks the skills required to easily relax.

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T H E E W I N G C O M PA N I E S

BUILDING | REMODELING | CABINETRY Custom Residential Projects Are Our Specialty.

Visit our showroom: 1701 S. Main St., Blacksburg, VA 540.951.0544 • EwingBuildingAndCabinets.com

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Fe at u re

Candle-Making and Dancing through

High School

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The entrepreneurial bug can bite young, and Lindsay Santos, 15, doesn’t remember a time when she did not want to start a business. She would daydream about it and even sketch out business plans and marketing ideas. There’s nothing like peer pressure as a teen, and when one of her friends started making and selling soap, Lindsay went into action. It was the summer of 2020, and Lindsay watched 14

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youtube videos and began a trial-and-error approach to making candles. “I started with small quantities, and my parents helped me with documentation, keep things straight, what worked well and what did not work at all,” she says. “It’s a long process, the learning and the crafting. I need different wick sizes for different jar sizes, and I have learned to figure out how to make sure the wick does not burn too hot or not hot enough.” May/June

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Text by Joanne M. Anderson Photos by Christy Wallace shower steamers and wax melts. Though she does most of her work in the kitchen, she also has space in the dining room and basement for storage of supplies and finished products. Her parents, Webster and Claire Santos, have been tremendously supportive. For Lindsay’s part, she picks up and puts away everything so the kitchen it neat and tidy once again for meal times. A sophomore at Blacksburg High School, Lindsay purchases most of her supplies online, with Virginia Candle Supply one of her favorite vendors. “There was a shortage of glass during covid,” she recalls, “so I had to re-test multiple times when I ordered jars I had not previously used.”

She named her business CALI for Candles and Luxury Items. All her products are crafted with soy wax from American-grown soy beans. “They are environmentallyfriendly, burn cleaner and have a longer lasting life,” she explains.

Placing the wrong wick in a candle can cause a candle jar to explode. So taking the temperature of the candles over a period of burn time is imperative to be sure it burns at the correct temperature and speed. “If the burn is too cold,” Lindsay explains, “then the candle tunnels, and liquid wax extinguishes the flame.” With more reading, learning and experimentation in the home kitchen, Lindsay perfected her candles, NRVMAGAZINE.com

One of the greatest challenges in any business is sales and marketing. For this generation, social media comes as naturally as brushing your teeth. Lindsay found it interesting and picked it up quickly. She sells nationally on Etsy. Handcrafted local items are in demand, and Blacksburg Books reached out to her for a supply of candles to sell on consignment in its bookstore. She has products for sale sometimes at Hethwood Market, and she supplies decorative things for gift boxes to Burg Box and In Focus Interiors. The latter was featured in our MarchApril issue, and Burg Box started when people fussed about not coming to Blacksburg for Virginia Tech football or other events during covid. Pals Jennifer and May/June

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Dana, VT alumnae who love all things VT, Blacksburg and NRV, decided to “send Blacksburg to them.” What started as a simple idea has evolved into a real business that supports “shop local” and features seasonal products. Lindsay has made wee candles in beer bottle caps and real candles to be included in “Burg Boxes”. [www.theburgbox.com] Dancing has been a big part of Lindsay’s life since she was 3 years old. She joined a dance competition group three years later, and continues dancing in ballet, jazz, contemporary, lyrical and lots of other styles. She spends 10 or more hours per week in dance – lessons, practice, competition, etc. She runs a business, handcrafts her products, does her homework and enjoys her family and friends and the variety in her life.

www.etsy.com/shop/CALIcandlesVA CALIcandlesVA@gmail.com

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Visit The New River Valley`s Largest Tile and Flooring Showroom! Installation, Sales, and Service

57 Years of Proudly Serving the New River Valley! (540)-382-3271 - deharttile.com 1140 Radford St. Christiansburg,VA 24073 Ceramic & Porcelain Tile - Carpet - Hardwood - Luxury Vinyl - Stacked Stone - Window Treatments

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make your home the best it can be!

NRVMAGAZINE.com

540.443.9966 www.wecheckenergy.com

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Speakeasies

and Fine Dining

Bad Apple Restaurant

Text by Joanne M. Anderson

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There appears to be no definitive reason for the term “speakeasy”, though it referred to places which illegally sold alcoholic beverages during Prohibition. Perhaps patrons might “speak easy”, as in a whisper, for their participation in buying and consuming unlawful liquor. The entire Prohibition Era, 1920-1933, was implemented with the lofty goals of solving social issues, improving health and reducing corruption. It turned out to deliver a study in contrasts. The dark side involved bootlegging, moonshine, illegal liquor transported across state lines and rampant crime and bribery. A hopelessness permeated the nation following the brutality of World War I. Speakeasies sprung up all over the country when the 18th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution took effect Jan. 17, 1920, banning “the manufacture, transportation or sales of intoxicating liquors.”

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On the bright side, women got the vote, liberation exploded in public and private circles, and prosperity was at hand. Americans were treated to movie theaters, baseball games, dance halls and amusement parks. They had money for radios, new home appliances, phonographs, cars, travel and entertainment. Inventions in medicine and excitement in fashion captivated the population. Notable names from the 1920s include Babe Ruth, Coco Chanel, Charles Lindbergh, Al Capone, Albert Einstein, Charlie Chaplin, Duke Ellingson, Jack Dempsey, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and many more. The Harlem Renaissance redefined arts and culture, and glamour and glitz commingled in society with copious corruption and a dose of despair. It all ended when the 21st Amendment repealed the 18th Amendment in 1933. It is this fascinating slice of time that three New River Valley restaurants have embraced as a theme. May/June

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Clay Corner Inn & Restaurant Josh and Jenna Roseberry, both natives of the New River Valley, chose the bright side for their new restaurant. The speakeasy, aka Roaring ‘20s Lounge, is in a charming, long, rectangular space with windows on three sides. The stunning, handcrafted bar top was made by Todd Chrisley, a self-described jack of all trades. A special slab of thick walnut found in Giles County was shaped, sanded and shellacked into one beautiful, 22-foot long piece. Three casual dining rooms sport large windows with natural daylight flooding the spaces and mostly jazz and 1920s music in the background. Dinner plates include Gatsby’s Stuffed Chicken and Louis Armstrong Glazed Salmon, while you can choose starters and small plates like Babe Ruth Sliders or Hoover Deviled Eggs. Not to bypass the New River Valley, however, the brunch menu offers entrées like Huckleberry Bowl, Cassell Burger and Smithfield Shrimp & Grits. Josh Roseberry is the general manager over all the lodging, restaurant and catering businesses, and his wife has just left her day job at the Corporate Research Center to NRVMAGAZINE.com

work by his side. He holds a business degree from Virginia Tech and dreamed for years of having his own business. He employs a friendly staff with the skills, talent and experience to tend to every detail of comfort and satisfaction. He and chef Charlie Jones are pals from way back and have enjoyed planning, plotting and collaborating on the new restaurant. “Charlie creates the dishes, makes the sauces and directs the food service,” Josh says. The casual atmosphere beckons everyone who loves being in a happy place with great food, friendly folks and a giant serving of amiable hospitality – in dining and lodging.

Claycorner.com 401 Clay St., SW, Blacksburg 540-552-4030 Brunch - Sat. and Sunday, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Dinner - Wed., Thurs., Sunday, 5 – 9 p.m. Fri. and Sat. 5 – 10 p.m. May/June

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Bad Apple Restaurant at Doe Creek Farm From a spectacular hilltop setting in Giles County, dining guests step though a weighted door (look for the weight) into the smartly renovated barn. The structure was built in the 1940s and served to house sheep and hay for decades. As priorities changed on this fully operating farm, the barn stood as a high-point sentry without a purpose for several years. When the idea of renovating the barn was embraced, Georgia Haverty, owner of Doe Creek Farm, found the awesome stained glass window at Black Dog Salvage in Roanoke. “It’s from a Presbyterian church in Pennsylvania, and quickly became the centerpiece of the renovation,” states Allison Hollopter, Georgia’s daughter and owner of the Bad Apple. The chandeliers were ordered online and came in pieces, every glass pendalogue or crystal was individually wrapped. “It took us 14 hours and six bottles of wine to assemble them, one piece of glass at a time!” Once inside, take the stairway up and step into a luxurious, spacious dining room. A calm elegance infuses the restaurant. Should you need to wait, walk up the set of stairs near the bar and cozy up to a cocktail table, sink into

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the leather couch or simply stand at the railing and look over the dining area. Restrooms are back on the lower level and provide individual cloth hand towels. Nice touch. Dinner begins with warm cornbread and ends with dessert. But, dining guests may be here mostly for the cocktails, wine and middle of the evening meal, and they will not be disappointed. All spirits and wines come from Virginia distilleries and wineries, and the entire Bad Apple team is responsible for the creative cocktails. For the noncarnivores in the crowd, ratatouille and pasta primavera grace the menu. For the genuine beef lover, this writer highly recommends the filet mignon. Tropical white fish, apricot curry pork chop, shrimp scampi and other options are offered as well.

Badapplebarn.com

[directions on website, do not trust GPS]

363 Doe Creek Farm Road, Pembroke 540-626-2232 (Reservations recommended) Thursday, 5 – 9 p.m. (last seating 7:30) Friday and Sat., 5 - 10:30 p.m. (last seating at 8:30) Sunday, 4 – 8 p.m. (last seating at 6:30) May/June

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Kid’s Fishing Day May 14

Pearisburg Community Market May-September and Narrows Farmers Market this summer Brewridge Music Festival May 21

Pearisburg Festival in the Park June 10-11

Newport Fair August 12-13

Find more information on our Facebook page or by visiting our website VirginiasMtnPlayground.com

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Lush Lounge

Lush Lounge in Floyd raises the bar on the speakeasy experience where you get a buffalo nickel for a vintage Coke machine and can slip through a secret door for your cocktails, replicating the Prohibition Era. They have elevated the art of the craft cocktails popular a century ago with names like Puttin’ on the Spritz, It All Went Sour and Cheap Perfume. The blind pig logo comes from it being a secret code for a speakeasy. “They first opened in butcher shops,” explains owner Lindsey Parks. “One would step in and say something about a blind pig and gain access to the illegal bar.” The Lush Gastro Lounge focuses on fine dining, and there’s an interesting Prohibition Era gift shop you won’t want to miss. There are four dining spaces - The Peacock Lounge, The Prohibition Bar, The Traveling Carnival Tent, and The Silent Movie Theatre. 22

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Lush Lounge opened on the 100th anniversary of Prohibition, Jan. 17, 2020. Glenn and Lindsey Parks have a background in contracting and renovated the house built in 1919 themselves. Their passion for craft cocktails and food trends brought Lush Lounge to fruition, and they are opening a second establishment named Twisted Liquid in Blacksburg.

Lushlounge.net Also on Facebook 317 E. Main St., Floyd (540) 745-5874 Tues., Wed., Thurs., Sunday, 5 – 10 p.m. Fri. and Sat., 5 – 11 p.m.

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The Hallmark Movie Neighborhood a family finds their dream home

Text by Joanne M. Anderson Photos by Tom Wallace Moms sometimes get to do what they want on Mother’s Day, and Kim Mann’s idea of a great day in 2021 was driving around Blacksburg looking at houses. “We went through several neighborhoods before parking in front of this beautiful house on Tall Oaks Drive,” she recalls. “My husband Matt and I sat in the car discussing what we liked about it when a man popped around the corner. He held up his hand with a hesitant but friendly wave. We got out to say hi and assure him we were just admiring the home. After talking 20 minutes, he graciously asked if we would like to see inside, the whole family, as two of our kids were with us.” 24

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They all enjoyed walking through many rooms and learning what had been done to make the home so amazing. After thanking the man for his time and the tour, Matt commented on the way home to Peterstown, W.V.: “Now that’s a house I’d move to Blacksburg for.” Fast forward a couple months, and the Mann family took up residence in the house they already loved.

The Journey to Blacksburg Matt and Kim Mann were high school sweethearts. They both grew up in Peterstown, W.V., a small hamlet with May/June

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a population below 750, just a few miles over the state line northeast of Narrows in Giles County. They have a lot of respect for their rural roots and values, but wanted to be part of a larger community to grow themselves and enjoy more activities in later years. Matt is the founder, CEO and president of M-Rock Stone Manufacturing in Peterstown, and Kim moved her Allure Spa business from Giles County to Blacksburg in the spring of 2018. “I felt drawn to Blacksburg for a long time,” she

“Once I came to work here almost every day, I started feeling connected to the community and knew I wanted our family to get involved. states. “Once I came to work here almost every day, I started feeling connected to the community and knew I wanted our family to get involved. I heard great things about the schools and absolutely love the wellness-minded spirit.”

Life in the ‘Hood The 6,798-square-foot house sits on approximately an acre with pastoral views behind it. “I love the backyard view,” Matt says. “The place has the right feel for our family, and it flows so easily on to the patio. The landscaping is beautiful with potential to add our own touch, as we both enjoy yardwork.”

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Kim enjoys hearing stories from so many people who have been in the house – kids growing up and playing here and others who have been entertained as a guest of previous owners. “I smile as I drive to work and see kids walking and riding their bikes to school. Families walk dogs or enjoy one another along wide streets with pretty homes and beautifully landscaped yards. The neighborhood literally feels like a Hallmark movie neighborhood.”

Life at Home While Matt loves the family space, interior flow and backyard view, Kim loves the entertainment angle, cozy feel throughout and proximity to schools. “At first, 26

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I wasn’t sure I’d like the walking path just 30 yards from our back patio,” she relates, “but it turns out, we enjoy sitting out back, and watching walkers and bicycles going by. We sit out with coffee in the mornings and a glass of wine by the firepit in the evenings. In summer, the field is full of cows, and playful calves entertain us some of the time.” Homeowners always have projects, if just a list in their heads, and the Manns plan to paint the exterior at some point and likely incorporate some M-Rock. She’d like a few more modern light fixtures and hopes to paint some inside. “For now, we are comfortable and content with the house. It is elegant and comfortable,” Kim states. We are more out in the country in Blacksburg than we were back home in W.V., but with cool restaurants, great schools, VT and shopping within 10 minutes.”

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Vacation on Wheels a mobile Airbnb Text by Nancy S. Moseley Photos by Christy Wallace It's hard being new parents. You bring home your new acquisition, stare at it incredulously with doe-eyed wonder, with equal parts joy and intimidation. "We got it home and said, 'What have we done?! We don't even know how to use it!'" Laureen Blakemore of Blacksburg offers, thinking back to the days when they hadn't yet figured out how to get their brand-new bundleof-camper up their steep driveway. Laureen and her husband, Mike, purchased the 2018 Thor Motor Coach Four Winds close to quitting time during a St. Patrick's Day sale. The salesman, anxious to clock out, took all of five minutes to explain operations. The two drove it to an interstate RV park, and actually paid for a spot, just to practice using the sewer system. Since settling into life with a camper, the Blakemores have enjoyed galivants up and down the eastern seaboard and as far west as Texas, mostly targeting state parks for 28

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the peacefulness and facilities. They've taken it to family reunions, to visit kids in college and currently, to annual escapes with friends to Gatewood Park in Pulaski. But their favorite destination is Carrabelle, Fla., where they belly right up to the sea. "It's a little bit of home that comes with us," Mike states. "And you don’t have to worry about how much you pack," Laureen adds. Now "Spudnik," named as a clever twist on the Russian word "Sputnik" meaning "traveling companion" and the couples' love of potatoes, sports 30,000 rental miles. "It's been back and forth across the country twice. Just not with us," Mike explains. The idea sparked when they were pricing out what it would cost to fly to California and rent an RV for the trip back. In the process, they discovered outdoorsy.com, a company that aggregates available RV, camper van and May/June

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travel trailer rentals internationally. Outdoorsy takes care of vetting of renter driving history and insurance. Rentable units are showcased on profile pages like those found on Airbnb or Vrbo.

"It was sitting in the driveway a lot and we're paying every month for it. It might as well be doing something. Now it pays for itself," Mike says. "It was sitting in the driveway a lot and we're paying every month for it. It might as well be doing something. Now it pays for itself," Mike says. "Spudnik" runs on a Ford E-350 chassis and is licensed for five passengers. There are two queen beds, one full bed, a large refrigerator and freezer, a 3-burner gas cooktop and a microwave. A 40-gallon freshwater tank services the full bath. Linens are provided as well as basic cookware and cleaning supplies. After a 90-minute orientation - required by Outdoorsy, that includes a driving (and parking) lesson - it is ready to roll. When the Blakemores' profile went live, it was booked within two days. "We set it up how we would want to rent it, we didn't want it to be a math exam. Being able to say "Off you go!' is what's helped with some of the bookings." The camper rents for daily, weekly and monthly rates which include unlimited miles and use of the generator. "Spudnik" once hosted four cousins who arrived in Blacksburg from all over the country to tour the Blue Ridge Parkway. This year there is a booking for Virginia 30

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Tech graduation where it will simply be enjoyed in a local driveway. (Do you best not to think of "National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation.") "Spudnik" might even go to Floyd Fest this year. Outdoorsy lets renters set allowable travel and destination parameters. At just 23 feet in length, the Blakemores have established a niche corner of the market because they offer a small, easy-to-drive camper and one that allows pets. Mike and Laureen took their cats to Gatewood Park once, though it comically proved to be less than a pleasurable experience. Laureen and Mike met when they were 13 in Banbury, England, and were married in 1989. In 1995, they embarked on three months of tent camping in the U.S. from Canada to Florida with their 2-year-old daughter and 4-year-old son. They eventually arrived in Blacksburg to visit a cousin of Laureen's. In 1996, they relocated to Blacksburg permanently, halfway between family members in New York and Florida. Each year the couple looks ahead at the calendar year to block out times they want to use the camper. They add in buffer days for maintenance, which Mike takes care of, plus professional cleaning. As they set their sights on eventual retirement and a bigger RV, Mike and Laureen have mapped out a lengthy bucket list trip to explore the American West. They thought about living in a camper full time, but they want to bring their cats, which causes pause. "We'd need to pull a cattery," Mike laughs, recalling their previous cat conundrum. "We could even have extra storage underneath it!" After all, with camper life, it's all about the nooks and crannies of where to tuck things. Apparently, even cats. Nancy S. Moseley is a freelance writer from Blacksburg. She once rented a camper to travel out west and learned the importance of securing everything in the refrigerator the hard way. Especially glass bottles, like the kind that hold beer. Or not.

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ADVENTURE COULD BE IN your backyard...

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Cooking at Home is the New Going Out cooking classes, curbside chef, catering Text by Joanne M. Anderson Photos courtesy of Jud Flynn

When I see Jud Flynn, he’s not dressed in chef’s whites, black and white houndstooth pants and the distinctive toque blanche (white hat) of the award-winning executive chef that he is. He is more likely wearing jeans, work boots and a plaid shirt, operating JD or Big Blue with an 800-pound round bale of hay on a spear, waiting for me to position my truck to accept the bale. JD refers to his large John Deere tractor. Big Blue is the large model New Hollander tractor, and Little Blue, his small New Hollander tractor, is stationed nearby. Flynn grew up in Blacksburg and attended the old Prices Fork Elementary and Blacksburg High School. He spent summers in the tiny hamlet of Long Lake, N.Y., inside Adirondack Park, one of the first Forever Wild Forest Preserves in the country. There he worked beside his grandmother, who was a short order cook in the family restaurant. By the time he graduated from high school, Flynn had done dishes, prepped food and worked as a chef’s assistant. After a couple years in the culinary side of exclusive B&Bs in New Hampshire, he returned to Blacksburg. Back in town, he served as sous chef under a Dutch-trained chef, who left the job, and Flynn took over as executive chef. “Though I was doing everything well, the respect for my work was not present from peers and others, so I attended the esteemed New England Culinary Institute in Vermont,” Flynn relates. “I learned a new way of analytical thinking which has served me well, along with the requisite diploma which then validated my culinary skills.” He opened a couple restaurants in the New River Valley before spending 10 years as a senior executive chef at Virginia Tech. It was here that he met his wife, Heather Flynn, a graduate of Johnson & Wales, renowned for its culinary degrees. “It’s nice to have married someone also 32

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in the food service business,” Jud Flynn declares. “We have the same thought process and something we enjoy together, personally and professionally and as a family.” His awards and accolades are extensive: [ACF = American Culinary Federation] • • • • • •

23 Gold Medals in ACF National Culinary Competitions Gold Medallion from the ACF President ACF Regional Chef of the Year ACF Regional Chef Professionalism Award Silver Medalist at the Culinary Olympiad ACF national judge

In 2008, Chef Jud founded On-Site Culinary Solutions LLC [onsiteculinary.com]. Though he has traveled the country offering training and development programs in the kitchen at several universities, the business now focuses on catering and classes. His skills and talents embrace an extraordinary breadth of food knowledge and experience. “Cooking methods and classical techniques are the backbone of a great culinary foundation,” he explains. Cooking is not especially difficult, but cooking well is a craft that can be honed through demonstrations and hands-on lessons in the classes Flynn offers. His students include people of all ages from all walks of life, and any one of the classes is a fun experience for the home cook, couples, families, friends and small groups of any kind.

Chef Jud’s classes offer something for everyone in a relaxed kitchen environment. “Cooking at home is the new going out,” he offers, and classes cover a wide range of topics, like: • • • • • • • • •

Mastering Fish Baking and Pastry Curries of the World Global Street Foods Holiday Baking Art of Sausage Making and Smoking Techniques Soups, Chowders and Bisques Steaks and Butter-poached Lobster And more …

Gift certificates are available, and what a novel present for someone special, the kind of gift that keeps on giving. Not long ago, to mark the 100th anniversary of the German Club on Virginia Tech’s campus, he provided the ice sculpture in the shape of the club’s logo. When not cooking or teaching, he and Heather might be found at Walnut Spring Stables, which they own. It sits on the old Hoge family farm owned by his brother Tyler Hoge and which, in the 1800s, was known for selling its hams to patrons in England. Their mother married into the Hoge family after Jud was born. Whether sitting on a tractor outside or standing in a kitchen indoors, Jud Flynn enjoys the work at hand. I think I’ll order some eclairs or chocolate mousse with my next bale of hay. Hay for the horses and a sweet delight pour moi, n’estce pas?

Onsiteculinary.com | Walnutspringstables.com 34

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Not Your Grandpa’s Tailgate

Text by Joanne M. Anderson It’s a bird, it’s a plane. No. No. It’s a step, it’s a table, it’s a toolbox, a laptop storage spot, a boombox, a phone charger, a measuring tool, a workbench, a bottle opener. Aha. It’s a tailgate! Definitely not your grandpa’s tailgate. Someone brilliant took note of what a tailgate can be. Perhaps someone sketched it out on a paper napkin to submit to the bigwigs at the truck factories and voila! Multifunction tailgates. Of course, since the advent of “tailgating”, the simple noun has evolved into a verb. There’s one theory afoot that credits the Green Bay Packers with coining the term tailgating in 1919. Fans parked pick-up trucks around the field and sat on the beds to watch the game. Since it was the last year before Prohibition (covered in more detail in the Speakeasies and Fine Dining article on page 18), one can safely assume fans enjoyed some spirits with their ham, potatoes and custards. Tailgating aside, the wonderful tailgate, which heretofore has kept things from sliding out of the pick-up bed, and enabled access and removal when down or open, 36

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has morphed into a multi-use truck part. The once dead space between tailgate panels is now shaped with little doors of its own for storage. Thin things like laptops and sandpaper fit neatly inside. The Ford F-250 has an integrated tailgate step with grab bar. Once the tailgate is down, you press a button and the step comes out and down. Then you can pull out a bar and position it vertically for a grab bar. In reverse, the grab bar comes down and when horizontal, pressing a button takes it inside and out of sight. Same with the step. The Ram 1500 offers a split tailgate, akin to the 60/40 split backseat in an SUV. There are handy moments when one wants to swing open only half the tailgate, though it also pulls down like normal. Lights and outlets are available near the tailgate on many pick-up truck models. The GMC Sierra 1500 offers a sophisticated speaker system that operates independently of the truck, which need not be running to amplify your own little tailgate concert. There are many reasons to buy one pick-up truck model or another, and now the tailgate could be a major decision factor. Innovation and creativity have definitely been applied to the once simple, dull, pull down, tailgate. May/June

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Montgomery Museum of Art and History preserving our region's past while coloring the present

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Text by Emily Kathleen Alberts Photos courtesy of Montgomery Museum of Art and History

Formerly known as the Montgomery Museum and Lewis Miller Regional Art Center and perched behind Montgomery County Courthouse on Pepper Street since circa 1980, the Montgomery Museum of Art and History went through a rebranding about four years ago. Now the museum is in the midst of another major development as it prepares to open in a new location on Main Street, next to the U.S. Post Office building. This positions the museum in the heart of Town Square, and director Casey Jenkins is thrilled about this new opportunity. “This is our chance to make a huge splash and be a real community driver,” Jenkins says. “With more exhibit space, meeting space, parking and exposure, we are getting a chance to grow at a fraction of the cost of trying to expand at our current site.” Though the new location boasts 15,000 square feet, the museum is also retaining the former property, choosing to lease it as office space while preserving the garden. “The garden is maintained by the NRV Master Gardeners and is a big draw for locals. We are grateful to have the chance to protect it and continue holding outdoor art installations in 38

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the garden area.” The soft opening date for the new location is June 22, the same day as the Community Foundation of the New River Valley’s annual “Give Local” event, an entire day dedicated to non-profit fundraising. The ribbon cutting by the Montgomery County Chamber of Commerce is 9 a.m. “There will be family-friendly activities all day, rolling into the evening with an emerging artist exhibit opening,” says Jenkins. Prior to the soft opening, the museum will host the Arts♥NRV Market on May 20 and 21 at The German Club Manor on the campus of Virginia Tech. Local juried artists will sell some of their pieces and demonstrate their incredible skills. This year the event will also hold a fashion show with food, drink and music on Friday evening. Heritage Day is on the calendar for August 20, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. New, exciting activities are planned to kick off the first major event in the new location, including guided tours of the building. “The move is a catalyst to opening new doors for ways in which we engage the community,” Jenkins relates. May/June

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Curator of the Montgomery Museum, Sherry Wyatt, explains how the most interesting things happen at the intersection of art and history. “In the decade since I became curator, we have worked to bring exhibits that entertain and enlighten,” she explains. “We are especially proud of our most recent exhibits that strive to bring attention to stories from the African American community.” In partnership with Christiansburg Institute, storyboards were unveiled in front of the building, an art form that depicts slavery, community life and education in the 1800s. “One storyboard in particular by Lewis Miller is a sketch of enslaved people being sold at auction here in Town Square,” Jenkins declares. “His simple sketch of an observation of daily life is now the anchor to this entire story -- we know about history because of the art.” Wyatt’s favorite exhibits combine personal narratives with artifacts and photographs from the museum's extensive collections “to immerse the viewer in another time,” she says. “Making exhibits is a creative process that often starts with a simple question suggested by an artifact, photograph or oral history narrative. The interesting thing is that exhibits tend to build upon one another as we gain information and better understand the rich history of Montgomery County. I don't think I will ever tire of learning about this history and bringing it to museum visitors in imaginative ways.” Combining art and history is its own form of artistry, and the Montgomery Museum of Art and History is weaving a beautiful multi-cultural thread into the fabric of our region. Freelance writer Emily Kathleen Alberts believes finding real answers about the past is all about asking creative questions.

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Brick Road Drama Camp day camp for special needs kids Text by Joanne M. Anderson

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You know the not-so-old saw now: There’s an app for that! In the old days, kids went to summer day camp for swimming, crafts and assorted activities. Now there are day camps for dance, cheerleading, technology, bugs, horses, music, robotics and much more. If you have a specially challenged child in the New River Valley who struggles with social skills and communication, there’s a camp for that! Brick Road Drama Camp is a half-day, full week, day camp for special needs children ages 4 and up who 40

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don’t fit neatly into society’s norms and disciplines. Each camper is paired with a child, teen or two in the same age group, as appropriate, and like the proverbial buddy system, moves through the activities by their side. There is no cost to campers. They are asked only to bring their own snack, a sack lunch and drink every day. Each camper has a special part to practice for the final performance, which is held on stage the evening of the last camp day. Refreshments follow for families and the May/June

2022


audience to mingle with the day campers, now actors and actresses. “When my daughter Nicki attended, two sisters around middle school ages were with her the whole week,” says Weesie Hubbard of Christiansburg. “She even let them put a gown and hat on her, and she was funny about things like that. They went on stage with her at the final performance, and I had no qualms about leaving Nicki every day. In fact, she did better than she would have with me there.” Nicki Hubbard functioned on a very low level of special needs, having been severely developmentallydelayed physically, emotionally and mentally. “She operated all her life in the range of a 3-year-old,” Weesie relates. “Whatever the level where a child functions, the drama camp matches each camper with the best peer volunteers.” Nicki was not able to offer feedback from the experience, given her disabilities, but Weesie would take her again if she could. Nicki died in 2021 at the age of 43.

The Routine Campers ages 4 to 11 attend mornings, 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., ending with lunch. Those in the 12 and up age group begin with lunch at 12:30 and stay until 4 p.m. Each day opens with prayer, though the camp is not an evangelical mission. Campers will hear that they are made and loved by God, as they engage in acting games, role modeling, using puppets, fine-tuning social skills and preparing their part in the Friday night show. The adult and peer model volunteers deliver guidance, compassion and supervision in an atmosphere of loving kindness and patience. “We tell jokes, practice greetings and focus on social skills like joining a conversation, telling a story, or approaching a new person,” states Courtney Hood, who has organized these camps and presentations across more than a decade. “The drama camp is one of the most memorable weeks that I’ve ever been a part of,” says Jim Krouscas, pastor at Blacksburg Christian Fellowship. “To witness firsthand the personal growth of the campers from when they show up on Monday morning, with little or no on-stage experience, to watching them perform during Friday evening’s live performance is nothing short of amazing!" "Not only is this a blessing for the campers,” Krouscas continues, “but in many ways an even greater blessing for their parents. To see the joy in the parents as they watch their children perform is beyond words.” Each half-day of drama camp is structured for fun, learning and practice. All the volunteers are vetted with a background check and receive training and instruction in NRVMAGAZINE.com

managing a variety of possible personality meltdowns and challenges. There are plenty of adult volunteers to love, appreciate and encourage everyone.

The Camp Director Courtney Hood draws on her experiences teaching children with a wide range of disabilities for nearly 20 years, plus her education. She holds a Master of Arts degree in Early Childhood Special Education and has been drawn to teaching since she was in 5th grade. In high school, she veered into drama and performance, but majored in communications and broadcasting for her undergraduate degree. Not enamored with journalism, Hood stepped into a preschool special education position. After 10 years, she switched to homeschooling her two sons full-time to address and guide them through their own special needs. “Drama therapy for socializing and communication challenges is an up and coming approach,” Hood relates. “I attended a conference with a woman from New York who wrote a book about drama therapy, and I felt motivated to do it.” “Without Courtney, there is no drama camp,” Krouscas explains. “This kind of event can only happen with an entire team of committed volunteers and a gifted leader like Courtney Hood.” Limitations and impairments come in all stripes, and many conditions present challenges in the realm of social skills and communication. Learning disabilities in children impact their lives inside and out of the classroom, and many struggle in social settings with isolation, misunderstandings and inappropriate behavior. And for many of them, there are no day camp options. This is indeed a unique opportunity for special needs kids and their parents, guardians and caregivers in the New River Valley.

Brick Road Drama Camp

Monday to Friday, half day, June 27 – July 1 Performance Night, July 1, 7 p.m., reception following Each camper brings a snack, lunch and drink every day No cost Camp and performance at Blacksburg Christian Fellowship 2300 N. Main St., Blacksburg Questions, inquiries and sign-up: Courtneyhood@live.com or 540-770-8899

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Tires and Tire Safety

Text by Emily K. Alberts With

summer

around

long. To extend the life of your tires,

if the alignment is altered. These newer

underway, there is a lot riding on your

miles. If something feels off when you

are on all sides, and the car’s alignment

the corner and vacation planning tires. Improper inflation pressure and out-of-spec alignment conditions can

cause tires to wear out prematurely, so you want to be sure your tires are in good shape before logging any major miles this vacation season.

“The general rule of thumb

you should rotate them every 5,000 are driving, such as the car pulls to the left or right, you may want to check the

than flat, so there will be some natural

all-season tires should last somewhere

here, the roads are crowned rather pulling toward the edge.”

Alignments are usually covered

using synthetic oil, some folks can go

pothole) heading back in to check your

an oil change,” says Kin Jennelle,

production manager of Collision Plus

in Blacksburg. “Your tires can’t wait that 42

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On average, people drive

between 12,000 and 15,000 miles a year,

for three months, so if you run into some

7,500-10,000 miles before needing

will alter the detection sensitivity.

alignment. Keep in mind that around

is to check your tires with every oil change, but nowadays, with more cars

systems can detect how close vehicles

traffic trouble (and say, hit a curb or alignment might be advisable. Jennelle also warns that if you drive a newer

vehicle with driver assist technology,

the radar will need to be recalibrated

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which means average, good quality,

between three and five years or 45,000 miles. Commonly, new tires come with a

tread life or mileage warranty, meaning

the manufacturer will replace the tires at a prorated value if they wear out (fail

inspection) prior to their advertised lifespan.

. . . continued on page 46

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Life doesn’t fit into boxes. Neither do home loans.

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Battle Strategy for

Rats

Text by Jo Clark News flash! Those may not be bats you’re hearing in your belfry, but instead…rats! Not even cute little mice, but big, ugly rats! The Entry Point Rushing to pack for a long trip, I noticed the broken dryer vent fins. I innocently asked my neighbor: “It’s not a big deal, right?” He shrugged: “It gives access to critters.” But it was more than a foot off the ground, and I didn’t give it another thought … until I came home and saw the tell-tale evidence of an invader. More annoyed than frightened, I made a note to buy a mouse trap. How dare a mouse move in! As soon as the lights went out, the scurrying began. I shut my bedroom door and my eyes, but visions of that hole with a neon flashing “Vacancy” danced in my head.

The Battle Friends suggested poison, but I wanted to know my intruder was going to be gone soon and for good. With a two-pack of plastic traps, a pocket for food and a fingerguard, I set peanut butter for the bait of choice. I wore gloves to prevent transference of my scent, baited and set out traps. I was then secure in the knowledge I’d be tossing out trap 44

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and trespasser in the morning’s light. Not so. Only empty traps. Off to the hardware store for more supplies, specifically a sticky pad that claimed the mouse would be “attracted by the scent and glued in place.” Once those traps were prepared, I settled in to watch a movie. As I passed through the kitchen on the way to bed, the creature and I startled each other—and I got my first look at something that was NOT a mouse! This was big—I mean B.I.G.! I called my next purchase “Jaws” and picked up a glue board guaranteed to hold down rats and snakes, with a warning it would also hold down small household pets. Morning three found a large rat in the new trap. I cheered and reset the trap “just in case” but felt sure I’d caught my intruder. That night, as soon as the lights went out, I heard the tell-tale scampering again. Rats, it seems, produce 75 or more “droppings” a day. Judging from my pantry floor, I had several. Rats give birth to about seven babies at a time, who mature in just seven weeks. Ding, ding, ding!! Mama rat moved in and had a family! Now that she was no longer providing meals, hungry adolescent rats ran wild in my house. Morning came, with empty traps and little feet prints across the glue board but no rat. I started thinking strategically. In my absence, these rats had devoured half a box of Ritz crackers (and we’re talking the huge Costco size), so clearly, they had discriminating taste. I added a bit of May/June

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cracker atop each trap’s peanut butter and awaited morning. Two catches! I bought two more snap traps, bringing my eradication arsenal total to $33. Maybe by Christmas, not a creature would be stirring! My breaking point came when one in a trap wasn’t “snapped”—running through the house with the trap firmly clamped on his head! A 5-gallon bucket and water were involved in his demise! By now, I needed reinforcements and dialed my pest control company. That Tuesday, I caught rat #8 the same day the experts came. Two hundred dollars later, I had four more traps, two poison stations in the house, one under the house, and a “heavyweight bait box” outside. They have returned to inspect the poison packets, and none has been touched. Rat #8 must have been the last soldier.

Pest Control Brown Exterminating has been serving the New River Valley for almost 40 years. Owner Barry Ratcliff says his best advice if you have an infestation is: “Call somebody! The inspection is free, and you will learn a lot about problem prevention.” When my cousins came for a visit, I pointed out the big traps dripping with peanut butter. Over the next four days, I repeatedly cautioned: “Watch your toes! Stay away NRVMAGAZINE.com

from the traps!” Their 4-day weekend was mishap-free. Two days later, what did I do? I stuck my toe in a *~^ trap!! Jo Clark is a travel writer, who came home from an extended trip to find roof rats had taken up residence. She took it as a personal assault, and the battle was on. Follow her (usually) less exciting escapades on Instagram @JoGoesEverywhere or HaveGlassWillTravel.com.

Save yourself the headache: • Plug any openings to the outside, around pipes and cracks, with stainless steel pads. A mouse can fit through a dimesized hole! Rats need only slightly larger openings. • Eliminate food or water left out in open areas. • Clean up. High grass and wood piles are open invitations. • Use glass, tin or plastic containers to store all food, even hush puppy mix or split peas. • Determine the size of the creature before purchasing traps. • Skip the glue boards. • Add whatever they have been eating to peanut butter. • Don’t delay. Rats and mice can quickly do tremendous damage, chewing through drywall, woodwork and wiring. And they reproduce. • Wear shoes during the battle. May/June

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. . . continued from page 42

Tire rotation is important to

keep up with on AWD vehicles to avoid

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tire tread depth is a penny. Insert the

replace tires, we offer free rotations for

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upside down. If the top of Abe’s head is

Every tire manufacturer also requires

35

Blacksburg Battles Cancer

A few tire brands offer a

the warranty to be valid,” says Swain.

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covers irreparable damage caused

time suspension work is done, or if a

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35

Camp Dickenson

hazards. Keep in mind, however, that

It is important to note that run-

4

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23

Celco FCU

All you need to check your

damaging the differential. “When we

penny with Abraham Lincoln’s head

the life of the tires. Maintenance is key.

showing, it’s time for new tires!

an alignment when replacing tires for

limited road hazard warranty that

Alignments are recommended any

by potholes, nails, glass and other

driver encounters a deep pothole.

oftentimes a simple patch job can be

flat tires are more expensive to replace.

whole tire. Patches are said to last from

done to prevent having to replace the

Prices will vary by tire type and purchase

37

Collision Plus

location, but it's not uncommon to pay

17

Dehart Tile

seven to 10 years or for the rest of the

a $40-$65 premium for a run-flat tire.

31

Dogtown Roadhouse

life of the tire. If the sidewall of your tire

Also, many run-flats cannot be repaired

27

Dwight Atkinson

is punctured, though, be prepared for

and often need to be replaced in pairs.

17

Energy Check

tire replacement. Beware when parallel

For those looking to save

21

Eric Johnsen

parking next to the metal edge of a

money, buying used tires might be

13

Ewing Companies

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Eyes on Main

8

Freedom First Mortgage

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Giles County

43

Joba

33

Kesler Contracting

3

Long & Foster Blacksburg

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Macado's

2

Member One

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Mitchell Law Firm

5

Moss Arts Center

curb drain. These are notorious tire

an enticing option. Keep in mind,

faster than others, and some all-wheel

sometimes the savings are simply

replacement of all four tires at a time.

Automotive used to carry both new

at Modern Automotive behind The

carrying used tires out of a concern for

“Car buyers should be aware when

but for the safety of those traveling on

are buying an AWD vehicle, all tires

And don’t forget to check your

poppers. Certain cars go through tires

these don’t come with a warranty and

drive [AWD] vehicles typically require

not worth the strife. Though Modern

writer

and used tires, they have stopped

Farmhouse in Christiansburg, notes:

safety. “It’s not just for your own safety,

purchasing a new vehicle, that if you

the road with you,” Swain explains.

need to be within the same tread depth

tire pressure. When the weather gets

31

Nest Realty

and if you are not replacing all four at

Dirk

Swain,

service

and size -- this comes from the factory,

cold, tire pressure also drops and low

33

New River Art & Fiber

tire pressure can not only cause faster

48

New River Equipment Rental

a time, it can cause damage to many

wear on the tire, but also can eventually

21

NextHome

different areas of the vehicle and end

lead to a flat. Newer cars will have an

37

NRVIP Law

up being much more expensive long

indictor light when tire pressure needs

33

P Buckley Moss

term.”

to be checked and most filling stations

21

Pearis Mercantile

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Progress Street Builders

6

Pulaski County

17

Shelter Alternatives

43

Skyline National Bank

33

VA Shoreline

Avoid offsetting your wheels,

i.e., making your rear and front rims

different sizes, as this can ruin the

differential in an AWD vehicle within a month, costing thousands of dollars to

have a station for air as well.

Emily K. Alberts is an NRV-based freelance science and technology writer who kisses a lot of curbs in her Sienna Minivan and is frequently heading in for “adjustments.”

repair. 46

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