Issuu on Google+

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF PROFESSIONAL GEOLOGISTS

Northeast Section

NEWSLETTER Holidays 2010

www.ne-aipg.org -1-


-2-


-3-


AIPG NORTHEAST SECTION NEWSLETTER HOLIDAYS 2010

EDITION NO. 121

PUBLISHED BY THE NORTHEAST SECTION OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF PROFESSIONAL GEOLOGISTS

TABLE

OF

CONTENTS:

Executive Committee Directory ......................................................................5 Executive Committee Meeting Schedule........................................................7 Presidential Ramblings ..................................................................................8 Bosnian Pyramids ........................................................................................22 Executive Committee Meeting Minutes 7/12/10 ...........................................24 Where in the Northeast? ..............................................................................28 News of Members ........................................................................................29 NEAIPG Election Results .............................................................................31 Executive Committee Meeting Minutes 9/7/10 .............................................33 Ashokan Clay ...............................................................................................37 NEAIPG Newsletter Archive.........................................................................39 News From the Northeast ............................................................................40 Piggyback Mailing Information .....................................................................43 Chilean Mine Disaster ..................................................................................56 NEAIPG Fall Meeting Roundup ...................................................................60 In Sympathy ................................................................................................71 25 Years Ago in the NEAIPG Newsletter .....................................................74 Angelo Tagliacozzo Scholarship Fund Update ............................................76 2010 Index of Advertisers ...................................................................... 82-83 Angelo Tagliacozzo Scholarship Fund—List of Contributors .......................84 NEWSLETTER EDITOR

PUBLISHER & ADVERTISING MANAGER

Bill Prehoda United Water New York 360 West Nyack Rd West Nyack, NY 10994 845-620-3306 (Office) 845-620-3318 (Fax) neaipg.editor@gmail.com

Dick Young Consulting Geologist 179 Intervale Road Parsippany, NJ 07054 973-335-2569 (Office) 973-335-9799 (Fax) RYoungNJ@aol.com

The Newsletter of the Northeast Section of the American Institute of Professional Geologists is published four times annually and is mailed directly to Section Members under a Bulk Rate Permit as Dated Material at Parsippany, New Jersey. Design and Layout by Bill Prehoda and Dick Young. The Newsletter is printed in Parsippany, New Jersey by Staples. Preparation and distribution are accomplished by the Young family. Many thanks are extended to all who helped in compiling this issue. -4-


2010 NEAIPG EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE PRESIDENT Mike Greenman, CPG-10442 890 Grant Place North Bellmore, NY 11710 amgreenman@optonline.net PRESIDENT- ELECT Jeff Frederick, CPG-10989 Malcolm Pirnie, Inc. 17-17 Route 208 North Fair Lawn, NJ 07410 Office: (201) 398-4318 Email: jfrederick@pirnie.com SECRETARY William (Tom) West, CPG-08935 Haley & Aldrich of New York 200 Town Centre Drive, Suite 2 Rochester, NY 14263-4264 Office: (585) 359-9000 Fax: (585) 359-4650 E-mail: twest@haleyaldrich.com TREASURER Robert P. Blauvelt, CPG-06508 GEI Consultants 1 Greenwood Ave, Suite 210 Montclair, NJ 07042 Direct Dial: 973-873-7127 Cell: 973-803-0167 Fax: 973-509-9625 rblauvelt@geiconsultants.com

Craig Werle, CPG-07412 Roux Associates, Inc. 209 Shafter St. Islandia, NY 11749 Office: (631) 232-2600 Fax: (631)-232-9898 E-mail: cwerle@rouxinc.com Open Member Position PAST- PRESIDENT Robert A. Stewart, CPG-08332 Arcadis/LFR, Inc, 87 Church Street East Hartford, CT 06108 Office: (860)290-9300 Fax: (860) 290-9009 E-mail: robert.stewart@lfr.com SCREENING BOARD CHAIRMAN Charles A. Rich, CPG-04433 CA Rich Consultants, Inc. 17 Dupont Street Plainview, NY 11803-1602 Office: (516) 576-8844 Fax: (516) 576-0093 E-mail: info@carichinc.com NEWSLETTER EDITOR Bill Prehoda, CPG-09289 United Water New York 360 West Nyack Rd West Nyack, NY 10994 Office: (845) 620-3306 Fax: (845) 620-3318 E-mail: bill.prehoda@unitedwater.com

MEMBERS Dennis McGrath, CPG-08578 The Louis Berger Group, Inc. 565 Taxter Road, Suite 510 Elmsford, NY 10523 Office: 914-798-3716 Fax: 914-592-1734 E-mail: dmcgrath@louisberger.com

DIRECTORY OF MEMBERS EDITOR Curtis A. Kraemer, CPG-06019 Shaw Group 111 Van Cedarfield Road Colchester, CT 06415 Office: 860-537-2935 Fax: 860-537-3019 E-mail: curtkraemer@comcast.net

Bill Prehoda, CPG-09289 United Water New York 360 West Nyack Rd West Nyack, NY 10994 Office: (845) 620-3306 Fax: (845) 620-3318 E-mail: bill.prehoda@unitedwater.com

PUBLISHER & ADVERTISING MANAGER Richard H. Young, CPG-03356 Consulting Geologist 179 Intervale Road Parsippany, NJ 07054 Office: 973-335-2569 // Home 973-335-2289 Fax: 973-335-9799 E-mail: ryoungnj@aol.com

Laurie Scheuing, CPG-09898 46 Homestead Road Saratoga Springs, NY 12866-5808 Office: 518-695-9445 E-mail: lescheuing@aol.com George Tyers, CPG-10274 Roux Associates, Inc. 209 Shafter St. Islandia, NY 11749 Office: (631) 232-2600 Fax: (631)-232-9898 E-mail: gtyers@rouxinc.com

WEBMASTER Mike Greenman, CPG-10442 890 Grant Place North Bellmore, NY 11710 E-mail amgreenman@optonline.net

(Executive Committee continued on page 7) -5-


-6-


(Executive Committee continued from page5)

2010 NORTHEAST SECTION SUBCOMMITTEES Advertising Sales: Dick Young Advisory Board Delegate: Open Financial Planning and Treasury: Bob Blauvelt, Curt Kraemer, Dick Young Legislative Liaison and Registration: Tom West (NY), Russell Slayback (CT), Sam Gowan, Tim Stone, Dorothy Richter (NH), Laurie Scheuing (NY) Membership: Open Nominating: Bob Blauvelt Public Affairs: Dennis McGrath Scholarship: Sam Gowan, Dean Herrick, Len Rexrode, Craig Werle, Arnie Schiffman, Tom West, Dennis McGrath Section Directory: Curt Kraemer, Dick Young Section Meetings: Open Section Newsletter: Bill Prehoda, Editor; Dick Young, Publisher Screening Board: Charles Rich (Chairman), Don Bruehl, Carol Graff, William Penn, Daniel Toder, Andrews Tolman 2011 Executive Committee Meeting Schedule: January 10 March 7 May 11 - Spring Meeting July 11 Sept. 6 Oct. 12 - Fall Meeting (TBD) Dec. 5 Meetings are typically held from 4:00 to 6:00 pm at the offices of Louis Berger Group, Elmsford, New York or via teleconference Meetings are open to all members—hope to see you there!

-7-


Presidential Ramblings Mike Greenman, CPG-10442 President, NEAIPG Since school has just started, I think I’ll write an article on how I spent my summer vacation. We all remember doing this in grade school. It was always an effort coming up with the required 200, 500, or more word essay. Here I am again required to write my 1,500 word essay. I thought about using a photo in the article, since a picture is worth a thousand words, thus leaving me with only 500 words to write, but I think Bill our editor would seriously frown on this. Last year I cruised and toured Alaska with its glaciers and mountain ranges. This year I finally made a long awaited trip to Yosemite National Park, in the Sierra Nevada range on the California-Nevada border. I have long been a fan of visiting the National Parks and National Monuments. All my vacations within this country revolve around visiting these natural and historic places. In the east, I am especially drawn to Civil War battlefields, both national and state run. I am especially fascinated by how geology and topography has often had an effect on the battles. Unfortunately, every time the Federal budget needs to save billions (trillions?) of dollars, the first thing cut is the Department of the Interior budget which controls the National Parks. Since the parks are not an entitlement program, the government does not hesitate to cut our National Park budget and thus save mere millions of dollars. As one wanders through Yosemite, you can here the sounds of dozens of foreign languages spoken by the visitors. Overheard at one location was, French, Italian, Russian, Spanish, Polish, German, and several unidentified Slavic languages. The economic draw of the parks is a huge boost to our econ(Ramblings continued on page 10) -8-


-9-


(Ramblings continued from page 8)

omy. The return on investment in our parks is enormous, in the jobs created as well as saving these unique places. Rather than cutting the budget, more needs to be invested since the parks are being overused. Over the years I have managed to visit most of the well known parks but somehow managed to miss out on two of the most popular, Yosemite and the Grand Canyon. Each park has something different to set it apart. Who hasn’t seen pictures of the Yosemite Valley flanked by El Capitan and Half Dome. Obviously seeing for yourself and hiking the many trails is much more rewarding. Yosemite, unlike several other parks, still allows cars. It is suggested that one take shuttle buses within the park. While we were visiting Yosemite, some of the entry roads were being paved which led to an interesting ride along an unpaved road with no shoulder and a 3,000 foot drop without barriers. Our trip to Yosemite started off in San Francisco with stops in Sacramento and Lake Tahoe and side trips to Reno, Carson City, and Virginia City in Nevada. Of special note, we visited a former silver mine in Virginia City home of the famous Comstock Lode. Originally gold was being mined until it was found out that the material being thrown away was rich in silver, much more valuable than the meager findings of gold. Hundreds of mines dotted the landscape, some of which are still visible today. The town itself has kept its nineteenth century look with wooden sidewalks and restored facades. We decided to enter Yosemite from the east. This includes a ride up the steep eastern side of the Sierras through Tioga Pass which is at 9,945 feet above sea level. The climb from Mono Lake to Tioga Pass is spectacular. The Sierras are an asymmetrical mountain range, they rise gradually upwards from California’s Central Valley on the west and form an escarpment that drops off suddenly on the east. (Ramblings continued on page 11)

- 10 -


(Ramblings continued from page 10)

View looking west at east side of Sierras

Leaving Lake Tahoe, one climbs some of the eastern peaks and then drop three to four thousand feet to the valley below. This trip over the peaks is repeated at Tioga Pass. Along the ride, snow is still visible on the peaks in the middle of August. (Ramblings continued on page 12)

- 11 -


(Ramblings continued from page 11)

Even at 9,900 feet, the surrounding mountains still tower over the road, with surrounding peaks reaching over 13,000 feet. This eastern escarpment was formed by the Sierras being uplifted along a fault and simultaneously being tilted to the west. This uplift and tilt created the Sierra range and is still active today. From Tioga pass we continued on into the Yosemite Valley for a quick peak at the park before continuing to our rented cabin in the south end of the park near the giant sequoias. The trip from Tioga Pass to the valley floor drops about five to six thousand feet. Correspondingly, the temperature rises about ten to fifteen degrees as one approaches the valley floor. Bare hills turn into verdant green. A quick look at Bridal Veil Falls and then a view of the valley from Tunnel View. Tunnel View is at the exit of a tunnel through the mountains that was designed so that one exiting the tunnel emerges into the classic view of Yosemite.

View of Yosemite Valley from Tunnel View

The mountains of Yosemite are plutonic igneous rocks comprised mainly of granites, that were formed deep below the (Ramblings continued on page 15)

- 12 -


- 13 -


- 14 -


(Ramblings continued from page 12)

earth’s surface and were later revealed by erosional forces. Granite, because of its unfoliated massiveness, allows for these rather large bare structures. The granite looks uniform to the casual observer but a closer inspection reveals that the granite is made of a series of magmatic intrusions of one granite into another. These intrusions continued in the Sierras for 100 million years along the full length of the range. The u-shaped nature of the valley also indicates the effect of valley glaciers in carving the landscape. The top of the peaks on either side of the valley were unglaciated. Metamorphic rocks occur on the west side of the park and are an indication of the country rock into which the granites intruded. Some of these metamorphic rocks that formed the cover for the granites can still be found in the park but only cover less than five percent of the park area. The granites were exposed by the end of the Cretaceous, about 65 million years ago. The uplift that formed the Sierras started about 25 million years ago and is still active today. The continued uplift has fostered fast running streams which flow west into the Central Valley. These streams have led to increased erosion and the formation of new and higher waterfalls. No trip to a national park would be complete without a ranger tour. We decided on a tour to Sentinel Dome. This is a small brother of the famous Half Dome. The tour is about 2 hours and a trek of two miles long took us up to the top. The view from here was spectacular—mountains as far as the eye could see. Half dome is also where naturalist John Muir took his famous picture of a bent over ancient tree, the tree is still there but unfortunately has died. We continued on to Glacier Point for probably the best view of the Park. Here, one can look down 3,000 feet to the valley floor and also see all the main features of the valley including water falls, some of which were still flowing in the summer. Evidence that the park is still evolving is shown by the num(Ramblings continued on page 19)

- 15 -


- 16 -


- 17 -


- 18 -


(Ramblings continued from page 15)

View of Half Dome from Sentinel Dome

ber and frequency of rock falls that occur. Some tent and cabin rental areas of the park have been closed due to the occurrence of large rock falls. These rock falls have always occurred but have grown in size and frequency. The last part of visit to Yosemite was a visit to the Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias. Although not geologic, it is a natural wonder not to be missed. Once again we took a ranger tour which was a sequence of talks starting with the plant roots and culminating with the upper foliage. This is the area (Ramblings continued on page 22) - 19 -


- 20 -


regdwg@comcast.net

regdwg@comcast.net

- 21 -

regdwg@comcast.net


(Ramblings continued from page 19)

of the famous Wawona Tree seen in pictures with cars driving through it. Sadly the tree died in the sixties but we were still able to walk through the Grizzly Giant, another of the tunnel trees. It is impossible to grasp the size of the trees until you are close. Everything in Yosemite is oversized—heights cannot be appreciated until you are looking straight up or straight down along a cliff face, or looking up from the bottom of a tree. Mountain passes don’t look that high until you drive up from the valley floor or wind down from the summit. I have included three of my 400 pictures taken on the trip and all 400 are available, with dull commentary, for interested parties. As with most vacation pictures that we are forced to sit through, they are a good cure for insomnia. Next issue, a career continues, or another topic I can think of. -The End

Bosnian Pyramids According to bosnianpyramid.com, “The Bosnian Pyramid, Visocica Hill, is the first European pyramid to be discovered and is located in the heart of Bosnia” . Many other pyramids have also been “discovered” in the area. Reportedly, a geological “expert” indicates that “Nature does not make correct geometrical shapes like this and the rocks could not have been formed in this pattern by natural forces”. According to posts on Wikipedia, "...academics...from the Faculty of Mining and Geology at the University of Tuzla and led by Professor Dr. Vrabac concluded that the hill is a natural geological formation, made of clastic sediments of layered composition and varying thickness, and that its shape is a consequence of endodynamical and exodynamical processes in the post-Miocene era." Well, it sounded like a good story. –The End, Editor - 22 -


- 23 -


- 24 -


Meeting Minutes NORTHEAST SECTION – AIPG EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING MINUTES

The Louis Berger Group, Inc. 565 Taxter Road, Suite 510 Elmsford, NY 10523 Monday, July 12, 2010 1. Call to Order – 1610 hrs: Dennis McGrath, Bill Prehoda, Jeff Frederick; by phone Mike Greenman, Bob Blauvelt, Laurie Scheuing, George Tyers, Dick Young; minutes by Dennis McGrath. 2. Secretary’s Report: The Secretary’s report covering the May meeting was circulated electronically prior to the meeting. The meeting minutes were reviewed; approval will follow by email after the updated minutes are re-circulated. 3. Treasurer’s Report: The Ex Com reviewed and discussed the June Angelo Tagliacozzo Memorial Geologic Scholarship Trust Fund (ATMGSTF) and Section Treasurer’s reports. The Treasurer’s reports were accepted. 4. Correspondence: National has requested the annual report from each Section for the Advisory Board meeting report in September at the Annual Meeting in Orlando, FL. 5.

Old Business:

● Fall Meeting – Potential venues for the fall meeting were discussed including Dinosaur State Park; Lamont Do(7-12-10 Meeting Minutes continued on page 26)

- 25 -


(7-12-10 Meeting Minutes continued from page 25)

herty Earth Observatory; the Poughkeepsie Foot Bridge; and the Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries. The Beacon Institute garnered the most support. Bill Prehoda agreed to contact the Institute’s public outreach coordinator, explore the options at this venue, and report back to the ExCom. ● Short Course – Lee Slater has returned from the UK. Bob Blauvelt plans to meet with him soon to discuss details of a revamped Geophysical short course. Danbury, CT was a suggested location/area for the short course. ● Vacant Executive Committee Positions: Dennis McGrath will call Dorothy Richter to see if she may be interested or if she could suggest someone. ● Web site – Dennis McGrath reported that no new progress was made on updating the web site. Mike Greenman reported that he would look into obtaining Dreamweaver (web site building) software. ● Newsletter – Bill Prehoda reported that he was exploring options for making the NL available in electronic format. ● NYSCPG Update – Laurie Scheuing provided an update on the licensure efforts in New York State. The licensure bill was passed in the Senate but held up in the Assembly. As a result of the economic and political forecast, Laurie did not believe that there was a favorable environment that would allow the licensure bill to pass during the 2010 fiscal year. 6.

New Business:

● 2010 Annual Meeting – Mike Greenman reported that he will be unable to attend. Laurie Scheuing may be able to attend and represent the NE Section. A motion was made, seconded, and passed to reimburse one Section member up (7-12-10 Meeting Minutes continued on page 27)

- 26 -


(7-12-10 Meeting Minutes continued from page 26)

to $1,500 in expenses to attend the Annual Meeting and represent the NE Section. 7.

Adjournment – 1735 hours.

State By State Distribution of the 2010 636 NEAIPG Members (2008 US Census estimated population).

RI NJ MA NY ME CT NH VT

6.2 6.6 6.6 7.1 8.0 10.9 11.8 13.7

Number of members per 500,000 people in each respective state are listed at left.

- 27 -


WHERE IN THE NORTHEAST?

(Answer page 80) - 28 -

?


NEWS OF MEMBERS Lawrence Daniels, P.G., CPG-09216 Reports that he continues to manage an internal environmental consulting division of Global Loss Prevention, a Chartis Insurance company. Larry is based in Jersey City, NJ but deals with sites all over the U.S. and Canada. His staff of environmental professionals, located in New Jersey and elsewhere throughout the U.S., provides internal technical consultation and advisement to hundreds of claims analysts and attorneys handling pollution and environmental-related claims from our insureds. Larry also runs an internal program (“PIER�) that provides emergency response services to pollution incidents through a nationwide network of vetted contractors, available to all his clients. After 12 years, Larry continues to find the work varied and interesting and the insurance industry has been a great place to apply his technical knowledge and background. Lawrence D. Daniels, P.G., C.P.G. Assistant Vice President/Division Manager Global Loss Prevention, Environmental Claims Division 201.631.7233 Telephone 917.783.6035 Cell 201.631.5053 Facsimile larry.daniels@chartisinsurance.com Chartis 101 Hudson Street, 31st Floor Jersey City, New Jersey 07302 www.chartisinsurance.com

What is going on in neaipg.editor@gmail.com.

your

world?

- 29 -

Drop

us

a

line

-


- 30 -


NEAIPG Election Results Two-Year Terms: 2011 - 2012

PRESIDENT-ELECT: Jeff Frederick (CPG-10989) TREASURER: Bob Blauvelt (CPG-6508) SECRETARY: Tom West (CPG-8935) MEMBER: Dorothy Richter (CPG-7033) MEMBER: Dennis McGrath (CPG-8578) MEMBER: Craig Werle (CPG-7412) NOTES: Current President, Mike Greenman (CPG-10442), will continue in the role of President for 20112012. Current Past-President, Bob Stewart (CPG8332), will continue in the role of Past-President for 20112012.

CONGRATULATIONS to all and thanks for you efforts on behalf of NEAIPG! - 31 -


- 32 -


Meeting Minutes NORTHEAST SECTION – AIPG EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING MINUTES

The Louis Berger Group, Inc. 565 Taxter Road, Suite 510 Elmsford, NY 10523 Tuesday, September 7, 2010 1. Call to Order – 1610 hrs: Mike Greenman, Bob Blauvelt, Dennis McGrath, Bill Prehoda, Laurie Scheuing, Jeff Frederick, Craig Werle, George Tyers, Dick Young; minutes by W Thomas West 2. Secretary’s Report: The Secretary’s report covering the July meeting was not available; Dennis McGrath agreed to circulate the draft July meeting minutes electronically to the Ex Com following the meeting. 3. Treasurer’s Report: The Ex Com reviewed and discussed the August monthly Angelo Tagliacozzo Memorial Geologic Scholarship Trust Fund (ATMGSTF) and Section Treasurer’s reports. Bob Blauvelt agreed to prepared and distribute a draft 2011 Section budget during the next 2010 Ex Com meeting in October. 4.

Correspondence: No new correspondence.

5.

Old Business:

● Fall Meeting – Details for the Fall meeting at the Beacon Center for Environmental Innovation and Education are (9/7/10 Meeting Minutes continued on page 35)

- 33 -


(631) 581-6076 Fax (631) 581-3832 E-Mail: rlwelldrilling@optonline.net

WELL DRILLING LLC 31 UNION AVENUE ISLIP, NY 11751

TOM ZACKMAN

- 34 -


(9/7/10 Meeting Minutes continued from page 33)

well underway. The meeting is scheduled to be held on Wednesday, October 27th. The Ex Com agreed that the cost of the fall meeting (including dinner) should be kept under $50; the Ex Com agreed that the cost of the meeting would be $47 and announcements for the meeting made by email. Details regarding the dinner selection were discussed and Option 2 (Prime Rib/Chicken or Veal) was recommended. Bill Prehoda agreed to finalize the dinner arrangements at Brother’s Trattoria. Laurie Scheuing agreed to follow-up with National to determine if we could use the National paypal account for reservations. ● Short Course –Bob Blauvelt has agreed to complete additional research about securing a presenter and location for an upcoming short course. ● Vacant Executive Committee Positions: Currently there is one Member-at-Large position vacant on the Executive Committee. Dorothy Richter has agreed to fill the position. In addition, Dennis McGrath agreed to draft and circulate the 2011-2013 ballots for three Ex Com Officer and three Member-at-Large positions (including Dorothy Richter) that expire at the end of 2010. The deadline for distributing paper ballots with the Indian Summer NL was missed; therefore Section voting will be completed electronically with the assistance from National. Dennis will coordinate this effort with National in time for the results to be announced at the Fall Meeting. 6.

New Business:

● National Meeting – Laurie Scheuing agreed to attend the National Meeting on behalf of Mike Greenman, who currently has a schedule conflict and cannot attend. Laurie will represent the Section at the meeting and be compensated for travel and lodging expenses up to $1,500, consistent with (9/7/10 Meeting Minutes continued on page 37)

- 35 -


CSG ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTANTS

property transfer site assessments groundwater development, management, protection, permitting UST closures and investigations litigation support Carol S. Graff, CPG-06429 109 Renfrew Avenue Trenton, NJ 08618-3335

Phone: 609-393-4442 FAX: 609-393-5999 E-mail: cgraff5297@aol.com - 36 -


(9/7/10 Meeting Minutes continued from page 35)

prior Section funding allotments for attendance at the meeting. ● Scholarship – Dennis McGrath was preparing to mail approximately 120 announcements of the 2011 Angelo Tagliacozzo Memorial Geologic Scholarship to colleges throughout the Northeast. Dennis requested reimbursement for anticipated mailing expenses. The Ex Com agreed that Mike Greenman, as Section President, could allocate discretionary funds for Section operations. Dennis was requested to submit receipts for the postage to Bob Blauvelt for reimbursement. 7.

Adjournment – 1710 hours. The New York State’s Catskills Ashokan Clay

Geologists from the New York State Museum are mapping the location and thickness of Ashokan clay deposits in the Esopus Creek watershed. According to a Museum press release, the clay was deposited in large lakes dammed by glacial ice during the most recent retreat of the continental ice sheet from New York State between 20,000 and 12,000 years ago. Geologists hope to extract paleo-climate data from the recovered sediments to help determine the timing of the lakes' existence and the ice retreat. Since these deposits flow, via the Esopus Creek, into the Ashokan Reservoir, this is a concern of the New York City DEP who operates the reservoir as part of the New York City water supply. The amount of turbidity caused by the suspended clay in the water is problematic. Knowing the location and extent of clay deposits will aid the Ashokan Watershed Stream Management Program’s proposed management strategies for improving the quality of New York City's drinking water. -The End, Editor

- 37 -


- 38 -


NEWSLETTER ARCHIVE The search for an option to bring our NEAIPG newsletter in the traditional booklet format in digital form and also archive these issues on the web, the ExCom has agreed that this web site appears to be a good option: http://issuu.com/ neaipg/docs/

Just click on the link and you will see the 2010 newsletters I have uploaded so far. Just click on an issue and scroll through the document with the page scroll bar on the bottom of the screen, it is very user friendly (It looks best in full screen mode). My plan will be to periodically upload more back issues from our digital archive, and when I get some time, start scanning the analog issues from the days when Publisher Dick Young was hand setting type and operating the manual printing press (just kidding Dick). I think you will enjoy the older issues, as do I, thanks to Dick's diligent saving of every copy. Hopefully this web resource will be of interest and value to our members. -Editor - 39 -


News From the Northeast New York NYSDEC WOES As we go to print, we are in the midst of a governor's race in New York State, with Carl Paladino (R) and Andrew Cuomo (D) the apparent front runners (we will leave the story of Jimmy McMillan and his "Rent is To Damn High Party� for another time). The current Governor, David Paterson, was favored over Mr. Cuomo on the Democratic ticket, and thus will be leaving office. As one of his outgoing actions, Governor Paterson has fired the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Commissioner, Pete Grannis. Commissioner Grannis was appointed by former Governor Eliot Spitzer, before his premature departure from office (Paterson was Lt. Governor under Spitzer). Apparently the firing of Grannis was over a leaked memo reportedly authored by Grannis that discussed in detail Commissioner Grannis' dislike of a mandate by the Governor's office to cut an additional 200+ jobs from the NYSDEC (after 250 jobs have already been recently cut from the NYSDEC). The memorandum is unsigned and undated and discusses how the NYSDEC comprises approximately 2.5% of the New York State workforce that is subject to Executive control and that the proposed NYSDEC's layoffs will comprise more than 10% of the 2,000 positions that Governor Paterson has proposed to be eliminated. The Governor's statewide layoff proposals are in response to New York State's massive budget deficit, in part due to the recent economic downturn (as with many other State's budgets). (News From the Northeast continued on page 49) - 40 -


- 41 -


SGS Environmental Services Inc. Drilling Division www.sgs.com

West Creek, NJ DUAL ROTARY DRILLING

609-294-1110

6”, 8”, 10” ODEX DRILLING

Baltimore, MD 410-483-2200

AIR ROTARY DRILLING

MONITORING WELLS

MUD ROTARY DRILLING

RECOVERY WELLS

HOLLOW STEM AUGER

GEOPROBE SAMPLING

HYDROPUNCH SAMPLING

WELL ABANDONMENT

BEDROCK CORING

PACKER TESTING

ATV GEOPROBE® SAMPLING

CERTIFIED SOLINST® CMT MULTIPORT SYSTEM INSTALLER

A Full Service Environmental Drilling Company, Serving the United States and the Caribbean.

VIBRASONIC DRILLING

All employees are OSHA certified, and medically monitored according to OSHA, and DOT

BACKHOE AND TEST PITTING Licensed in: NJ, NY ,PA ,DE ,MD ,CT ,SC ,NC ,GA, FL, MA, MI, VA, WVA, USVI

Members NGWA, MDWWA and NJGWA

- 42 -


PIGGYBACK MAILING A SERVICE FOR NE/AIPG ADVERTISERS The NE/AIPG Newsletter has expanded the options offered to advertisers to include Piggyback Mailing. Now you can include preprinted promotional flyers or brochures along with our normal mailing of the Newsletter. Piggybacking gives NE/AIPG advertisers a cost-effective way to get their promotional material into the hands of NE/AIPG's targeted audience of decision-makers. That audience has grown to over 700, including 600± NE/AIPG Members and Applicants throughout New York, New Jersey, and the six New England states, 50± AIPG National and Section Officers, over 80 advertisers, and others. Likewise, NE/ AIPG benefits from additional income and from keeping members current on available, innovative products and services. Rates depend upon the size and weight of the promotional piece. A single 8 1/2” by 11" sheet of 20# paper, pre-printed, and pre-folded costs $0.20 each to Piggyback. To schedule Piggybacking your promotional information or to learn more, just call Dick Young at 973335-2289. - 43 -


- 44 -


- 45 -


- 46 -


- 47 -


- 48 -


(News From the Northeast continued from page 40)

Interestingly, approximately 75% of the $500 million budget of the NYSDEC is provided by the Federal government and special revenue accounts. Reportedly, other agencies that receive outside funding (100%) are exempt from the proposed layoffs, thus making the proposed NYSDEC layoffs disproportionately severe. According to the memorandum, in April 2008, the NYSDEC employed 3,775 staff and since that time has lost 595 employees or 16% of the workforce. The additional proposed 209 layoffs would bring the NYSDEC's total job loss count to over 800 employees or 21% of the workforce since 2008. This reportedly has left the NYSDEC in the weakest position since its founding 40 years ago. The memorandum states "The public would be shocked to learn how thin we are in many areas - in many instances, we have offices or sections responsible for important permitting and monitoring functions staffed by only one or two people." The memorandum discuss how over the period of recent layoffs, State mandates have continued to grow. The NYSDEC is looking to reduce services across that board to meet the targeted layoffs, and the list of reduced services is long: cleanup of petroleum spills; inspections; enforcement activities in hazardous waste, air emissions, wastewater discharges, dam safety, mining and drilling safety, wetlands development, shellfish safety, and enforcement of hunting/fishing regulations. The memorandum points out that economic development of the State relies in large part on the NYSDEC permitting process in such areas as general construction, mining, oil and gas drilling (Marcellus Shale), energy generation, water-dependent (News From the Northeast continued on page 50)

- 49 -


(News From the Northeast continued from page 49)

activities, brownfields development, waste transportation, commercial fishing and most manufacturing. In order to carry out the proposed personnel cuts, the NYSDEC has proposed preserving programs which directly address risks to human health or prevent immediate environmental degradation. Programs that do not fit these criteria would be targeted for reductions and/or elimination. Across the board cuts would decimate already foundering departments. In addition, some programs are more important in certain parts of the state than in others. Reportedly, all categories of employees will be considered for layoffs, including executive and other exempt position. So, in the end, the currently understaffed NYSDEC will potentially be further burdened with more work and less people, effectively slowing down every conceivable NYSDEC permitting process, cleanup and enforcement across the State. Massachusetts Cape Cod Wastewater For a very long time, the Cape Cod coastal area of Massachusetts has been home to many folks who made a living from the sea. In more recent decades, the Cape has become a popular vacation spot and second home region, not only for nearby Bostonians but for people from far and wide. As usual, more people equals more problems. In this case, more people means more wastewater discharge, traditionally through subsurface disposal systems (i.e., septic tanks/ fields). Herein lies an issue somewhat unique to the Cape area, the porous sandy soil does not always allow for enough residence time for the breakdown of human wastes. As a result, "unprocessed" wastewater often makes its way di(Continued on page 51)

- 50 -


(News From the Northeast continued from page 50)

rectly to surface water bodies (lakes, streams and the ocean bays).

Source: Cape Cod USA Real Estate

The end result of these often poorly designed wastewater systems is the rising nitrogen levels in adjacent surface water bodies. In the end, the natural processes sustaining life in the water bodies is severely altered, resulting in the loss of natural flora and fauna in these water bodies due to excess algae and seaweed feeding on the wastewater byproducts. The lack of oxygen in the surface water bodies as the result of excess algae and seaweed can and has decimated shellfish beds, which along with the rotting algae and seaweed, don't help the local economy (tourism, fishing) and real estate values. The problem is acute in bays where the ocean (News From the Northeast continued on page 55)

- 51 -


ECOTEST LABORATORIES, INC. Environmental Testing Drinking Water • Wastewater • Groundwater Soils • Wastes • Air

377 Sheffield Ave. • North Babylon, N.Y. 11703 (631) 422-5777 • FAX (631) 422-5770 Website: ecotestlabs.com • Email: ecotestlab@aol.com Approvals: NY, NJ, CT, RI, NELAC

- 52 -


- 53 -


John.Luttinger@amec.com

MAINE TEST BORINGS Complete Test Boring Service P.O. Box 320, Brewer, Maine 04412 Telephone (207) 989-7820 Fax (207) 989-7821 www.mainetest.com E-mail: jon@mainetest.com

THOMAS A. GARSIDE President

JON RUDNICKI Vice President

- 54 -


(News From the Northeast continued from page 51)

does not flush the water sufficiently to reduce the wastewater byproducts. The influx of people created the problem in more ways than one. In a response to this influx, local governments did not accept the Federal monies available in the 1960's and 1970's for sewer systems, fearing an even greater influx of people. Of course, this did not stop people from coming to the Cape and installing ever more individual septic systems. The solution is obvious, better wastewater control. But how that is to be done, and of course, where is all the money coming from, is a source of constant debate. The very independent Towns on Cape Cod are not necessarily used to working closely with one another, which would be crucial for an adequate wastewater control plan. More information can be found on these websites: http://www.apcc.org/content/water-quality-and-wastewaterinfrastructure http://www.ccwpc.org/ http://www.3bays.org/ -The End.

“A cultivated man, wise to know and bold to perform, is the end to which nature works, and the education of the will is the flowering and result of all this geology and astronomy.� - Ralph Waldo Emerson - 55 -


Chilean Mine Disaster I'm sure that most of the readers were following the Chilean mine disaster story, where 33 poor souls were stuck in a collapsed mine about a half mile below ground for a couple of months. It was hard not to miss the story, as quite a media circus built up around it. I admit to checking the status of the rescue effort almost on a daily basis. The San Jose mine is located in a volcanic formation in the Atacama Desert, near Copiapo, in northern Chile and is owned by the San Esteban Mining Company. There are hundreds of mines in this region of Chile. The San Jose mine is old, begun in the late 1800's.

â—?

The San Jose gold and copper mine's main shaft reportedly collapsed around 1,300 feet below ground. This, believe it or not, was actually fortunate in a way for the miners since there were working a lot further down, about 2,200 feet below ground. Thus, there were a lot of passageways full of air to keep the miners alive prior to the initial contact of the rescue operations. Luckily, in this hard rock formation (quartzite), methane or other explosive gases were not an issue. Three efforts to rescue the miners were conducted simultaneously, Plans A, B and C, each involving a different drilling rig, different location, borehole size and target depth. The theory was that if one plan failed or got bogged down, there were two other plans operating simultaneously. Ultimately, Plan B worked. (Chilean Mine Disaster continued on page 57) - 56 -


• Brownfields Evaluation, Cleanup

• Single and Multiple Lot Septic

Negotiations and Remediation

System Design and Permitting

• ASTM Phase I and II Real Estate • Water Supply Siting, Analysis, Assessments

and Permitting

• Facility Operations Environmental • Federal, State, and Local Audits

• Permit Status/Compliance

Development Permitting

• Boundary Surveying, ALTA/ACSM

Review

Land Title Surveys, Construction Layout, Construction Inspection

163 Revell Drive, Lincoln, VT 05443 802-453-4384 * 802-453-5399 (Fax) * 800-477-4384 Email: lagvt@lagvt.com (Chilean Mine Disaster continued from page 56)

The interesting part about Plan B is that one of our very own advertisers, Layne Christensen (p.77), was a major player in Plan B, providing the personnel with the drilling expertise to complete the task. The chosen drillers, Jeff Hart and Matt Staffel, were recently drilling water wells in Afghanistan. Layne is know for large-diameter well drilling capability, and I have frequently turned to them for water-supply related applications. Layne bills themselves as the largest water supply well driller in the world and the second largest mineral exploration company. Layne began in 1882 as a water-well drill(Chilean Mine Disaster continued on page 59) - 57 -


Geotechnical & Environmental Site Investigations

Site & Subsurface Investigations

SOILTESTING, INC.

• Test Boring - Core Drilling • Monitoring Wells 52 Years of Drilling Services • Micro Piles • Helical Piers • Underpinning 140 Oxford Road, Oxford, CT 06478

1-800-388-4473

(203) 888-4531 - 58 -

fax (203) 888-6247


(Chilean Mine Disaster continued from page 57)

ing company in South Dakota. Layne completed the work with their Latin American affiliate, Geotec Boyles Bros. (http://www.laynechristensen.com/rescue.html) Plan B involved the use of a Schramm T-130 top head drill to bore out a 6-inch diameter previously drilled pilot hole (drilled within 17 days after the collapse). The borehole was reamed first to 12-inches and ultimately to 26-inches in diameter, using specialized down hole hammer bits. All appeared to be going well (pun intended), until, as often happens, the bit hit an obstruction and broke. The usual fishing expedition commenced and the bit was successfully extracted and the operation was only slightly delayed. It took the Layne crew 33 days to reach the miners, two months ahead of the conservative Christmas time estimate. Kudos to Layne Christensen, and the massive amount of worldwide support, in the rescue of those 33 Chilean miners. -The End, Editor

Poem on the 1653 New England Earthquake The solid earth, before an angry God, Shakes at the terrors of His awful nod. The balance of the mighty world is lost— Its vast foundations, in confusion toss'd, Through all the hollows of its deepest caves Rock like a vessel foundering in the waves. Volumes of sulphurous air, with booming sound, Burst through the gorges of the parted ground. The earth doth heave, with groanings of distress, Beneath the weight of human sinfulness. Shall not our eyes drop penitential rain, When all creation travaileth in pain? Great God! who shall not fear Thee in the hour When heaven and earth are trembling at Thy power! Father, to nature's tumult whisper peace, And bid the wickedness of man to cease! Latin poem composed by Reverend Peter Bulkeley, Concord, Massachusetts, on the occasion of the 29 October 1653 earthquake; recorded by Cotton Mather. About.com - 59 -


NEAIPG FALL MEETING ROUNDUP Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries, Beacon NY So, we get out the crystal ball and predict what the weather will be for the Fall Meeting—perfect crisp Fall air and bright sunshine, right? Of course not, we have that weather pattern in the preceding days, and of course following the meeting. But on meeting day, rain, wind and some fog was in order. Nevertheless, this did not dampen the spirits of approximately 30 members and guests to trek to Beacon, New York to visit the Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries (BIRE). We were greeted at the Center for Environmental Innovation and Education (CEIE) facility by Michael Heintzman, the Public Outreach Coordinator for the BIRE who was invaluable in coordinating this event with NEAIPG. About half the

ExComm Meeting Participants (Fall Meeting continued on page 63) - 60 -


• • • • •

Magnetics Electromagnetics Ground Penetrating Radar Seismic Application Utility Location

• • • • •

UXO Detection Borehole Logging Downhole Camera Self Potential Resistivity Gravity

NEW YORK

VIRGINIA

225 N Route 303, Suite 102

P.O. Box 7325

Congers, NY 10920

Charlottesville, VA 22906

854-268-1800

434-978-3187

854-268-1802 fax

434-973-9791 fax

staffny@naevageophysics.com

staffva@naevageophysics.com

http://www.naevageophysics.com

- 61 -


- 62 -


(Fall Meeting continued from page 60)

crowd showed up for the Executive Committee meeting, which is unusual and a welcome change. As it poured outside, we enjoyed the spacious meeting facility to carry out the ExComm business. As the ExComm meeting wound down, and the remaining party of 30 showed up, we were seated and provide with a discussion of the State of the Federal Clean Water Act by the director of the BIRE, John Cronin. Mr. Cronin opened his talk with a broad statement that the CWA is largely a failure, which immediately caught the attention of many in the audience (a statement that is not often heard, particularly among the members in the field). Although Mr. Cronin indicated there were some successes within the framework of the CWA, they were few and far between.

BIRE Director, John Cronin

Mr. Cronin started with a few quotes from a speech and queried the audience as to who gave the speech. Paraphrasing the speech, two items of note that John wanted to point out was that the speaker indicated that entities that pollute water should be the ones that clean it up and also that the cost of cleanups should be incorporated in the products produced. A few members in the audience guessed who gave the speech and it was none other than President Nixon, who gave the speech prior to the passage of the significant environmental legislation in the 1970’s. Mr. Cronin indicated that a central purpose of the CWA was to restore and maintain the nation’s water resources, with a goal to have this done by 1985. Obviously, this came and went, and State Pollution Discharge Elimination Systems (Fall Meeting continued on page 65)

- 63 -


WATER AND MONITORING WELL DRILLING ROTARY -AUGER-CORE-PROBE RIG DOWN HOLE VIDEO INSPECTION SERVICES HYDROFRACTURING & WELL REDEVELOPMENT 7 PUMP SERVICE TRUCKS AND INVENTORY OF 400 PUMPS Dick Stothoff FAX: 908-782-9528

David Lyman Phone: 908-782-2116 - 64 -


(Fall Meeting continued from page 63)

permits were issued instead. Overall, Mr. Cronin indicated that the CWA ended up as a punitive act, since no “good deeds� relative to restoring and maintaining the water resources are rewarded. There is essentially no incentive to go beyond minimum compliance and it is often cheaper to violate the law. The Director then discussed the issues of water supply

(Fall Meeting continued on page 68)

- 65 -


- 66 -


80 Lupes Drive Stratford, CT 06615

Tel (203) 377-9984 Fax (203) 377-9952 E-mail: rblake@cetlabs.com www.cetlabs.com

Contact Robert Blake Technical Sales Representative

- 67 -


(Fall Meeting continued from page 65)

(contaminated or not). There are many areas in the United States where future water sources are either uncertain or unknown, with no significant solutions in sight. This is true throughout the world also, with many areas lacking adequate supply right now. Mr. Cronin indicated that major corporations are cognizant of the fact that there cannot be significant economic growth without adequate water supply. To this end, corporations are on the forefront of innovation and technology with respect to a clean, safe, reliable water supply. BIRE is, and wants to, tap into this innovation resource in its goal to fully monitor the Hudson River water quality. BIRE is working with such industrial giants such as GE and IBM and has committed the Institute to innovation in the area of water quality monitoring. The BIRE has already deployed numerous water quality monitoring platforms up and down the Hudson River, with plans for significantly expanding the network. Some of the water quality parameters currently monitored at the platforms include atmospheric conditions, particle counting, chlorophyll, conductivity, salinity and temperature. The data can be viewed at the BIRE website at www.thebeaconinstitute.org. After the Director’s talk, a tour of the restored brick factory building was provided by Mr. Heintzman. The building was restored and outfitted with the latest in “green” technology. One such innovation was the “Green” rooftop (Fall Meeting continued on page 71)

- 68 -


- 69 -


- 70 -


(Fall Meeting continued from page 68)

ground source heat pumps, circulating water from numerous wells drilled by none other than one of our advertisers— Aquifer Drilling and Testing. Of particular interest to the group was the sod roof on the addition for the original building. Mike Greenman wasn’t sure how they got the lawn mower up there, but it was decided that mowing was not necessary. After the meeting concluded at the CEIE, the group proceeded a short distance to downtown Beacon where we reconvened at the Brother’s Trattoria Italian Restaurant for an excellent meal. -The End, Editor

In Sympathy We are sad to report that Mrs. Charleen F. Dimmick, wife of Charles W. Dimmick, CPG-3886, passed away Monday October 18, 2010, in Meriden, CT. A Memorial Service for Charleen was held October 30th at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, Cheshire, CT. Donations in Charleen’s name may be made to Friends of Feral Cheshire Cats, P.O Box 946, Cheshire, CT 06410. To send a condolence or light a memorial candle, please visit www.aldersonfuneralhomes.com. Charles served for many years on the NE/AIPG Executive Committee and has been active in Section matters, as well as serving as AIPG Editor. - 71 -


- 72 -


The

Stephen B. Church Company Since 1886

-

Bucket Auger Drilling

-

12 Âź Inch Hollow-Stem Auger Drilling

-

Cable Tool Drilling

-

Well Rehabilitation

-

Iron Bacteria Remediation

-

Gravel Wells

-

Ground Water Exploration

-

Well Abandonment

-

Pump Sales, Service, Rentals

-

Pumping Tests

-

Well Camera Service P. O. Box 67, Seymour, Connecticut 06483 Phone 203-888-2132 Fax 203-888-1863 - 73 -


25 YEARS AGO IN THE NEAIPG NEWSLETTER Holidays 1985 •

Rochester Drilling Co., Inc., offered complete test boring programs for buildings, sewage-water treatment plants and connecting systems, landfills, groundwater, oil and fuel spills and had a complete materials testing laboratory. NEAIPG President Ted Clark indicated the recent ExComm meeting in New England (Concord), which was combined with an upper Northeast Section AIPG meeting, was successful if lightly attended. Ted was busy in the Fall since the next week he (and Russ Slayback) were off to the National AIPG meeting in St. Paul, Minnesota. Ted indicated that the meeting program was outstanding, and the St. Paul Hotel was worth the trip in of itself. At the National meeting, Ted was awarded an AIPG Presidential Certificate of Merit by President Ernie Lehmann for superior performance as 1985 President of the Northeast Section. Ted mentioned that the “Future Trends in Professional Geology” discussion at the meeting eventually became the theme for the upcoming NEAIPG Spring 1986 meeting. The discussion at the National meeting was an “eye-opener”, where some geologic professions were doing fine, other fields were faced with significant cutbacks and for those geologists, most of whom had years of experience and were highly qualified, (25 Years Ago continued on page 75)

- 74 -


(25 Years Ago continued from page 74)

• • •

employment was difficult to find. The NEAIPG Fall meeting was held at the LamontDoherty Geological Observatory with speakers Dr. Kim Kastens and Dr. William Haxby. Dr. Kastens discussed her research on ocean rifts and fracture zones she has been studying along the eastern limits of the Pacific Ocean. Dr. Haxby’s talk dealt with his significant work on interpreting the gravity field over the world’s oceans that was transmitted by the short-lived SEASAT satellite that circled the earth in 1978. The title of Dunn Geoscience’s advertisement read “Ground Work”, with the text of the ad promoting the 25 years of interpreting subsurface data for engineers, municipalities, utilities and industries. The Dunn office locations at the time were in Albany, Buffalo, Harrisburg and Laconia. Bill Siok submitted to the NEAIPG Ex Comm a draft position statement on registration of geologists. In part, the statement reads: “The question of registration for professional geologists remains in dispute. There are equally valid reasons for and against formal statutory registration similar to the licensing requirements for other professionals, such as doctors, lawyers and engineers. While the arguments, pro and con, have continued for many years, it is the consensus of the NEAIPG that formal statutory registration of professional geologists in a state-by-state basis is desirable and necessary.” S.A. Alsup & Associates, Inc., Gloucester, Massachusetts, advertised as Consultants in Engineering Geology and Engineering Geophysics. The NEAIPG Section Screening Board noted that 15 applications for membership were processed in 1985 and 14 were recommended for approval. Lawrence LaChance of Dunn Geoscience and Fred Troise of Geraghty & Miller were named to the Executive Committee replacing Erhardt Werth and John Bee who have moved out of the NEAIPG territory.

-The end.

- 75 -


ANGELO TAGLIACOZZO MEMORIAL GEOLOGICAL SCHOLARSHIP

Dennis G. McGrath, CPG-08578 Chair, Scholarship Committee

The announcement and application form for the 2010 – 2011 academic year scholarships was distributed in September. On a trial basis, I took a more eco-friendly approach this year to reduce the mass mailing typical of years past. A package consisting of a cover letter, two color announcements suitable for posting on a department bulletin board or circulating to students (8.5 x 11-inch and 11 x 17-inch formats), and an updated application form were sent to 58 faculty members that have sponsored one or more students since 2000. We try never to forget a faculty sponsor, so emails with the announcement and application form were sent to another 26 faculty members that sponsored a student applicant before 2000. Lastly, emails with the announcement and application form were sent to another 31 faculty members at colleges or universities where we have never received a student application. In total, a paper or electronic copy of the announcement and application form were sent to 112 faculty members at 81 different colleges and universities in the seven states that comprise the Northeast Section (CT, MA, ME, NH, NJ, NY, RI, and VT). The announcement and application form are also posted on and can be downloaded from our web site (www.ne-aipg.org). Information on the Angelo Tagliacozzo Memorial Geological Scholarship was also listed on a free college scholarship search web site (www.scholarships.com). Scholarships.com was established to help students locate scholarship opportunities and is en(ATMGS Report continued on page 79)

- 76 -


- 77 -


NEAIPG NEWSLETTER 2011 PUBLICATION SCHEDULE Winter Newsletter January February February March

21 4 21 7

Deadline (Material to Editor) Content ready to print Dispatch by mail/e-mail Receipt by Members

Directory of Members February March April April

18 4 11 25

Deadline (Material to Editor) Content ready to print Dispatch by mail/e-mail Receipt by Members

Spring Newsletter March March April April

11 25 11 25

Deadline (Material to Editor) Content ready to print Dispatch by mail/e-mail Receipt by Members

Indian Summer Newsletter July July August September

1 22 15 1

Deadline (Material to Editor) Content ready to print Dispatch by mail/e-mail Receipt by Members

Holidays Newsletter October October November November

7 21 7 21

Deadline (Material to Editor) Content ready to print Dispatch by mail/e-mail Receipt by Members

e-mail news and information to Bill Prehoda neaipg.editor@gmail.com Advertising rates and information: contact Dick Young RYoungNJ@aol.com

- 78 -


(ATMGS Report continued from page 76)

dorsed by both the National Association for College Admission Counseling (NACAC) and the National Scholarship Providers Association (NSPA). The deadline for submitting applications this year is December 7, 2010. The Scholarship Committee will begin their evaluations shortly thereafter. By the time the Winter 2011 Newsletter is published early next year, I should be able to report on the number of applications received. Our success in growing the Angelo Tagliacozzo Memorial Geological Scholarship Trust Fund is largely attributed to your generosity – the members of the Northeast Section AIPG. Because of the continuing sluggishness in the economy, financial need is expected to rise so continued growth of the fund is even more important. We saw evidence of this last year with a record number (23) student applications. The long-standing goal of the scholarship program has been and still is to get 100% participation from the membership. The size of your contribution is not as important as making a contribution. Give what you can afford, but give something. Look for the insert in this newsletter and mail-in your contribution today. If your contribution is received before the end of 2010, you will receive a tax-deduction for this year. Remember: the Angelo Tagliacozzo Memorial Geological Scholarship is a scholarship for geologists, awarded by geologists. Be a part of our success, give something back to your profession, and help us continue to aid undergraduate geology students in need of financial support! -The end

- 79 -


Where in the Northeast? (answer from page 28)

Slate quarry, Granville, NY Area

?

Well, you don’t see this sight much anymore (if at all), but it was a staple of the slate industry on the New York / Vermont border for many years. Prior to excavators and dump trucks driving down into the open pit mines, quarry operators set up “sticks” (oversized telephone poles) on top of slate dump (excess waste slate was piled up in “dump”). A stick was rigged upright with a dizzying array of steel cables, anchored in the ground or to large pieces of slate. A main cable was run across the top of the quarry pit, upon which sat a “carriage” that you see in the photo. An operator controlled a hoisting system that consisted of a secondary cable that ran from the cable drum on the hoist to the carriage and around the “billy wheel”. Down in the “pit”, holes were hand drilled (later pneumatically) and black powder charges were used to break away the slate for removal. After much splitting, moving the slate with bars, and propping the blocks up with smaller chunks of slate, a chain was wrapped around a block of slate in preparation for hoisting out of the pit. The pit man would signal the hoist operator (sometimes with an electric cable hooked to a bell in the “engine house”, the pit man would contact the wires, making the bell sound). The hoist operator would wind up the secondary cable on the drum, bringing the billy wheel and its cargo up out of the pit and to the carriage. Once the billy wheel hit the carriage, it locked on a lever and the carriage and cargo would ride up the main cable to the yard area. The cable routing allowed the carriage to remain in place while the billy wheel was lowered with its cargo down to the yard. A yard man would unhook the chain on the slate block and the hoist operator would raise the billy wheel to the carriage and send the carriage back over the pit and down again. A steel box was also attached to the billy wheel which allowed the pit man to “shovel rubbish” (waste slate) into the box, which would then be brought up the main cable to the area where the stick was and dumped on the waste pile. Eventually, the dump got high enough that the stick would have to be taken down and placed higher up on the dump. As a youth, I worked in the family slate quarry with my father and worked as pit man and yard man, occasionally with help, my father would let me run the hoist controls. Thank the stars for the invention of hydraulics. -The End, Editor.

Photo: Slate Valley Museum

- 80 -


- 81 -


2010 INDEX OF ADVERTISERS Alpha Analytical ......................................................................... 69 Aquifer Drilling & Testing, Inc .......................... Inside Front Cover Arcadis ...................................................................................... 19 Atlantic Screen & Mfg. Inc ......................................................... 54 Boart Longyear .......................................................................... 64 Boyd Artesian Well Co., Inc....................................................... 52 Brinkerhoff Environmental Services, Inc .................................. 32 CSG Environmental Consultants............................................... 36 Church, Stephen B., Co ............................................................ 73 Clearwater Drilling, Inc. ............................................................. 38 Clough, Harbour & Associates .................................................. 67 Complete Environmental Testing, Inc. ...................................... 67 ConeTec, Inc ......................................................... Centerfold (45) Connecticut Test Borings, LLC.................................................. 67 Conrad Geoscience Corporation ............................................... 32 Delta Well & Pump, Inc ............................................................... 6 Directional Technologies, Inc ............................... Centerfold (44) Diversified Geophysics, Inc .............................. Inside Rear Cover Drilex Environmental, Inc ............................................................ 3 Earth Data Northeast, Inc ................................. Inside Rear Cover Eastern Analytical, Inc ............................................................... 20 EcoTest Labs,Inc ...................................................................... 52 EnviRent .................................................................................... 47 Environmental Assessment & Remediations ............................ 52 Environmental Closures, Inc ................................ Centerfold (45) Enviroscan................................................................................. 30 EWMA ................................................................... Centerfold (47) Expedition Drilling, Inc ............................................................... 16 Gannett Fleming ........................................................................ 24 General Borings, Inc ................................................................. 38 Geo-Cleanse International, Inc. ................................................ 13 GEOD Corporation .................................................................... 14 Geomatrix Consultants .............................................................. 54 Geophysical Applications, Inc ............................... Centerfold (43) GEOSPHERE Environmental Management, Inc. ..................... 74 Hager Geoscience, Inc.............................................................. 23 Hager-Richter GeoScience, Inc ................................................ 58 Haley & Aldrich .......................................................................... 34 Hatch Mott MacDonald .............................................................. 62 (Index continued on page 83)

- 82 -


(Index continued from page 82)

Hetager Drilling, Inc. ................................................................. 21 Jonathan Paul Associates, Inc. ................................................... 9 JPI Associates, Inc. ................................................................... 21 Layne Christensen Company.................................................... 77 Leggette, Brashears & Graham, Inc. ............ Outside Rear Cover Lincoln Applied Geology, Inc. ................................................... 57 McLane Environmental, LLC..................................................... 20 MC Environmental, LLC ............................................................ 53 Maine Test Borings. .................................................................. 54 Malcolm Pirnie .......................................................................... 81 Morris Industries, Inc................................................................. 18 NAEVA Geophysics, Inc. .......................................................... 61 New England Boring Contractors of CT., Inc. ........................... 24 Pennsylvania Drilling Company ................................................ 64 Probe Support Services ............................................................ 86 Pure Earth, Inc. ......................................................................... 32 Quality Inspection Services, Inc. ............................................... 17 Quantitative Hydrogeology, Inc ................................................. 81 R&L Well Drilling, LLC .............................................................. 34 Regenesis ................................................................................. 53 ReRem ...................................................................................... 77 Rich, C. A., Consultants, Inc ......................... Outside Rear Cover Rinbrand Well Drilling Co., Inc. ................................................. 69 Roux Associates, Inc ................................................................ 11 SGS Environmental Services, Inc. ........................ Centerfold (42) SJB Services, Inc. ..................................................................... 36 Soil Mechanics ...................................................... Centerfold (41) Soiltesting, Inc........................................................................... 58 StoneHill Environmental, Inc..................................................... 23 Stothoff, Samuel, Company, Inc ............................................... 64 Summit Drilling Co., Inc ............................................................ 66 TAM International...................................................................... 81 Terracon.................................................................................... 70 Thermal Remediation Services, Inc .........................Centerfold 46 TRC Environmental Corporation............................................... 16 URS Corporation......................................................................... 9 Zebra Environmental .........................................Centerfold 48, 72

- 83 -


ANGELO TAGLIACOZZO MEMORIAL GEOLOGICAL SCHOLARSHIP TRUST FUND LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS SINCE 1987 (List Updated Through December 2009) FRIENDS OF THE FUND ($1,000+) AQUIFER DRILLING AND TESTING, INC. BANINO, GEORGE LEGGETTE, BRASHEARS & GRAHAM, INC. MILLER, DAVID W. NE-AIPG REXRODE, H. LEONARD , JR. ROUX ASSOCIATES ROUX, PAUL H. SLAYBACK, RUSSELL G. VALKENBURG, NICHOLAS YOUNG, RICHARD H. BENEFACTORS ($500+) BLAUVELT, ROBERT P. EMERSON, MARK HERRICK, DEAN H. HIGGINS, JONATHAN B. (IN MEMORY OF LEO HALL)

KASABACH, HAIG F. KAYLER, KYLE STONE, TIMOTHY S. PATRONS ($250+) AIRMAG SURVEYS, INC. ANONYMOUS BRINCKERHOFF, LAURA

GRAHAM, JACK B. GREENMAN, MIKE HINCE, ERIC KOCH, ELLIS KRAEMER, CURTIS A. MASLANSKY, STEVEN P. MATHEZ, MURIEL PIERIBONI, JOHN PREHODA, BILL SCHECHNER, CLAIRE AND LOUIS SHOPE, STEVEN B. STANDISH, RICHARD STEWART, ROBERT A. TSACOYANNIS, NICHOLAS URBAN-MEAD, RUSSELL B. WASTE MANAGEMENT, INC. (MATCHING GIFT ON BEHALF OF GEORGE BANINO)

CONTRIBUTORS ($50+) ARGUDEN, A. TEFVIK Barish, James M. BECKER, ARTHUR E. BELL, DAVID L. BELT, EDWARD S. BUGH, JAMES CLEMENS, ROBERT H. DAVIS, R. LAURENCE ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE, INC. (ON

(IN HONOR OF FRANK MCCARTHY)

BURKE, MICHAEL CHAMBERLAIN, JOHN MARK DIMMICK, CHARLES WM. GRAFF, CAROL S. GAVRAS, JOHN M. HARRINGTON, JONATHAN HIGGINS, JONATHAN B. KLEIMAN, AMY MCGRATH, DENNIS Nova Consulting & Engineering

RICH, CHARLES A. RICHTER, DOROTHY ROSENFELD, MORDECAI SCHIFFMAN, ARNOLD SOILTESTING, INC. SPONSORS ($125+) ALLEN, BOYD, III ALPHA GEOSCIENCE DE ANGELIS, JAMES ERM-NORTHEAST

HALF OF

BE

JOSEPH TORLUCCI)

FAKUNDINY, ROBERT GALLAGHER, EVELYN A. HANLON, KERRY HEINDEL, CRAIG HERMAN KARPEL MEMORIAL FOUND. (ON BEHALF OF FRIENDS OF RHODA TAGLIACOZZO)

HIXON, RICHARD HNOTTAVANGE-TELLEN, KEN Hoogerhyde, Kevin HOUSMAN, JOHN J. , JR. Jonathan Paul Associates, Inc. KACZOR, SOFIA KETANI, RALPH Mase, David MOZER, ROBERT PENN, WILLIAM E. RICE, JOHN RHYNER, JOHN ROSS, LOREN RYAN, MICHAEL J. SCHEUING, LAURIE (ATMGS Contributors continued on page 85) - 84 -


ANGELO TAGLIACOZZO MEMORIAL GEOLOGICAL SCHOLARSHIP TRUST FUND LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS SINCE 1987 (List Updated Through December 2009) (con’t from pg. 84) CONTRIBUTORS ($50+) SCOTT, DAVID Sillman, Robert and Roberta STOKES, KURTIS W. SPARROW, LESLIE ST. GERMAIN, DANIEL STONEHILL ENVIRONMENTAL, INC. TATLOCK, DEREK TIMMONS, ROBERT TORLUCCI, JOSEPH TYERS, GEORGE WARING, ANDREW D. WENZ, KENNETH P. WERLE, CRAIG WEST, William T. WOHLFORD, THOMAS

HARWOOD, DAVID G. HAGER, JUTTA HERGERT, DAVID KING, DANIEL KOWALSKI, RICHARD G. MAHIER, LUKE SASS, DANIEL B. (IN HONOR OF K. E. CASTER)

SHAKTI ASSOCIATES SKEHAN, JAMES SUSCA, MICHAEL VOZZA, SCOTT WEINSTOCK, ERIC

Why Isn't Your Name On This List?

DONORS (UP TO $50) BRADLEY, MARGARET BUSA, MARK D. COX, PETER FALDETTA, SARAH FOURNIER, LEROY GANNETT FLEMING, INC. FREDERICK, WILLIAM T.

Do Your Part Today: Give Back to the Profession That Has Given You So Much ! “Preservation of Every Dollar You Contribute” … is the cornerstone concept of NE-AIPG’s Angelo Tagliacozzo Memorial Geological Scholarship Perpetual Trust Fund (PTF) Scholarships are funded from the income on the PTF, So your tax deductible contributions are preserved, perpetually ! Make checks payable to ATMGSPTF, and mail to: NE-AIPG c/o Dennis G. McGrath The Louis Berger Group, Inc. 565 Taxter Road, Suite 510, Elmsford, NY 10523 E-mail: dmcgrath@louisberger.com

Become a Perpetual Philanthropist !

- 85 -


- 86 -


BOREHOLE LOGGING • Color Downhole/90º Video • Borehole Geophysical Logging • Heat-Pulse Flowmeter

• Acoustic Televiewer

GEOPROBE SERVICES

1-800-279-9466 STRADDLE PACKER TESTING

• Soil Sampling • Groundwater Sampling • Vapor Sampling and Onsite GC Analysis • HRC-ORC Injection

• Full Data Logging Capabilities • Vertical Delineation of Contaminant Concentrations

• Discrete Ground Water and Vapor Sampling

REMEDIAL SLURRY INJECTIONS • Fractured Bedrock and Soils See our web page for additional Logging services

www.earthdatane.com

ENVIRONMENTAL FIELD SERVICES - 87 -


- 88 -


Holidays 2010