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EXPLORE SUMMER PAGES 4-8

THE LUMBER JACK

MAY 23, 2019 – JUNE 26, 2019


Online at JackCentral.org

From the Editor

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lthough it just snowed this past Monday, it is in fact summer. As someone who was born and raised in the valley, I know summer is the time of year where we all hide from the sunshine hoping to not turn into a lobster. It’s also the time of year where we valley folks pray to God traffic doesn’t get stopped on the I-10 in fear of our vehicles overheating. However those of us reading this paper are most likely living in the 928; a place where summer gets in the high 80s and very rarely any higher. This time of year, for locals, is easy to enjoy. There’s a surplus of hiking trails, outdoor events and a giant lake to spend your time at. And if you are new to Flagstaff, fear no more. In this issue of The Lumberjack the editorial team compiled a list of things to do around town. You can browse our summer movie guide, event calendar and even read about how to de-stress after the semester. The team also gives you tips about how to enjoy summer without breaking the bank. All these things are insightful, however, it’s up to you to create of your summer what you want out of it. For most students, summer is all about BAILEY working full time and saving up so work can take the backseat once school HELTON starts back up. For others, summer is a chance to explore, relax and unwind. EDITOR-IN-CHIEF For me personally, summer is going to be a little bit of both. I’ll be working full time while trying finding time to read a book for the first time since the summer before my senior year of high school... crazy to think that was exactly four years ago. It’s also a goal of mine to hit some trails that dwell within this scenic mountain town. My advice to those of you reading this is to turn to page 14 and view the bucketlist our team has made then create your own. There’s at least two and a half months where life slows down just a little bit, so enjoy it and experience something you’ve never had the opprotunity to do before. Thank you for reading.

Visit jackcentral.org for digital editions of our previous issues

THE LUMBERJACK VOL. 106 ISSUE 16

Phone: (928) 523-4921 Fax: (928) 523-9313 Lumberjack@nau.edu P.O. Box 6000 Flagstaff, AZ 86011

On the cover Clouds drift across the sky above the plains between San Francisco Peaks and Meteor Crater, April 26. John Chaides | The Lumberjack

Summer Editorial Board and Staff Adviser David Harpster

Editor Conor Sweetman

Writer Ashley Lohmann

Editor-in-Chief Bailey Helton

Managing Editor Scout Erhler

Writer Chandler Staley

Director of Photography Shannon Swain

Director of Digital Content Brady Wheeler Print Chief Bella Valenzuela

Photographer Joseph Whitney

Writer Renee’ Hanneken Writer Teana Long

Sales Manager Marsha Simon

Director of Illustration Madison Cohen

Writer Shaelene Walker

Corrections & Clarifications In the May 2 issue of The Lumberjack in the story regarding the W. A. Franke College of Business the story implied that the average salary of Ph.D. faculty was complilation of the entire NAU system. The number was strictly based on the the Ph.D. professors within the W. A. Franke College of Business.

The Lumberjack is committed to factual correctness and accuracy. If you find an error in our publication, please email Bailey Helton at brs289@nau.edu.

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PoliceBeat May 3 At 10:04 a.m., an officer reported contacting a non-student consuming alcohol publicly in a wooded area east of Denny’s. The subject was booked into the Coconino County Dentention Facility (CCDF) for public consumption of alcohol. At 9:10 p.m., Sechrist Hall staff reported an odor of marijuana. One student was cited and released for possession of drug paraphernalia, while two other students were deferred for minor in possession of alcohol. May 4 At 2:11 a.m., an officer reported being out with two subjects causing a disturbance in parking lot 33. Two students were deferred for minor in consumption of alcohol. At 10:15 a.m., NAUPD reported assisting Flagstaff Police Department with a domestic violence case. The suspect was located at South Beaver Street and West Butler Avenue. NAUPD arrested one nonstudent. The suspect was booked into CCDF on an active warrant. At 7:43 p.m., an officer reported being out with an alcohol offense in Reilly Hall. Four students were criminally deferred for minor in consumption and minor in possession. At 9:44 p.m., a subject called NAUPD to report a nonstudent having a seizure at lot 13. Flagstaff Fire Department (FFD) and Guardian Medical Transport (GMT) responded and the patient was transported to Flagstaff Medical Center (FMC).

Compiled by Chandler Staley

May 5 At 9:34 a.m., NAUPD received a call from a University Union staff regarding a student possibly in need of medical assistance. FFD and GMT responded and the student was found in good health. At 9:09 p.m., a Cline Library staff member called to report a subject passed out. FFD and GMT responded, and the non-student was transported to FMC. May 6 At 1:19 a.m., Drury Inn staff reported an intoxicated subject. The non-student was booked into CCDF for second-degree trespass and resisting arrest. At 11:25 a.m., a faculty member from the Science and Health building called to report a possible transient in the building. One subject was booked into CCDF for an active warrant. At 3:34 p.m., ROTC staff member called to report a student making suicidal statements. The subject was located and found in good health. May 9 At 8:17 a.m. a staff member called to make multiple reports of criminal damage, including graffiti at the Science Lab Facility and Taylor Hall, and flour sprinkled over a vehicle parked near Taylor Hall. An officer responded and the incident was added to ongoing investigation. May 10 At 2:47 a.m., Reilly Hall staff reported residents littering. One student was arrested and booked into CCDF on an outstanding warrant.

At 9:41 a.m., a GMT unit reported a fall injury at the Skydome. Subject refused medical transport. At 6:38 p.m. an officer reported being out with a lost child near the Skydome. The child was reunited with their parents. May 11 At 4:53 p.m., a Mountain View Hall RA called to report property left inside of a room. The property was entered into lost and found, and hall staff referred the residents for found marijuana. May 12 At 7:44 p.m., a Raymond Hall RA called to report the odor of marijuana. An officer responded and one student was criminally deferred for possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia. One student has an open pending case. May 13 At 12:44 p.m., a student called to report they didn’t feel safe in their dorm at Raymond Hall. Student was involuntarily admitted to the Guidance Center. At 9:49 p.m., an officer initiated a traffic stop at East University Drive and South Knoles Drive. One student was cited and released for possession of drug paraphernalia. A verbal warning was issued for expired registration. May 18 At 3:55 a.m., a Mountain Line bus driver called to report found drug paraphernalia in lot 66. An officer responded and took a report.

MAY 23, 2019 - JUNE 26, 2019 | THE LUMBERJACK

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SUMMER PREVIEW

How to de-stress after the semester Renee’ Hanneken

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t comes in waves. It comes in patterns. It can show up in your work and just about every area of your life. Stress. To some extent, stress affects everyone. It can be induced from school, work, family and everything in between. Stress is something that manifests itself and may become so severe it leads to mental and physical illness, according to the Mayo Clinic. It can cause anxiety, sleep deprivation and even depression. The Harvard Health Department also attests that stress may lead to high blood pressure, heart disease and overall immune system suppression. One of the best options to control stress is as simple as breathing. Deep breaths allow one to handle the day to day things which elicit that flight-or-fight response. Although at first, deep breathing may seem unnatural, breath control is a technique often used in yoga and many religious practices. Deep breaths encourage full oxygen exchange, an enormously beneficial proponent when it comes to slowing one’s heartbeat and stabilizing blood pressure. “Essentially, there are lots of different breath retention exercises that can trigger certain things in your body, like a sense of calmness, control, and stability,” said Catie Nicewonger, a yoga instructor at ESenEM. “I’d say my number one move when I’m stressed is to breathe deeply. Like even today, the fire alarms went off at the studio and the chaos got me feeling stressed [and] jumpy,” said Nicewonger. “I remember asking my teacher if she could only pick one ‘yoga thing’ to do every day what would it be, and she said pranayama, which is breath work.” Here are some tips on how to practice pranayama. Find a quiet place in or outdoors to set your heart at ease by focusing on the rise and fall of your chest. Allow your mind to drift and every worry to melt away just for five minutes. Feel your heartbeat fall with the sinking of your shoulders after a heavy breath. Take your mind away from your stress. After the exercise, you may have the ability realize how to tackle your problems with ease, while staying mindful of your well-being. Another benefit which can be combined with breath work is fresh air. Fresh air serves many purposes that can be great for de-stressing.

“Essentially, there are lots of different breath retention exercises that can trigger certain things in your body, like a sense of calmness, control, and stability,” – Catie Nicewonger, EsenEm yoga instructor 4

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The outdoors and fresh air cleans out your lungs, creates focus and energizes according to the American Heart Organization (AHO). “Research shows that a 90-minute walk in nature lowers activity in the part of the brain linked to negative rumination. The same walk in an urban setting doesn’t have the same effect,” according to the AHO website. Fresh air can be attained as easily as opening a window. On rainy days, the sounds of water hitting pavement can occupy your room and the refreshing scent of rain washing away the impurities on the ground can replace the sounds of a humming heater and the artificial scent of a candle. On sunny days, chirping birds and fresh sunlight can outshine even the best air conditioners. Allowing yourself to take in nature’s resources can open up new windows to stress management, some doctors are even prescribing it in the United Kingdom, according to CNN. Open a window by your desk at work, sit under a tree, turn off your phone for two whole hours and get outside. Take a walk down the street and take the time to revel in the cleansing power that only nature can offer. You can reset your mind and cleanse your body by taking in the fresh air that surrounds us. Unplugging social media for one day out of the week can have serious health benefits. The hustle and bustle of the 24/7 glow of the Internet can be linked to a rise in mental health concerns, according to a study conducted by Bradley University. By releasing yourself from social media, it allows you to maximize your time during the day. This can free up the day and decrease the added time-precious stresses in life. It also allows you to take a step back and assess how the impacts of social media trends and social media standards really do not have to take a toll on your mental health. You allow yourself moments to stop comparing and to really value you, for you. Set aside one hour of your day, morning or night. Take out your phone and turn it off. Set aside that time to not worry about it. Consciously analyze how often you tend to grab your phone in an effort to read a notification or check on something. Notice the

more often you practice this, the less often you reach for it. This allows you to be present in your endeavors fully and completely. For three days, set aside time to de-clutter your mind through the work of breath control, nature and unplugging. It is important to invest in time for yourself, this allows you to work, think and feel more efficiently. Start by opening the window more. Allow all of the fresh goodness of the outdoors to enter your home. Take more walks and understand the many overlapping benefits of Mother Nature. Turn off your phone for as little as 30 minutes. For this time, do something for you. Pick up a book, turn on some Netflix or just lay in bed for a little bit longer. But most of all, just breathe.

Illustration By Madison Cohen


MAY 23, 2019 - JUNE 26, 2019 | THE LUMBERJACK

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SUMMER PREVIEW

Summer Movie Guide: What you need to know Brady Wheeler “Aladdin” (May 24, PG) Directed by Guy Ritchie Featuring: Mena Massoud, Naomi Scott, Will Smith, Marwan Kenzari Coming to theaters next weekend, Director Guy Ritchie plans to wow fans new and old with his live-action remake of the Disney musical-fantasy classic “Aladdin.” When the genie is finally freed from his magical lamp May 24, moviegoers will know for sure whether all of their cinematic wishes have been granted. “Booksmart” (May 24, R) Directed by Olivia Wilde Featuring: Beanie Feldstein, Kaitlyn Dever Two over-achieving seniors look to end high school with a bang this Memorial Day weekend. Olivia Wilde’s directorial debut promises a female spin on the age old high school party motif akin to films such as “American Pie” and “Superbad.”

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“Godzilla: King of the Monsters” (May 31, PG-13) Directed by Michael Dougherty Featuring: Millie Bobby Brown, Vera Farmiga, Ken Watanabe Godzilla has called into question man’s place in the natural world since it first hit the big screen in 1954. “Stranger Things” star Millie Bobbie Brown plays the latest protagonist to watch in awe as the giant lizard flattens cities battling for world domination — this time going head-to-head with monsters Mothra, Rodan and Ghidorah.

“Ma” (May 31, R) Directed by Tate Taylor Featuring: Octavia Spencer, Diana Silvers, Juliette Lewis “There’s probably something wrong with me.” Oscar winning actress Octavia Spencer plays the role of Ma, a recluse who unintentionally forms a deep obsession with hosting parties for high school kids in her basement. Perhaps the biggest horror release this summer, thrill-seekers will not want miss this gruesome and disturbing tale.

“Rocketman” (May 31, R) Directed by Dexter Fletcher Featuring: Taron Egerton, Jamie Bell Piano prodigy Reginald Dwight transforms into music icon Elton John in this classic rock biopic. This film features vocal performances from the multi-talented star Taron Egerton and is a must see for film and music connoisseurs alike.

“Domino” (May 31, R) Directed by Brian De Palma Featuring: Nikolaj Coster-Waldau Director Brian De Palma may have enough thrillers to satisfy an entire career, but that is not stopping him from debuting another. Domino follows a Copenhagen police officer intent on tracking and avenging the killing of his partner.


SUMMER PREVIEW

“Dark Phoenix” (June 7, PG-13) Directed by Simon Kinberg Featuring: Sophie Turner, Jennifer Lawrence, James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender, Jessica Chastain, Nicholas Hoult, Evan Peters, Tye Sheridan, Kodi Smit-McPhee, Alexandra Shipp. This selection is for all of the X-Men fans. If you have kept up with the X-Men franchise, this latest installment will provide a backstory for one of the most beloved characters, Jean Grey. It is supposedly the last film in the franchise.

“Secret Life of Pets 2” (June 7, PG) Directed by Chris Renaud Featuring: Kevin Hart, Tiffany Haddish, Harrison Ford, Patton Oswalt, Jenny Slate Finally, a film to take the family to. This animated franchise offers moviegoers a peek into the secret life their pets have while they are away. If the film can successfully build upon the success of it’s predecessor, then it should be one of the best animated films this summer.

“Men in Black: International” (June 14, not yet rated) Directed by F. Gary Gray Featuring: Chris Hemsworth, Tessa Thompson, Liam Neeson, Emma Thompson. Chris Hemsworth and Tessa Thompson will try to replicate the comedic synergy of their predecessors Tommy Lee Jones and Will Smith that captivated audiences in the first three installments of the franchise. Here’s to hoping they can pull it off, and maybe save the world from aliens in the process.

“The Last Black Man in San Francisco” (June 14, R) Directed by Joe Talbot Featuring: Jimmie Fails, Jonathan Majors Jimmie Fails — as himself — attempts to reclaim the Victorian home his grandfather built in the Fillmore District. If the rave festival reviews are any indication, this quest through the gentrified streets of San Francisco is worth the watch.

“The Dead Don’t Die” (June 14, R) Directed by Jim Jarmusch Featuring: Adam Driver, Bill Murray, Chloë Sevigny This film is a zombie comedy starring Bill Murray — what more can you ask for? How about an all-star cast consisting of Adam Driver, Chloë Sevigny, Steve Buscemi, Tilda Swinton, Danny Glover, Caleb Landry Jones, Carol Kane and Rosie Perez? Don’t overlook these small town cops when they battle it out with the undead mid-June.

“Shaft” (June 14, R) Directed by Tim Story Featuring: Samuel L. Jackson, Jessie T. Usher, Richard Roundtree. “Shaft” features private eye JJ aka John Shaft Jr. attempting to uncover the details surrounding his best friend’s death. To do this, he must enlist the help of his father, the legendary John Shaft. Expect this film to take a humorous turn in comparison to the rest of the franchise.

MAY 23, 2019 - JUNE 26, 2019 | THE LUMBERJACK

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SUMMER PREVIEW

“Toy Story 4” (June 21, G) Directed by Josh Cooley Featuring: Tom Hanks, Tim Allen, Annie Potts, Tony Hale, Patricia Arquette, Joan Cusack, Keanu Reeves, Keegan-Michael Key, Jordan Peele. Many worry this is an unnecessary sequel. Still, it is the counterpart to one of the greatest trilogies ever made. It’s a mustsee. “Spider-Man: Far From Home” (July 2, not yet rated) Directed by Jon Watts Featuring: Tom Holland, Jacob Batalon, Zendaya, Samuel L. Jackson, Jake Gyllenhaal. SPOILER: Spider-Man returns this summer after his demise in “Avengers: Infinity War.” If you are a fan of the Marvel Character Universe, this will come as no surprise. The film features Jake Gyllenhaal as Mysterio, a villain in the comic series. Be on the lookout for a potential twist involving this character in particular.

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“The Lion King” (July 19, not yet rated) Directed by Jon Favreau Featuring: Chiwetel Ejiofor, Donald Glover, James Earl Jones, Beyoncé, Seth Rogen, Billy Eichner, John Oliver. The live-action distinction is generous to say the least in this CGI remake of the animated original, but that is what Disney has decided to call it. Expect this film to be visually stunning, and if it’s lucky, a worthy remake of the highest-grossing hand-drawn film of all time. “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” (July 26, not yet rated) Directed by Quentin Tarantino Featuring: Leonardo DiCaprio, Brad Pitt, Margot Robbie, Dakota Fanning. “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” is legendary director Tarantino’s ninth film. He is set to retire after ten. This film takes place in 1969 Los Angeles following the Manson Family murders. It is sure to feature everything one would expect from a Tarantino flick — violence, sex and insight into the filmmaking process.

“Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs and Shaw” (Aug. 2, not yet rated) Directed by David Leitch Featuring: Dwayne Johnson, Jason Statham, Idris Elba, Vanessa Kirby. “Fast & Furious” promises physics-defying stunts, narrowly avoided explosions, and of course, exotic sports cars. In the latest installment of the franchise lawman Luke Shaw (Johnson) and outlaw Deckard Shaw (Statham) join forces to save the world from a genetically engineered anarchist (Elba). “The Nightingale” (Aug. 9, R) Directed by Jennifer Kent Featuring: Aisling Franciosi, Sam Claflin, Baykali Ganambarr. Set in the Tasmanian Wilderness in the year 1825, this grotesque drama follows Clare, an Irish convict, as she hunts a British officer who has wronged her family. Jennifer Kent’s sophomore film is shaping up to be worthy follow up to her debut, The Babadook. All movie posters courtesy of IMDb


MAY 23, 2019 - JUNE 26, 2019 | THE LUMBERJACK

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SUMMER PREVIEW

Summer Calendar Summer Concert Series — The Arboretum — Every first Saturday starting in June through August @ 5:30 p.m. — $22 Two-Hour Flagstaff City Tour — City of Flagstaff — Selected Saturdays and Sundays through the end of September — $35 Fun Flagstaff History Segway, Bike or Walking Tour— City of Flagstaff —Weekdays through the end of the year — $30 Flagstaff Arizona Terrain Race Mud Run — Fort Tuthill — May 31 through June 1— $40 10th Annual Flagstaff Hullabaloo — Wheeler Park — June 1 @ 10 a.m. and June 2 @ 11 a.m. — $8 General Admission Dutch Oven Cooking Workshop — Buffalo Park — Saturday June 1 @ 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. — $30/REI members and $50/nonmembers Flag Wool and Fiber Festival — Arizona Historical Society Pioneer Museum — June 1 to June 2 @ 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — FREE Blues and Brews Music Festival — Continental Driving Range — June 7 @ 2:30 p.m. and June 8 at 11 a.m. — General Admission Friday $30/ General Admission Saturday $45/ Two-day General Admission $55 First Friday Art Walk — Downtown Flagstaff — Evening of June 3 — Free Made in the Shade Beer Tasting Festival — Beaver Street Brewery — Saturday, June 8 @ 1 p.m. — $55 General Admission 2019 Adult Prom, The Naughty Bits — The Orpheum — Saturday, June 15 @ 9 p.m. — $8.50 Pride in the Pines 2019 — Thorpe Park Softball Field — June 22 @ noon — $22 General Admission

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FEATURES

All photos courtesy of Better Oblivion Community Center

A compilation of melancholy and angst Scout Ehrler

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hroughout January of this year, a mysterious group by the name of Better Oblivion Community Center dropped Easter eggs and hints all over the Internet, growing anticipation. The group managed to gain some traction by releasing a Better Oblivion Community Center hotline and confusing the general public. They even made Seterogum’s “The 101 Most Anticipated Albums of 2019” list. When the much-awaited self-titled album dropped January 24 and the veil dissolved, the project was exposed to be an iconic duo of every alt-girl’s dreams: Conor Oberst and Phoebe Bridges. Conor Oberst is often heard, rarely seen. He’s been prominent in the alternative music scene since 1995 as the frontman of Bright Eyes. You may recognize that name from hits such as “First Day of My Life,” or if you’ve ever seen “Stuck in Love.” Before disbanding in 2011, Bright Eyes had found a niche and made a name for themselves. Oberst went on to do numerous solo and side projects, including one of my favorite albums of all time, Upside Down Mountain. Phoebe Bridges isn’t necessarily as veteran as Oberst, but she has carved out a place in the alternative music scene in the short number of years she’s been active. Beginning her career in 2014, Bridgers has conquered quite some territory in terms of musical success. Bridgers got her start working alongside famed female alternative musician, Julien Baker. Bridgers took off upon then release of her 2017 album, Stranger in the Alps, and has since joined collaborative side projects such as Boygenius and Better Oblivion Community Center. Bridger’s appeal is similar to that of Julien Baker, Maggie Rogers or Mitski. They have soft, yet powerful voices which carry

guitar riffs on a magic carpet of harmony. Their music is just similar enough that if you like one of them, it is likely you like all of them. Better Oblivion Community Center is not the first collaboration from Oberst and Bridgers. The duo has been touring since 2018 and have recorded tracks together. Bridgers told New Musical Express, “We wrote a song together and it was fun. And we were like, ‘Ah! It doesn’t immediately fit into one of our styles ... maybe we should put out a seven or something.’” “Then it ended up being a full record,” Oberst said to New Musical Express. In describing the band’s name, Oberst told New Musical Express, “For me, it’s kind of like impending doom mixed with the positivity of a community center. Like, we’re all in this together. So, kind of the duality of that.” Oberst and Bridgers both specialize in sad music, to be general. There is an air of nostalgia, regret and yearning that undercurrents most, if not all, of their songs — both as individuals and on Better Oblivion Community Center. They both describe their world outlooks in their lyrics with similar uses of figurative language. This compatibility within their individual projects makes them the perfect musical duo. The album itself alternates between melancholy and angst. Tracks like “Sleepwalkin’” carry a folksy sound that is familiar with fans of Oberst, while others like “Big Black Heart” experiment with distorted sound and ambient noise. The album’s hit track, “Dylan Thomas,” is driven by upbeat acoustic guitar and prominent tambourine. Percussion is a vital aspect of this album, yet at times understated. “Dylan Thomas” contains a guitar solo that is unmatched by any other track on the album. It’s a dance-able track, unlike most of its counterparts. Bridgers and Oberst write honest lyrics which are often cloaked with clever uses of metaphors and similes. They tell

tales through allegories in order to convey messages. Such as in “My City,” the duo speaks of a place that was once home. They harmonize, “Today was a smoking sky. Today was a civic menace. Today, I went walking while things explode.” Bridgers screams over the bridge, “Looking bad like those Vegas odds / Wear a smile like it’s camouflage.” The album carries themes of regret and nostalgia — Bridgers and Oberst yearn for things that once were. These are common topics for these two. Oberst’s 2014 album Upside Down Mountain contains similar motifs of alienation, loneliness, as well as personal accounts of depression and anxiety. Bridgers and Oberst don’t shy away from discussing the human condition and some lyrics are so honest, they’re borderline uncomfortable. Listening to Better Oblivion Community Center is like taking a corkscrew to your bottled emotions. While some tracks are light-hearted, the whole album carries a heavy air On “Didn’t Know What I Was in For,” the duo croons, “I didn’t know what I was in for / When I signed up for that run / There’s no way I’m curing cancer / But I’ll sweat it out / I feel so proud now for all the good I’ve done.” Oberst and Bridgers push the listeners’ noses into all the feeling and regret which is often avoided. Better Oblivion Community Center relates to the audience through pain rather than fun, upbeat joy. Better Oblivion Community Center is a first-person folk-rock tale of the human condition, broken down using an amalgamation of creative storytelling devices. The album may evoke some tears, or it may make you feel less alone. Either way, give it a shot. Better Oblivion Community Center will be performing at The Wiltern in Los Angeles, California on August 9. In the meantime, check out their NPR Tiny Desk Concert.

MAY 23, 2019 - JUNE 26, 2019 | THE LUMBERJACK

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FEATURES

Fifty five with an a Shaelene Walker

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hether it’s kayaking, cliff jumping, hiking or spelunking, Craig Carlton can master it all. A 55-year-old with long, ruffled hair and a constant tan, Carlton is active and always seeking adventure. Carlton started his own outdoor adventure business, South by Southwest, five years ago with his wife and partner Brandy Carlton. The two of them have worked hard to grow their business into a successful career that they hope to pass down to their children. South by Southwest is a company in Cottonwood, Arizona that offers kayaking tours, adventure camps and outdoor activities to people of all ages. Utilizing the Verde River and the land around it, the Carltons spend their days teaching others how to kayak, as well as lead people on hiking and caving explorations and creating activities for kids during summer camps. They work together to share the adventures of the world with others. They each perform different jobs that keep their company working well. Craig is the front man. He leads the kayaking tours and teaches customers the ins and outs of nature. Craig is the main guide and he spends most of his time on the Verde River. He’s the typical outdoorsy type, who doesn’t care if he needs to take a quick shower in the river water. He loves to be outside and said he is always looking for new places to discover. “We’ve always loved going on different journeys together,” Craig said. “When we first started dating, 27 years ago, we went exploring all the time.” Living in Arizona, the couple would spend most of their weekends at a random beach in Mexico or hiking to hidden waterfalls. They took their passion for the wilderness and turned it into a business. Now, they have the opportunity to do what they love and get paid for it. With a degree in business from Grand Canyon University, Brandy crunches the numbers and runs the operation. She handles the business and legal aspects such as the company website and copyright issues. She deals with paperwork,

Brandy and Craig Carlton loading their boats after spending a day on the river. Shaelene Walker| The Lumberjack

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FEATURES

adventurous drive sales and the shop where they sell supplies like water-shoes and flashlights. Spending most of her time in the shop, she carries herself in a professional manner. However, she is always ready to help outside. Keeping her blonde hair up and out of her face, she is prepared to help transport customers and load boats with Craig. While other couples could be wary when it comes to working with their spouse, Brandy said she and Craig feed off their teamwork. “We ignored all the cliche warnings,” Brandy said. “Everyone always tells you not to work with your significant other, but that’s actually how we met. We work better together and we make a great team.” With Brandy working the logistics and Craig out on the water, they have formed a cohesive team and effective business. Although they are successful together, it was not an easy road to get there. They outlined the problems they had to overcome along the way. “In the beginning, we had to work twice as hard and got paid half as much,” Brandy said. Craig agreed, adding that their motivation is what got them through the difficult times. “Maintaining diligence and energy is what got us past the ‘three-year hump,’” Craig said. The Carltons explained that the “three-year hump” is the hardest part about owning a business. Getting started and staying afloat can be the most challenging part. They described the amount of extra work and little reward they got in return, and how that can be discouraging. However, they pushed through and stayed dedicated. Although the Carltons just recently started this business, they have always been the adventurous type.

Growing up in Arizona, they’ve had the opportunity to visit the Grand Canyon. However, the Carltons have done much more than just visit. They have hiked to the bottom of the Grand Canyon at least once a year for the past 20 years. They take their children and their friends, and plan to continue hiking down and camping for as long as they can. Before they worked together to form a business, the Carltons worked in Child Protective Services. Working for different companies, they spent their days helping families reunite. However, it was not always sunshine and good news. Often times, they had to report parental neglect and decide that the children should not return home, for their own safety. The Carltons said this kind of work was draining and hard to live with. Craig was the first to leave, and Brandy followed shortly after. Now, Craig loves what he does, despite the physical strain it places on him. He explained how he continues to do strenuous work like carrying heavy boats, rafting through rapids and helping others out on the water. “When you do what you love, the physical exasperations don’t seem to matter as much,” he said. “Besides, working outside every day keeps me in better shape anyway.” Brandy and Craig said they hope to continue working and building South by Southwest until it is time for their retirement. Then, they want to pass their legacy onto their four children and many grandchildren. Although all of their kids help out, their youngest son, Dylan Carlton, helps them the most. He spends his summers working at camps and kayaking alongside his father. Dylan is currently training to be a firefighter, — therefore has certifications in techniques in first aid and water safety — and he has taken EMT training classes. He said he enjoys helping his parents at work. “Most parents have pretty boring jobs,” Dylan said. “But how cool is it that I get to say my parents are outdoor adventure guides?” Dylan said he loves working with his parents and siblings. He has always had a desire for adventure. Although he plans on becoming a firefighter, he also wants to keep the business going after his parents retire. “This business has brought us closer as a family,” he said. “We all get to spend more time together, and it really is a lot of fun. Even though we’ll each be doing our own thing, I think we’ll be able to keep it going by working together.” Dylan and his siblings plan to each work a few days at the shop. That way, each of them can have their own careers, while still keeping the family business up and running. With the Carltons’ first two daughters already having husbands and kids, they expect their grandchildren to jump in and help out as soon as they’re old enough. “Creating a family business wasn’t what I always planned to do,” Craig said. “But it turns out to be a lot more fun than I would’ve thought. I get to spend time with my wife and kids, doing what makes me happy. The best part is that I can see they are happy too.”

Craig and Brandy Carlton kayaking on the Verde River together. When the couple first started this business they never planned for what was in store. Shaelene Walker | The Lumberjack

MAY 23, 2019 - JUNE 26, 2019 | THE LUMBERJACK

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CULTURE

Summerjack’s Editorial Bucket List

DAVID HARPSTER ADVISER

1. READ A BOOK OR TWO 2. COME BACK FROM VEGAS AHEAD 3. FINISH PAINTING MY NEW HOUSE 4. TRAIN MY NEW PUPPIES 5. HIKE FIVE NEW TRAILS

BAILEY HELTON EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

CONOR SWEETMAN

BELLA VALENZUELA PRINT CHIEF

BRADY WHEELER DIRECTOR OF DIGITAL CONTENT

1. HIKE THE WEST FORK TRAIL OF OAK CREEK CANYON 2. BECOME AN EXPERT USING ADOBE ILLUSTRATOR 3. KAYAK ALL LAKES SURROUNDING FLAGSTAFF 4. ORGANIZE MY BELONGINGS 5. SAVE MONEY FOR FALL TERM

EDITOR

1. GO ON A WEST COAST ROAD TRIP 2. DO MORE YOGA 3. WATCH END GAME 4. GET BETTER AT SEWING 5. SPEND LESS TIME ON SOCIAL MEDIA

1. GO TO YOSEMITE 2. CAMPING AT LEAST EVERY OTHER WEEKEND 3. EXPLORE NEW AND EXCITING PLACES IN NORTHERN ARIZONA 4. VISIT DIFFERENT NATIONAL PARKS

1. SPEND THE MAJORITY OF MY TIME OUTDOORS 2. READ AT LEAST 10 NOVELS 3. START A ZINE MANAGING EDITOR

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY

THE LUMBERJACK | JACKCENTRAL.ORG

1. CATCH A RAINBOW TROUT IN AN OREGON RIVER 2. GO TO SEDONA AT LEAST FOUR TIMES 3. PICK UP A HOBBY 4. MASTER THE ART OF ADOBE INDESIGN 5. FLOSS EVERYDAY

SCOUT ERHLER

SHANNON SWAIN

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1. READ A BOOK 2. CREATE A NEW ROUTINE 3. HIT THE GRAND CANYON 4. GO TO JEROME 5. GET REAL GOOD AT LONG BOARDING


CULTURE

1. FINISH PAINTINGS 2. READ MORE BOOKS 3. TRAVEL TO A NEW PLACE

ASHLEY LOHMANN WRITER

1. DROP IN WITH ROLLER SKATES 2. LEARN TO DRIVE 3. WORK ON POETRY 4. RELEARN HOW TO CARTWHEEL 5. FINALLY CHOOSE A ROLLER DERBY NAME

MADISON COHEN

1. PARTAKE IN THREE NEW OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES 2. GO TO MONUMENT VALLEY 3. GO TO THE PAINTED DESERT

DIRECTOR OF ILLUSTRATION

RENEE’ HANNEKEN

SHAELENE WALKER

1. GO TO MEXICO 2. EXPERIENCE 21ST BIRTHDAY IN VEGAS 3. GO TO DISNEYLAND 4. GO TO NORTH DAKOTA 5. GO TO NEW PLACES

WRITER

WRITER

JOSEPH WHITNEY

1. HIKE TO THE TOP OF HUMPHREYS PEAK 2. BIKE TO SEDONA AND BACK TO FLAGSTAFF IN ONE DAY 3. PASS THE GRE AND THE LSAT TESTS

CHANDLER STALEY

1. GO TO MEXICO 2. EXPLORE FLAGSTAFF NOW THAT I HAVE A CAR 3. GET A JOB 4. CREATE A GYM ROUTINE 5. RELAX.

WRITER

PHOTOGRAPHER

1. DO WELL AT REGIONALS WITH MY HORSES 2. DRINK MORE WATER 3. READ THREE BOOKS 4. PASS MATH TEANA LONG WRITER

MAY 23, 2019 - JUNE 26, 2019 | THE LUMBERJACK

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CULTURE

thrift Shop Chronicles: Part One

The Garden Thirft is located on the corner of South Beaver Street and West Phoenix Avenue. Runway Fashion Exchange is close by located in the Sherwood Forest Shopping Center. Goodwill has two Flagstaff locations with one location on each side of town. Meanwhile, Savers is located on the east side of town off U.S. 89, May 13. Bailey Helton | The Lumberjack

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CULTURE

Thrift Shop Chronicles: Best Shop in Flagstaff Scout Ehrler

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am an avid thrifter. My wardrobe is composed of 90% Goodwill, 5% Savers and 5% miscellaneous hand-me-downs or the odd piece of clothing from Target. I began thrifting regularly in early high school, but I have always dabbled. When I arrived to Flagstaff, I immediately noted where the local Goodwill is. However, despite having lived here for two years, I have yet to expand my horizons beyond Saver’s and Goodwill. Today, I will. I went to five different thrift stores in Flagstaff to judge which one is the best, based on price, location, variety and quality. The Garden Thift My first stop was The Garden Thrift. This shop has an adorable storefront with a repurposed Volkswagen van and picnic tables where customers can sit. The Garden Thrift is located downtown near The Hub and Fratelli’s. And Single Speed Cafe is just next store, so you can grab yourself a coffee before you browse. The store is split into three stories: the first floor has furniture and linens, the second floor — where the entrance is located — has cutlery, china, music and literature, and the third floor is dedicated to clothing. On the day I went in, all clothing was 75% off, making the average of $5 to $10 plummet to a buck or a few. All the plates and kitchenware average between $1 and $3. The furniture varied in price, but was still reasonable — they had a very comfortable duck down armchair on sale for only $20. Overall, The Garden Thrift had a wide variety of products. I saw camera gear, tons of pillows, art, bikes and a crib. Everything was well priced — definitely no more expensive than Saver’s — and while it’s not super close to campus, it’s location isn’t too shabby. Depending where you are on campus, it’s most likely walkable. The quality of all the products seemed about the same as or even better than Goodwill’s average

The Garden Thrift gets my seal of approval, especially if you’re looking for a place to get cheap stuff to decorate your apartment or dorm. Rating: 8/10 Runway Fashion Exchange My next stop was Runway Fashion Exchange. This place has a strong Plato’s Closet feel. They accept name brand clothes for cash or store credit, but due to the pickiness, per se, of the shop, it’s somewhat of a luxury thrift store. The average price for tops ranges from $8 to $10 and pants range from $15 to $30, pretty much double that of The Garden Thrift. They carry some nice winter coats which average around $20 — a steal in my opinion. Runway is just as expensive as Forever 21 or H&M. They do carry some cool products and I saw quite a few things I contemplated snagging. The price is due to the focus on name brands and high quality clothing, which isn’t a problem. I think the higher prices give less incentive for the average person to shop there when they can go to the mall and get something “new” for the same price. Regardless, Runway promotes the recycling of clothes which would otherwise have been thrown away by whoever took them in to sell. Since everything is on the higherend side, as opposed to Goodwill or Saver’s, you are paying for the name and quality, which one could argue is worth it. They have a clearance section which ranges from 20% to 50% off and sell new clothes from small designers, which Runway buys wholesale, according to an employee. She said the wholesale products take up about 10% of the store. Runway, while on the pricey side, has a wide variety of clothes and the store is heavily stocked. It’s pretty close to campus, located on Milton Road near McDonald’s. The clothes are high quality enough to justify the price. However, price is the biggest factor to me, personally, which is why

I shop at Goodwill. If you want used clothes that look new, this is the place to go. Rating: 7/10 Savers I call Saver’s, “Better Goodwill.” While it’s slightly more expensive than Goodwill, the store is vast and carries a wider variety. Saver’s has a similar set-up to Goodwill: narrow aisles jam-packed with thousands of clothing items. The outskirts of the store contain books, kitchenware, art and other household items. Everything at Saver’s is about a dollar or two more than it would be at Goodwill. The quality is only slightly better than it’s thrift department store counterpart — every now and then I get stained or ripped items from Goodwill, but rarely do I come across damaged items at Saver’s. Saver’s stock of shoes, jeans and dresses, just to name a few, is larger than that of Goodwill. When I’m looking for a specific piece of clothing, I go to Saver’s because I know it’s more likely they carry it. The clothing ranges from $2 to $10, but every now and then I’ll stumble upon something in the teens. However, the slightly higher prices don’t necessarily deter me because the quality and variety make up for that buck or two. Rating: 9/10 Goodwill Goodwill is a classic and honestly, it’s hard to go wrong. I will always have a soft spot for Goodwill, but it does have its downfalls. There are two Goodwills in Flagstaff: the outlet and the regular store. The regular store is what you would expect from a Goodwill. They carry tons of clothes, some shoes and jewelry, linens and art. The average price for clothing floats somewhere around $5, but pants and jackets can bring that average up, of course. On the other hand, the outlet — AKA “the bins” — doesn’t have organized racks of clothes on hangers.

RATINGS: THE GARDEN THRIFT 8/10 RUNWAY FASHION EXCHANGE 7/10 SAVERS 9/10 GOODWILL 6/10 The thrift market in Flagstaff offers a variety of retail items, it may just take a little extra exploring to find your perfect match. Bailey Helton | The Lumberjack

Rather, you can dig through bins of donated clothes in hopes of finding something of value. This experience is dirty and cheap, but there’s no guarantee you’ll find anything you like. Going to the Goodwill Outlet can take some time and requires some digging, but in the end, you can walk away with a lot for very little. At the bins, you can get items for anywhere from 10 cents to a dollar. For me, that price is worth the grime of the experience. However, some Goodwill Outlet locations may be more “worth it” based on where they are in the country. A Goodwill Outlet in Los Angeles is likely to be better

than one in Flagstaff. Rating: 6/10 The Outcome Saver’s comes out on top, but “the best thrift store in Flagstaff” is still an unclaimed title. It depends on individual needs and where in the city you’re looking to shop. If you’re by the mall, Saver’s is the place to be, but if you’re downtown, The Garden Thrift is the perfect place to shop around. Flagstaff’s thrift market isn’t only limited to these handful, either. Go out there and find your best thrift store.

MAY 23, 2019 - JUNE 26, 2019 | THE LUMBERJACK

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CULTURE

Budget your fun(ds) throughout summer Ashley Lohmann

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chool’s out, but the summertime may present some students with more financial instability than when school was in session. With housing and work changes, travel plans, a lessfixed routine and the desire to have fun, finances may be rocky for students over the summer. Students and employers say budgeting may be the best way to find more financial stability. Throughout the school year, tuition, fees, housing and other expenses can add up, and this might prompt students to want to save their money over the summer. However, the summer can also be a time when students want to travel and have the most fun they can. Although seemingly incompatible, budgeting can help make student financial stability and traveling more harmonious. Junior Angela Houston said many students plan to travel over the summer, which has the potential to be a hefty expense, but she recommends carving out a shorter amount of time for travels over the summer. Houston said this method allows for students to have fun while traveling, but also work and potentially save money by living with their parents while they aren’t exploring other places. This summer, when Houston is not traveling, she plans on living with her mom to save money before moving into her new apartment in Flagstaff. Houston said finding a balance between travel and budgeting is the best way to still have fun and save money this summer. “Have fun doing things that are reasonable but also try to keep a plan or any sort of budget so you don’t spend way too much and just try to keep track and be responsible of all your money as opposed to partying hard every night,” Houston said. Houston said travels can be made less expensive by working within a budget and planning well. She also said there are opportunities like scholarships and study abroad programs that can help mitigate and regulate travel expenses. “I made a really tight budget and I planned out all the money that I was going to have and I made a plan of how I was going to stay within that budget,” Houston said. “I am doing something that is reasonably within my financial capabilities and I also got a scholarship for this LA trip that I’m on and I really just put as much money aside as I could and I’m getting a job to make up for whatever money I lose.” Junior Corey Clemetsen said budgeting for traveling is crucial so that a trip is organized enough such that money is not a worry. He stresses that finding a balance when planning ahead is key. “You never want to go somewhere and be so organized that you have no fun but you also don’t want to be so relaxed that you don’t have any fun because all you’re doing is stressing out over money,” Clemetsen said. Though Clemetsen said the importance of budgeting goes beyond traveling or even how to manage money in the summertime. He said budgeting is a great way to understand one’s own finances well enough to know how much they need to work and save. “I have to see it in person to be able to consistently do whatever it is that I do,” Clemetsen said. “I like to make lists or sticky notes or Excel sheets or whatever it may be. For my budget,

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I have multiple Excel sheets, one of them being my overall budget more good than just saving up money for college expenses or for the year and I go all the way through the year, looking at trips. He said that employers like himself tend to like it when everything like rent and credit card bills so that I can look at my student employees are willing to work over the summer and that money for the year and split it down into months and split it this added experience is worth a lot to students. He said that down into how much I need to pay out weekly so that I can go working over summer can be balanced with fun and can even ahead and justify how much I need to work.” allow for student workers to have more fun since they are making According to Clemetsen, planning finances out as much money.w as possible lets one determine how much they need to work or “Find a good, comfortable work environment where they save to be able to not only secure themselves but also to have can work enough to where they can afford to do little summer a good time. He said many students trips because you don’t get to do many of those throughout may find that traveling is the school year,” Silva said. not reasonably within their Silva also said that budgeting is the best way to summer budgets, but there find that crucial balance of work and fun. are ways to work with “Knowing how much you have to work and one’s finances to still have knowing how much you have to spend and creating a fun locally. Clemetsen said spreadsheet of where you can spend your money is a doing research on what there great way to just know how much you’re getting paid is to do locally that’s fun and and know how much you’re spending,” Silva said. “It’s free or affordable can ensure just about knowing how much I get to spend and not that while someone is going over that, so self-discipline is a big thing.” spending their summer Clemetsen said budgeting involves being very working, they don’t feel realistic and honest with oneself and being willing to like they’re miserable understand and act accordingly with what one can and not able to have actually afford. a good time here in “Budgeting takes time, budgeting takes Flagstaff or wherever motivation and budgeting takes dedication, which they may be. is difficult and is something I’m still working on, Houston suggests I’m still trying to figure out what works best for students consider me,” Clemetsen said. “No one is perfect, there is working more hours no way to do it right. I think it just really helps to over summer since they remember why you’re doing it.” typically have more Clemetsen said that budgeting should always time than throughout strive to make oneself happy, which is why it is the semester. Though a matter of balancing wants and needs. He said Clemetsen said that remembering that budgeting is helping to achieve since everyone is something one wants in the long run or even different, finding how helping achieve something small one wants soon, much one should work can help maintain the discipline needed for this comes with trial and planned, balanced frugality. error. “Whatever you do, you need to make yourself “You know happy and so sometimes you need to work a little yourself, you know bit extra to save up that money or maybe you your boundaries,” need to spend more time off because you’ve been Clemetsen said. “So it working too much,” Clemetsen said. “I think my you’re going to work biggest thing is to think about what you want to do, a job or multiple jobs, figure out what works best for you and plan how to maybe one week push do that and stick to it.” yourself to work a ton and He said budgeting isn’t forcing oneself to spend Illustration By Madison Cohen then maybe the next week, work nothing. He said it’s about understanding the money one as little as you can so you can see has and distributing it appropriately. maybe you do need to work less but work at a higher paying job According to Clemetsen, budgeting should be in conformity or maybe you are OK to work 60 hours a week and you don’t get with happiness and a means to achieve more happiness. tired out but maybe you’ll do that three times a month instead of all four.” Tony Silva, the assistant general manager at Drury Inn and Suites Flagstaff said that working over summer can do students

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MAY 23, 2019 - JUNE 26, 2019 | THE LUMBERJACK

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OUTDOORS

A review of northern Arizona trails Chandler Staley

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ith winter withering away and summer emerging, exploring the great outdoors becomes a priority for many tourists. There are hundreds of trails to explore around northern Arizona, and hikers and cyclists alike no longer have to wait for them to be clear of snow. George Jozens, the deputy public affairs officer for the Coconino National Forest, said that one does not have to venture far from Flagstaff to dive into nature. Buffalo Park hosts a variety of trails, and it is one of the most popular destinations within the city limits. According to Jozens, some trails near mount elden are closed off due to helicopter logging in the Dry Lake Hills Area. Fatman’s Loop Trail is one of the most used in Flagstaff as it is one of the easier ones near the city. Even with its location, mule deer and grey foxes are frequently seen on this hike. This trail leads to a much more strenuous hike known as Elden Lookout Trail. Jozens said that there are parts where the trail inclines to 45 degrees. “It is the steepest trail we have in the forest, so it is very difficult,” Jozens said. Additionally, Jozens said that Rogers Lake County Natural Area has two trails for hikers and bikers. The Gold Digger Trail is 4 miles long and has a ramada with rainwater collection for birds, and the Two-Spot Trail is 2 miles long that gives visitors a great view of the wetlands. “With the water present there it is absolutely gorgeous,” Jozens said. According to the United States Forest Service (USFS) website, the Campbell Mesa Trail System is an easy hike that should take three to four hours to complete. Everyone from hikers, cyclists, and skiers enjoy theses trails year round. This trail system is surrounded by Gambel Oak-Ponderosa Pine, diverse wildlife, and breathtaking views of Mt. Elden, Anderson Mesa

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The beginning of the Island Trail Loop at Walnut Canyon National Monument is at the end of several dozen flights of stairs May 15. Joseph Whitney | The Lumberjack

and Mormon Mountain. There are five loops in the trail system, offering a variety of length and difficulty for trail enthusiasts. Sinagua Loop is the shortest one which is about a mile long, and the Continental Loop is not much longer as it is barely 2 miles. The Continental Loop has a great view of the Rio de Flag and Walnut Canyon Lakes. Next is the Anasazi Loop which measures at 2.7 miles, and the Walnut Meadows Loop stretches to 4 miles. Taking this trail grants the hiker with a beautiful view of Mormon Mountain and Anderson Mesa. The longest trail is the Campbell Mesa Loop at 5.7 miles long. The Sycamore Rim Trail has five different trailheads that give hikers access to this unique system. According to the USFS website, the northern and western sections travel through Ponderosa Pine forests. Meanwhile, the southern and eastern portions of the loop follow the rim of Sycamore Canyon. Jozens warned that bikes are not allowed in the wilderness area and advised that visitors should double check where they are permitted to bike. Sycamore Falls also attracts rock climbers as well, and previous experience is highly recommended before scaling these mountains. Walnut Canyon National

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Monument has two short trails to explore and allows visitors to look into the past. This National Monument is home to the ruins of the Sinagua who inhabited the area hundreds of years ago. The Rim Trail is a quick 0.7-milelong hike that goes around the rim and passes through the preserved structures of the Sinagua. The Island Trail goes into the canton for about a mile and encounters over 20 ruins. The Grand Canyon also has a variety of trails. Nicholas Brown, a recreation specialist with the North Kaibab Ranger District, said that Rainbow Ridge is one of the most popular trails in northern Arizona. “People love to hike and bike through the 22-mile-long trail, it’s a great experience,” Brown said. Located along the north rim of the Grand Canyon, it offers a different view places such as Powell Plateau, Steamboat Mountain, Tapeats Amphitheater and Great Thumb Mesas, as well as the Mt. Trumbull region of The Arizona Strip. The trail passes through the Ponderosa Pine Forest and drops into steep canyons filled aspens and small meadows. For those looking for an immersive wilderness experience, Brown recommended the Kanab Creek Wilderness. This trail is in the middle of an intense desert environment and is not for the lighthearted adventurer. However, the

Walnut Canyon National Monument was created in 1915 in order to preserve the dwellings of the Sinagua people. From the Island Trail, there are around 25 easily viewable dwellings, with more scattered throughout the rest of the monument May 15. Joseph Whitney | The Lumberjack

remoteness is unmatched. “I love the landscape,” Brown said. “There is beautiful scenery along with great archaeological sites that you can visit too.” Brian Grube, the assistant director of Coconino County Parks and Recreation, said that trails are an essential fabric to the Flagstaff community. “Trails are conducive to a healthy community because people are surrounded by nature while they exercise,” Grube said. “It brings people in the neighborhood closer

together and attracts visitors from all over the world.” He added that trails challenge people to get out of their comfort zone and push people to explore and admire the local wildlife. Jozens had some wisdom to give to trail enthusiasts before they explore the great outdoors. “Make sure you bring plenty of water and snacks, you need to be as prepared as possible,” Jozens said.


OUTDOORS

Places to Explore in Arizona 1 2 3 4 5

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Across: 5. Northern AZ's ghost town 8. Border dam 9. AZ wine country 11. Slot canyon east of Page 12. Extinct cinder cone 13. Southwestern states intersection 16. Indigenous cliff dwellings 19. Original capital of AZ 20. Training cite of Apollo Missions

ACROSS: 5. JEROME 8. HOOVER DAM 9. SONOITA 11. ANTELOPE CANYON 12. SUNSET CRATER 13. FOUR CORNERS 16. WALNUT CANYON 19. HAVASU 17. ARCOSANTI 18. LAKE MEAD

Down: 1. Home of the Queen Mine 2. One of the Seven Wonders 3. Second-largest man-made reservoir in US 4. Indigenous castle 6. Location of O.K. Corral gunfight 7. Home of the Red Rocks 10. Trees paralyzed in fear 14. "Heart of Arizona" 15. Location of London Bridge 17. Uninhabited modern city project 18. Body of water bordering Nevada

PRESCOTT 20. METEOR CANYON

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DOWN: 1. BISBEE 2. GRAND CANYON 3. LAKE POWELL 4. MONTEZUMA 6. TOMBSTONE 7. SEDONA 10. PENTRIFIED FOREST 14. PAYSON 15. LAKE ANSWERS:

MAY 23, 2019 - JUNE 26, 2019 | THE LUMBERJACK

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OUTDOORS

Summer festivals celebrate individuality ASHLEY LOHMANn

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s the weather gets warmer, many people will be seeking opportunities for fun outdoor activities and local and larger scale festivals prepare to provide entertainment and a sense of community to those who attend. Regardless of the celebration, Flagstaff residents said the popularity of festivals is increasing, especially for the summertime events. Flagstaff resident Nicole Urbowicz said the prominent music festivals like Summerfest and Coachella are growing in popularity because of the great publicity they have and also because they offer an opportunity for people to see many of their favorite artists within more mainstream genres. “I think it’s getting to the point where a lot of people go to music festivals so a lot of people hear about it and want to go to one,” Urbowicz said. Urbowicz also said local festivals like Hullabaloo and Pride in the Pines are becoming more popular due to Flagstaff’s growing population, as well as the sense of connectedness and togetherness these events can offer to the community. “Most of the local festivals are put on very well and they’re growing, which is great,” Urbowicz said. “It’s really fun to see the whole town come together for something like that, to do something fun.” Flagstaff resident Camile Wishart said regardless of the size and popularity of the festival, there is always something that ties the group of attendees together. “I think festivals can appeal to most people because summer is the ideal time for outdoor events and everyone can get involved,” Wishart said. “The culture is always positive.” Urbowicz said that although the uniting factor of more mainstream music festivals is popular music, there are represented subgenres that allow for people with similar interests to come together. The capacity of the

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event also allows for people to become introduced to music they otherwise would not hear and meet people they would otherwise never meet. “I like exploring the different kinds of music at the festivals,” Urbowicz said. Urbowicz said the people one would meet at large music festivals are typically younger adults. She said this can be great for people in college to meet people and make friends around their age, but it would be difficult for prominent music festivals to be geared towards a more diverse age group. “Music festivals tend to appeal to a college population because people who are out of college usually have a nine to five job and work 40 hours a week,” Urbowicz said. “It’s kind of hard to take that much time off, whereas in college, it can be done more easily.” Because they don’t require as much of a time and traveling commitment, Flagstaff local Rylan Shannon said local festivals are accessible to anyone and everyone and can provide a more affordable and encompassing experience than larger music festivals. “They’re usually during the weekends,” Shannon said. “So it’s just a fun way people want to devote their time off and have a really nice, relaxing day.” Being more accessible to locals, Flagstaff festivals can draw diverse crowds with similar interests solely being to celebrate what the festival is celebrating and to have a fun and relaxing time. “You get people from all walks of life that come,” Shannon said. “You get large families, you get people from out of town, so it’s a really cool way to meet people and just see who all shares the same interests with what the festival shares and celebrates.” Urbowicz said that attending local festivals is a great way for people to dip their toes in genres or cultures they may find interesting. She said because of the welcoming, celebratory culture of festivals, they are the perfect way to discover new things.

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Festival goers get into a rythm as Shemehia Copeland plays at Blues and Brews Saturday, June 20, 2015. Zac Velarde | The Lumberjack

“At festivals here, the music is not as mainstream so you can go and explore new stuff,” Urbowicz said. “And a lot of the bands are local so that’s great because you’re supporting local artists.” Shannon said the local festivals are a great opportunity for tourists to get a taste of the Flagstaff community as summer is one of Flagstaff’s biggest tourist seasons. He said that while the summer festivals allow for residents to become connected with the community, they also allow for outsiders to be introduced to the unique connectedness Flagstaff has as well. “The festivals contribute to Flagstaff’s summer experience because they really build off that sense of a community experience because they’re very interactive and outside and you get to enjoy the weather and meet new people and see what’s out there,” Shannon said. “So it’s just a good way

to learn about your community and build ties to it.” Urbowicz said for some people, festivals can be something definitive of a summertime experience, regardless of if they’re big and international or small and local. She said they’re often things people look forward to in the summer even though festivals happen throughout the year. According to Urbowicz, festivals are fun and offer a feeling of freedom that people often associate with the summertime. To ensure safety and enjoyment during summer festivals, Wishart said the most important thing to remember is to stay hydrated. Shannon said it is important to always bring cash to local festivals. Urbowicz said it is important to know oneself and their personal boundaries when it comes to being around so many people, and recommends attending local festivals as a sort of training for bigger, more

populous music festivals. “If you’re anxious about being around a lot of people, go to a small festival first before you decide to go to a big festival because you don’t want to have a bad experience the first time you go,” Urbowicz said. Regardless of what a festival might be celebrating, Urbowicz said they are meant to be fun and relaxing. She said festivals may be a celebration of something in particular that allow for people of similar interests to come together and enjoy what they love, but they are also a means for people with great differences to come together and celebrate what they don’t have in common, which ultimately is what makes a community.


MAY 23, 2019 - JUNE 26, 2019 | THE LUMBERJACK

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