Page 1

Steinberg’S KingS arena hooKup! see news, page 9

Corruption, pirates and perms:

Fall movie preview! see arts&Culture, page 18

Feds

pot? Stop see the 420, page 39

StalKing

him, already see ask Joey, page 27

Sacramento’S newS & entertainment weekly

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Volume 25, iSSue 21

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thurSday, September 5, 2013


ryan bailey

yoga instructor owner of East Wind Yoga

get ready to get sweaty lululemon athletica roseville galleria - opening friday, september 13 lululemon athletica sacramento arden fair - opening friday, september 27

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September 5, 2013 | vol. 25, Issue 21

47

Syria, seriously Never mind that the United States hasn’t yet proven to the American people a direct link between Syrian President Bashar Assad’s government and the chemical attacks that occurred late last month on the eastern edge of Damascus. Or that even America’s most hard-core allies, including the United Kingdom, are against military action. The United States should not attack Syria. Someone please explain what a bombing and cruise-missile assault will accomplish? Will it demonstrate to the Assad government that America isn’t afraid to go it alone and obliterate one of the oldest cities on Earth? Fallujah, anyone? I have suspicions about what a U.S. operation might accomplish, however, and none are good. An attack will fuel already-simmering regional, sectarian conflicts in neighboring Middle Eastern countries. And it will uphold—no, escalate—this tragic proxy war within Syria, which already has gone on too long. I’m disappointed by Obama. Many Americans believed he would be a president to work with and listen to the international community. But on Syria, his ears are, sadly, deaf. And, as an American journalist, I’m equally frustrated by this country’s traditional media and its kowtowing to war. Including The Sacramento Bee’s editorial board, which, last Friday, beat the drum in favor of a military attack, arguing that Obama’s reputation and this country’s standing in the world will “suffer” if we don’t drop bombs and lob missiles. First, the president’s reputation and the nation’s standing are two different things. But both will suffer if we do attack. Have we learned nothing from the past dozen years of war in the Middle East? What’s wrong with you, my America?

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31 28 Creative Director Priscilla Garcia Art Director Hayley Doshay Designers Brian Breneman, Vivian Liu, Serene Lusano, Marianne Mancina, Skyler Smith Contributing Photographers Lisa Baetz, Steven Chea, Wes Davis, Ryan Donahue, Taras Garcia, William Leung, Kayleigh McCollum, Shoka, Justin Short, Anne Stokes

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Co-editors Rachel Leibrock, Nick Miller Staff Writers Raheem F. Hosseini, Dave Kempa Copy Editor Shoka Shafiee Entertainment Editor Jonathan Mendick Editorial Coordinator Deena Drewis Contributing Editor Cosmo Garvin Editor-at-large Melinda Welsh Editorial Interns Cody Drabble, Jessica Rine Contributors Ngaio Bealum, Daniel Barnes, Rob Brezsny, Joey Garcia, Blake Gillespie, Becky Grunewald, Mark Halverson, Jeff Hudson, Jim Lane, Greg Lucas, Garrett McCord, Kel Munger,

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“I think my mouth goes faster than my brain, so I am always interrupting people.”

Asked at the Sunday farmers market at Eigth and W streets:

What’s your most annoying habit?

Tim Bright

Andy Williams

Sierra Franks

call-center manager

federal biologist

Taking on too much. I’ve always had a problem saying no. It’s not horrible, but there’s many times where I was like, “Why did I do that?” And once I commit myself, I have to follow it through. I’m getting better at it.

self-employed painter

Biting my fingernails. I just don’t clip them. My mom always clipped them too short when I was little, so I won’t use clippers. I have to bite them.

I’m a little OCD, kind of about everything: locking doors, turning stoves off, making sure toasters are turned off. I try to keep it on the down low so [other people] don’t see I’m doing it. I’ve had that since I was a teenager. I would go [downstairs] after my folks were asleep and make sure everything was unplugged.

Frederico “One Love” B.

Cindy Steinberg administrator

poker player

I probably talk too much and interrupt people. I think my mouth goes faster than my brain, so I am always interrupting people. My co-worker will tell me to stop talking sometimes.

I’ll be on the light rail or bus, and I hear people use the N-word, and I confront them about it, and people seem annoyed that I get in their business. It’s a terrible word. Anyone who uses the [N-word] has an IQ of 60. That’s keeping it real.

James Murphy musician

The most annoying habit ever is checking your Facebook on your phone every five minutes. I don’t do that! That would be silly! Especially in public places. People who do it are just too much.

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Email your letters to sactoletters@newsreview.com.

Homelessness could happen to you

well, and he described them with feeling and flair. Great story. One thing I would add: It could happen to you. (My personal mantra about homelessness.) Divorces happen. Layoffs happen. Foreclosures happen. Illnesses depleting one’s savings, happen. Or to someone you love.

Re “My days living homeless in Sacramento” by Dave Kempa (SN&R Feature Story, August 29): As a formerly homeless human, I enjoyed Dave Kempa’s story about being faux homeless for a week, since it was well-written and accurate. I spent two-and-a-half years living in the bushes, getting wet in the winter, sweating letter of in the summer, and the week avoiding the wrath of rangers. I moved to Quinn Cottages a month ago, so I am one of the few who’s managed to crawl out of the abyss that is the poverty and utter boredom of being homeless. I’ve kinda gotten to know Kempa, since he interviewed me a while ago. (I gave him the sound bite “Same shit, different day” that he used to full advantage.) I’ve also run into him at homeless feedings and at my fave bar, Henry’s Lounge, where he sometimes repairs on Wednesdays after the paper’s been put to bed. He enjoys talking to me, since we can talk shop, since I was a journalist in a former life, and he’s appalled at the reason why I became homeless. I know many of the folks he wrote about so

Stacy Selmants

Sa c ra m e nt o

Say yes to superfoods! Re “Up for a food challenge?” by Shoka (The V Word, August 29): I gave up meat and fish about 30 years ago and immediately stopped coming down with the flu, which had been a regular, annual experience. Then, 10 years later, I gave up dairy and eggs, and immediately stopped catching colds once or twice a year, which had been my experience in my younger years. Clearly, animal foods in my diet had suppressed my immune system all those years, and today, with the abundant evidence of what the superfoods like kale, blueberries and tempeh can do to boost the effectiveness of one’s immune system, nuisance diseases no longer need be a dreaded expectation of winter. Don Knutson Sacramento

SN&R overlooks Walmart’s good deeds

‘9/11 truth’ and the NSA

Re “Walmart gives to Wind Youth Services to feed homeless teens” by Dave Kempa (Beats, August 8): The SN&R overlooked two decades worth of supporting nonprofits in Sacramento to take a cheap shot at our company and draw inaccurate conclusions about our motivation. That’s insulting to our customers, associates and the thousands of organizations and individuals that have been positively impacted throughout the years due to a boost in philanthropic funding. Our track record speaks for itself. We’re proud of our contributions here over the past 20 years to organizations including Sacramento Veterans Resource Center, River City Food Bank, Roberts Family Development Center and many others. ... Last year, we gave more than $26 million to nonprofits throughout California. Giving back to the communities where we do business is part of our culture, and it’s something we’re proud to do in every market we serve across California. It’s a shame that the SN&R only chooses to pay attention to those contributions when it suits their needs. Rachel Wall senior manager of community affairs Walmart (and proud Sacramento native)

Re “NSA surveillance necessary” (SN&R Editorial, August 15): I’m afraid that your argument is flawed from the get-go, as it is based on an emotion and an assumption, both of which seem to always lead to poor consequences. The emotion is fear, and the assumption is that “the end justifies the means.” ... Perhaps worse, however, is that this editorial is based on the disgracefully stillpopular, though long-discredited notion that we were attacked by Muslim terrorists on September 11, 2001. We were attacked by terrorists, all right—the same ones who are bringing us the NSA and all the other agencies of totalitarianism. Wake up, folks! Thomas Lambie Weimar

Correction In “Chelsea, lately” by Blake Gillespie (SN&R Music, August 29), Chelsea Wolfe’s album title was misidentified. The correct title is Pain Is Beauty. It has been corrected online.

@SacNewsReview

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BUILDING A

HEALTHY S A C R A M E N T O

You Get What You Give Young man inspired to empower youth through outreach BY M I K E B LO U N T

L

uis Guerrero is like most college kids. He enjoys hanging out with friends, listening to music, and he’s excited about his future. But the 22-year-old Sacramento State electrical engineering major says he wasn’t always like this. Growing up as a troubled youth, he flirted with the gang lifestyle and got into trouble often for fighting and stealing. Eventually, Guerrero says he decided he wasn’t living up to his potential. Looking back on those experiences after he graduated high school made Guerrero realize that he could make a difference in the lives of youth in the community. He was proof that they could turn their lives around and put themselves on a different path. In 2011, Guerrero and a couple of his friends contacted their former high schools to find out how they could get involved in helping at-risk youth. That’s when he found out about a new Boys and Men of Color collaborative starting up through the Sacramento Building Healthy Communities Hub. The coalition works with nonprofits like La Familia to affect positive change in the community. It is funded by The California Endowment’s Building Healthy Communities grant. “As soon as I heard the name, I was sold,” Guerrero says. “I understand the struggle that exists for boys and men of color because I am a man of color, so it was important for me to lend my support. I knew the potential from just hearing the name.”

Through Boys and Men of Color, he has helped organize several workshops and helped coordinate the Boys and Men of Color summit this past summer, an event that brings together boys and men of color to take community action toward health, safety and better education in Sacramento. Guerrero will also be involved with planning and coordinating the Boys and Men of Color summit next year.

art spaces for kids to do graffiti and we need to open music studios for kids that like to make beats. We need to give them options and somewhere to explore their minds.”

“I UNDERSTAND THE STRUGGLE THAT EXISTS FOR BOYS AND MEN OF COLOR BECAUSE I AM A MAN OF COLOR, SO IT WAS IMPORTANT FOR ME TO LEND MY SUPPORT. I KNEW THE POTENTIAL FROM JUST HEARING THE NAME.”

“The work we’re doing is important for the community because we want to have safer communities and healthy communities,” Guerrero says. “We want to have safe schools and educated students, and the only way we’re going to achieve those goals is by investing in the population that has the highest dropout rates, incarceration rates, and suspension and expulsion rates.”

Guerrero adds that he believes in the power of outreach and its potential to change lives. Ultimately, he hopes to continue working with youth in the community long after he graduates from college.

BUILDING HEALTHY COMMUNITIES In 2010, The California Endowment launched a 10-year, $1 billion plan to improve the health of 14 challenged communities across the state. Over the 10 years, residents, community-based organizations and public institutions will work together to address the socioeconomic and environmental challenges contributing to the poor health of their communities. College student Luis Guerrero began volunteering with Boys and Men of Color because he wanted to give back to his community. Photo by Mike Blount

Luis Guerrero Guerrero says that Boys and Men of Color are just getting started in making an impact in the community, but there is still much work to be done. He encourages anyone who wants to get involved to contact Boys and Men of Color to find out how they can help. “The Sacramento Boys and Men of Color is a collaborative and anyone can join,” Guerrero says. “We need to start up after school programs and open basketball courts for teams. We need

Your ZIP code shouldn’t predict how long you’ll live – but it does. Staying healthy requires much more than doctors and diets. Every day, our surroundings and activities affect how long – and how well – we’ll live. Health Happens in Neighborhoods. Health Happens in Schools. Health Happens with Prevention.

PAID WITH A GRANT FROM THE CALIFORNIA ENDOWMENT 6 

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www.SacBHC.org


Is your home on toxic ground? See NEWS

8

Steinberg hooks up Kings arena See NEWS

9

Rim Fire remembered See EDITORIAL

13 PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY BRIAN BRENEMAN

The Medi-Cal mess Will ‘Obamacare’ fix things? About 160,000 people in the Sacramento area are uninsured, even though they could be by signed up for the state’s low-income Alastair Bland health-care plan, Medi-Cal. Instead, they are paying bills from their own pockets, or incurring costs on overburdened county clinics and hospitals. The same problem exists statewide: Nearly 3 million low-income Californians eligible for Medi-Cal have not signed up—a monumental failure rate of a program that guarantees low-cost coverage for about 11 million Golden State residents, plus some level of reimbursement for their medical providers. One reason for Medi-Cal’s low enrollment rate is ignorance: Eligible individuals simply don’t know. But the registration process is also complicated— and, even if people do sign up, there’s no guarantee HMOs are giving patients the care they need. “Right now, people need to know they’re eligible, and go sign up,” said Robert Phillips, director of health programs with the Sierra Health Foundation, a private Sacramento-based group working to improve health care. He says many people receiving Medi-Cal coverage only learn by chance that they are eligible after becoming injured or ill and visiting a hospital, “where the eligibility worker tells them.” Trouble is, some hospitals and clinics, Phillips says, don’t have such workers onsite, and eligible Medi-Cal patients may be seen and treated without ever learning they could receive federal assistance. But there is another problem with Medi-Cal: The enrollment process can be so laborious and time-consuming that tens of thousands of people in the Sacramento area don’t even bother signing up, or can’t complete the process once they start. “It’s so complicated,” said Kelly Bennett-Wofford, executive director of Sacramento Covered, a local organization that provides direct assistance to people interested in getting screened and, if eligible, signed up for Medi-Cal. “There are so many determining factors that you need to process to figure out if you’re covered.” Copies of bank statements, trust-fund records, properties owned, vehicle registration, a birth certificate and other forms must be handed over to the county in order to help determine if an individual qualifies. “Generally, the more paperwork that you ask of people, the less likely they are to sign up for something,” said Vanessa Cajina, a legislative advocate with the Western Center on Law and Poverty in Sacramento. Improvements to the existing system and relief for uninsured low-income BEFORE

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Californians is on the way. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act—what has been called “Obamacare” for several years now—takes effect on January 1, 2014, and will greatly simplify the Medi-Cal application process. The criteria for determining if one is eligible will be reduced—culled down to just age, family size and income, which must be less than 138 percent of the federal poverty level. This means that a person between 19 and 65 years of age living alone and making less than roughly $15,900 per year will qualify for Medi-Cal. In all, the Affordable Care Act will increase the number of Californians eligible for Medi-Cal by more than a million people statewide.

Nearly 3 million low-income Californians eligible for Medi-Cal have not signed up. When the Affordable Care Act kicks in, Sacramento County is going to see significant Medi-Cal uptake. “There are probably 200,000 people uninsured right now in the county,” said Ethan Dye, with the county’s Health and Human Services Department. “We’re forecasting that 30 to 50 percent of them will apply for Medi-Cal within the first year, with more coming later.” Assemblyman Richard Pan, a strong health-care advocate, is currently pushing outreach efforts to notify those eligible that they can sign up. Although county governments have substantial financial incentives to sign up their residents for Medi-Cal, since the program brings them both state and federal reimbursement, many counties’ efforts to inform the public that the state could be paying their medical bills have been lacking to nil, according to Pan. Other problems in the Medi-Cal system may be too deeply ingrained to be eliminated. Most troubling, in many critics’ opinions, is the possibility that enrolled Medi-Cal members might not be receiving medical attention when they want it. That’s because of the way that the state pays health-maintenance organizations, or HMOs, such as Health Net and Molina Healthcare. They receive money based on the estimated population of eligible MediCal patients in their service area—whether or not those people ever visit a hospital. STORY

“There is concern that this arrangement could cause an HMO to discourage someone from receiving care, since they get paid no matter what,” Pan said. But exactly how HMOs, hospitals and other providers treat—or don’t treat—Medi-Cal patients based on payment quibbles is an entirely gray area, lacking in authority oversight. “No one knows whether or not the level of access we’re paying for is on par with what we’re receiving,” said Phillips. Pan recently authored legislation that could improve some of Medi-Cal’s shortcomings and increase public transparency. Assembly Bill 209 would require the state’s Department of Health Care Services to hold public meetings every few months to report on the quality of both health and dental care through Medi-Cal HMOs and providers. The state would also be required to appoint an advisory committee to improve health-care quality. Beginning in 2014, Medi-Cal will serve single adults without children, who have previously not been eligible. This group of people, some have said, likely includes a disproportionate number of single men with drug and alcohol problems—expensive additions to the Medi-Cal population. Federal reimbursements will be ramped up to help soften the expected blow for providers—but they will still take a hit. Already, Medi-Cal has been a costly program to enact. “We hear all the time how hospitals can’t even break even because they have a high number of Medi-Cal participants,” said Bennett-Wofford, at Sacramento Covered. Providers, after all, only receive fractional compensation for each Medi-Cal patient they see. This system may have two opposite effects, according to analysts, either creating incentive for providers to not serve Medi-Cal patients at all, or actually driving stronger preventative efforts so that providers can avoid having to cover the cost of expensive treatment later. Thus, Medi-Cal under the Affordable Care Act will put to the test whether social health care in America can work, and it remains to be seen whether enhanced MediCal will drain hospitals of their resources—or if it helps to keep millions of Californians out of them in the first place. Ω

  |    A R T S & C U L T U R E    

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Experts say the process to sign up for Medi-Cal requires too much paperwork.

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on new sstands 09.12.13 By Ryan Bunbury, Leader of ONE Singles Ministries

Single? Do you like to meet, mix, and mingle with other singles? This is what the new ONE is all about! Starting this September, ONE will meet every Sunday at 5:30pm at Capital Christian Center. We are rebooting our group by launching the all new 20s/30s mingle as well as the all new 40s/50s+ mingle. Each group is designed and tailored just for you. If you enjoy an energetic atmosphere, don’t miss the all-new ONE! With countless social events, activities, and services, we have seen new faces every single week. Not one month has passed without ONE reaching out and connecting with hundreds of Sacramento singles.

What Was Accomplished?

In year one of ONE • 700 new singles connected through Capital • ONE Christmas Wish donation program – Dozens of single-parent family wishes came true during the holiday season as we supplied gifts, groceries and hope to many needy families. • Glasses for Peru – Earlier this year we supported humanitarian work to South America, giving both sight and health to the less fortunate. Through many donations, we sent over 800+ pairs of reader glasses and hundreds of diabetic medical supplies to Catacaos, Peru. • Dozens of social outings – With countless social events, activities, and services, we have seen many singles develop deeper friendships and build community. • We have seen singles enter healthy dating relationships, as well as couples happily getting married, through ONE. By focusing on becoming the person that the person you are looking for, is looking for, this could be your story too.

Launch Date: He Said, She Said

The fun begins on Sunday, September 8, at 5:30pm. Do not miss the series, “He Said, She Said” with hot topics like: “The Do’s & Don’ts of Dating”, “The Birds & The Bees – Sex and the City”, “Q & A Panel – Anything Goes” and more. ONE is an advocate for positive change “body, mind, and spirit” in Sacramento singles. If you’re single and looking for life, laughter and love, then join the movement and experience the power of ONE!

Capital Christian Center 9470 Micron Ave. Sacramento, CA 95827 www.Facebook.com/ONECapital Text ONECAPITAL to 99000 now www.ONECapital.cc 8

SN&R

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| 2013.indd 1 the | new one snr piece august

Sundays @ 5:30pm 20/30s Mingle 40/50s+ Mingle 8/29/13 2:58 PM

BEST OF SACRAMENTO 2013

THE NEW ONE

Healthy ’hoods Sacramento’s most impoverished neighborhoods are also the most polluted Sacramento is home to some of the most troublesome toxic hot spots in the state, all of which lie in the region’s most impoverished and racially diverse communities. by Dave Kempa According to data by the state Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment and the California davek@ Environmental Protection Agency, six ZIP codes in north ne w s re v ie w.c o m and south Sacramento are among the top 10 percent of California locations most impacted by pollution. Two of these spots, located in the Florin-Stockton neighborhood, sit in the top 5 percent. “There is a risk here,” said Charles Mason, CEO of Ubuntu Green. “There is a serious risk.” Ubuntu Green is a nonprofit, with offices in Oak Park and Lemon Hill, that is dedicated to helping impoverished Sacramento neighborhoods to become healthier, sustainable and more equitable. One of the most commonly used indicators of a community’s health in relation to pollution is asthma rates, and Sacramento—particularly south Sac—scores badly, with some neighborhoods in the top 2 percent of asthma rates in the state. Six ZIP codes in Mason says that Sacramento is north and south also home to more than 400 brownSacramento fields—contaminated, abandoned lots that can’t be put to use until they are are among the cleaned up. “If you were to look at some of top 10 percent of the most incompatible land uses in California locations residential areas, you’re going to find most impacted by that the population around that is lowincome and minority communities,” pollution. said Sofia Parino of the Center on Race, Poverty & the Environment, a national environmental-justice organization. Parino, who grew up in south Sacramento, said that these communities are targeted by businesses prone to pollution because they pack a smaller civic punch than more affluent communities. But that is changing. For instance, a survey released this summer by the Public Policy Institute of California showed that the state’s blacks and Latinos are at least 20 percent more likely to view global warming as a “very serious threat” than whites. Last Wednesday, around 200 members of the California Environmental Justice Alliance, a statewide coalition of environmentalist organizations, met on the steps of the Capitol to lobby, in both English and Spanish, for bills that would benefit the environment. Their rally included a surprise appearance by Assembly Speaker John Pérez, whose proposed Assembly Bill Independent 1330 would both increase transparency of the state’s reporting for this story is funded Environmental Protection Agency and ensure that speakers by a grant from of foreign languages have equal time in public testimony. Sacramento Here in Sacramento, one of Ubuntu Green’s priorities Emergency Foodlink. is to raise awareness on the region’s brownfields, with the hope that funding will come to clean them up. After that, Mason would like to turn many of them into gardens. Ω


Steinberg’s arena assist

BEATS

Leader keeps promise, reveals contentious Kings bill The proposed Kings arena received an unusual—but not unexpected— Kevin Johnson-worthy assist from by Darrell Steinberg this past week: Nick Miller Sacramento’s state senator is poised nic kam@ to score with an eleventh-hour bill news re view.c om that would fast-track the proposed downtown arena’s environmental review and allow construction to begin sooner. The pro tem’s pitch would also help the city with its eminent-domain proceedings against owners of the Downtown Plaza Macy’s property.

executive director of the Planning and Conservation League, which promotes smart environmental legislation. Steinberg’s no stranger to lastminute bills that help out sports arenas. In 2011, he drove two bills through the Capitol during the final 48 hours of session, including one that specifically eased the environmental review of downtown Los Angeles’ proposed football stadium. Steinberg says his latest bill would disallow the Kings-arena development from being bogged down by lawsuits. PHOTO BY JUSTIIN SHORT

If the bill wiggles its way through the Capitol during these final days of session and the governor signs it, arena construction could get an eight-month head start. This is good for the Kings owners, as the NBA has threatened to take control of the team if a new arena isn’t built by 2017. Critics worry that beginning construction before exploring matters such as traffic impacts could end up costing Sacramento millions of dollars. A contingent of regional lawmakers voiced support of Steinberg’s plan last week. He insists the bill doesn’t cut corners. “This bill still demands a full public environmental review and ... delivers a quicker resolution of any legal challenges,” he said in a press release. Indeed, the bill does not eliminate any aspect of review under the California Environmental Quality Act. Still, environmentalists and others groaned at its arrival. “We’re disappointed to see yet another CEQA streamlining bill for yet another sports arena popping up in the last days of the legislative session,” wrote Bruce Reznik,

Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg hopes to pass a last-minute bill to make it easier for Sacramento to build a new Kings arena.

BEFORE

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It would require that the California superior and appeal’s courts review any suits within 180 days. Reznik says that while he appreciates that the pro tem’s proposal “doesn’t affect the actual environmental review undertaken” for the arena, he and others are concerned about different provisions. One such condition would allow arena construction during the environmental-review process, instead of after a report is completed sometime next summer. Tab Berg, a local political consultant who says public dollars shouldn’t be used to pay for this Kings arena, called this aspect of the bill “a sham.” “It’s amazing that the Legislature is creating a process where the construction moves ahead of the financing,” he said. Another contentious inclusion would permit the city to engage eminent-domain proceedings against the owners of the Macy’s property, a New York-based real-estate firm. So far, these owners have not accepted any of the Kings offers for the Downtown Plaza Macy’s Mens & Home Store property. Last month, city council gave staff permission to use eminent domain to

  F E AT U R E

STORY

Age before NIMBYs

take control of the property. But, as it stands, the city would have to wait to engage until next year. Steinberg’s bill alters this—and eminent-domain experts say the Capitol lawmaker’s involvement is not the norm. “It’s unique,” is how local attorney Brian Manning, who focuses mostly on eminent-domain law, put it. He says that if Gov. Jerry Brown signs Steinberg’s bill, the city could take over the Macy’s property within “a few months.” Berg called this part of the bill “an absolute abuse of eminent domain.” Craig Powell, with watchdog group Eye on Sacramento, said he was “outraged” by Steinberg’s bill, which he referred to as “a time bomb.” Specifically, he worries that the arena will have traffic impacts on downtown—almost a certainty—but a judge will not give an injunction to stop work and addresss said issues. “Caltrans will not foot the bill for new special uses” such as an arena, he explained, adding that the city could end up having to pay tens of millions of dollars for upgrades to freeway onramps and roadways.

“It’s amazing that the Legislature is creating a process where the construction moves ahead of the financing.” Tab Berg political consultant This past March, when Steinberg, Mayor Kevin Johnson and the soonto-be-owners of the Sacramento Kings presented a pitch to keep the team to the NBA board of governors in New York City, the pro tem explained to the NBA how he could pass a bill to streamline arena development. Helping Steinberg hold good on this promise is local developer Mark Friedman, who leads the new arena development team and is lobbying lawmakers to pass the bill this week. Former state Senate President Pro Tem Don Perata will also be at the Capitol working for the bill, according to sources. They’ll be on a tight schedule: The session ends on Thursday, September 12. Ω

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Anne Rudin barely cleared the lectern Thursday night, but her words swayed a dialogue about whether Land Park has any room for seniors. The city’s diminutive 89-year-old ex-mayor made an unplanned appearance before the Sacramento Planning and Design Commission on behalf of a 40-bed residential-care facility for the elderly. Neighbors who feared parking hassles, traffic congestion, construction noise and the size of the proposed two-story building bemoaned the project, slated for a tree-shrouded residential lot on Del Rio Road. Rudin called those fears “overdrawn,” and cut through the audience’s respectful applause with a plainspoken appeal: “I would like other people to have the same benefits that I’ve had living here for the past 50 years,” she said. A neighbor with a family member at the applicant’s assisted living facility at 10 Country Place said he’d support one in a lesscrowded part of Land Park. “This is not the spot for it,” Steve Lahey said. “Let’s put this where it belongs.” The commission sided with Rudin, approving the planning request from John Cimino Jr., who runs The Meadows at Country Place in Greenhaven. The commission did place additional conditions that would cut down on noise and decrease the odds of overflow parking around the neighborhood. One local supporter said he always has a place to park when he visits family and friends at assisted-living homes. “Unfortunately, they don’t get a lot of visitors,” Joseph Fong said. “And that’s just a sad fact.” (Raheem F. Hosseini)

Sunday strange Sacramento police welcomed the month of September on Sunday with adolescent home invaders and scissors-wielding Dumpster divers. Around midnight, a Valley Hi-North Laguna resident woke up on his couch to discover two youths jacking jewels in his home. The suspects, described as between 13 and 15 years old, allegedly threatened the victim before escaping. Around 1:30 a.m., a 40-year-old parolee digging through trash cans at the Mercy Learning Center aroused the suspicions of private security patrolling the complex. According to Sacramento Police Department logs, security guards detained Anthony Wayne Broadway, despite his being armed with a pair of scissors. Broadway was jailed on a parole violation. Several hours later, a man with a much bigger blade surrendered quietly when officers confronted him in south Sacramento. The unidentified suspect laid a machete down when asked, logs say. Police capped off the weirdness around 10 p.m., when they arrested a man who was seen tipping over bus-stop benches near Stockton Boulevard. (R.F.H.)

Gone bike fishin’ Midtown is after you, bike thieves. Frustrated with the perpetual problem of pedaled rides going AWOL, the Handle District board of directors teamed up with the Sacramento Police Department to start nabbing unsuspecting bicycle thieves with the deployment of two “bait bikes” around Midtown. True to Sacramento form, the first bike was stolen less than two hours after police deployed it. While they didn’t catch the thief this time around, cops did retrieve the bicycle, using it to take down a string of other crooks. “We have been making consistent arrests, and we have no doubt that many of the thieves we have arrested have been stealing dozens of bikes per month,” said Sac P.D.’s Marc Coopwood. Keep fishing, officers. (Dave Kempa)

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Port of opinion

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10   |   SN&R   |   09.05.13

Too many bills sound swell but don’t do anything. Like one this year

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But occasionally—to quote John Burton, chairman of the California Democratic Party—a bill that looks like a “jack-off deal” actually affects many thousands of Californians. Sometimes positively. Such a bill is Assembly Bill 14 by Assemblywoman Bonnie Lowenthal, a Long Beach Democrat. Establishing an advisory committee to help create a state freight plan, as her bill does, seems to readily qualify as a “jack-off deal.” Is another advisory commission needed? California is awash in scientific panels and peer reviewers and revision commissions. There’s an advisory committee on everything from the plight of the yellow-bellied fart catcher to standards for hygienic trimming of nostril hair. More fundamentally, why is a freight plan needed at all? Because of what legendary Assembly Speaker Jesse Unruh calls the “mother’s milk” of politics: Moola. Greenbacks. Simoleons. Seriously dead presidents. Without a freight plan, California doesn’t get as hefty a slice of the federal money pie for transportation projects designed to move goods from here to anywhere in more efficient and environmentally thoughtful ways. That’s way big, particularly for California’s ports, where an almost

morbidly obese amount of this freight enters the state. The economic vitality of California’s principal ports—Long Beach, Los Angeles and Oakland— isn’t as widely fretted over as the propriety of twerking, even though Los Angeles and Long Beach are the largest port complex in the country, generating $14.5 billion in traderelated wages. If the amount of cargo coming here goes south—literally and figuratively—then there’s going to be some major fretting—and layoffs. The Port of Long Beach is responsible for one in eight jobs in that city—about 30,000. Throughout Southern California, Long Beach and the Port of Los Angeles support 500,000 jobs and more than 1.5 million trade-related jobs nationwide. What’s called the logistics industry is tied directly to the ports. Lots of folks in the Central Valley make a comfortable living unloading the 40-foot-long cargo containers from ships and shoehorning the contents of five of them into four 53-foot standardized intermodal containers used by the United States and Canada to more swiftly disperse more stuff across North America. But everything isn’t shipshape for California’s ports. Doing business in the Golden State is costlier than other places. To save money, some shipping lines are weighing anchor for Canada and Mexico. Those crazy Panamanians are also dropping $5.25 billion to widen the canal to allow the monster ships that carry 12,000 or more cargo containers to pass through to the Gulf or the Atlantic rather than dock at Long Beach, thread the containers through congested freeway to antiquated rail yards, reload them into the 53-foot containers and send them on their way. A supersize canal means a 40 percent loss in volume for California’s ports, according to the direst statistic. That could happen even with the most righteous freight plan on the planet. Signing Lowenthal’s bill and creating a plan—with the valuable input of an advisory committee—demonstrates at the very least the state wants to stay competitive and, at best, snags millions for environmentally sound improvements on how goods move through California. Moral of the story? Never judge the chickenshitedness of a bill by its advisory committee. Ω


Public-access ghetto Why is AT&T trying to stop you from keeping an eye on local government? Being a full-time student and underemployed journalist, Bites recently switched cable companies, hoping to save a few bucks. For many people, this process is a hassle, with hours spent waiting for the cable guy and figuring out new gear. For Bites, it was all of that, plus a lesson in California’s Digital Infrastructure and Video Competition Act and the discovery ARvin that Sacramento County is right now by CoSmo G locked in a legal battle with the telecomcos mog@ n ewsrev iew.c om munications giant AT&T, trying to protect the ability of citizens to keep an eye on local government. The story starts the usual way. The Comcast bill was too damn high, and AT&T had a deal that would cut Bites’ cable bill in half, at least for a while. Yes, it’s probably better to cut the cord completely and not do business with either company. Still, Breaking Bad, The Daily Show With Jon Stewart, the 12th Doctor Who, etc., seemed like a reasonable compromise at the time. And everything was fine—for about a day and a half. That’s when Bites went to set the digital video recorder to record the Sacramento City Council meeting on Metro Cable Channel 14. Turns out, AT&T’s U-verse service doesn’t let customers record city council meetings, or school-board meetings or any of the local government programming on that channel. Same goes for programming on Access Sacramento’s (channels 17 and 18), like the public-affairs show Soapbox, or local church services or backyard wrestling or foreignlanguage programs that never get play on commercial TV. Same goes for the additional programming public-TV station KVIE’s second slot, channel 7. These channels also don’t show up in the programming guide. You can’t even get to any of them by punching the channel number into the remote, as with normal channels. “It’s not really a channel, it’s more like an app,” the customer-service rep cheerfully explained when Bites called to ask what’s up. To get local public, educational and government-access channels, you have to go to Channel 99 and work your way through a series of menus in the “app” before you find the channel you want. According to AT&T spokesperson Alex Carey, Channel 99 provides, “a convenient location where a viewer can bring up an alphabetical list of all communities in the entire ‘Designated Market Area.’” That means with a bit of digging, you can eventually find Sacramento’s public-access channels, along with those of Davis and Vacaville and other somewhat-nearby places. Which would be sort of interesting, if it was in

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So, who cares if Bites can no longer come home from school at night and catch up on the city council meeting? There’s always the Web the next day or The Sacramento Bee’s coverage. Right? Well, hiding the PEG channels may be illegal under California’s Digital Infrastructure and Video Competition Act of 2006. That’s the law that AT&T spent millions lobbying to pass, in order to ease regulations and pave the way for the rollout of the U-verse system in the state. And in 2009, the cable commission of Sacramento County, along with the cities of Los Angeles and El Segundo, sued AT&T to get the company to comply with state law.

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Initially, AT&T even refused to provide closed-captioning for the PEG channels, explained Harriet Steiner, the cable commission’s lawyer. That’s why the suit was originally based in part on the Americans with Disabilities Act. There have been some concessions, but the lawsuit is still going, four years later. Steiner said, “The county and all of the cities have invested a lot of money in those channels,” and added that citizens really ought to be able to watch their government. Bites groused about the “PEG ghetto” on Facebook recently and drew a response from Lloyd Levine, former California assemblyman and DIVCA co-author. He said he’s proud of the bill and explained, “We worked very hard to make sure that PEG was preserved and in a way that all customers would receive and be able to view them.” The same post prompted Ron Cooper, former executive director of Access Sacramento, to comment that he believed AT&T intended to “marginalize these channels out of existence.” Public access and PEG channels have provided an extremely important way to engage with local government and a space for the community to produce its own programming for decades. They’ve never been as popular as the commercial stations, of course, but at least they had a shot at being seen. Once the PEG channels disappear into AT&T’s public-access ghetto, we may never see them again. Ω

STORY

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Old Man Brown wants the feds to stay off ART DIRECTOR Michael California’s lawn. L./Brandon M. So much by COPYWRITER n/aso that Gov. Jerry Brown Raheem is flouting the spirit of a federal Lisa Tharp F. Hosseini PRODUCER three-judge panel’s ruling to shrink the Alanna Bradley state’s packed prisons to 137.5 percent ra h eBRAND e m h @ MANAGER of their design capacity. ne w s re v i e w . c oOF m PUB/DATE NAME Sac News & Review, 9/5 In 2009, the panel agreed with JOB TYPE/COLOR Print/4CP incarcerated plaintiffs, who said their OUTPUT SIZE 100% conditions prevented sardine-canlike them from4.9" accessing adequate—and ACTUAL SIZE x 11.5" constitutionally mandated—health FONTS care. But Cubano the ruling’s subtext was that Helvetica Neue California’s insane criminal-justice Museo policies—mandatory-sentencing guidelines, such as three strikes and a LINKS law that makes 14-year-olds eligible for life sentences—turned this Golden State into a veritable penal colony. At the time of the ruling, California’s 33 prisons were triplebunked with roughly 168,000 inmates. After some carping about states’ rights, Brown muscled through a prison-realignment plan that shifted tens of thousands of low-level offenders to the counties from which they came, beginning in October 2011. The logic was (and still is) that local communities are where true rehabilitation occurs.

so-called reforms, the prison population will only grow. California is over its federal cap by about 7,000 inmates today and is projected to have 14,000 too many prisoners by 2017. The governor proposes dealing with this shameful trend by outsourcing nearly 10,000 inmates to private, for-profit facilities. Under his plan, the state would spend $315 million this year to scatter some 9,600 inmates across institutions owned by Corrections Corporation of America and GEO Group Inc., two major penitentiary contractors. It’s the equivalent of a mother telling her son to clean up his room for the third time, and the little brat responds by stuffing his toys into his buddy’s closet. Brown’s plan also amounts to a fat jobs bill for the prison-guards union, which would get the contract to staff the private prison in Kern County. As with past strategies, the Legislature is on an accelerated track to ram this “reform” through by next week. “The governor’s plan does not contemplate a long-term solution,” observed Tor Tarantola, a fiscal and policy analyst at the Legislative Analyst’s Office. A long-term solution would be to California is over its federal cap incentivize rehabilitation, as Senate by about 7,000 inmates today President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg’s competing proposal suggests; invest and is projected to have 14,000 in re-entry services, as Capt. Milo too many prisoners by 2017. Fitch does at his Elk Grove jail; return judges’ sentencing discretion with reforms like last year’s Proposition But that was just a bullshit selling 36; create alternative-housing systems point. While its coun[ PROOF ] 1 2the 3 4state 5 6 bribed 7 8 9 10 for addiction and mental health; and ties with $2.2 billion and counting, it expand a sentencing-review process doesn’t track how the moneyDATE is spent APPROVAL for low-risk inmates, as local reformer or penalize counties that don’t invest Eugene Dey advocates. in rehabilitation. For instance,____________ tiny ART DIRECTOR ____________ “Bringing those absolute numbers Kings County in the Central Valley COPYWRITER ____________ down based on exemplary behavior is shipped more convicts to state____________ prison the humane way to reform the system, than any other before realignment. Of DESIGNER ____________ ____________ not send even more offenders out of the roughly $9 million it’s received state,” said Dey, a former three-striker. the past two____________ years, PRODUCERfrom realignment ____________ “That’s insane.” zero dollars went to evidence-based BRAND MANAGER ____________ ____________ But true reform means giving rehab programs. Zero. Many ____________ other counties followed suit, up the poor, brown, undereducated E-PRO ____________ masses that have become this state’s albeit not as brazenly. Of the nearly $46 million Sacramento County spent, unofficial currency. The governor’s plan just wants to slip the yolk of for instance, only $1.7 million found federal receivership, so we can go its way to community groups, and back to depositing people like dollars. only after laundering through various That’s a dismal goal to pursue, but justice departments first. No rehab it’s fast becoming California’s true organizations received direct funding. legacy. Forget gold rushes, screen Maybe that’s why the California idols and tech booms. This is where Department of Corrections and slavery made its comeback. Ω Rehabilitation projects that, even with


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Protect journalists Orange The world is a dangerous place to be a journalist, with 36 confirmed dead so far in 2013, according to the Committee to Protect Journalists. But it’s not just individual journalists in danger. The profession itself is under fire, even in the United States, where we have First Amendment protection. As reported in this week’s Feature Story package (see page 14), journalists are finding more blocks to doing their work and more punitive actions when they report what they find. Currently, investigative journalist Barrett Brown is in federal custody on a number of charges, which could send him to prison for up to 105 years. Brown, who has written for The Guardian and Vanity Fair, was investigating emails from a private security firm with government contracts that had been hacked and given to WikiLeaks. No one thinks Brown was the hacker—that guy’s going to prison for 10 years—but Brown’s investigation was so unnerving to the U.S. security apparatus that, in early August, government prosecutors made a motion to ban media from covering Brown’s trial. If journalists aren’t making the government nervous, we’re not doing our jobs. The current obsession with secrecy and threat or use of arrest, imprisonment and violence to silence journalists are signs that government secrecy is out of control. Freedom of the press—including the freedom to report on things that the government, business, religious or social institutions would rather have ignored—is at the crux of all American freedoms. We simply cannot allow the criminalization of journalism. Instead, we must insist that government secrets be vetted by a truly independent judiciary—not one handpicked by the security establishment—and that the burden of proof that secrecy is required be placed on the government, not the journalists. Without a free press and an informed citizenry, we have no democracy. We urge readers to support the proposed federal shield law and to contact their congressional representatives to demand an end to spying on and prosecuting journalists for doing their constitutionally protected jobs. Ω

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Rim Fire reminder The Rim Fire, one of the worst in California’s history, is threatening (as of this writing) the water and power supplies to San Francisco, which relies heavily on mountain snowmelt around Hetch Hetchy Valley. This summer, we find a changing climate with droughts that last longer and ever-higher temperatures. There’s no doubt that the prolonged dry conditions have had profound effects on the frequency and severity of wildfires, including the Rim Fire. But if the water and power supply of a major American city can be at risk, shouldn’t we take that as a clue that it’s time to make contingency plans to safeguard the water and power supplies for the entire state? The current situation is a reminder that our place on this planet is in jeopardy. It’s a call, not only to support the efforts of our firefighters, but also to reduce our impact on the planet at large, and to plan carefully for a future when the snowmelt and rainfall will be less predictable, and our resources will have to go further. As we move forward with discussions about the proposed Delta tunnels, we need to bear in mind that water is not an infinite resource. If the Rim Fire teaches us anything, it should remind us that none of our resources can be taken for granted. All must be protected and all are fragile. Ω BEFORE

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Join us out here Please drink responsibly. STORY

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The day before Michael Hastings died, he’d warned colleagues in an email that he was being investigated by the FBI. He also said he was onto a “big story,” and would be going off the radar. 14   |   SN&R   |   09.05.13


Journalist Michael Hastings was loved, feared and haunted.   But did government surveillance lead to his untimely death?

by

Gene Maddaus

In April, a man named Erin Walker Markland drove off a mountain road near Santa Cruz and was killed. The woman who had planned to marry him, Jordanna Thigpen, was devastated. For comfort, she turned to a man who had taken up residence next door. He had been through something similar—years before, his fiancée had been killed. “He was the only person in my life who understood what I was going through,” she says. The landlord they both rented from had encouraged her to meet him, saying he was a writer. In their initial conversations, he was unusually modest. It was only when she Googled his name— Michael Hastings—that she learned he was a famous war correspondent. In February, Hastings had rented a onebedroom apartment with a gorgeous view overlooking Hollywood. The landlord allowed him to use another unit, the one below Thigpen’s, to write. Often, when Hastings was done for the day, he would visit Thigpen. He would talk passionately about the stories he was working on. They talked about other things in the news, about stories she thought he should pursue, and about their shared sense of grief. “We both suffered the same thing, which was depression,” she says. Hastings was intensely interested in government surveillance of journalists. In May, the story broke about the Department of Justice obtaining the phone records of Associated Press reporters. A couple weeks later, Edward Snowden’s revelations about the National Security Agency’s massive surveillance

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program became public. Hastings was convinced he was a target. His behavior grew increasingly erratic. Helicopters often circle over the hills, but Hastings believed there were more of them around whenever he was at home, keeping an eye on him. He came to believe his Mercedes was being tampered with. “Nothing I could say could console him,” Thigpen says. One night in June, he came to Thigpen’s apartment after midnight and urgently asked to borrow her Volvo. He said he was afraid to drive his own car. She declined, telling him her car was having mechanical problems. “He was scared, and he wanted to leave town,” she says. The next day, around 11:15 a.m., she got a call from her landlord, who told her Hastings had died early that morning. His car had crashed into a palm tree at 75 mph and exploded in a ball of fire. “I burst into tears,” Thigpen says. “I couldn’t believe it had happened again.” Michael Hastings was just 33 when he died, but he left behind a remarkable legacy. In tributes across the Internet, he was remembered as one of the best journalists of his generation. He was most famous for “The Runaway General,” the Rolling Stone piece that ended the career of Gen. Stanley A. McChrystal, commander of the Afghanistan War. Hastings had built a reputation as a fearless disrupter of the cozy ways of Washington, gleefully calling bullshit on government hacks and colleagues alike. He was loved and admired, hated and feared. The day before he died, he’d warned colleagues in an email that he was being investigated by the FBI. He also said he was onto a “big story,” and would be going off the radar. Almost inevitably, his death—in a fiery, singlecar crash, at 4:20 a.m. on June 18—resulted in a swarm of conspiracy theories. Amateur forensic examinations have proliferated online. A common refrain is, “A car just doesn’t blow up like that.” Some argue that he was murdered by the CIA, or the NSA, or the Pentagon.

  F E AT U R E

STORY

Hastings’ family and the Los Angeles Police Department both have dismissed the conspiracies. The Los Angeles Police Department also has ruled out suicide. “My gut is that this was really a tragic accident,” his widow, Elise Jordan, told CNN. Interviews with friends as well as the coroner’s report suggest that Hastings’ mental health was deteriorating. As a young man, he’d abused drugs and alcohol and received a possible diagnosis of manic depression. Now, after a long period of sobriety, he had recently begun smoking pot to treat his post-traumatic stress disorder—the product of years of covering combat. Hastings had long been both brilliant and troubled. Friends recall him as a captivating storyteller. “It was thrilling to have a conversation, because you never knew where it might end up,” says Alyona Minkovski, a close friend. “Everybody was drawn to him.” He was charming; he also could be an asshole. That was all part of his public persona. But he also had a darker side, which he tended to keep hidden. “[S]elf-destruction does haunt me,” he wrote, on the road to Baghdad. “[T]here was a long time in my life where I thought the only thing to do with myself was to destroy it.” Hastings was born in Malone, N.Y., in 1980. The family moved to Montreal when he was 11. As a teenager at Lower Canada College, a private prep school, Hastings got hooked on the gonzo writings of Hunter S. Thompson. He wrote a column for his school paper, called “Fear and Loathing at L.C.C.” Hastings emulated Thompson’s penchant for aggravating authority. After a move to Vermont, he and his brother Jeff were enrolled at Rice Memorial High School, a Catholic school, where they showed up the first day with hair dyed red and green. “That lasted for a day,” says Mike Pearo, Hastings’ history teacher there. “Rice stresses its dress code, and ‘oddball’ behavior isn’t tolerated.” Hastings had a sharp tongue, and was constantly asking questions in class. “He would

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say what he was thinking,” Pearo says, “sometimes not always a good thing.” In the school paper, Hastings compared the principal to Jabba the Hutt. He ran for class president on an anti-administration platform. (He won.) And he was suspended and removed from the student council when he used the word “shagadelic” in the morning announcements. As he dug into the work of Thompson and the Beat writers, he nurtured an appetite for drugs. “When I was a teenager I used to snort cocaine and smoke crack and party all night and booze for months because I wanted to know what it was like to hit those highs and to feel those highs when they all came crashing down,” he wrote in his memoir, I Lost My Love in Baghdad. There was trouble. Hastings would later allude to a drunken car wreck, suspension from college, a few days in jail, a restraining order, an aborted enlistment in the Marines and, finally, rehab. Chastened and clean, Hastings enrolled at New York University in 2000 and graduated in 2002. An unpaid summer internship at Newsweek set him on the path to a writing career. In his 20s, Hastings stayed clean and channeled his manic energies into journalism. Writer Rachel Sklar met him and dated him for a few months when he was living in New York and working for Newsweek. She remembers his apartment overflowing with books—Ernest Hemingway, Norman Mailer, Philip Roth, A.J. Liebling and many volumes on war. “He was voraciously learning the craft,” Sklar says. “He was ambitious. He was eager. He was really just 100 percent into it.”

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“dangerous reporTer”

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Two war books were especially influential: Michael Herr’s Dispatches and Chris Hedges’ War Is a Force That Gives Us Meaning. The latter famously equates war with a highly addictive drug—and Hastings felt himself getting sucked in. In 2005, he prevailed on his editors to send him to Iraq. At 25, he was one of the youngest foreign correspondents in Baghdad. He would spend much of the next five years in war zones. According to Lucian Read, the photographer who partnered with Hastings for much of that time, the writer brought an unusual affinity for troops. His brother was in the Army, and Hastings was close in age to most of the soldiers. He tended to adopt a soldier’s-eye view of authority. “His skepticism ran a lot deeper,” Read says. “He was skeptical of the generals, the plans, the pronouncements, spokespeople—all the happy talk.” The memoir Hastings would write at the time centers on his relationship with Andrea “Andi” Parhamovich, an Air America spokeswoman whom he met shortly before going abroad. For the first year, it was a long-distance relationship. But in the fall of 2006, she got a job with a nongovernmental organization that allowed her to follow him to Baghdad. She was killed when her convoy was ambushed in January 2007. “It’s a horrible situation, mindnumbingly horrible,” Hastings wrote. “But you try to do what you can.” What he could do was write. He returned home to Vermont and wrote the first draft of his memoir in three weeks. It was his way of processing the trauma. “It was either write or die for me,” he wrote. In April, he returned to Baghdad—and had to confront his reasons for doing so. “Was part of me looking to get killed, too?” The car Hastings was driving the night he was killed, a Mercedes-Benz C250, retails for $37,800—not the kind of car the average journalist would own. But Hastings was not the average journalist. After his initial stint in Iraq, he catapulted to success, which often put him on the receiving end of nasty barbs from green-eyed colleagues. He got a reported $500,000 deal for his memoir. Though the book got mixed reviews, it helped Hastings to establish his voice and his brand. Feeling stifled at Newsweek, he quit and started to freelance, earning big assignments for GQ. Now, 16   |   SN&R   |   09.05.13

when he called bullshit on the wars, there was emotional authority behind it. He pitched a story to GQ in which he would “embed” with a general: Stanley McChrystal. GQ turned it down, so he took the idea to Rolling Stone. Even with presidential-campaign reporting and a book under his belt, Hastings worried about his future in journalism. As late as April 2010—when he was in the middle of reporting the McChrystal story—Hastings wrote a blog post in which he mulled whether the decline in media would force him to find another line of work. With the McChrystal story, however, Hastings became an overnight sensation. McChrystal and his aides were quoted bad-mouthing top civilian leaders, including Vice President Joe Biden and Ambassador Richard Holbrooke. President Barack Obama summoned McChrystal back to Washington and fired him. In the book This Town, author Mark Leibovich calls it “the most consequential political story of 2010—maybe all of Obama’s first term.” Hastings quickly turned the story into another book deal, also for a reported high six figures. (The book, The Operators: The Wild and Terrifying Inside Story of America’s War in Afghanistan, was optioned by Brad Pitt.) By any measure, he was a star. Yet he paid a high price for the story. The military canceled his embeds, making it much harder for him to report from war zones. And Hastings took tremendous flack from his fellow foreign correspondents, who accused him of bringing down McChrystal by breaking the unwritten rules of access. The criticism fortified Hastings’ image as a gate-crashing rebel with no greater loyalty than to the truth. “Look, I went into journalism to do journalism, not advertising,” he told The Huffington Post.

Though his disdain for the campaign trail was well-documented, he’d signed on to cover the race for BuzzFeed. The upstart website, best known for viral lists of animal pictures, was looking to add gravitas, and nabbing Hastings was a coup. For his part, Hastings missed covering the wars; he quipped that the campaign was “a kind of methadone, a weak substitute.” He also signed up to do an e-book—Panic 2012—which was being sold as an homage to Thompson’s Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail ’72. Hastings had wanted to write in a more provocative voice, and now he had the chance, though often he just sounded like a jerk. He did have his moments. Hastings got into an obscenity-laced email battle with Hillary Clinton’s spokesman over Benghazi, then published the exchange. He also got in trouble when he reported on an

“He was one of us,” says Cenk Uygur, host of The Young Turks. “There just aren’t very many really aggressive journalists challenging the Pentagon.” Hastings hung out with The Nation’s Jeremy Scahill when the reporter was in town promoting his documentary Dirty Wars. In May, Hastings was invited to a salon at director Oliver Stone’s house, along with a guest list of progressive stars like Sean Penn, Glenn Greenwald, writer David Sirota and economist Dean Baker. “He seemed a little stressed,” Stone says by email, “but nothing out of the ordinary in our culture.” A certain level of lighthearted paranoia would be unremarkable in such company. Uygur says, “We joked that night that, if Scahill was there, we would have definitely had a drone strike on the house.” The Boston Marathon bombing in April brought new attention to government surveillance. Soon thereafter, a retired FBI agent said on CNN that the government would be able to go back and listen to the suspects’ phone calls from before the bombing. In mid-May, the Justice Department disclosed that it had obtained records of 20 phone lines belonging to Associated Press reporters as part of a leak investigation. The next week, The Washington Post obtained an affidavit from another investigation, in which a Fox News reporter was described as a “co-conspirator” with an alleged leaker. And on June 5, Snowden’s leaks unmasked the NSA’s electronic dragnet. As these revelations tumbled out, one after the other, Hastings grew increasingly consumed by them. Hastings ended Panic 2012 on a hopeful note about President Obama. But when the AP story broke, he quickly changed course, arguing that the government’s behavior would have a chilling effect on investigative journalism. “Any leeway or sympathy I ever give to the Obama White House, I take back forever,” he said on HuffPost Live on May 14. The next week on The Young Turks, Hastings wore a green “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” T-shirt. Gesticulating for emphasis, he shouted, “I’m sick of this partisan, defend-Obama-on-everything. He’s tapping your phones! The man is tapping your phones!”

Hastings worried about his future in journalism. As late as April 2010, he wrote a blog post in which he mulled whether the decline in media would force him to find another line of work.

Hastings had been politely turning down drinks for 10 years—even refusing a shot before going on The Colbert Report. But in 2010, he started to relapse. In The Operators, he tells of getting drunk at the Dubai airport in April 2010 while awaiting a flight to Kabul. He also wrote about getting drunk and taking Adderall to get through the 2012 presidential campaign—what he called a “campaign-induced relapse.”

off-the-record drinks session between Obama and campaign reporters. Hastings argued that the reception was fair game, and that only the president’s remarks were off the record. That’s not how the Obama campaign saw it, nor many in the press. The resulting furor came to be called, jokingly, “The Battle of Hastings.” In February, he moved to Los Angeles, where he joined BuzzFeed’s new bureau. He also got a prescription for medical marijuana and smoked regularly. For recreation, he took up skateboarding and boxing. Friends noticed he had lost weight. Though he was officially in town to cover Hollywood, he did relatively little of that. As ever, he remained focused on national security. He found a legion of admirers in L.A.’s progressive media world. He was invited to attend panels and share his views on drones, Afghanistan and presidential politics. Hastings was a regular guest on Current TV’s The Young Turks and HuffPost Live, making friends on the staffs of both shows.

In public appearances, Hastings said he had no information to suggest that he was being targeted. In private, he was convinced that he was. “He felt that everything he was doing was being watched,” Uygur says. “The NSA stuff ... really rocked him a bit,” says David Rosenthal, his editor. “I’m not a doctor, but he certainly was agitated in the last day or two of his life.” The day before Hastings died, he sent an email to his BuzzFeed bosses with the subject line “FBI investigation, re: NSA.” The email informed them that “the Feds are interviewing ‘my close friends and associates,’” and advised them to get a lawyer if they were contacted. (No friends or associates have stepped forward to say that they were interviewed, and the FBI has denied it was investigating Hastings.) “Also,” Hastings wrote, “I’m onto a big story and need to go off the rada[r] for a bit.” By then, his behavior had frightened his out-of-town family members. Hastings’ brother had come to visit that day from New York, hoping to persuade him to enter drug treatment. Hastings’ brother later would speculate to authorities that, in addition to marijuana, Hastings was taking the hallucinogen DMT—which his neighbor, Thigpen, calls “ridiculous.” Hastings’ brother also told investigators that he would not be surprised to find cocaine or another stimulant in the apartment. Thigpen argues that Hastings was not doing anything harder than pot. She strongly disputes the coroner’s suggestion that Hastings was taking methamphetamine, saying it was much more likely the amphetamine found in his system came from Adderall. (A coroner’s spokesman acknowledged that the amphetamine could have come from either Adderall or meth.) In addition to his drug use, Hastings was saying some disturbing things. Hastings’ brother told investigators that, although Hastings had never talked of suicide, he did think of himself as “invincible,” believing he could jump off his balcony and be all right. On the last night of his life, his brother later told investigators, Hastings smoked marijuana and passed out around 12:30 or 1 a.m. His brother retired to the empty apartment underneath Thigpen’s. That timeline may be slightly off, however, because Thigpen says that at 12:30 a.m., Hastings came to her apartment and asked to borrow her car. He was scared, she says, and trying to get out of town. Pizzeria Mozza is about 2 miles south of Hastings’ apartment. The restaurant’s surveillance video showed his Mercedes barreling down the road and exploding in a flash of


light at 4:20 a.m. Hastings was killed instantly, his body charred and unrecognizable. The United States has detained journalists— and even their associates—over materials leaked by Edward Snowden.

There’s a sign tacked to the tree where Hastings crashed that night, reading, “This was not an accident.” Taken down several times, it always gets put back up. Another sign says, “Didn’t have to know you to know the truth of what happened.” After the Fourth of July, someone gathered up about 30 mini American flags and planted them around the memorial site. Kimberly Dvorak, a freelance reporter for San Diego 6, was barely aware of Hastings until he died in circumstances too bizarre for her to ignore. She’s now the leading reporter looking at “alternate” theories of the crash. “Something just kept telling me, ‘You need to look into this,’” Dvorak says. “I just looked into it, and it grabbed me.” Dvorak has blogged about terrorism and immigration, generally from a conservative or libertarian point of view. (She has blogged about Obama’s “dubious birth certificate.”) She has not always been entirely reliable. She mistakenly reported, for instance, that Hastings’ body was cremated against his family’s wishes. Nevertheless, her reports have generated a wide following online, especially, she says, among hackers and supporters of Snowden. “A lot of people in that world are keeping this alive,” Dvorak says. “I’m not certain that Michael was a part of that world, but in their minds, he became a part of that world when he died.” Dvorak does not claim to know what happened to Hastings. Asked if she believes it is possible that the government had him killed, she says, “It’s absolutely possible they could do something like that. “The more I find out about this, the more I’m convinced something happened,” she says. Hastings likely had reason to be concerned about government surveillance. “I cannot count the number of times I’ve had my communications recorded, my computers ‘read,’” says Michael Ware, a CNN and Time correspondent who spent six straight years in Baghdad. “I’ve had transcripts read back to me of some of my conversations.” Hastings was working on a story about the CIA and communicating with people abroad who were critical of the agency. It would not be a stretch to imagine that his calls really were being recorded.

photo couRtesy of LAuRA poitRAs/pRAxis fiLms

War on journalism Government surveillance and prosecution targets   more and more reporters—and their sources “The Obama administration has clearly declared war on the press. It’s declared war on investigative journalists, our sources.” That was Michael Hastings’ warning to viewers of the cable-news show The Young Turks not long ago. What’s the old saying? “Just because you’re paranoid …” It appears drugs and mentalhealth issues contributed to Hastings’ death, at age 33, in a car crash in Los Angeles in June. But as explored in this week’s Feature Story, “A dangerous reporter,” by Gene Maddaus (see page 14), that doesn’t mean Hastings wasn’t right to be worried. Journalists and their sources, particularly those involved in important national-security stories, as Hastings was, have been targets of government surveillance and prosecution lately, to an extent unprecedented a few years ago. A few examples: In August, David Miranda was detained for questioning in a British airport, per that country’s anti-terrorism laws. Miranda is the partner of Glenn Greenwald, the independent journalist who received material from Edward Snowden and wrote stories this year about the U.S. National Security Agency’s surveillance of American citizens. In May of this year, the Associated Press learned that the U.S. Department of Justice has secretly collected two months of telephone records on 20 phone lines inside AP offices, as part of an aggressive leak investigation. The AP’s CEO, Gary Pruitt, said the records dragnet hauled in information on reporters’ activity that “the government has no conceivable right to know.” “The DOJ’s actions could not have been more tailor-made to

BEFORE

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comfort authoritarian regimes that want to suppress their own news media,” Pruitt told the National Press Club in June. (Sacramento readers may remember that Pruitt was, for many years, CEO of The McClatchy Company, publisher of The Sacramento Bee.) Shortly after the AP revelation, Fox News found out that its correspondent, James Rosen, had been named as a possible “criminal co-conspirator” by the DOJ, and issued a warrant to search his emails. All this was to ferret Rosen’s source in the U.S. Department of State, Stephen Jin-Woo Kim, who has been indicted under the U.S. Espionage Act. Between its passage in 1917 and the beginning of Barack Obama’s presidency in 2009, the Espionage Act had been used just three times to prosecute those accused of leaking classified information to the media. Since Obama took office, his administration has invoked the Espionage Act seven times to prosecute sources who gave classified information to journalists. This includes Chelsea Manning (formerly Bradley Manning) and Snowden, who are variously described as whistle-blowers or criminals in the press. And in this month’s Harper’s Magazine, local writer William T. Vollmann recounted the uncovering of his own FBI file; the organization spied on him extensively and, at one point, even considered him a Unabomber suspect. There has been some pushback against what critics call the criminalization of investigative reporting. Legislation for a federal “shield law” has been revived in the U.S.

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Congress, to prevent journalists from being prosecuted for protecting their sources. But the proposal bogged down when California Sen. Dianne Feinstein introduced amendments to restrict the law’s protections to people who are “really journalists,” salaried employees and those with certain “professional qualifications,” like regular publication with a journalistic “entity.” This notion of defining “real” journalists, and thus creating a class of government-approved reporters, has been controversial. The category would seem to exclude a great many bloggers and citizen journalists, freelance and independent reporters, and whole groups of people engaged in new, perhaps not yet known, forms of enterprise reporting. The ones New York Times media writer David Carr calls, “an emerging Fifth Estate composed of leakers, activists and bloggers who threaten those of us in traditional media.” Hastings was a threat, too, in that he argued for journalists to stop playing the insiders’ game, stop trading compliance for access. “We’ve been too easygoing with these guys. We’ve let them tell us what to print and what not to print,” he said. If the government is going to declare war on journalism, then journalism should “say back to the government, ‘We declare war on you.’” That’s part of what made him dangerous.

STORY

—Cosmo Garvin c o s m o g @ne w s re v i e w . c o m

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“It’s possible Michael was of interest to the intelligence agencies,” says Phillip Robertson, a freelance correspondent who covered the Iraq war for Salon and has spoken about war’s psychological toll. “If they were interested, they would own your communications. They could do that.” But that line of thinking can be “very dangerous,” Robertson adds. “Being of interest to the intelligence agencies is like doing a bunch of really awful speed,” he says. “Since you’re in a world of uncertainty, your mind races.” In that situation, marijuana may only have compounded the problem. “It would not be wise to go expose yourself to combat and then smoke a ton of extremely potent pot,” Robertson says. “Certain things are not good to do.” Robertson snuck into Iraq just before the 2003 invasion by riding an inflatable raft down the Tigris River. After a lengthy tour covering combat, he finally took four years off. He stayed home and published nothing. Now he’s back covering the Syrian civil war, witnessing some of the worst atrocities he’s ever seen. The psychological effects have proven difficult to shake. Long after he left Iraq, he explains via Skype, he had “PTSD dreams.” “I was in an open-backed truck with a bunch of Marines,” he says. “We were driving into the western provinces of Iraq, and I realize I don’t have a flak jacket on. I get a feeling, like, ‘Hey buddy, we can’t turn back. We’re going straight in. Good luck.’ I knew in that dream it was not gonna be OK.” Hastings wrote about having similar dreams. In one, insurgents chase him down in a pickup truck. He tries to escape by jumping into a lake. “Insurgents can’t swim, can they? Yes, they can, and one comes after me, splashing me as he gets closer, and then he kills me.” After sitting with his thoughts for a moment, Robertson says, “This is speculation. But he’s going at high speed. It’s as if he was gripped by fear and he was trying to outrun something. And he floored it, trying to escape. He enacted a flight from something, real or imagined.” As theories go, it’s better than most. Ω A longer version of this story originally appeared in the LA Weekly. Read it at www.laweekly.com/2013-08-22/news/ michael-hastings-crash/full.

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NOW WATCH THIS SN&R film critics Daniel Barnes and Jim Lane take on pirates, drug traffickers and Bradley Cooper’s perm in this rundown of the season’s most anticipated films

If

summer is a time for blockbuster movies, lowbrow comedies and megafranchise flicks, then fall is the season when the films turn more serious. Think auteurs and arty, intellectual indies, epic documentaries and highbrow award fare, with nary an Iron Man: Part Whatever or drunken Vegas trip in the mix. Not sure what to see and what’s worth skipping (or at least waiting to download)? No worries, SN&R film critics Daniel Barnes and Jim Lane did the heavy lifting for you by highlighting some of the upcoming season’s most promising fare.

Sam Claflin (left) co-stars with Jennifer Lawrence in The Hunger Games: Catching Fire, the second book in Suzanne Collins’ addictive trilogy.

Ta l e n t s h ow

CATC H I N g exCITeMeNT by Jim Lane I must admit that I am rather looking forward to The Hunger Games: Catching Fire—mainly because the movie’s producers had the good sense to dump Gary Ross, whose efforts to make a mess of the story’s first installment were thwarted mainly by the presence of Jennifer Lawrence as Suzanne Collins’ teenage heroine. For this outing, Ross has been replaced as director by Francis Lawrence (no relation to Jennifer), and as scriptwriter by Oscar-winners Simon Beaufoy and Michael Arndt. But Catching Fire isn’t the movie I’m most looking forward to this season—it’s not even in my top five. Here they are, in the order of scheduled release.

L i g h t t h e w ay Enough Said (September 20): I’ve been a fan of writer-director Nicole Holofcener ever since her first indie, Walking and Talking in 1996. She’s worked steadily since then—mainly on TV (Sex and the City, Gilmore Girls), with the occasional feature—but she’s still a well-kept secret. She has a flair for well-observed characters and smart dialogue that actors just love to light into. She’s got some good ones lighting into her dialogue this time, too: Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Catherine Keener, Toni Collette and, in his penultimate screen appearance, the late James Gandolfini.

M o n ey f a l l

Joaquin Phoenix stars in the latest Spike Jonze flick, Her.

Tom Hanks revisits his Cast Away look in Captain Phillips.

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Bradley Cooper (left)—and his chemically treated curly locks— stars with Christian Bale in American Hustle.

The Wolf of Wall Street (November 15): Master director Martin Scorsese and writer Terence Winter (The Sopranos, Boardwalk Empire) take on the life and career of stock-market buccaneer Jordan Belfort (Leonardo DiCaprio). This one has securities fraud, money laundering, a prison term, even a shipwreck—plus Matthew McConaughey, Jonah Hill, Jon Favreau, Rob Reiner, Christine Ebersole and director Spike Jonze in a rare turn in front of the camera.

Black Nativity (November 27): From what I can tell, this appears to be less a film version of Langston Hughes’ 1961 gospel musical than an original story centered around a production of it. In any case, adaptor-director Kasi Lemmons is a talent to reckon with. She made a debut splash with Eve’s Bayou, coaxed Samuel L. Jackson to the performance of his life in The Caveman’s Valentine and distilled the AfricanAmerican experience in Talk to Me. There’s talent to reckon with in front of the camera, too, including Forest Whitaker, Angela Bassett and Jennifer Hudson. With all those names, this could be a Christmas perennial—a holiday musical with real soul.

Te r r o r o n t h e h i g h s e a s Captain Phillips (October 11): Director Paul Greengrass showed himself to be a master of the docudrama with Sunday and United 93, and he galvanized Universal Studio’s Jason Bourne franchise with The Bourne Supremacy and The Bourne Ultimatum. Here, he takes on the real-life hijacking of an American freighter by Somali pirates, who held the captain (Tom Hanks) hostage and shouted their defiance at the United States—right up until the moment U.S. Navy snipers blew their brains out. This promises to be another real nail-biter from Greengrass, with his usual you-are-there authenticity.

O s c a r w a tc h August: Osage County (December 25, but not due in Sacramento until January 2014): Tracy Letts’ prairie-gothic family dramedy was the kind of play that gives American theater a good name. Teeming with darkly comic intimations of Eugene O’Neill, John Steinbeck and William Faulkner, it carried audiences through three-anda-half hours with never a dull moment, and it deserved every award it got (Pulitzer Prize, New York Drama Critics’ Circle Award, five Tony Awards, etc.). And talk about an all-star cast: Meryl Streep, Julia Roberts, Abigail Breslin, Ewan McGregor and Benedict Cumberbatch, among others. Directing is John Wells, long-time producer. Don’t be surprised if this is the one to beat when Oscar time rolls around.


21

Even more movies! See NIGHT&DAY

26

Adam Ant returns See COOLHUNTING

Fa i t h i n a n up-and-comer 12 Years a Slave (October 18): Steve McQueen’s 2008 film Hunger was one of the great sit-up-straight-and-notice-me debuts of the last decade, and this is his first shot at a sweeping epic. It’s adapted from the memoirs of Solomon Northup, a free black man kidnapped and sold into slavery in the 1840s, and like Hunger, it explores human strength and degradation in a visceral and intensely personal fashion. The chronically underused Chiwetel Ejiofor takes the lead as Northup, and he’s supported here by a strong ensemble cast, featuring Michael Fassbender, Benedict Cumberbatch, Paul Giamatti, Brad Pitt and Alfre Woodard.

GoT TA hAVe

FAITh

Fa i t h i n a n established brilliance

by Daniel Barnes I hate hype, dislike spoilers, loathe franchises and don’t care about buzz, so selecting my five most anticipated movies of the fall is an exercise in the many forms of cinematic faith.

Inside Llewyn Davis (December 20): Ethan and Joel Coen are nothing if not inconsistent, alternating of late between top-shelf gems (A Serious Man) and unworthy fluff (Burn After Reading), yet no American directors have a higher ceiling. Their oeuvre may not stack up pound for pound against that of Martin Scorsese, but right now, I have more faith in the Coen brothers to make a great film. It doesn’t hurt that Inside Llewyn Davis, about a Dylan-esque musician (Oscar Isaac) traipsing

Long shots E lisabeth Nunziato had no clue what she was getting into when she agreed to direct Stolen Moments. Production started two-and-a-half years ago, and post-production could very well continue right up until the film premieres, she said. “[Actress Danielle Moné Truitt] actually got pregnant and had her first child over the course of shooting, and she lives in Los Angeles,” said Nunziato of her film’s star and former B Street Theatre company member. “It was all on our dime the whole way and [required] an enormous amount of labor. It was all sweat equity.” Here’s hoping the film is complete by the time it premieres at the Crest Theatre this Wednesday, September 11, as the opening-night

selection of the Sacramento Film & Music Festival (see “Two cities, two film festivals,” SN&R Night&Day, page 21). The self-proclaimed “no-budget” film, a comedy-drama that focuses on two intersecting romances, was produced and shot in Sacramento and features a handful of local actors and a soundtrack of music by area artists. It’s also Nunziato’s directorial debut. Nunziato, who grew up in New York and moved to Sacramento during high school, was a founding member of the B Street Theatre in 1991 and still acts there. But for the now 20-year veteran of theater, film and voice acting, directing a film was both an accident and a learning process. It came

Creepy stalkers and unhappy wives See ASK JOEY

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through an off-kilter version of the 1960s Greenwich Village folk scene, was quite possibly created from a focus group of my dreams.

Fa i t h i n a l e g e n d a r y w r i te r The Counselor (October 25): Speaking of the Coen brothers, they were the first to prove with No Country for Old Men that author Cormac McCarthy’s work could be successfully translated into the language of film. The 2009 adaptation of McCarthy’s Pulitzer Prize winner The Road was a disappointment, but his lack of authorship on that production may have inspired him to seize control and write The Counselor, his first original screenplay. Ridley Scott’s steamy mise-en-scène might be just the ticket for this story of a sleazy lawyer (Michael Fassbender) mixed up with Mexican drug traffickers. He certainly has an intriguing cast to work with, including Javier Bardem, who reinhabits the sort of unhinged villain that won him an Oscar for No Country for Old Men.

Fa i t h i n a n a c to r o n a r o l l Her (December 20): I was a huge fan of director Spike Jonze’s first two films (Being John Malkovich and Adaptation.), but compared to most critics, I was on an island with regards

PhoTo CourTeSy oF Iron MounTAIn FIlMS InC. And nK MedIA

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to Where the Wild Things Are. Unfortunately, that island was filled with a family of clinically depressed magical creatures whining incessantly about their many disappointments. Jonze’s latest effort is Her, and the twee trailer emphasizes the same sort of mopey navelgazing that made Where the Wild Things Are unbearable. Still, if anyone can find the meaty center in this quirky romance about a sad sack who falls in love with an artificially intelligent operating system, it’s Joaquin Phoenix.

Fa i t h i n a r i d i c u l o u s l y a we s o m e t ra i l e r American Hustle (December 25): If they gave an Academy Award for best trailer, American Hustle would be a Schindler’s List-level shoo-in. It’s an intoxicating blur of sex and violence, color and motion, bravado, and bad wigs, electrically edited and set to Led Zeppelin’s “Good Times Bad Times.” You can’t watch it and not come away dying to see the movie, unless you gouged out your eyes when you saw Bradley Cooper’s perm. It is 150 seconds of pure cinematic sizzle, but whether or not the steak has any substance is up to hit-or-miss director David O. Russell (Silver Linings Playbook, The Fighter), and his stock company of Cooper, Christian Bale and Jennifer Lawrence. Ω

by Jonathan Mendick • jonathanm@newsreview.com about when she put together an impromptu reading of a script written by her acquaintance Maurice Robie. “[This is] a love story about the universal difficulty of recognizing happiness,” Nunziato said. “You still haven’t shaken off those adolescent nagging-at-you kind of fears or anxieties that may have held you back so far. … And I lived that—in this town, at those specific places.” So she brought together a group of actors around a table to read the script. Next, she approached Mike Malmberg (the film’s eventual director of photography and executive producer) to film a few of the actors performing several scenes, just to check out the

Elisabeth Nunziato directed Stolen Moments, which takes place in Sacramento and stars local actors.

See THE 420

Stolen Moments director elisabeth nunziato talks sweat equity, Sacramento and finishing what she started

The film pays homage to the city and people of Sacramento: Pivotal scenes take place in the Torch Club, outside of the Crest Theatre and throughout Midtown.

BEFORE

Pot’s still illegal, but ...

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chemistry. Then, Nunziato’s husband Jason Kuykendall joined the project as an actor, sound guy, producer, location scout, designer and post-production supervisor. Lynn Malmberg— Mike’s wife—also joined the project as another executive producer and editor. And with that, Stolen Moments was born. The end product pays homage to the city and people of Sacramento: Pivotal scenes take place in the Torch Club, outside of the Crest Theatre and throughout Midtown; local musicians Harley White Jr., Rick Estrin and Mike Farrell all have small acting roles, and the film’s soundtrack features the music of Lee Bob Watson, Atlas & Arrows, and Dave Christensen of K Sera. “It evolved over time in many ways, and it was a very gestalt way to make a movie,” Nunziato said. “I don’t recommend it to anyone, [but] we’re so proud of everybody’s work.” Ω View Stolen Moments at the Crest Theatre (1013 K Street) on Wednesday, September 11, as part of the Sacramento Film & Music Festival. A reception begins at 6:30 p.m., and Jack Gallagher will introduce the film at 7:30 p.m. Tickets cost $10. Visit http://stolenmomentsfilm.com for more information.

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wEEkLY PICkS

The Bitchslap! ThuRSDAY, SEPTEMBER 5

, S E I T I S L C A O V I W T T S E F M L I F O W T

Co-created by Eloisa Bravo and Kimberly Rose  Wendt, this event highlights the talented women in  the world of stand-up comedy. In addition to performances by Bravo and Wendt, the  COMEDY evening features acts by Northern  California comediennes Caitlin Gill, Kristee Ono,  Jennifer Dronsky and Leslie Small. $15, 8 p.m. at  Punch Line Comedy Club, 2100 Arden Way, Suite 225;  (916) 925-5500; www.punchlinesac.com.

—Jonathan Mendick

Fika (Sacramento Coffee & Innovation Meetup) FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6 Sacramento is continually stepping up its coffee  game. Accordingly, on the first Friday of every  month, Insight Coffee Roasters hosts a fika, a  COFFEE Swedish tradition of communing  over a cup of coffee. The events   at Insight aim to foster inspiration within the   community. Free, 5 to 6:30 p.m., 1901 Eighth Street,   http://sacfikasept-es2.eventbrite.com.

—Deena Drewis

Yolo Microbrew Festival SATuRDAY, SEPTEMBER 7 Drinking beer, listening to music and eating  food: that’s what the Yolo Microbrew Festival  is all about. Track 7 Brewing Co., Hoppy Brewing  Company and Old Glory Brewing Company will pour  suds; Zuhg and Grooveline will bump jams; and Holy  FESTIVAL Rosary Catholic Church, Smokey  D’s and Om Karmabile will  serve food. $15-$30, 3 to 9 p.m. at the Yolo County  Fairgrounds Rotary Park, 1250 East Gum Avenue in  Woodland; www.yolomicrobrewfest.com.

—Jonathan Mendick

G

rab some popcorn and a soda: It’s film-festival  season. And we’re not talking about Venice,  Toronto or Telluride. You can get a quality filmfestival experience this week—without buying  a plane ticket—by attending the Nevada City  Film Festival (Thursday, September 5, through  Saturday, September 8) and the Sacramento  Film & Music Festival (Wednesday, September 11, through  Sunday, September 15). Here’s the skinny on both: The 13th annual Nevada City Film Festival blends live comedy, film and food. It kicks off with a screening of the classic  Clint Eastwood Western, The Good, the Bad and the Ugly   (6 p.m. on Thursday, September 5, at Miners Foundry, 325  Spring Street). The event is followed by a reception featuring  sweets, live deejays and a full bar. Then, on Friday, September  6, after an evening of film that starts at 6 p.m. (also at the  Foundry), catch comedians Nick Rutherford, Moshe Kasher and  Brett Gelman at 9:30 p.m. The festival continues Saturday, September 7, with film  panel discussions, more comedy and film (comedic shorts,  features, children’s films and a special music-video program  featuring Nevada County bands) at the Miners Foundry and  the Haven Underground (226 Broad Street). And at 4 p.m.  on Sunday, September 8, NCFF closes with a Best of the Fest  afterparty at Ol’ Republic Brewery (124 Argall Way), featuring  awards, a film screening, food trucks and local brews. For more  information, visit www.nevadacityfilmfestival.com.

Highlights of the Sacramento Film & Music Festival, happening at the Crest Theatre (1013 K Street), include music-video  screenings, a filmmaker challenge, a fashion competition  and a night of locally made films inspired by Edgar Allan Poe.  SFMF starts on Wednesday, September 11, at 6:30 p.m. with  a reception, awards and a screening of Stolen Moments (see  “Long shots,” SN&R Arts&Culture on page 18 for more details).  Thursday, September 12, offers more films (documentaries,  a music video and a feature) and a panel discussion on digital  distribution. Then, the festival kicks into high gear over the weekend,  starting with a fashion challenge and those Poe-inspired films  on Friday, September 13. Saturday, September 14, features  short films in the morning and afternoon, music videos and a  feature film in the evening, and more shorts—this time, the  late-night variety—to close the evening. Sunday, September  15, begins with documentary and narrative shorts, a feature, and films from the 10X10 Filmmaker Challenge, in which  filmmakers had 10 days to make 10-minute shorts about a  specific, secret theme. SFMF ends with an afterparty at a stillto-be-announced location. Visit www.sacfilm.com for more  information.

—Jonathan Mendick

Go With the Flow OngOIng ThROugh SATuRDAY, SEPTEMBER 28 Soft, delicate, flowing, dreamlike: all words used  to describe the feeling of a watercolor painting.  The Watercolor Artists of Sacramento  ART Horizons hosts this annual watercolor  exhibition. Free, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday; 11 a.m.  to 3 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday; Second  Saturday, September 14, reception from 5:30   to 8:30 p.m.; Sacramento Fine Arts Center,   5330 Gibbons Drive, Suite B in Carmichael;   (916) 971-3713; www.sacfinearts.org.

—Jessica Rine

Gourmet on K Culinary Walking Tour OngOIng ThROugh OcTOBER 9 Know any self-proclaimed “foodies”? Sign them  up for the Gourmet on K Culinary Walking Tour. A  food-slash-history guide will take participants to  six different restaurants on “The Kay” for tastings,  FOOD while explaining the history of K Street.  $52-$62, 1:30 to 5 p.m. on Wednesday,  Thursday and Saturday at Hyatt Regency  Sacramento, 1209 L Street; (800) 407-8918;   www.local-food-tours.com.

—Jessica Rine BEFORE

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3 f i r e s

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1501 L St, Sac | 916.443.0500 | www.3FiresLounge.com

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Latin Touch FRI, SEPT 13TH 5–11PM $5 COVER | 21 & OVER ONLY

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MON, S EPT 16


Keep it in the family Español Italian Restaurant 5723 Folsom Boulevard, (916) 457-1936, http://espanolitalian.com My family usually holds a reunion in Bodega Bay each August. With three kids in tow, I always make a trip to the übercute town of Occidental for by Ann Martin Rolke an Italian family meal. The Union Hotel and Negri’s Original Italian Restaurant have both been there since the early 20th century, serving hearty multicourse dinners. Since we missed the annual trek this year, we wanted something similar here. Sure, it’s nice to go out and have a “farm-to-fork” meal at one of this city’s many wonderful eateries, but there’s a reason chain restaurants continue to thrive: They serve families well. rating: That said, my family didn’t want to patronHHH ize Thank God, It’s the Olive Factory. What could be more perfect then, but Español? dinner for one: Now celebrating its 90th year, the confus$15 - $20 ingly monikered Español Italian Restaurant is an old-timey Italian joint. Originally a Basque boarding house in Old Sacramento, then a restaurant and hotel, it moved to its present East Sacramento location in 1965. Part of the neighborhood’s miniature Little Italy stretch, it’s directly across the boulevard from the venerable Corti Brothers grocery store and down the street from Talini’s Nursery. H Owned by the Luigi family for more Flawed than 50 years, Español still serves fourHH course prix fixe meals. For less than the has moments cost of the fried, cheese-smothered Tour of HHH Italy at a certain chain, diners at Español appealing can enjoy bottomless minestrone, a fresh salad, a generous pasta entree and ice HHHH authoritative cream—plus beverages and bread. The décor is delightfully movie-set Italian, HHHHH epic with red-and-white checkered tablecloths and family photos aplenty. The servers seem like family, too. They don’t wear uniforms or introduce themselves—although they probably know most of the diners by name. You can order à la carte or “dinner” style, and if you don’t specify, you get the multicourse dinner. There are set daily specials Still hungry? (chicken cacciatore, for example) and a short search sn&r’s children’s menu, but all meals begin with a “dining directory” to find local tureen of soup—refills on the house. It’s not great minestrone, but it’s chockrestaurants by name or by type of food. full of chunky veggies and tender shell pasta. sushi, mexican, indian, No one will be offended or enlightened. Sop italian—discover it all in the “dining” it up with some soft Italian bread, and move section at on to the salad. www.news Español makes all of its sauces and review.com. dressings in-house, and you get to ladle your own, with a choice of Italian, blue cheese or Thousand Island. The salad is a mix of crunchy fresh romaine, a wedge of ripe tomato, and some antipasti in the form of salami, beans and shredded beets. It’s quite delightful, and all the better with a dollop of the zesty vinaigrette. There are many pasta sauce options and styles, and some meaty standards, such as chicken Parmesan, veal cutlets Milanese and fried chicken “à la Luigi” with garlic. BEFORE

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ter & Get your concert, thea

We’ve had good luck with the pork-chop plate, which features two large, tender pan-fried chops served with applesauce and perfectly al dente fresh vegetables. The fried chicken is often smothered in garlic, but scrape it off if you must and get to the juicy, plentiful poultry.

plus no service fees!

NOw - sept 28

Oct 5 – Oct 6

arden Playhouse PresenTs “Be haPPy” $18 Tix For $9.00

A dish of ravioli is OK on its own, but topped with the house-made marinara, it invites plate licking.

The Big Crush harvesT FesTival @ The amador vinTner visiTor CenTer in PlymouTh $40 Tix For $20

NOw – sept 29 B sTreeT TheaTre PresenTs “oTher deserT CiTies” $35 Tix For $14

Oct 7

exile Parade & The novoCaines @ harlow’s $10 Tix For $5

sept 11

Cheryl wheeler @ harlow’s $25 Tix For $12.50

The real revelation here is the marinara sauce. Made on-site, it’s a fresh, chunky blend of ripe tomatoes and herbs. Every entree comes with a plate of nicely cooked pasta bathed in this ambrosial sauce. A dish of ravioli is OK on its own, but topped with the house-made marinara, it invites plate licking. Dessert is usually just a simple dish of spumoni or vanilla ice cream, although Español sometimes also has cannoli. The wine list is uninspiring but serviceable. Just don’t get the cloyingly sweet house wines. Español’s servers are great with kids, although the average diner’s age is usually much higher. Don’t forgo it as a relic, though. It has a great retro neighborhood feel, and it’s a lovely nonchain example of family dining at its best. Ω

Oct 9

red Fang @ harlow’s $15 Tix For $7.50

sept 13 – Oct 6 davis musiCal TheaTre PresenTs “monTy PyThon’s sPamaloT” $18 Tix For $9

sept 18

aCorn ProjeCT @ harlow’s $10 Tix For $5

New shOws added weekly fOr ace Of spades be sure to check the sweetdeals website for show dates!

sept 25

The unknown morTal orChesTra @ harlow’s $15 Tix For $7.50

Oct 1

donna Brazile @ sT. mark’s uniTed meThodisT $25 Tix For $12.50

Smoothie slipup Congratulations for making it through the first few days of National Dairy-free Month! What’s that? You got slipped some cow juice in your Jamba Juice smoothie, because you didn’t know sherbert is made with milk? Isn’t it surprising how frequently dairy is added to items that we wouldn’t imagine contained it? Like whey, the watery byproduct of making cheese, for instance, appears on so many ingredient lists. And watch this video at http:// tinyurl.com/dairyvideo to see another byproduct of the dairy industry. Play it during your darkest days of this monthlong challenge—or when you are beating yourself up over that smoothie slipup—for perspective that the cows being beaten and dragged by their necks on a concrete floor are having much darker days than yours because you miss ice cream.

STORY

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—Shoka |

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Downtown Grange Restaurant & Bar You 

Where to eat?

Here are a few recent reviews and regional recommendations by Becky Grunewald, Ann Martin Rolke, Garrett McCord and Jonathan Mendick, updated regularly. Check out www.newsreview.com for more dining advice.

won’t find any “challenging”  dishes on this menu—just  delicious local and seasonal  food such as the Green Curry  & Pumpkin Soup, which has a  Southeast Asian flair. A spinach  salad features ingredients that  could be considered boring  elsewhere: blue-cheese dressing, bacon, onion. But here,  the sharply cheesy buttermilk  dressing and the woodsy  pine nuts make it a salad to  remember. Grange’s brunch  puts other local offerings to  shame. The home fries are like  marvelously crispy Spanish  patatas bravas. A grilled-hamand-Gruyere sandwich is just  buttery enough, and an eggwhite frittata is more than a  bone thrown to the cholesterolchallenged; it’s a worthy dish   in its own right. American.   926 J St., (916) 492-4450. Dinner  for one: $40-$60. HHHH B.G.

Midtown Capital Dime Sacramento foodies can finally eat chef Noah  Zonca’s food without having to  cough up rent money. The menu  is split up into “Dime plates,”  “rabbit food,” sandwiches and  “plates.” The dime plates and  rabbit food both go for $10. This,  and the idea that every dish is  supposed to be a “perfect 10” is  the idea behind the restaurant’s  name. One simple dish, the  clams chorizo, is something  you’d stab your mother with  a seafood fork over, should  she attempt to pluck one of its 

S A C R A M E N T O

A R E A ’ S

delightful bivalves from your  plate. Here, seared chorizo  is drowned in white wine and  garlic, creating a silky palominocolored broth in which the  teeniest clams ever are cooked.  The kalua-pork slider is also a  thing of beauty, with flavorful  pulled pork tender as a bruise.  The fries are fried in rice oil with  their skins on—which always  means more flavor. Delicate,  crisp and fantastic to munch  on. American. 1801 L St., Ste. 50;  (916) 443-1010. Dinner for one:  $15-$25. HHH1/2 G.M.

Hook & Ladder Manufacturing Co. The restaurant, by the same  owners as Midtown’s The  Golden Bear, sports a firefighting theme (a ladder on the  ceiling duct work, shiny silver  wallpaper with a rat-andhydrant motif, et al) and a bar  setup that encourages patrons  to talk to each other. An interesting wine list includes entries  from Spain and Israel; there are  also draft cocktails and numerous beers on tap. The brunch  menu is heavy on the eggs,  prepared in lots of ways. One  option is the Croque Madame,  a ham-and-Gruyere sandwich  usually battered with egg. This  one had a fried egg and béchamel, with a generous smear of  mustard inside. The mountain  of potato hash alongside tasted  flavorful and not too greasy.  Another highlight includes an  excellent smoked-eggplant  baba ganoush, which is smoky  and garlicky and served with  warm flatbread wedges and   oil-cured olives. American. 1630 S St., (916) 442-4885. Dinner  for one: $20-$40. HHH1⁄2 A.M.R. 

LowBrau This place specializes in  beer and bratwursts. Both are  done smashingly. The sausage  is wrapped in a tight, snappy  skin like a gimp suit, which gets  nicely charred by the chefs.  Within it lies a beguilingly spicy  and juicy piece of meat. Get it  with a pretzel roll for a truly  exciting experience. There are  vegan options, too: The Italian,  an eggplant-based brat, has  a surprisingly sausagelike  texture that no self-respecting  carnivore will turn it down for  lack of flavor. Toppings include  sauerkraut, a “Bier Cheese”  sauce and caramelized onions.  The idea behind Duck Fat Fries  is a glorious one, yet somehow  still falls short. You just expect  something more when you see  the words “duck fat.” The beer  selection is epic. If you’re lost  and confused, the staff will help  guide you to the right brew via  questionings and encouraged  tastings. German. 1050 20th St.,   (916) 706-2636. Dinner for   one: $10-$15. HHHH G.M.

The Rind This is a fromage fanatic’s  delight with a menu that changes frequently. A chalkboard by  the bar lists the daily suggested  trios for cheese boards, but  order the Diving Board to  choose your own combo. Each  arrives with six crisp toasts  and two sides, like dried fruit  and honey. The rations are  small, but reasonable for two  people. Buy any of the cheeses  by the pound. Ask for the list at  the bar. There are also many  grilled-cheese sandwich choices  and several versions of mac  ’n’ cheese, including Not Your  Mom’s Mac with Parmesan, 

Gruyere and cheddar. It’s silky  smooth, without any excess oil.  A richer version includes blue  cheese and prosciutto for overthe-top indulgence. American.  1801 L St., Ste. 40; (916) 441-7463.  Dinner for one: $10-$15.   HHHH A.M.R.

East Sac Hot City Pizza This East  Sacramento eatery is probably  better known for its beer than  its food, but its pizza is pretty  darn good. Each slice is made  with a unique multigrain crust  that’s soft, airy and helps soak  up a belly full of beer. There  are also interesting topping  combinations, notably a section  full of chicken-topped pizza,  plenty of vegetarian options  and handful of Pacific Islanderthemed pies, such as the Hawaii  on Fire, which comes topped  with sweet Thai chili sauce,  Canadian bacon, pepperoni,  green peppers, pineapple, jalapeño and mozzarella cheese. Of  course, beer is the real draw  here, and Hot City gets an extra  star for its fine selection. With  so many choices—there are  several fridges full of bottled  beer and a handful of rotating  taps—selecting a brew can be  a tremendously difficult but  worthwhile undertaking. Pizza.  5642 J St., (916) 731-8888. Dinner  for one: $10-$20. HHHH J.M.

Istanbul Bistro Turkish chef  Murat Bozkurt and brother  Ekrem co-own this paean to  their homeland, with Ekrem  usually at the front of the  house, infusing the space with 

cheer. Turkish cuisine features  aspects of Greek, Moroccan  and Middle Eastern flavors.  The appetizer combo plate  offers an impressive sampling.  Acili ezme is a chopped, slightly  spicy mixture of tomatoes,  cucumber and walnuts that’s  delicious paired with accompanying flatbread wedges. For  entrees, try the borani, a lamb  stew with garbanzos, carrots,  potatoes and currants. The  meat is very tender, while  the veggies arrived nicely al  dente. Also good is the chicken  shish plate (souvlaki), which  features two skewers of marinated grilled chicken that’s  moist and succulent. There  are also quite a few choices  for vegetarians, including flatbread topped like pizza, with  spinach and feta or mozzarella  and egg. Turkish. 3260 B J St.,  (916) 449-8810. Dinner for one:  $15-$20. HHH1⁄2 A.M.R.

South Sac Blue Moon Cafe and Karaoke In Sac,  most people equate Hong Kongstyle cuisine with dim sum, but  this restaurant, which also features private karaoke rooms,  serves up tasty, familiar food by  way of rice plates, sandwiches,  noodle bowls, soups and stirfries. A few random Japanese  (ramen, fried udon), French  (sweet or savory crepes),  Russian (borscht), Korean (beef  and kimchi hot pot) and Italian  (various pastas) foods add to  the feeling that whatever your  cultural background, you’ll   find a comfort dish from your  childhood to wrap its arms 

around you and give you a hug.  Cultural diversity aside, one   of Blue Moon’s best dishes is   the braised pig ear with soy  sauce and peanuts. Asian.   5000 Freeport Blvd., Ste. A;   (916) 706-2995. Dinner for one:  $10-$20. HHH J.M.

Arden/ Carmichael Taqueria Garibaldi One of this  restaurant’s biggest pulls is its  choice of meats. The chorizo is  red, crispy and greasy in all the  best ways. The lengua (tongue)  is soft and dreamily reminiscent  of only the most ethereal bits  of beef. The fish is fine and flaky  and the cabeza and pork are  herculean in flavor options worthy of note, too. Tacos are small  and served on two tiny tortillas  (flour or corn, your call) with a  bit of house salsa that has all  the kick of a pissed off Girl Scout  who’s just tall enough to nail you  right under the kneecap. Or, feel  free to customize, too, courtesy  of the fully loaded salsa bar. Be  sure to pick up a glass of the  homemade horchata, which is  sweet and milky with seductive  whispers of cinnamon. You   will want seconds. Mexican.   1841 Howe Ave., (916) 924-0108.  Dinner for one: $8-$10.   HHH G.M. 

Land Park/ Curtis Park Burgess Brothers’ Burgers  This burger joint’s motto  is “Committed to Service,”  and that’s evidenced in its 

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The Hideaway Bar & Grill This bar fills a niche Sacramento might not have known it lacked with its vague rockabilly vibe, lots of greased hair on the men, brightly dyed hair in retro styles and cat-eye glasses on the ladies, and an abundance of black clothes and tattoo sleeves for all. The liquor selection is basic (no craft cocktails here). The menu’s heavy on fried appetizers, salads, sandwiches and burgers, the latter of which are architectural, towering assemblages. Happily, the fluffy charred buns are sturdy enough to hold up when the tower is squeezed to a more realistic height. A meaty veggie burger gets crunch from fried pickles and sweet heat from barbecue sauce. Overall, the Hideaway offers cheap beer, adequate bar food and a comfortable place to hang with out friends. American. 2565 Franklin

starter. Try the mixto version, which features fish, shrimp, octopus and calamari, or sample the spicier ceviche de aji amarillo—both are exceptionally piquant and hearty. Entree recommendations include the arroz chaufa, a dish that resulted from the Chinese immigrants’ influence on Peruvian cuisine. Here, it’s served with shrimp and crispy fried pork. The lomo saltado oozes with an incredibly smoky flavor—apparently, the result of cooking the beef in pisco, a type of brandy popular in Peru. The star of the arroz con pato isn’t the duck or the rice, but rather a house-made salsa criolla, consisting of pickled onion and cilantro. Whatever you order, La Huaca’s attention to detail makes it the ideal place to be introduced to the complexities found in this regional cuisine. Peruvian. 9213 Sierra College Blvd., Ste. 140 in Roseville; (916) 771-2558. Dinner for one: $20-$40. HHHH1/2 J.M.

Blvd., (916) 455-1331. Dinner for one: $10-$15. HHH1⁄2 B.G.

Fair Oaks Mighty Tavern Part tavern, part restaurant, this spot offers good food highlighting local ingredients. There’s both a bar menu and a regular dinner menu. The burger, from the dinner menu, arrives perfectly cooked (a little pink on the inside), but the fries aren’t particularly inventive. The best dish here is the scallops, which—sitting atop a bed of pancetta, leeks, corn and tomato beurre blanc—achieves a nice balance of salty, sweet and creamy that makes it worth every penny of the $23 price tag. Want to order from the happy-hour menu? Try the steamed mussels, which arrive piled high with a handful of french fries, lemons and bacon. This is fancier than normal pub food, and the garlicand-white wine sauce it’s cooked in make it perfect for dipping the fries and any spare bread. American. 9634 Fair Oaks Blvd. in Fair Oaks, (916) 241-9444. Dinner for one: $10-$25. HHHH J.M.

finding out he’s a terrible kisser: greatly disappointing. In the end, a little refinery needs to happen to make the food at Back unique enough for the average Sacramento diner to find it worth the trip, but for the Folsom diner who feels Grange Restaurant & Bar is too far, then Back will do right enough. The wine selection is strong, and pairing recommendations are practical. American. 25075 Blue Ravine Rd., Ste. 150 in Folsom; (916) 986-9100. Dinner for one: $25-$50. HHH1/2 G.M.

Lotus 8 The menu here is organized with sections such as “Our Most Popular Dishes,” “If You’re Feeling Adventurous” and the “Chef’s Special” tasting list, which offers dishes less familiar to American diners. Worthy options include the fried-milk appetizer, which is made of sweetened milk that’s been battered and fried and tastes like pillows of the lightest cheesecake. Pair it with the sweet-and-sour sauce, or top it with powdered sugar for a dessert. The salted egg with pumpkin arrives as lightly battered, fried half-moons topped with hard-boiled egg. With classic sweet and salty complements, the flavor is even better with a drizzle of hot chili sauce. The fried tofu with salt and pepper is exceptional. Cubes of fried, silky tofu taste like custardy goodness. This is the kind of tofu that could almost make one give up meat. Chinese. 199 Blue Ravine Rd., Ste. 100 in Folsom; (916) 351-9278. Dinner for one: $10-$15. HHHH A.M.R.

Folsom Back Wine Bar & Bistro Back has nuzzled itself into a comfortable niche with an eclectic wine selection and—albeit unfocused—menu that draws an upscale crowd. The bruschetta plate arrives with four types of toppings, two of each: goat cheese, avocado, caramelized onion and tomato. They don’t suck, but they aren’t great. A rib-eye steak with a basil-andtomato compound butter is served cooked to perfection. But the chocolate soufflé is like having a hot date and then

Roseville La Huaca This Peruvian eatery offers an experience decidedly upscale in every way: décor, art, lighting, presentation, price and—most importantly—taste. Peru’s national dish is ceviche, seafood cured in lime, salt and chili, and it’s a must-have

IllustratIon by Mark stIvers

outstanding customer service. The food is also exceptional. There are plenty of burgers on the menu—all smoked before they’re grilled. The one-third pound Tactical Blue Burger is served with blue cheese, tomato, lettuce and fried onions. With a generous slathering of the “Patrol” sauce, it’s full of flavor but not too smoky. Don’t miss the barbecue, though. The pulled-pork sandwich is nicely smoked and shredded, piled on a garlic roll. There are also kidsized sliders and the Code 4 vegetarian burger, made with a portobello mushroom. Barbecue. 2114 Sutterville Rd., (916) 209-0277. Dinner for one: $5-$10. HHH1⁄2 A.M.R.

Of farms and forks Sacramento doesn’t seem to be dropping the “farm-to-fork” tagline or concept any time soon. The inaugural Farm to Fork Week begins Friday, September 20, with an opening reception. Events happen throughout the week at various parks and farmers markets (visit http://farmtoforkcapital.com for the full lineup), and it concludes with (an already sold-out) dinner right on the Tower Bridge on Sunday, September 29. There are even a couple of unrelated farming events happening this week: the third annual Slow Food Sacramento Edible Garden Bike Tour ($10; 9:30 a.m. on Saturday, September 7; https://2013ediblebiketour.eventbrite.com), in which participants tour home gardens in Midtown and downtown on bike; and Soil Born Farms’ Grow Your Groceries educational series, which helps train the beginner home gardener (free; 11 a.m. on Saturday, September 7; and 6 p.m. on Wednesday, September 11; www.soilborn.org). An interest in farming and eating organic food is not required, but recommended. —Jonathan Mendick

French Tea Service $2 5 per person

Tax not included. Please present coupon. Not valid with any other offers. Not valid with variety platter. Exp. 9/19/13.

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Some problems are better to have than others, like  trying to figure out how to host a pool party and  watch the big game at the same time.  GADGET Fortunately, such dilemmas have  solutions. Superior Inflatables’ Superior Home Swimming Pool Movie Screen solves this little conundrum,  and it’s just what it sounds like: A big-screen TV  (110 inches!) for the pool. The price is a little steep  at $1,249, but after enjoying a movie marathon on a  particularly hot Sunday afternoon, it’ll feel like it’s  money well spent. Yay, another rich-person problem  solved. www.superiorinflatables.com. —Aaron Carnes

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The season-two premiere of Nashville is still weeks  away. In the meantime, get your fix with YouTube  clips of the show’s youngest stars, Lennon and  Maisy Stella. The actresses play siblings Maddie and  Daphne Conrad on the sudsy country-music drama.  They’re also real-life sisters and talented musicians,  with a poise and charisma that far belies their   youth (ages 14 and 9, respectively). No word yet  on a record (some of the sisters’ Nashville-related  WEB tracks, however, are available via iTunes),  so these clips will have to suffice. Videos  include covers of tracks by the Swell Season, the  Lumineers and, fittingly, John Lennon’s “Imagine.”   www.youtube.com/user/lennonandmaisy. —Rachel Leibrock

School for thought confeSSionS of A bAd teAcHer First, let’s be clear: John Owens seems to be a very  good teacher. The problem he addresses in Confessions of a Bad Teacher: The Shocking Truth About the  BOOK Front Lines of American Public Education  (Sourcebooks, $13.99) is that individual  teachers often instruct with their hands tied. Owens  left a high-profile publishing job to teach in South  Bronx, where he discovered that his students had  problems (understanding English, learning disabilities,  troubled homes, poverty) that made it impossible for  them to work at the level expected. He documents— in enraging detail—the way that the institutional  emphasis on checking off “skill sets” actually keeps  students from gaining any actual skills.  —Kel Munger

AdAm Ant Years before the likes of Duran  Duran and Michael Jackson blew  up MTV with lavish video spectacles, British artist Adam Ant broke  ground on the medium.  The singer, who performs  Wednesday, September 11, at Ace  of Spades, made wild, colorful clips  replete with pirates and horses,  MUSIC boxers and butlers. His  image was curated in  part by Sex Pistols manager Malcolm McLaren, but much of it was  also informed by Ant’s graphic-design background. Before he started  performing, the artist, born Stuart  Leslie Goddard, studied at Hornsey  College of Art. “Everything I learned in art  school helped me when I got into  rock ’n’ roll, [with] album covers  and typography, and the videos,”  Ant told SN&R in a recent interview.  “[But] videos don’t have the same  impact now—the whole MTV thing  peaked by the time “Thriller” came  along, and artists were competing  with major Hollywood directors  and million-dollar budgets.” Even still, faced with such  competition, Ant’s “new romantics”  style and raw, post-punk sound  continued to earn him fans for such  tracks as “Goody Two Shoes” and  “Strip.” The singer struggled with  mental illness over the years, but  experienced a 1995 comeback with  the hit song “Wonderful,” and also  acted in TV and on film. Ant’s latest record is the double  album Adam Ant Is the BlueBlack  Hussar in Marrying the Gunner’s  Daughter, and his current tour focuses on both new and old material. “Obviously, the hits are what  people want to hear,” he says. “If I  were to go see Roxy Music, I’d want  to hear the hits, too.” 8 p.m. $30,  Ace of Spades, 1417 R Street; (877)  463-2875; www.adam-ant.com. —Rachel Leibrock


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I’m worried that this guy will think you are desperate or a creepy stalker. Please don’t contact him again. You do bear some responsibility for your marital strife. You have allowed your husband to sweet-talk you into embracing his choices, rather than standing your ground on behalf of your needs. Maybe you believed that accepting his absences exemplified love. Or perhaps you imagined that your husband would eventually see that you and the children miss him, and he would change. Either way, the task now is to determine if he is willing to join the family. Write out a realistic list of your non-negotiable terms for marriage and family life. It should look something like this: “family dinners, four nights a week; date night, two nights per month; family outings two times each month,” and so on. Then, schedule a sit-down conversation with your husband using the

Got a problem?

Write, email or leave a message for Joey at the News & Review. Give your name, telephone number (for verification purposes only) and question—all correspondence will be kept strictly confidential. Write Joey, 1124 Del Paso Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95815; call (916) 498-1234, ext. 3206; or email askjoey@ newsreview.com.

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time-management tool of his choice. If his buddies schedule their nights out by text message, for example, do the same. Send him a loving text with a set start time and end time for the conversation. Please do not write: “We need to talk.” That language seems straightforward, but because of its dramatic overuse in TV and film, those four little words are loaded. Do let your husband know that you want to have more fun, especially with him. Invite him on a date night, without the kids. Let him know you want a commitment to outings with him every month. Share your other non-negotiable expectations, too. If your husband balks, suggest seeing a marriage counselor together. If he refuses, go on your own. You will need professional support to decide the next best course of action for you and your children. I met this guy, and we clicked right off. He gave me his number, and I called him like an hour after he left the bar. He didn’t pick up. I sent him a text around midnight, but still no response. I called him again the next day, and the call went to voice mail. Should I keep chasing him? Or give up? I’m really attracted to him. It’s exciting to discover an attraction and courageous to make the first move. But I’m worried that this guy will think you are desperate or a creepy stalker. Please don’t contact him again. In the future, when you call someone you like, leave one message. Yes, only one. When you do, tell the guy what you liked about him and invite him to do something specific, like: “You are so fun. I had a blast hanging out with you last night. Let’s go to ComedySportz Sacramento Friday night!” Then, practice patience. If a guy doesn’t respond, he’s not interested in you. Move on. Ω

Meditation of the Week “Without deviation from the  norm, progress is not possible,”  said musician Frank Zappa. How  comfortable are you coloring outside  the lines?

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My husband has a life, and I don’t. When he is not at work, he is playing video games, cycling, playing softball, restoring his grandmother’s Studebaker or spending hours on fantasy football. I love him but feel like the kids and I are on his back burner. I’ve tried talking to my husband, but he charms his way out of the conversation, or we end up angry and not talking at all. He is always so happy, and I’m by Joey ga always angry and frustrated. rcia I do everything for the house and the kids. He’s so selfish a skj o ey @ n ewsreview.c om that I am ready to leave him. Your husband isn’t selfish, he’s single. That’s right, he doesn’t Joey have a clue what it means to be didn’t fall in love married. Unfortunately, you have with the film The tolerated his single-man’s mentality Spectacular Now. for too long. He knows that by sugaring his words or by giving you the cold shoulder, he can have all Are we friends on Facebook yet? Like Ask the playtime he desires. Your chilJoey on FB today. dren are watching his machinations. Take care not to fall into the same trap with them, or they may repeat this pattern of emotional neglect in adulthood.

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Tragedy, triumph and thespians SN&R previews the fall theater season  Prominent scripts that contended for recent awards, plus some loveable old chestnuts and timeless tragedies: That’s the scoop on fall theater. by Jeff Hudson Capital Stage begins with Clybourne Park, a drama about race and real estate, winner of 2011’s Pulitizer Prize for Drama and 2012’s Tony Award for Best Play (through October 6). Then, Cap Stage adapts Shakespeare’s Scottish tragedy of witchcraft and revenge, Macbeth (October 23 through November 24; www.capstage.org). Closing out 2013 will be The Santaland Diaries, the sarcastic David Sedaris tale of a departmentstore elf (December 5 through December 29). Underlying question: Who takes the reins as artistic director Stephanie Gularte moves on?

Photo by Joan Marcus

Broadway Sacramento kicks off its season with a touring production of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert, which won a Tony Award for Best Costume Design in 2011.

The B Street Theatre’s Mainstage season is already underway with the widely admired Other Desert Cities (through September 29; www.bstreettheatre.org). Then comes Detroit, a drama about suburban couples during hard economic times (October 6 through November 17); it was a 2011 Pulitzer Prize for Drama finalist, and won this year’s Obie Award for Best New American Play. In December, B Street mounts a (still untitled) new play by producing artistic director Buck Busfield, who annually creates a fresh script for the holidays. Underlying question: When will B Street break ground on its long-planned Midtown venue? Meanwhile, B Street’s B3 series (“for the sophisticated theatregoer”) offers My Name Is Asher Lev, based on the 1972 novel by Chaim Potok (September 20 through October 20). This recent script won honors from New York’s Outer Critics Circle. B Street’s Family Series starts its 10th season in November with Beauty and the Beast—aimed at kids, but with professionals in the cast. The Sacramento Theatre Company goes retro with a stage version of Jane Austen’s 19th-century novel of courtship and marriage, Pride and Prejudice (October 2 through October 27; www.sactheatre.org). Then comes Crazy Horse and Custer, set amid the Indian wars of the 1800s (November 6 through December 15). Its holiday show is It’s a Wonderful Life: The

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5

The Drowsy Chaperone

Bob Irvin directs perhaps  his most perfect cast  (Deane Calvin, Joe Hart, Brianne  Hidden-Wise, Analise LangfordClark, Daniel W. Slauson, Corey   D. Winfield and a host of others)  in this musical within a comedy  as a lonely, obsessive theaterlover (Slauson) conjures a musical in his mind (and on stage)  while listening to a recording of  his favorite show. F, Sa, Su 8pm. Through 9/8. $5-$15. Fair Oaks  Theatre Festival at the Veterans  Memorial Amphitheatre,   7991 California Ave. in Fair Oaks;   (916) 966-3683, www.fairoaks  theatrefestival.com. J.C. 

5 

Other Desert Cities 

Self-righteous Brooke  Wyeth (Dana Brooke),  carts her tell-all memoir to her  parents’ home in Palm Springs,  hoping for a blessing from them,  but gets a blasting instead. The  play combines conflicting family  dynamics with blunt sarcastic  humor, which puts some fun in  dysfunctional. Talented cast, including Brooke and Joan Grant,  who create caustic chemistry as  mother and daughter. Th, F, 8pm;

Sa 5 & 9pm; Su 2pm; Tu 6:30pm; W 2 & 6:30pm. Through 9/29.  

$25-$35. B Street Theatre,   2711 B Street; (916) 443-5300;   www.bstreettheatre.org. P.R.

4

Squabbles

“An argument a day keeps  the doctor away,” says Abe  Dreyfus (Rodger Hoopman). At 73  and in his curmudgeonly prime,  Abe is honest to a fault about his 

love for his daughter Alice (Julie  Bock) and his tolerance of her  husband Jerry (Walt Thompson),  with whom he now lives. When  Jerry’s mother Mildred (Monique  McKisson) loses her home,  belongings and pet bird to a house  fire, she moves in with the young  couple, too. Insanity ensues.   F, Sa 8pm; Su 2pm. Through 9/22.  $17-$19. Chautauqua Playhouse  at the La Sierra Community   Center, 5325 Engle Rd. in   Carmichael; (916) 489-7529;   www.cplayhouse.org. J.C.

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Time Stands Still 

Ovation Stage’s production is compact, intense  and intimate due to the tight  storyline, a cohesive cast and  the small 30-seat Three Penny  Theatre. It all takes place in the  New York apartment where a  prideful and resentful Sarah  (Beth Edwards) is brought home  by her supportive boyfriend  James (James Andrew) to recover from her massive injuries.  The conversations run the gamut  of the moral dilemmas facing  journalists, the righteousness  of individual and job choices,  and the escapism and long-term  impact demanding careers can  have on personal lives. F, Sa 8pm; Su 2pm. Through 9/15. $15-$18.  Ovation Stage at the Three Penny  Theatre in the R25 Arts Complex,  1723 25th St.; (916) 448-0312;  www.ovationstage.com. P.R.

3 GooD

4 WELL-DonE

5 subLIME–Don’t MIss

short reviews by Jim carnes and Patti roberts.

Photo courtEsy oF harrIs cEntEr For thE arts

Musical (November 27 through December 22), reprising the 1946 film. Underlying question: Will contemporary audiences warm to three shows set in the (sometimes distant) past? New Helvetia Theatre hasn’t announced a fall show. But New Helvetia favors new and edgy musicals (and lesser-known shows from decades past). Underlying question: When will New Helvetia (www.newhelvetia.org) capitalize on community goodwill by announcing shows in a timelier manner? Broadway Sacramento—which hosts big-box touring musicals—gets underway with Priscilla, Queen of the Desert, a musical based on the 1994 film that picked up the 2011 Tony Award for Best Costume Design for its outrageous costumes (November 5 through November 10; www.calmt. com). Then, Buddy—The Buddy Holly Story, a 1950s rockabilly songbook show (December 27 through January 2, 2014). Underlying question: When will the long-delayed modernization of the Community Center Theater begin? The smaller companies have plans, too. Big Idea Theatre (www.bigidea theatre.com) offers Lonesome Hollow, a near-future dystopia about the imprisonment of a photographer of artistic nudes (September 27 through October 26), followed by Outrage, a time-bending journey from ancient times into the present (November 15 through December 14). Green Valley Theatre Company (www.greenvalleytheatre.com) revives The Rocky Horror Show for Halloween (October 11 through October 26). City Theatre (www.citytheatre.net) does After Juliet, set in fair Verona after the suicides of Shakespeare’s star-crossed lovers (September 20 through October 13), then, a raucous holidayseason production of Snow White: A British Panto (dates to be determined). Runaway Stage Productions (www.runaway stage.com), which favors musicals, does How to Succeed in Business (September 6 through September 29), followed by Monty Python’s Spamalot (November 8 through December 1). Ovation Stage (www.ovationstage.com), which favors dramas, has Time Stands Still through September 15, followed by Sam Shepard’s 1979 Pulitzer Prize-winning Buried Child (November 2 through November 24). The Actor’s Workshop of Sacramento (www.actinsac.com) will stage River City Anthology (September 20 through October 20), featuring poems describing Sacramento. Synthetic Unlimited (www.synthetic unlimited.org) in Nevada City mounts Harold Pinter’s Betrayal (September 19 through September 29), followed by Shakespeare’s Othello (October 17 through October 27). Ω

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He’s still in this photo, but Todd Ellison is an energetic conductor.

A bunch of Broadway Todd Ellison: It’s a name you may not be familiar with unless  you’re a huge musical-theater buff. But the music director  whose Broadway credits include 42nd Street, La Cage aux Folles  and Monty Python’s Spamalot—and who was called “electric”  by The New York Times—will be visiting the Harris Center for the  Arts for the first time on Sunday, September 8. In a performance  titled Todd Ellison: Classic Broadway, the conductor will be joined  by Broadway vocalists Ashley Blanchet, David Larson, Christopher Sieber and Tony Award winner Beth Leavel to perform  selections from Wicked, Memphis and Once. Not only is Ellison  currently conducting Annie on Broadway, he’s also a classically  trained pianist and symphony orchestra conductor who tours  the nation performing special concert-hall engagements like   this one. Talk about an overachiever. Sunday, September 8,   2 p.m.; $12-$45. Harris Center for the Arts, 10 College Parkway in  Folsom; (916) 608-6888; www.harriscenter.net. —Jonathan Mendick

jo na th a nm@ ne wsr e v ie w.c o m


BEFORE

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  |    A R T S & C U L T U R E     |    A F T E R

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2 5 0 8 L A N D PA R K D R I V E L A N D PA R K & B R O A D WAY F R E E PA R K I N G A D J A C E N T T O T H E AT R E “CLEVER ROM-COM.”

“IMMEDIATE THRILLS.” - Peter Debruge, VARIETY

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Getaway

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Getaway is a movie for people who think The Fast and Furious franchise has gotten too low-key and realistic, its plots too mundane and slice-ofby Jim Lane life, with too much dialogue interrupting the car chases. Writers Sean Finegan and Gregg Maxwell Parker and director Courtney Solomon set the bar so low that it constitutes a sort of high: Let’s see if we can make a movie with no plot whatsoever, and no more character than it takes to fill the front seat of a car. Ethan Hawke plays—if that’s the right word for what he’s called on to do here—somebody

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called Brent Magna. Brent is a former race-car driver who has been somehow disgraced—all he will say is that “the only thing I was good at was wrecking expensive cars”—and is now trying to rebuild his life in Sofia, Bulgaria. Ah, yes, Sofia, that international mecca for people who want to start over. Exactly what Brent has been doing in Sofia is, like much of Finegan and Parker’s script, left unexplained. “Done some things I’m not proud of,” he says. (Ethan Hawke might want to commit those words to memory if he plans to continue making pictures like Sinister, The Purge and now this.) Now somebody has kidnapped Brent’s wife Leanne, played by Rebecca Budig, who actually is from TV soap operas, having played something called Greenlee Smythe for 12 years on All My Children. In Getaway, she has little to do but sob and squeal and say things like, “Why are you doing this?” and “Please don’t shoot me!” So, what Ms. Budig may be capable of remains, for the moment, unknown outside the fan base of All My Children. As Brent stands in the shambles of his and Leanne’s ransacked home in suburban Sofia, his cellphone rings. It’s a character identified only as The Voice, but any connoisseur of lips photographed in closeup will recognize Jon Voight, sporting an accent that makes him sound

like Colonel Klink on Hogan’s Heroes. “Doo ass I say,” The Voice orders Brent, “or your vife vill tie.” The Voice’s plans for Brent begin with stealing a car. Not just any car: It’s a Shelby Super Snake loaded with options—most of them consisting of a multicamera video surveillance system so The Voice can keep an eye and ear on Brent as he negotiates the obstacle course laid out for him. It’s a sort of combination of destruction derby and Beat the Clock, and Brent’s instructions essentially boil down to “drive all over the place wrecking other cars and scattering bystanders.” With a side trip into kidnapping. This is where Selena Gomez comes in, playing someone known only as “The Kid”— Finegan and Maxwell apparently having exhausted their fertile imaginations coming up with “Brent Magna” and “Leanne” (other character names include The Man, Distinguished Man, Head Valet, Thug and Henchmen 1, 2 and 3). The Kid is the actual owner of the car Brent has stolen. She’s also very tech savvy and has a smart mouth. Also, her father is CEO of the Incredibly Rich and Slightly Shady Investment Bank of Sofia. This is not a coincidence.

Getaway writers Sean Finegan and Gregg Maxwell Parker set the bar so low that it constitutes a sort of high. The Kid begins their evening together by shoving a pistol into Brent’s face and demanding her car back. From there, she progresses to wheedling and begging to be dropped off at the nearest corner as Brent sends them both careening through streets, over sidewalks, around turns, and through crowded parks at the behest of The Voice. Somewhere along the line, however, she and Brent become partners in trying to outwit their tormentor. This happens so suddenly that I wondered if somehow a reel or two had been left out of the release print, although the thought of Getaway running any longer than it already does was too depressing to contemplate. In the end, not to spoil something that’s already pretty rotten, the whole game seems to have been a sort of audition, as a sequel seems to be threatened. Getaway’s title is never really explained—unless it’s Finegan, Parker and director Solomon who think they’ve gotten away with something. Ω


by daniel barnes & JiM lane

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Blue Jasmine

A snooty New York socialite (Cate Blanchett), left penniless when her crooked financier husband (Alec Baldwin) goes to prison, moves in with her working-class sister in San Francisco (Sally Hawkins). Critic Walter Kerr once wrote, “Neil Simon didn’t have an idea for a play this year, but he wrote one anyway.” Well, Woody Allen didn’t have an idea for a movie, so he did a riff on A Streetcar Named Desire. But Allen never gets the colored lights going. The role of Stanley Kowalski is drained of sexual energy and divvied up between the sister’s ex-husband (Andrew Dice Clay) and present boyfriend (Bobby Cannavale); without that conflict, Streetcar lacks a core, and one is missing here. The whole is less than the sum of its parts, though some parts (especially Blanchett’s performance) are well worth watching. J.L.

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Log onto GOFOBO.COM/RSVP and enter the RSVP code SNR3UCN for your chance to win passes to attend a special screening on Thursday, September 12 in Sacramento.

Closed Circuit

There couldn’t be a better time than right now for Closed Circuit to capture the public’s attention, since the plot is a veritable scrapbook of recent newspaper headlines. Beyond the topical trappings, though, this is an unimaginative post-9/11 “legal thriller” in the John Grisham mold. Closed Circuit opens and closes on a mosaic of black-and-white security camera images, but in between, the themes of omnipresent surveillance are only used as hoary plot devices. Stars Rebecca Hall and Eric Bana lack the credibility to play trial lawyers, and even worse, they lack chemistry. Without competent leads, Closed Circuit relies on its supporting cast to supply the gravitas, including Jim Broadbent as an attorney general whose buttoned-down politeness conceals a passive-aggressive evil. Unfortunately, after a passable third act, the film goes 10 minutes too far in pursuit of a tidy ending. D.B.

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The elegantly stylish martial arts meditation The Grandmaster ostensibly portrays the prelegend life of Ip Man, the Wing Chun master who famously taught Bruce Lee. However, those expecting a factory-assembled biopic—or a traditional kung fu film—don’t know Chinese auteur Wong Kar-wai very well, do they? With The Grandmaster, Kar-wai lays out the entire history of China’s competing martial arts schools, touching at length on their role in Sino-Japanese War-era internecine political struggles. Fortunately, he does it by staging one awesome fight scene after another, emphasizing closeness in combat and building to an epic train-station sequence. Kar-wai also elicits grand movie-star performances from Tony Leung Chiu Wai and Ziyi Zhang, whose silent-filmworthy faces distract from the herky-jerky plot lurches and repetitive camera moves. D.B.

Fruitvale Station

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Lee Daniels’ The Butler

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NEWS

The Spectacular Now

A hard-drinking high-school party boy (Miles Teller), recently dumped by his girlfriend (Brie Larson), strikes up a friendship, then a tentative romance, with a classmate (Shailene Woodley). He barely knows her, but she knows him well—by reputation. Will she pull him up to her level, or will he drag her down to his? Just when you’re tired of teen rom-coms, along comes one like this to redeem the whole debased genre. Written by Scott Neustadter and Michael H. Weber (from Tim Tharp’s novel) and directed by James Ponsoldt, this is the most charming such movie since Cameron Crowe’s Say Anything, which was released 24 years ago. (Not surprisingly, Neustadter and Weber also wrote the equally charming (500) Days of Summer.) Teller and Woodley have great chemistry, and rightly shared a special acting award at the Sundance Film Festival. J.L.

Lee Daniels’ The Butler was “inspired by true events” much like John Hinckley Jr. was “inspired” by The Catcher in the Rye. Actually, it’s adapted from a Washington Post article about an African-American butler who served at the White House during some of the most turbulent times in recent history. Daniels expands that idea into a Gump’s-eye view of the civil-rights era that is Oscar chum at its most pandering. Forest Whitaker, looking like an audio-animatronics figure at Disneyland Presents Great Moments With Lee Daniels’ The Butler, plays Cecil Gaines, son of a murdered cotton farmer reborn through servitude. Whitaker is strong, as usual, but the U.S. presidents are portrayed in a series of distracting cameos by Robin Williams as Dwight D. Eisenhower and Alan Rickman as Ronald Reagan. D.B.

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Planes

A lowly crop-dusting airplane (voice by Dane Cook) cherishes an ambition to participate in an around-the-world air race, and by a combination of pluck and luck, he succeeds. Yes, it’s Turbo with planes instead of snails, but it’s also an unimaginative rehash of every other follow-your-dream movie, with little more than some stunning animation to distinguish it from all the rest. The story trudges through its predictable formula with excruciating precision, hitting every beat right on schedule. With no suspense or surprises, we have to pass the time by trying to identify the celebrity voices (which include Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Stacy Keach, Brad Garrett, Teri Hatcher, John Cleese and Cedric the Entertainer) and contemplating the inevitable Disney theme-park attraction. At least the ride will be over more quickly. J.L.

An Acapulco beach bum (Eugenio Derbez, who also directed and co-wrote the script) has a baby girl dumped on him from one of his flings, so, naturally, he moves to Hollywood and works as a stuntman to raise the kid, while refusing to learn English. When the child is 7 (and now played by Loreto Peralta), her mother (Jessica Lindsey) returns and wants custody. This Spanish-language comedy’s original title translates as “Returns Not Accepted,” so the English subtitles may be no more accurate than that; what comes through is a sloppy melange of unpersuasive melodrama, amateurish mugging, unfunny comedy and mawkish sentimentality, a sort of boneheaded Kramer vs. Kramer. Derbez, a major star in Latin America, has all the personal charm and comedic gifts of Italy’s Roberto Benigni—i.e. none whatsoever. J.L.

BEFORE

One Direction: This Is Us

Director Morgan Spurlock traces the rise of the current boy-band sensation One Direction (Niall Horan, Zayn Malik, Liam Payne, Harry Styles, Louis Tomlinson), formed by Simon Cowell from also-rans on his series The X Factor. Spurlock also follows their world tour, with generous helpings of their backstage hijinks. In performance, we seldom see more than a few bars of any given song; ordinarily, that would be a mistake, but with these songs, that’s plenty. The movie is patently staged and may have been scripted (it’s always fishy when a “documentary” has camera crews on both ends of a phone call). Still, the boys are likeable enough, and who can begrudge them their moment in the spotlight? J.L.

Writer-director Ryan Coogler’s first feature is an auspicious debut, portraying the last day of Oscar Grant (Michael B. Jordan), the Hayward man who was shot dead in an altercation with police officers for Bay Area Rapid Transit in Oakland on New Year’s Day 2009. The shooting sparked protests, both peaceful and violent. Coogler’s movie is a protest, too, but more in sadness than anger. It’s that rarest of movies (these days, anyhow): one that’s “based on a true story” and actually has the ring of truth (some names are changed for either dramatic or legal reasons). Jordan’s performance is muted but earnest and strong, and there’s fine work from the supporting ensemble, especially Melonie Diaz as Grant’s girlfriend Sophina, Octavia Spencer as his mother, and little Ariana Neal as his 4-year-old daughter. J.L.

Instructions Not Included

The Grandmaster

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STORY

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We’re the Millers

Passes are limited and winners are chosen by random draw on 9/9.

This film is rated R. Passes received through this promotion do not guarantee admission - seating is first come, first served, and early arrival is strongly encouraged. No one will be admitted without a ticket or after the screening begins. Relativity Media, Sacramento News and Review, Allied-THA, Gofobo.com and their affiliates accept no responsibility or liability in connection with any loss or accident incurred in connection with this prize. Tickets cannot be exchanged, transferred or redeemed for cash, in whole or in part. We are not responsible if, for any reason, winner is unable to use his/her ticket in whole or in part. Void prohibited by law. No purchase necessary. NO PHONE CALLS!

A small-time pot dealer (Jason Sudeikis), having been strong-armed into smuggling tons of weed in from Mexico, hires a stripper (Jennifer Aniston), a teen runaway (Emma Roberts) and the dweeb next door (Will Poulter) to masquerade as a straight-arrow family and avoid suspicion at the border. The writers’ credit (Sean Anders, Steve Faber, Bob Fisher, John Morris) is studded with numerous “ands” and “&s,” indicating rewrites without collaboration, and the unevenness shows in story sags and digressions. On the plus side, the whole thing plays to Sudeikis and Aniston’s comic strengths, and they have good chemistry. The humor is often raunchy (watch out for that spider-bite scene!), but most of the gags hit the target, and some hit the bull’s-eye. Rawson Marshall Thurber directs with a game (if at times unsteady) hand. J.L.

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IN THEATRES SEPTEMBER 13

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The World’s End

A 40-year-old boy who never grew up (Simon Pegg) dragoons four pals (Nick Frost, Martin Freeman, Paddy Considine, Eddie Marsan) into returning to their hometown and repeating the epic pub crawl they got too drunk to finish back in their youth. The others have all moved on with their lives, but his enthusiasm brooks no denial. Still, all misgivings seem justified when they find the old town eerily changed. The script by Pegg and director Edgar Wright begins as a fast-paced British working-class comedy, with jokes coming almost too fast to catch. Then, it suddenly (and seamlessly) morphs into a latter-day Invasion of the Body Snatchers, with our boys battling an invasion of passive-aggressive aliens. It’s high old fun, though it plays as a bit too much of a rehash of Pegg and Wright’s Shaun of the Dead. J.L.

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A family’s reunion turns deadly when its isolated home is invaded, and its members are murdered one by one—but one of the intended victims proves unexpectedly adept at organizing resistance. Writer Simon Barrett throws in some plot twists intended to explain away the clichés (killers wearing masks with tiny eyeholes, victims going off alone into the night or darkened rooms, etc.), but the movie still doesn’t make much sense. Of course, it doesn’t have to: People who go for movies like this never look that closely as long as the blood flows thick and fast, and director Adam Wingard makes sure that it does. Shoddy and cheap-looking (blame cinematographer Andrew Droz Palermo), this run-of-the-mill slash-’em-up flick has been floating around for two years looking for a distributor. Unfortunately, it found one. J.L.

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CROSS FIT!

Just because Imagine Dragons is headlining the Launch  festival doesn’t mean they’re bigheaded rock stars Rock stars—true rock stars, mind you; the ones who’ve embarked on big tours, hit the festival circuit, et al.—aren’t always as down-to-earth and by Brian Palmer thoughtful as Wayne Sermon, the guitarist for Imagine Dragons. Nearly a year after the release of the band’s wildly successful fulllength debut, Night Visions, Sermon is still blown away by how quickly his band’s star has risen.

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Imagine Dragons guitarist Wayne Sermon (second from right) and the rest of the band will close out the 2013 Launch festival.

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It’s the sort of self-effacing statement that, at least in part, helps to draw in the band’s legions of fans. Indeed, they’re anything but spotlight-seeking prima donnas. For Sermon and the band, it’s about the fans—evidenced by their hesitancy to talk about the meaning of their songs. To do so, they feel, would lessen the impact of the songs for listeners. “Growing up, hearing your favorite artist say that a song was about something completely different to them than you thought it was, it almost ruined the song,” said Sermon. “You’ve had your own belief about what this song was about, and it’s had its own personal meaning to you, so I always felt like when people said what it was about, it was always disappointing. So, we try and leave that for the fans to decide.” In fact, Sermon often partakes in that bit of the fan experience as well. He often doesn’t know what the songs are about, because Imagine Dragons singer-songwriter Dan Reynolds usually keeps the meanings to himself. “There are times when I don’t understand them, and I think that mystery reaches out to me,” Sermon said. “But in a strange way, I don’t really want to know what the lyrics mean. I’ve attached my own meaning.” PhOTO COuRTESy OF InTERSCOPE RECORDS

ROCK

Open to interpretation

Imagine Dragons performs at the Launch festival at 8 p.m. on Sunday, September 8, at Cesar Chavez Plaza on 10th and J streets. Other Launch festival artists include Doombird, Exquisite Corps, Girl Talk, Rocket From the Crypt and Blonde Redhead. Tickets range from $10-$75 for single day or multiday passes. Visit www.launch sacramento.com for a complete schedule of artists, events and locations.

“We’re kind of floored by it, to be honest,” Sermon said. “I mean, there’s not a lot that I can say that doesn’t sound like a cliché at this point. I feel silly even saying this anymore, but we’re just humbled by everything.” Imagine Dragons performs Sunday, September 8, at Cesar Chavez Plaza as the closing act during the multiday Launch festival. Night Visions has already been certified platinum, and three of its tracks have appeared on the Billboard Hot 100. The song “Radioactive,” in fact, peaked at No. 3, and Rolling Stone even proclaimed it to be “the biggest rock hit of the year” back in May. But for all the accolades and attention the band has received, its meteoric rise did not come without struggle. And Sermon says he’s glad about that. “I think for us it was pretty crucial,” he said of the band’s early hardships. “Some bands are together for three or four months and boom! Everything happens, they get huge real quick,” he said. “But for us, it wasn’t like that. It was over three years of just living in Las Vegas, playing to mostly empty rooms and casinos and touring. We needed that as a band. If we had made it big right off the bat, it wouldn’t have been good for us. We probably didn’t deserve it at that point.”

“Ifwehadmadeitbigright offthebat,itwouldn’t havebeengoodforus. Weprobablydidn’t deserveitatthatpoint.” Wayne Sermon Imagine Dragons And meaning is perhaps the most crucial aspect of the band’s makeup. The group has stuck with it through the ups and the downs because, Sermon said, it felt like there was no other choice. “We’ve always been of the mindset of ‘Don’t do this because you want to do it; do it because you have to do it,’” he said. “All four of us had to do it. There’s a lot to not love about doing this, so there’s got to be a lot you love … to make all the hard times worth it.” Ω


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FRIDAY 9/6 - SATURDAY 9/7

FROM THE AXIS OF EVIL Murder can be fun: In a press release Easy on the sizzurp: “What a nice COMEDY TOUR! sent out earlier this summer, the young man!” isn’t necessarily the MAZ JOBRANI members of Avey Tare’s Slasher phrase one would expect to be SUNDAY 9/8 Flicks described themselves as “a uttering while leaving the Sleep THERE GOES THE NEIGHBORHOOD COMEDY JAM murderous cannibalistic” band, Train Arena after a Lil Wayne concert, ERIK MYERS but it is definitely fitting. During including a “leather-masked Guitar WEDNESDAY 9/11 the rapper’s long set on August wielding Avey Tare ... his knifeCOMEDY CENTRAL’S 17, his tatted, pierced face was all wielding keyboard player … and UP NEXT SHOWCASE NATIONAL TALENT SEARCH smiles—projected clearly on the their cannibal chief Drummer.” It’s PRELIMINARY SHOWCASE big talk for a band of what look venue’s jumbo screens. He even THURSDAY 9/12 - SUNDAY 9/15 like pretty nice folk, and the music, reminded the audience that “I ain’t AS SEEN ON CONAN! though slightly experimental, is pretty shit without you!” multiple times. DARRYL LENOX tame to fans acquainted with Avey’s The America’s Most Wanted KEVIN CAMIA, MIKE BETANCOURT solo work or that of his other group, Tour, also featuring 2 Chainz and T.I., Animal Collective. A revised description hit a bump before its Sacramento FRIDAY 9/20 - SUNDAY 9/22 FROM CHELSEA LATELY AND MADTV! would more accurately read, “dude arrival when 2 Chainz was arrested BOBBY LEE with puckish energy, girl with a in Oklahoma City for weed possession. DJ MERVIN There, he had a nine-hour standoff prodigious vocal range and a drumTHURSDAY 9/26 - SATURDAY 9/28 with cops in which he refused to get mer who spurns predictable timing.” FROM FITZDOG RADIO AND CHELSEA LATELY! That obviously lacks the same ring as off his bus. In Sac, however, not only GREG did he get off the bus, but he started the “cannibal” version, but that’s also FITZSIMMONS his set so early, that I spent it in the why I don’t write press releases. LARRY “BUBBLES” BROWN beer line. Dave Porter, a.k.a. Avey Tare, FOLLOW US ON TWITTER! T.I. is as handsome and relevant as has been holding down his spot in the ;>0;;,9*647<5*/305,:(*‹-(*,)662*6473:(* ever, but it’s hard to take his gangster avant-pop group Animal Collective WWW.PUNCHLINESAC.COM poses seriously if you’ve seen his since 2000 as the weird synergist to reality show featuring his wife. On bandmate Panda Bear’s pop sensibiliCALL CLUB FOR SHOWTIMES: (916) 925-5500 2100 ARDEN WAY sIN THE HOWE ‘BOUT ARDEN SHOPPING CENTER ties. Wailing, yowling, losing himself in T.I. & Tiny: The Family Hustle, he’s 2 DRINK MINIMUM. 18 & OVER. I.D. REQUIRED. effect pedals that often give Animal more concerned with the crayon on his TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE CLUB BOX white couch than he is with being hard. Collective songs a drifting feelOFFICE WITH NO SERVICE CHARGE. On this night, the sound of his backing ing—it’s the same role Avey plays band was terrible and drowned out in Slasher Flicks, only this time, the the signature grandiose production on melodic drift is anchored by former hits like “Rubber Band Man” and Dirty Projectors’ member Angel “Whatever You Like.” On the latter, Deradoorian, whose vocal acrobatics give an accessibility to the wandering he stripped down to velour track THURSDAYS pants and promised to “put this big psychedelia. KAR AOKE boy in your life,” which got the ladies Taking the stage before a packed 9PM // FREE screaming. Or at least this lady. house at Harlow’s Restaurant & FRI 9/06 Lil Wayne’s elaborate set featured Nightclub on August 27, the crowd JUKEBOX JOHNNY creepy projections, a crew of skaters seemed as excited to see Avey’s ALL REQUEST COVER and pyrotechnics, but he would have “cannibalistic” incarnation as they 9:00 PM //$5 been amazing without any of those were about checking out the actual SAT 9/7 trappings. The big surprise of the night headlining act, veteran ambient was that he can actually sing, even rockers Deerhunter. Slasher Flick’s DANE DRE WIS psych-heavy set featured DeradoorianNEWSPAPER: though his voiceSAC is usually heavily BAND NEWS & REVIEW on synth, her voice intermingling Auto-tuned on recordings. LAUNCH FESTIVAL AFTERPARTY ROCK // ACOUSTIC // FUNK // 9 PM //$7 9/5/2013 with Avey’s muddled and loping PUBLISHHeDATE: went through hit after hit, vocals. Many of the songs started out including “Lollipop,” “A Milli” and SUN 9/08 ART DUE: 8/30 focused and spaced out toward the three tracks of his new album I Am OPEN MIC middle, and finally warped back into Not a Human Being II. CONTENT: PUNCHLINE 7PM // NO COVER something beat-stable that had the The emotional high point, possiMON 9/09 1.87” 5.67” crowd dancing again. bly of SIZE: my life, was whenX saying, KARAOKE 8PM // FREE Deradoorian has Sacramento-area “I brought my family along with ART PRODUCTION: SACHA PFEIFER (720) 239-3411 roots, and is probably the closest the me,” Lil Wayne had his surrogate TUES 9/10 central city will ever get to a Dirty father and Cash Money Records NOTES: GSET Projectors show. creator Birdman come out on stage. CLASSIC ROCK & BLUES REVIEW The unfortunate nature of ambient The two did a few verses together, 8PM // FREE and then Birdman went backstage, rock performed live is it often just WED 9/11 presumably to go count his massive makes you want to sit down, and 5TH BAR DROP stacks of money. such was the case when Deerhunter FEATURING FUNK ADVISOR At the end, Lil Wayne skated took the stage. Neither notably faulty AND VIK ROKIT 9PM // $5 nor especially memorable, the closing gingerly for about 30 seconds, set walked a fine line between epically seeming afraid that he might bite it UPCOMING SHOWS: ambient and too dreamscapey to hold in front of the large crowd, and then 9/14: CHICK P’S CD RELEASE one’s attention. The conclusion: It’s thanked everyone again. He seemed 908 K STREET • SAC good, but keep it in your headphones. healthy and happy—let’s hope he goes easy on the sizzurp, so that he —Julianna Boggs 916.446.4361 stays that way. Ω |

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FEATURE

STORY

(FEATURING SINGERS OF MUMBO GUMBO)

NOVEMBER 4TH CREST THEATRE TAB BENOIT

DOUGIE MCLEAN

THE MOONDOGGIES

T YRON WELLS

CHERYL WHEELER

GORDON LIGHTFOOT

SEP 9 · HARLOWS

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

SEP 18 · ASSEMBLY

SEP 10 · HARLOWS

SEP 11 · HARLOWS

SEP 20 · HARLOWS

OCT 2 · CREST THEATRE

BOOM BOX

LEON RUSSELL

SEPT 17 · HARLOWS

OCT 20 · ASSEMBLY

THE WAILIN’ JENNY’S JAN 10 · CREST THEATRE

FOR ALL TICKETS VISIT SBLENTERTAINMENT.COM

wwwMarilynsOnK.com

—Becky Grunewald BEFORE

SPECIAL GUESTS: WEBSTER WALTON & EDWARDS

AFTER

|

09.05.13

|

SN&R

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33


06FRI

06FRI

06FRI

06FRI

Bastards of Young

The Beach Boys

Ian Ethan Case

Cold Eskimo

Midtown BarFly, 8 p.m., $8 Theâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Bastardsâ&#x20AC;&#x192;ofâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Youngâ&#x20AC;&#x192;oweâ&#x20AC;&#x192;aâ&#x20AC;&#x192;lotâ&#x20AC;&#x192;toâ&#x20AC;&#x192;theâ&#x20AC;&#x192; Replacements.â&#x20AC;&#x192;Evenâ&#x20AC;&#x192;itsâ&#x20AC;&#x192;nameâ&#x20AC;&#x192;isâ&#x20AC;&#x192;aâ&#x20AC;&#x192;nodâ&#x20AC;&#x192;toâ&#x20AC;&#x192;theâ&#x20AC;&#x192; famousâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Minneapolisâ&#x20AC;&#x192;rockers.â&#x20AC;&#x192;Additionally,â&#x20AC;&#x192;itsâ&#x20AC;&#x192; breedâ&#x20AC;&#x192;ofâ&#x20AC;&#x192;punkâ&#x20AC;&#x192;rockâ&#x20AC;&#x192;alsoâ&#x20AC;&#x192;includesâ&#x20AC;&#x192;aâ&#x20AC;&#x192;bitâ&#x20AC;&#x192;ofâ&#x20AC;&#x192;theâ&#x20AC;&#x192; Newâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Jerseyâ&#x20AC;&#x192;working-classâ&#x20AC;&#x192;soundâ&#x20AC;&#x192;(read:â&#x20AC;&#x192;theâ&#x20AC;&#x192; Gaslightâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Anthemâ&#x20AC;&#x192;andâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Titusâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Andronicus)â&#x20AC;&#x192;asâ&#x20AC;&#x192; wellâ&#x20AC;&#x192;asâ&#x20AC;&#x192;someâ&#x20AC;&#x192;gruffâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Jawbreakerâ&#x20AC;&#x192;punkâ&#x20AC;&#x192;sounds.â&#x20AC;&#x192; BOYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sâ&#x20AC;&#x192;songsâ&#x20AC;&#x192;haveâ&#x20AC;&#x192;drivingâ&#x20AC;&#x192;beats,â&#x20AC;&#x192;meatyâ&#x20AC;&#x192; riffsâ&#x20AC;&#x192;andâ&#x20AC;&#x192;passionate,â&#x20AC;&#x192;gutturalâ&#x20AC;&#x192;vocals.â&#x20AC;&#x192;Theâ&#x20AC;&#x192; groupâ&#x20AC;&#x192;isâ&#x20AC;&#x192;poisedâ&#x20AC;&#x192;toâ&#x20AC;&#x192;releaseâ&#x20AC;&#x192;aâ&#x20AC;&#x192;newâ&#x20AC;&#x192;LP,â&#x20AC;&#x192;aâ&#x20AC;&#x192;followâ&#x20AC;&#x192; upâ&#x20AC;&#x192;toâ&#x20AC;&#x192;2010â&#x20AC;&#x2122;sâ&#x20AC;&#x192;brilliantâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Californiaâ&#x20AC;&#x192; PUNK Redemption.â&#x20AC;&#x192;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sâ&#x20AC;&#x192;alreadyâ&#x20AC;&#x192;givenâ&#x20AC;&#x192; fansâ&#x20AC;&#x192;aâ&#x20AC;&#x192;sneakâ&#x20AC;&#x192;peekâ&#x20AC;&#x192;ofâ&#x20AC;&#x192;theâ&#x20AC;&#x192;song,â&#x20AC;&#x192;â&#x20AC;&#x153;Boysâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Likeâ&#x20AC;&#x192; Us,â&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x192;whichâ&#x20AC;&#x192;hasâ&#x20AC;&#x192;theâ&#x20AC;&#x192;signatureâ&#x20AC;&#x192;BOYâ&#x20AC;&#x192;sound,â&#x20AC;&#x192;butâ&#x20AC;&#x192; withâ&#x20AC;&#x192;aâ&#x20AC;&#x192;moreâ&#x20AC;&#x192;crispâ&#x20AC;&#x192;productionâ&#x20AC;&#x192;value.â&#x20AC;&#x192;1119â&#x20AC;&#x192;21stâ&#x20AC;&#x192; Street,â&#x20AC;&#x192;www.facebook.com/youngbasterds.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Aaron Carnes

Thunder Valley Casino Resort, 8 p.m., $37.50-$83.50 Theâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Beachâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Boysâ&#x20AC;&#x192;areâ&#x20AC;&#x192;unarguablyâ&#x20AC;&#x192;theâ&#x20AC;&#x192;oneâ&#x20AC;&#x192;bandâ&#x20AC;&#x192; toâ&#x20AC;&#x192;embodyâ&#x20AC;&#x192;theâ&#x20AC;&#x192;spiritâ&#x20AC;&#x192;ofâ&#x20AC;&#x192;theâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Californiaâ&#x20AC;&#x192;surfSURF ROCK rockâ&#x20AC;&#x192;sound.â&#x20AC;&#x192;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;reâ&#x20AC;&#x192;nowâ&#x20AC;&#x192; grownâ&#x20AC;&#x192;men,â&#x20AC;&#x192;butâ&#x20AC;&#x192;inâ&#x20AC;&#x192;theirâ&#x20AC;&#x192; youngerâ&#x20AC;&#x192;years,â&#x20AC;&#x192;brothersâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Brian,â&#x20AC;&#x192;Dennisâ&#x20AC;&#x192;andâ&#x20AC;&#x192; Carlâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Wilson,â&#x20AC;&#x192;alongâ&#x20AC;&#x192;withâ&#x20AC;&#x192;cousinâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Mikeâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Loveâ&#x20AC;&#x192;andâ&#x20AC;&#x192; friendâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Alâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Jardine,â&#x20AC;&#x192;wroteâ&#x20AC;&#x192;musicâ&#x20AC;&#x192;aboutâ&#x20AC;&#x192;classicâ&#x20AC;&#x192; cars,â&#x20AC;&#x192;surfingâ&#x20AC;&#x192;inâ&#x20AC;&#x192;theâ&#x20AC;&#x192;sunshine,â&#x20AC;&#x192;youngâ&#x20AC;&#x192;romanceâ&#x20AC;&#x192; andâ&#x20AC;&#x192;allâ&#x20AC;&#x192;thingsâ&#x20AC;&#x192;trueâ&#x20AC;&#x192;toâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Southernâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Californiaâ&#x20AC;&#x192; culture.â&#x20AC;&#x192;Dennisâ&#x20AC;&#x192;andâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Carlâ&#x20AC;&#x192;haveâ&#x20AC;&#x192;passedâ&#x20AC;&#x192;on,â&#x20AC;&#x192;butâ&#x20AC;&#x192; youâ&#x20AC;&#x192;canâ&#x20AC;&#x192;stillâ&#x20AC;&#x192;enjoyâ&#x20AC;&#x192;theâ&#x20AC;&#x192;rockâ&#x20AC;&#x192;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x192;rollâ&#x20AC;&#x192;soundsâ&#x20AC;&#x192; thatâ&#x20AC;&#x192;invadedâ&#x20AC;&#x192;theâ&#x20AC;&#x192;earlyâ&#x20AC;&#x192;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;60sâ&#x20AC;&#x192;atâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Thunderâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Valleyâ&#x20AC;&#x192; Casinoâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Resortâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sâ&#x20AC;&#x192;outdoorâ&#x20AC;&#x192;stage,â&#x20AC;&#x192;asâ&#x20AC;&#x192;theâ&#x20AC;&#x192;casinoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sâ&#x20AC;&#x192;annualâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Summerâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Concertâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Seriesâ&#x20AC;&#x192;comesâ&#x20AC;&#x192; toâ&#x20AC;&#x192;aâ&#x20AC;&#x192;close.â&#x20AC;&#x192;Whoâ&#x20AC;&#x192;knows?â&#x20AC;&#x192;Maybeâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Uncleâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Jesseâ&#x20AC;&#x192; willâ&#x20AC;&#x192;beâ&#x20AC;&#x192;thereâ&#x20AC;&#x192;behindâ&#x20AC;&#x192;theâ&#x20AC;&#x192;drumâ&#x20AC;&#x192;kit.â&#x20AC;&#x192;1200â&#x20AC;&#x192;Athensâ&#x20AC;&#x192; Avenueâ&#x20AC;&#x192;inâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Lincoln,â&#x20AC;&#x192;www.thebeachboys.com.

Shine, 8 p.m., $7

Sophiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Thai Kitchen, 9:30 p.m., $5

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sâ&#x20AC;&#x192;notâ&#x20AC;&#x192;clearâ&#x20AC;&#x192;whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sâ&#x20AC;&#x192;moreâ&#x20AC;&#x192;entertaining,â&#x20AC;&#x192;listeningâ&#x20AC;&#x192;toâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Ianâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Ethanâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Caseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sâ&#x20AC;&#x192;dynamicâ&#x20AC;&#x192; instrumentalâ&#x20AC;&#x192;acousticâ&#x20AC;&#x192;songs,â&#x20AC;&#x192;orâ&#x20AC;&#x192;watchingâ&#x20AC;&#x192; himâ&#x20AC;&#x192;playâ&#x20AC;&#x192;them.â&#x20AC;&#x192;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x192;hasâ&#x20AC;&#x192;aâ&#x20AC;&#x192;double-neckâ&#x20AC;&#x192;guitar,â&#x20AC;&#x192; andâ&#x20AC;&#x192;heâ&#x20AC;&#x192;makesâ&#x20AC;&#x192;aâ&#x20AC;&#x192;lotâ&#x20AC;&#x192;ofâ&#x20AC;&#x192;soundsâ&#x20AC;&#x192;comeâ&#x20AC;&#x192;outâ&#x20AC;&#x192;ofâ&#x20AC;&#x192; thatâ&#x20AC;&#x192;thing,â&#x20AC;&#x192;allâ&#x20AC;&#x192;byâ&#x20AC;&#x192;himself.â&#x20AC;&#x192;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x192;doesâ&#x20AC;&#x192;soâ&#x20AC;&#x192;throughâ&#x20AC;&#x192; implementingâ&#x20AC;&#x192;slapping,â&#x20AC;&#x192;tapping,â&#x20AC;&#x192;strummingâ&#x20AC;&#x192; andâ&#x20AC;&#x192;slidingâ&#x20AC;&#x192;techniquesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;oftenâ&#x20AC;&#x192;withâ&#x20AC;&#x192;eachâ&#x20AC;&#x192;handâ&#x20AC;&#x192; doingâ&#x20AC;&#x192;somethingâ&#x20AC;&#x192;different.â&#x20AC;&#x192;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x192;createsâ&#x20AC;&#x192;intricate,â&#x20AC;&#x192;preciseâ&#x20AC;&#x192;acousticâ&#x20AC;&#x192;symphoniesâ&#x20AC;&#x192;thatâ&#x20AC;&#x192;evenâ&#x20AC;&#x192; aâ&#x20AC;&#x192;groupâ&#x20AC;&#x192;ofâ&#x20AC;&#x192;fourâ&#x20AC;&#x192;guitaristsâ&#x20AC;&#x192;wouldâ&#x20AC;&#x192;struggleâ&#x20AC;&#x192;toâ&#x20AC;&#x192; pullâ&#x20AC;&#x192;off.â&#x20AC;&#x192;Lately,â&#x20AC;&#x192;heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sâ&#x20AC;&#x192;evenâ&#x20AC;&#x192;addedâ&#x20AC;&#x192;theâ&#x20AC;&#x192;useâ&#x20AC;&#x192;ofâ&#x20AC;&#x192; sampleâ&#x20AC;&#x192;andâ&#x20AC;&#x192;delayâ&#x20AC;&#x192;pedals,â&#x20AC;&#x192;whichâ&#x20AC;&#x192;hasâ&#x20AC;&#x192;reallyâ&#x20AC;&#x192; GUITAR uppedâ&#x20AC;&#x192;theâ&#x20AC;&#x192;complexityâ&#x20AC;&#x192;levelâ&#x20AC;&#x192; ofâ&#x20AC;&#x192;hisâ&#x20AC;&#x192;music.â&#x20AC;&#x192;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x192;isâ&#x20AC;&#x192;constantlyâ&#x20AC;&#x192; redefiningâ&#x20AC;&#x192;whatâ&#x20AC;&#x192;aâ&#x20AC;&#x192;â&#x20AC;&#x153;soloâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x192;performanceâ&#x20AC;&#x192;canâ&#x20AC;&#x192; be.â&#x20AC;&#x192;1400â&#x20AC;&#x192;Eâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Street,â&#x20AC;&#x192;www.ianethan.com.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Steph Rodriguez

Coldâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Eskimoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sâ&#x20AC;&#x192;chiefâ&#x20AC;&#x192;appealâ&#x20AC;&#x192;isâ&#x20AC;&#x192;itsâ&#x20AC;&#x192;dreamy,â&#x20AC;&#x192; electropopâ&#x20AC;&#x192;sound.â&#x20AC;&#x192;Butâ&#x20AC;&#x192;thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sâ&#x20AC;&#x192;somethingâ&#x20AC;&#x192; else:â&#x20AC;&#x192;Forâ&#x20AC;&#x192;soâ&#x20AC;&#x192;newâ&#x20AC;&#x192;aâ&#x20AC;&#x192;bandâ&#x20AC;&#x192;(formedâ&#x20AC;&#x192;inâ&#x20AC;&#x192;2011),â&#x20AC;&#x192;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sâ&#x20AC;&#x192; markedlyâ&#x20AC;&#x192;reserved,â&#x20AC;&#x192;offeringâ&#x20AC;&#x192;onlyâ&#x20AC;&#x192;glimpsesâ&#x20AC;&#x192; intoâ&#x20AC;&#x192;theâ&#x20AC;&#x192;progressâ&#x20AC;&#x192;ofâ&#x20AC;&#x192;itsâ&#x20AC;&#x192;newâ&#x20AC;&#x192;albumâ&#x20AC;&#x192;(forâ&#x20AC;&#x192;whichâ&#x20AC;&#x192; thisâ&#x20AC;&#x192;writerâ&#x20AC;&#x192;isâ&#x20AC;&#x192;impatientlyâ&#x20AC;&#x192;waiting),â&#x20AC;&#x192;playingâ&#x20AC;&#x192; showsâ&#x20AC;&#x192;rarely.â&#x20AC;&#x192;Layingâ&#x20AC;&#x192;thisâ&#x20AC;&#x192;lowâ&#x20AC;&#x192;perhapsâ&#x20AC;&#x192;seemsâ&#x20AC;&#x192; ELECTROPOP counterintuitiveâ&#x20AC;&#x192;forâ&#x20AC;&#x192;aâ&#x20AC;&#x192; fledglingâ&#x20AC;&#x192;band,â&#x20AC;&#x192;butâ&#x20AC;&#x192;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sâ&#x20AC;&#x192; allâ&#x20AC;&#x192;theâ&#x20AC;&#x192;moreâ&#x20AC;&#x192;intriguingâ&#x20AC;&#x192;forâ&#x20AC;&#x192;it.â&#x20AC;&#x192;Itsâ&#x20AC;&#x192;2012â&#x20AC;&#x192;debut,â&#x20AC;&#x192; Glassâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Beach,â&#x20AC;&#x192;isâ&#x20AC;&#x192;aâ&#x20AC;&#x192;patchworkâ&#x20AC;&#x192;ofâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Feist-esqueâ&#x20AC;&#x192; vocalsâ&#x20AC;&#x192;tracingâ&#x20AC;&#x192;folk-songâ&#x20AC;&#x192;melodies,â&#x20AC;&#x192;andâ&#x20AC;&#x192;guitarâ&#x20AC;&#x192; linesâ&#x20AC;&#x192;andâ&#x20AC;&#x192;percussionâ&#x20AC;&#x192;thatâ&#x20AC;&#x192;bringâ&#x20AC;&#x192;toâ&#x20AC;&#x192;mindâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Localâ&#x20AC;&#x192; Natives.â&#x20AC;&#x192;Forâ&#x20AC;&#x192;thoseâ&#x20AC;&#x192;curiousâ&#x20AC;&#x192;aboutâ&#x20AC;&#x192;whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sâ&#x20AC;&#x192; next,â&#x20AC;&#x192;thisâ&#x20AC;&#x192;headliningâ&#x20AC;&#x192;gigâ&#x20AC;&#x192;atâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Sophiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sâ&#x20AC;&#x192;mayâ&#x20AC;&#x192;beâ&#x20AC;&#x192; theâ&#x20AC;&#x192;biggestâ&#x20AC;&#x192;revealâ&#x20AC;&#x192;yet.â&#x20AC;&#x192;129â&#x20AC;&#x192;Eâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Street,â&#x20AC;&#x192;Suiteâ&#x20AC;&#x192;Eâ&#x20AC;&#x192;inâ&#x20AC;&#x192; Davis;â&#x20AC;&#x192;www.facebook.com/coldeskimo.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Aaron Carnes

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Deena Drewis

1PJOU8FTU3PUBSZPG4BDSBNFOUPJT1SPVEUP1SFTFOUUIF ZPG4BD ZPG4 4BDDSBNF SB BNFOUPJT1SPVE NFOU OUP UPJT JT1 JT 1SPVE

B

/08 50,&/-&44

A

8IBU

Sample le over le over ove ov verr 150 15 50 0 plus plu plus mic micro micro ro bre b brews rrews rew ews ews ws fro ffrom ro rom om ov o over v 60 brewers! Also enjoy live music, local food vendors and more.

8IFO

Saturday, September 21st, 2013 from 12:30pm to 5pm. Pouring starts at 1pm.

8IFSF

Discovery Park in Sacramento, CA

8IP

Point West Rotary puts on this festival to raise funds for the Weave, inc. and other childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s charities, which works to bring an end to domestic violence in our community.

"EWBODFE5JDLFU1SJDF

$5 OFF Admission* "U5IF(BUF7*1%FTJHOBUFE%SJWFST

Order Tickets Online at www.calbrewfest.com www calbrewfest com Use Promo Code: SNR2013 Or Present Coupon at the Gate

'PS%FUBJMT5JDLFU0QUJPOT7JTJU6T0OMJOFBUXXX$BM#SFX'FTUDPN PS %F % UB UBJM UBJM JMTT  5JDLLFUU 0QU QUJ UJP JPOT 7JT JPOT JTJU JTJU JU 6T 0O 0OMJ 0OMJ MJOF OF BU XXX $BM BM# M#S #SFX #SFX FX''F 'FTU DP 'FT DPN N 34â&#x20AC;&#x192; â&#x20AC;&#x192;|â&#x20AC;&#x192; â&#x20AC;&#x192;SN&R â&#x20AC;&#x192; |â&#x20AC;&#x192; â&#x20AC;&#x192;09.05.13


07SAT

08SUN

10TUES

12THURS

Sacramento Symphonic Winds

Minus the Bear

Middle Class Rut

John Hiatt and the Combo

Harris Center for the Arts, 8 p.m., $20-$35 The man dubbed “The March King,” John  Philip Sousa, wrote hundreds of marches,  10 operas, several musical suites and three  novels. Monty Python’s Flying Circus used  CLASSICAL his “The Liberty Bell” as  its theme song. At age 13,  he tried to run away to join a circus band  and ended up with a Marine band where  he wrote the “Moonlight on the Potomac  Waltzes.” He led a fascinating life, conducting “The President’s Own” under five sitting  presidents. In Oh, Mr. Sousa!, the 60-piece  Sacramento Symphonic Winds, conducted  by Dr. Les Lehr and joined by a cast of eight  actors in 37 costumed roles, will tell Sousa’s  story and perform his music. 10 College  Parkway in Folsom, www.sacwinds.org.

Cesar Chavez Plaza, 7:45 p.m., $55-$249

Ace of Spades, 7 p.m., $9.85

Minus the Bear has dazzled fans with  high-energy shows and albums, but 2009’s  Acoustics demonstrated it has a softer side,  too. Now the group’s recording Acoustics  II, which will feature eight reimagined versions of the band’s own songs, as well as two  new ones. “When We Escape” carries with  it a quiet, almost melancholy undercurrent,  while “Summer Angel” is a more upbeat,  acoustic rock song by way of 1970s grooves.  And, despite the stripped-down nature of  the album, the band’s penchant for soaring  vocals is still present on tracks like “The  Storm.” The band will be performROCK ing a special miniature acoustic set  in addition to its typically raucous set list.  910 I Street, www.minusthebear.com.

—Trina L. Drotar

—Brian Palmer

Crest Theatre, 7:30 p.m., $35-$65

Middle Class Rut, consisting of vocalistguitarist Zack Lopez and drummer Sean  Stockham, is in the midst of touring with  the Rockstar Engery Drink Uproar Festival,  along with Alice in Chains and Jane’s  Addiction. But that’s not stopping the them  from headlining a club show in the town  whence they came. The group, also known  ROCK as MC Rut, released its second  full-length album, Pick Up Your  Head, in June. It’s full of heart-pumping and  abrasive guitar riffs, and drums that make  the group sound way bigger than just two  dudes. Standout tracks include the hardrocking-yet-catchy “Sing While You Slave”  and a cover of “I Need to Know” by Tom  Petty & the Heartbreakers. 1417 R Street,  www.mcrut.com.

John Hiatt is an artist’s artist—the kind  of performer better appreciated by music  lovers than casual enthusiasts. He’s sort  of the American answer  FOLK ROCK to Richard Thompson, a  talented guitarist and canny writer whose  songs possess both muscle and grace.  Almost 30 years after his first release and  a variety of guises in between, he’s settled  on a rootsy sound that blends his native  heartland-rock sensibilities with a restless  chiaroscuro running from introspective folk  to gritty blues. His latest, Mystic Pinball,  leans toward the latter with an unfussy,  noticeably grimy, soulful stomp behind   his lean, flinty baritone. 1013 K Street,   www.johnhiatt.com.

—Chris Parker

—Jonathan Mendick

ACE OF SPADES FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6

(HED)PE

METTAL MAFFIA - DEAD IN SECONDS ZEROCLIENT - DEDVOLT

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8

CHIEF KEEF

1417 R Street, Sacramento, 95814 www.aceofspadessac.com

ALL AGES WELCOME!

DIZZY WRIGHT

SOON

EMILIO ROJAS - FUTURISTIC

09/27

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19

09/28

IRATION

10/01 10/03

THROUGH THE ROOTS - FORTUNATE YOUTH MICAH BROWN

PLUS SPECIAL GUESTS

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10

MC RUT NEW POLITICS - LITE BRITE

COMING

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 14

10/04 10/11

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20

10/12

TERRAPLANE SUN

10/16

PLUS SPECIAL GUESTS

10/17 10/18 10/19 10/20

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11

ADAM ANT

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 21

10/22

IAMSU!

10/25 10/26

KOOL JOHN - JAY ANT - PLAYAH K

PRIMA DONNA

11/11 11/12

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 12

THE SLACKERS RIOTMAKER (FEAT. JEFFRY OF SHAKEDOWN)

TECH N9NE

KRIZZ KALIKO - !MAYDAY! - STEVE STONE PROZAK - CESCRU - AMERICAZ MOST HAUNTED

11/14 11/30 12/08 12/11

Dance Gavin Dance Frightened Rabbit Between the Buried and Me Twiztid Senses Fail Andre Nickatina & Krazie Bone Arden Park Roots Yo Gotti Story Of The Year Roach Gigz Gwar Attila Streetlight Manifesto Parmalee Jonny Craig Clutch Mayday Parade Misfits Great White Metalachi Blood on the Dance Floor

Tickets available at all Dimple Records Locations, The Beat Records, and Armadillo Records, or purchase by phone @ 916.443.9202

BEFORE

|

  NEWS

|

  F E AT U R E

STORY

  |    A R T S & C U L T U R E    

| 

  AFTER

  |    09.05.13    

|

  SN&R    

|

  35


NIGHTBEAT

THURSDAY 9/5

FRIDAY 9/6

ASSEMBLY

1000 K St., (916) 832-4751

List your event!

Post your free online listing (up to 15 months early), and our editors will consider your submission for the printed calendar as well. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Online, you can include a full description of your event, a photo, and a link to your website. Go to www.newsreview.com/calendar and start posting events. Deadline for print listings is 10 days prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

BADLANDS

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 9/9-9/11

Sin Sunday, 8pm, call for cover

Mad Mondays, 9pm M; Latin video flair and Wii bowling, 7pm Tu; Trapacana W

Tipsy Thursdays, Top 40 deejay dancing, 9pm, call for cover

Fabulous and Gay Fridays, 9pm, call for cover

Saturday Boom, 9pm, call for cover

BAR 101

Karaoke, 7:30pm, no cover

DEVIN WRIGHT, TJ MCNULTY; 9:30pm, call for cover

BRODI NICHOLAS, 9:30pm, call for cover

BLUE LAMP

The Session, 9pm, call for cover

Record Club Presents: Radio Radio Dance Club, 9pm, call for cover

PARASITES, THE SECRETIONS, FLAMINGO NOSEBLEED, THE ENLOWS; 8pm, $8

THE BOARDWALK

DESPITE THE AFTERMATH, THE BIG

BOWS & ARROWS

1815 19 St., (916) 822-5668

LONESOME LOCOMOTIVE, MATTY CHARLES, ZEDEKIAH CHILD; 8pm, $5

CENTER FOR THE ARTS

ALELA DIANE, 8pm, $15-$18

THE COZMIC CAFÉ DISTRICT 30

101 Main St., Roseville; (916) 774-0505 1400 Alhambra, (916) 455-3400

314 W. Main St., Grass Valley; (530) 274-8384

BAD CONNECTION, KC AND THE CLOUDY DAY, NEW FANG; 8pm, $5

MIKE DONOVAN, FINE STEPS; 8pm Tu, $6-$8; Comedy open-mic, 8pm W

ANTSY MCCLAIN, JOE CRAVEN; 8pm, $25

IVAN NAJERA, 8pm, $20-$25

Community Music Jam, 6:30pm M, no cover

Open-mic, 7:30pm, no cover

JONNY MOJO, 8pm, $8

GLIMPSE TRIO, PAGEANT DADS; 8pm, call for cover

DJ Luigi, 9pm, call for cover

DJ Peeti V, 9pm, call for cover

DJ Jason Davis, 9pm, call for cover

DJs Mike Daimond, My Cousin Vinny, Jurts, Whores, Chrisupreme, Daims, 9pm

Hip-hop and Top 40 Deejay dancing, 9pm, $5-$10

Hip-hop and Top 40 Deejay dancing, 9pm, $5-$10

Dragalicious,9pm, $5

FACE 4 RADIO, COFFIS BROS; 9pm, $5

ONE-EYED REILLY, TAJIYN; 9pm, $5

Open-mic, 7:30pm M; Pub Quiz, 7pm Tu; Northern Soul, 8pm W, no cover

LOST IN SUBURBIA, 9pm-midnight, no cover

SKID ROSES, 9pm-midnight, no cover

Trivia night, 7:30-9pm Tu, no cover

SELF, ADRIAN ALAN, KASI JONES, SLEEPROCKERS; 10pm, $10

TAB BENOIT, M; THE MOONDOGGIES, Tu; CHERYL WHEELER, KENNY WHITE; W

FACES

2000 K St., (916) 448-7798

FOX & GOOSE

1001 R St., (916) 443-8825

Trivia, 6:30pm M, no cover; Open-mic, 7:30pm W, no cover

WILSON, THE GREENERY, THE ONGOING KAYASUN, MACHINE CITY, LAST IN THEIR SIDE FX, I-80 PLAYAZ, SHEYE T THE CONCEPT, HORSENECK; 6:30pm, $10-$12 CLASS, HOURLESS CHRONICLES; 8pm CONNECT; 7:45pm W, call for cover

9426 Greenback Ln., Orangevale; (916) 988-9247 DADDIES, RAVEN THRONE; 8pm

1016 K St., (916) 737-5770

Hey local bands!

SUNDAY 9/8

2003 K St., (916) 448-8790

594 Main St., Placerville; (530) 642-8481

Want to be a hot show? Mail photos to Calendar Editor, SN&R, 1124 Del Paso Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95815 or email it to sactocalendar@ newsreview.com. Be sure to include date, time, location and cost of upcoming shows.

SATURDAY 9/7

Fringe! Hosted by Jay Siren, 9:30pm, $15-$25

JAY SHANER, THE LION & THE WOLF; 8pm, no cover

HALFTIME BAR & GRILL

5681 Lonetree Blvd., Rocklin; (916) 632-8200

HARLOW’S

THE DODOS, TWO SHEDS; 8pm, $15-$18

TAINTED LOVE, 10pm, $15

LEVEL UP FOOD & LOUNGE

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

DJ Rock Bottom and The Mookie DJ, 9pm, no cover

1414 16th St., (916) 441-3931

Joe Montoya’s Poetry Unplugged, 8pm, $2

21B, JEBBY MOATES, MIKE SCHOLL, AZUL; 8:30pm, $5

DEVIN FARREN, KASSIE ORTEGA, KEATON NELSON; 8:30pm, $5

Nebraska Mondays, 7:30pm M, $5-$20; Comedy night, 8pm W, $6

MARILYN’S ON K

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

JUKEBOX JOHNNY, 9pm, $5

DANE DREWIS BAND, 9pm, $7

Karaoke, 8pm M; 5th Bar Drop featuring Funk Advisor and Vik Rokit, 9pm W, $5

Get Down to the Champion Sound, reggae and dancehall deejays, 10pm, $5

Elevate: electronic, house and dubstep deejay dancing, 9pm-2am, $5

TJ MCNULTY, AWKWARD LEMON, ZUHG; 8:30pm, $5

MOUNTAIN SHINE, PROXY MOON, MANDOLIN AVENUE; 8:30pm, $5

2708 J St., (916) 441-4693 2431 J St., (916) 448-8768

LUNA’S CAFÉ & JUICE BAR 908 K St., (916) 446-4361

MIDTOWN BARFLY

1119 21st St., (916) 549-2779

NAKED LOUNGE DOWNTOWN 1111 H St., (916) 443-1927

E

N

TE

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ABAGAIL LINK, KARLEE AND CONNOR, LET’S GO SLOW; 8:30pm, $5

NMENT! TA I

TR

AV

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MONDAY

!

TRIVIA @ 6:30PM

SP

FE

Gothic, Industrial, Darkwave, EBM, Retro, 9:30pm-2am, $5

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PL E !

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on newsstands next week! |

SN&R

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09.05.13

Swing, Lindy Hop, 8pm Tu, $6-$10; Salsa, Bachata, Merengue, 8:30pm W, $5 Jazz, 8pm M; GARRET WILDGUST, MAC RUSS, OL’ FASHION; 8:30pm W, $5

Encounter God & Come Alive Spiritually

L!

LI

Hip-hop and R&B deejay dancing, 9:16pm Tu, no cover

TUESDAY

TACO TUES $1 TACOS, $2 CORONAS, 2–8PM WEDNESDAY

OPEN MIC

SIGN-UPS AT 7:30PM THURSDAY

36

Queer Idol, 9pm M, no cover; Latin night, 9pm Tu, $5; DJ Alazzawi, 9pm W, $3

KARAOKE @ 7:30PM

SATURDAY SERVICE: 5:10pm Casual Yet Sacred SUNDAY SERVICES: 7:30am Classical Language 9:00am Contemporary Organ & Piano 11:15am Classical Music

TRINITY EPISCOPAL CATHEDRAL

2620 Capitol Ave. tvrbaker@trinitycathedral.org trinitycathedral.org

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HAPPY HOUR MON-FRI 3PM-7PM

OPEN FOR LUNCH & DINNER 7 DAYS A WEEK DOORS OPEN AT 11:30

UPCOMING SHOWS SEPT 06 DEVIN WRIGHT & DENVER J SEPT 07 BRODI NICHOLAS SEPT 13 REBEL RADIO SEPT 20 IRON HEARTS SEPT 21 HUMBLE WOLF SEPT 27 JOEL CROSS SEPT 28 ABANDON THEORY FACEBOOK.COM/BAR101ROSEVILLE 101 MAIN STREET, ROSEVILLE • 916-774-0505

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THURSDAY 9/5

FRIDAY 9/6

OLD IRONSIDES

JENN ROGAR, 5pm, no cover

GRUB DOG & THE AMAZING SWEETHEARTS; call for cover

THE PALMS PLAYHOUSE

ANTSY MCCLAIN, JOE CRAVEN; 7:30pm, $25

1901 10th St., (916) 442-3504 13 Main St., Winters; (530) 795-1825

SATURDAY 9/7

SUNDAY 9/8

HOME BY DARK, 8pm, $5 TRANCE MISSION, 8pm, $15

THE PARK ULTRA LOUNGE 1116 15th St., (916) 442-7222

DJ Sid Vicious, DJ Eddie Edul, 9pm, call for cover

DJ Peeti V, 9pm-2am, $15

PINS N STRIKES

THE EVOLUTION BAND, 9pm, $10

POINTE-BLANK, 9pm, $10

3443 Laguna Blvd., Elk Grove; (916) 226-2625

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 9/9-9/11 Karaoke w/ Sac City Entertainment, 9pm Tu; Open-mic, 9pm W, no cover

Asylum Downtown: Gothic, industrial, EBM dancing, 9pm, call for cover

PJ’S ROADHOUSE

DJ Michael Johnson, 9pm, no cover

UNLICENSED THERAPY, 9pm, $5

ELEMENT OF SOUL, DOGFOOD, MASSIVE DELICIOUS, POINTDEXTER; 3pm, $10

POWERHOUSE PUB

WHISKEY DAWN, 8pm, call for cover

AUDIOBOXX, 10pm, call for cover

ATOMIC PUNKS, 10pm, call for cover

CURTIS SALGADO, 3pm, call for cover

Country Karaoke, 9pm M, call for cover; DJ Alazzawi, DJ Rigatony, 10pm Tu, $3

THE PRESS CLUB

No Diggity: ‘90s Night w/ DJ Meek Da Kat, 9pm, no cover

Top 40 w/ DJ Rue, 9pm, $5

Top 40 Night w/ DJ Larry Rodriguez, 9pm, $5

Sunday Night Soul Party, 9pm, $5

ARMED FOR APOCALYPSE, M.D.L., TOM HANX, GHULHEIM; 8pm W, $7

SAMMY’S ROCKIN’ ISLAND

DAZE ON THE GREEN, 4pm, $75; RIVAL SONS, 10pm, no cover

TOTAL RECALL, 10pm, $5

AXIS, 10pm, $5

SOL COLLECTIVE

YOUNG RODDY, CORNER BOY P, FIEND; 8pm, $13

The Sol Mercado and Kid’s Day, 1pm, no cover

Microphone Mondays, 6pm M, $1-$2

Comedy open-mic, 8pm M; Bluebird Lounge open-mic, 5pm Tu, no cover

5461 Mother Lode, Placerville; (530) 626-0336 614 Sutter St., Folsom; (916) 355-8586 2030 P St., (916) 444-7914 238 Vernon St., Roseville; (916) 773-7625 2574 21st St., (916) 832-0916

SOPHIA’S THAI KITCHEN 129 E St., Davis; (530) 758-4333

COLD ESKIMO, THE PRESERVATION, FIALTA; 9:30pm, $5

MISS MADDY’S F STREET STOMPERS, THE BOTTOM DWELLERS; 9:30pm, $5

STONEY INN/ROCKIN’ RODEO

THE CHAD BUSHNELL BAND, 9pm, $5

Country dancing, 7:30pm, no cover; $5 after 8pm

Country dancing, 7:30pm, no cover; $5 after 8pm

Country dance party, 8pm, no cover

SWABBIES

THE SANDBAGGERS, 6:30pm, call for cover

MOTHER MAYHEM, 6-10pm, $5

MR. DECEMBER, 4-8pm, $5

REPLICA, 3-7pm, call for cover

TORCH CLUB

X TRIO, 5pm, no cover; DIPPIN’ SAUCE, 9pm, $5

PAILER AND FRATIS, 5:30-7:30pm; KAYE BOHLER BLUES BAND, 9pm, $8

JOHNNY KNOX, 5pm; DIPPIN’ SAUCE, HARLISS SWEETWATER; 9pm, $8

Blues jam, 4pm, no cover; LELAND SUNDRIES BAND, 8pm, $5

Acoustic open-mic, 5:30pm W; PETER PETTY REVIEW, 9pm W, $5

CHIEF KEEF, 8pm, $25

MIDDLE CLASS RUT, NEW POLITICS Tu, $9.85; ADAM ANT, PRIMA DONNA; W, $30

1320 Del Paso Blvd., (916) 927-6023 5871 Garden Hwy, (916) 920-8088 904 15th St., (916) 443-2797

Alela Diane 8pm Thursday, $15-$18. The Center for the Arts Indie folk

All ages, all the time ACE OF SPADES

WALLPAPER, AN ANGLE, MISTER METAPHOR; 7pm, $10

1417 R St., (916) 448-3300

CLUB RETRO

(HED) P.E., METTAL MAFFIA, DEDVOLT, DEAD IN SECONDS; 6:30pm, $20

Chief Keef 8pm Sunday, $25. Ace of Spades Hip-hop

CHELSEA HUGHES, THE MARK WOOD BAND, HAWK LANE; 6:30pm, $8-$10

1529 Eureka Rd., Roseville; (916) 988-6606

COFFEE GARDEN

ODI, 8pm Tu, no cover

2904 Franklin Blvd., (916) 457-5507

SHINE

IAN ETHAN, ADRIAN BELLUE, JUSTIN LYNCH; 8pm, $7

1400 E St., (916) 551-1400

EGG, TAO JIRIKI, NO WHERE BUT UP; 8pm, $5

Open jazz jam, 8pm Tu; Poetry With Legs with Bill Gainer, 7pm W, call for cover

EL TEATRO ESPEJO presents

2708 J Street Sacramento, CA 916.441.4693 www.harlows.com COMING SOON

- September 5 -

- September 9 -

THE DODOS

Two Sheds $15ADV • 7pm

Sep 13 Sep 14

TAB BENOIT

Sep 15 Sep 17 Sep 18 Sep 19 Sep 20 Sep 21 Sep 22 Sep 25 Sep 26 Sep 29 Oct 02 Oct 04 Oct 06 Oct 07 Oct 08 Oct 09 Oct 11 Oct 12 Oct 13 Oct 15

$25ADV • 7pm

- September 10 -

THE MOONTAINTED DOGGIES LOVE

- September 6 -

The Colonial Theater 3522 Stockton Blvd Sacramento

Thurs-Sat @ 8pm Sun @ 2pm

The Maldives $12 • 7pm

$15 • 9pm

- September 11 -

CHERYL WHEELER

- September 7 Music by LALO GUERRERO, DANIEL VALDEZ and LUIS VALDEZ

SELF

|

NEWS

|

FEATURE

A RT S & C U LT U R E

HARLOWSNIGHTCLUB

ORGONE$15ADV / MONOPHONICS • 7pm

$10 • 9pm

|

HARLOWSNITECLUB

- September 12 -

Adrian Alan, Kasi Jones and Sleeprockers

STORY

FOLLOW US

$25ADV • 5:30pm

(OF LIVE MANIKINS) ALBUM RELEASE PARTY

Directed by MANUEL JOSE PICKETT

September 13 - 29, 2013 BEFORE

Kenny White

|

AFTER

|

09.05.13

Brubaker Close to You (A Carpenters Tribute) The Features BoomBox Acorn Project Octopus Project Tyron Wells Lindsey Pavao Stellar: Incubus Tribute Unknown Mortal Orchestra The Lemonheads Indubious Everton Blender Nicki Bluhm & The Gamblers Lee DeWyze NOT made in USA Tour The Winery Dogs Red Fang Wonderbread 5 Steelin’ Dan Nicholas David Modern English

HARLOWSNIGHTCLUB

|

SN&R

|

37


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SN&R   |  09.05.13


by Julianna boggs

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “No regrets?

Really?” asks author Richard Power. “I have regrets. They are sacred to me. They inform my character. They bear witness to my evolution. Glimpses of lost love and treasure are held inside of them; like small beautiful creatures suspended in amber.” I think you can see where this horoscope is going, Aries. I’m going to suggest you do what Powers advises: “Do not avoid your regrets. … Embrace them. Listen to their stories. … Hold them to your heart when you want to remember the price you paid to become who you truly are.” (Find more by Richard Power here: http://tinyurl.com/ RichardPower.) tionary says that the newly coined word “orgasnom” is what you call the ecstatic feelings you have as you eat especially delectable food. It’s derived, of course, from the word “orgasm.” According to my reading of the astrological omens, you are in an excellent position to have a number of orgasmiclike breakthroughs in the coming week. Orgasnoms are certainly among them, but also orgasaurals, orgasights and orgasversations—in other words, deep thrills resulting from blissful sounds, rapturous visions and exciting conversations. I won’t be surprised if you also experience several other kinds of beautiful delirium.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The Amer-

ican naturalist John Burroughs (1837-1921) traveled widely and wrote 23 books. “I still find each day too short for all the thoughts I want to think,” he testified, “all the walks I want to take, all the books I want to read, and all the friends I want to see.” Let’s make that longing for abundance serve as your rallying cry during the next two weeks, Scorpio. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you have a cosmic mandate to push to the limits—and sometimes beyond—as you satisfy your quest to be, see and do everything you love to be, see and do.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Punk icon Henry Rollins did an interview with Marilyn Manson, rock ’n’ roll’s master of the grotesque. It’s on YouTube. The comments section beneath the video are rife with spite and bile directed toward Manson, driving one fan to defend her hero. “I love Marilyn Manson so much that I could puke rainbows,” she said. I think you will need to tap into that kind of love in the coming days, Sagittarius: fierce, intense and devotional, and yet also playful, funny and exhilarating. You don’t necessarily have to puke rainbows, however. Maybe you could merely spit them.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): If you were

about to run in a long-distance race, you wouldn’t eat a dozen doughnuts, right? If you were planning to leave your native land and spend a year living in Ethiopia, you wouldn’t immerse yourself in learning how to speak Chinese in the month before you departed, right? In that spirit, I hope you’ll be smart about the preparations you make in the coming weeks. This will be a time to prime yourself for the adventures in self-expression that will bloom in late September and the month of October. What is it you want to create at that time? What would you like to show the world about yourself?

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): If

you want to know a secret, I talk less crazy to you Capricorns than I do to the other signs. I tone down my wild-eyed, goddess-drunk shape-shifting a bit. I rarely exhort you to don an animal costume and dance with the fairy folk in the woods, and I think the last time I suggested that you fall in love with an alien, angel or deity was ... never. So, what’s my problem? Don’t you feel taboo urges and illicit impulses now and then? Isn’t it true that, like everyone else, you periodically need to slip away from your habitual grooves and tamper with the conventional wisdom? Of course you do. Which is why I hereby repeal my excessive caution. Get out there, Capricorn, and be as uninhibited as you dare.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): The Consti-

tution of the United States is the supreme law of the land. It’s the foundation of the most politically powerful nation on the planet. And yet when it originally went into effect in 1789, it was only 4,543 words long—about three times the length of this horoscope column. The Bill of Rights, enacted in 1791, added a mere 462 words. By contrast, India’s Constitution is 117,000 words, more than 20 times longer. If you create a new master plan for yourself in the coming months, Cancerian—as I hope you will—a compact version like America’s will be exactly right. You need diamondlike lucidity, not sprawling guesswork.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

Germany’s Museum Ostwall displayed a conceptual installation by the artist Martin Kippenberger. Valued at $1.1 million, it was called “When it Starts Dripping From the Ceiling.” Part of it was composed of a rubber tub that was painted to appear as if it had once held dirty rainwater. One night while the museum was closed, a new janitor came in to tidy up the premises. While performing her tasks, she scrubbed the rubber tub until it was “clean,” thereby damaging the art. Let this be a cautionary tale, Aquarius. It’s important for you to appreciate and learn from the messy stuff in your life—even admire its artistry—and not just assume it all needs to be scoured and disinfected.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): There are two

scientific terms for tickling. “Knismesis” refers to a soft, feathery touch that may be mildly pleasurable. It can be used to display adoring tenderness. The heavier, deeper kind of tickling is called “gargalesis.” If playfully applied to sensitive parts of the anatomy, it can provoke fun and laughter. Given the current planetary alignments, Leo, I conclude that both of these will be rich metaphors for you in the coming days. I suggest that you be extra alert for opportunities to symbolically tickle and be tickled. (P.S. Here’s a useful allegory: If you do the knismesis thing beneath the snout of a great white shark, you can hypnotize it.)

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In her novel White Oleander, Janet Fitch suggests that beauty is something to be used, “like a hammer or a key.” That’s your assignment, Pisces. Find practical ways to make your beauty work for you. For example, invoke it to help you win friends and influence people. Put it into action to drum up new opportunities and hunt down provocative invitations. And don’t tell me you possess insufficient beauty to accomplish these things. I guarantee you that you have more than enough. To understand why I’m so sure, you may have to shed some ugly definitions of beauty you’ve unconsciously absorbed from our warped culture.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In his “Song of

the Open Road,” Walt Whitman wrote some lyrics that I hope will provide you with just the right spark. Even if you’re not embarking on a literal journey along a big wide highway, my guess is that you are at least going to do the metaphorical equivalent. “Henceforth I ask not good-fortune— I myself am good fortune,” said Uncle Walt. “Henceforth I whimper no more, postpone no more, need nothing, / Strong and content, I travel the open road.”

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Mystical poet

St. John of the Cross (1542-1591) was one of Spain’s greatest writers. But not all of his work came easily. When he was 35, a rival religious group imprisoned him for his mildly heretical ideas. He spent the next nine months in a 10-foot-by-6-foot jail cell, where he was starved, beaten and tortured. It was there that he composed

BEFORE

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NEWS

bRezsny

his most renowned poem, “The Spiritual Canticle.” Does that provide you with any inspiration, Libra? I’ll make a wild guess and speculate that maybe you’re in a tough situation yourself right now. It’s not even 1 percent as tough as St. John’s, though. If he could squeeze some brilliance out of his predicament, you can, too.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Urban Dic-

you can call rob brezsny for your expanded Weekly horoscope: (900) 950-7700. $1.99 per minute. Must be 18+. Touchtone phone required. Customer service (612) 373-9785. and don’t forget to check out rob’s website at www.realastrology.com.

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F E AT U R E

phoTo by LoveLLe harriS

by Rob

For the week of September 5, 2013

STORY

The hive mind When artist and entrepreneur Bridget Lewis was laid off from her Bay Area job in 2012, it freed her up for the real opportunity to finally make good on a dream. A business plan and short move to Sacramento later, the Delta Workshop opened it doors in August. The new and inviting sunlit space just south of Broadway is nestled alongside likeminded hives, the Sol Collective art and music space, and the Capsity co-working community. The Delta Workshop currently splits duty as a gallery, shop, zine outlet and learning center. Lewis has plans for creative, business-minded artists and makers alike, with a roster of scheduled shows, workshops on photography, letterpress and, for those who prefer patronage over actually painting, the chance to shop for knickknacks. Lewis chatted with SN&R about connecting artists, problem solving and why Sacramento makes for an ideal creative city.

What’s your background? I come from a studio-art background. My undergrad [studies focused on] ceramics, and [in] grad school, [I studied] sculpture. Then, [I] got a day job for many years and tried to just make stuff on the side and see as much art at galleries and museums as I could while I wasn’t working, but it just wasn’t enough for me. It wasn’t fulfilling. I started to think about the job that I would make for myself if I could do anything. [Then, my] company laid me off, so I was like, “OK, I have this idea, and now I can do it.” It’s so great to be back in the art world and talking to artists a lot and being able to help them, but also using all the skills that I thought were totally unrelated while I was working, and it turns out they’re not that unrelated, after all. ... Those problem-solving skills I have, or being organized and doing paperwork? All right, I can use that.

What’s your broader vision for the workshop? Right now, the physical space is the right layout, and [it has] the right amount of physical objects and gallery space, but I really want the general business to be more of a hub of creative people, for artists, to give them a place to sell their work and also to meet other artists at events here, and make some sort of connection. I’ve been thinking about professional-development workshops for artists, just to help them work through whatever issues they’re having, whether its like, “Oh, I need to figure out how to sell wholesale. How do I even do that?” Well,

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A RT S & C U LT U R E

here’s someone who’s selling wholesale. Now you guys can connect and talk.

How do you decide what classes to put on? It’s kind of a mix of ideas that I have and people that I come into contact with. … I’ll try anything right now. I’m really new, and it’s always nice to figure out what people want to take. … For one [workshop] coming up, I found [Davis photographer Rik Keller] to teach photography, because I think it’s a natural partner to making stuff—being able to photograph the stuff that you make and putting it out into the world. And then, letterpress is something that I do, and I wanted to share that with people.

How did you end up in Sacramento? We moved here about a year ago from the Bay Area. [My boyfriend] Michael has family in town, so that’s maybe one of the reasons why we moved here, but ... after I got laid off, we were thinking, “Well, do we want to stay here?” He works from home, [and] we had this realization that we could live anywhere. So, we started looking at ... other cities that have good creative communities, and came up here for a couple weeks to try it out and really liked it. It felt really livable and approachable and creative, and we saw a lot of independent, small businesses, and we said, “OK, cool, we

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AFTER

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can ride our bikes and be a part of this community, and it feels right.” We love it, and there’s cool stuff happening, too. It’s stuff that you want to be involved in.

What wares are you selling? Artwork and handmade items. Not everything in the shop is made by hand, but everything is produced on a relatively small scale and starts with the creative work of an independent artist. … A lot of the stuff in the shop is based on really traditional art techniques, but they’re very modern interpretations of that technique, like the screen printing or the block printing, or even the ceramics to some degree. … That’s something that’s very important to me.

I feel like I would just want to keep everything. I’m often in that boat, but then, it’s also a good way for me to choose like, “Would I want this?” or “Is this something somebody else would like?” I like lots of different things, so it’s a good measure of what ends up here. Ω The Delta Workshop is located at 2598 21st Street. For more information on upcoming classes and events, call (916) 455-1125, or visit www.deltaworkshopsac.com.

09.05.13

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