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E D U C AT ION


NBRS SEEKS TO EXPLORE AND POSITIVELY TRANSFORM THE SOCIAL AND CULTURAL FORCES THAT SHAPE PEOPLE’S LIVES. 2


CORE VALUES SOCIAL ARCHITECTURE At NBRSARCHITECTURE we see that our purpose is to create life-changing environments for the people, communities and institutions we serve. Our user-centric, social architecture design skills help us to explore and positively transform the social and cultural forces that shape people’s lives. Our contemporary architecture is much more than simply buildings.

REAL INSIGHTS For NBRS design is the core of our practice. Our focus on thought leadership is an intentional journey to discover real insights; understanding and interpreting the needs and desires of the people and communities we serve. To do this we are committed to investing in the discovery of new concepts and applying these insights to guide our design thinking and solutions.

CREATIVE PARTNERSHIPS Through our investment in thought leadership, we believe that NBRS contributes to long-term and meaningful creative partnerships with clients and consultants. It is these creative partnerships which help to shape our communities to create life-changing environments.

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360° INTEGRATED STUDIOS EDUCATION

The Education Studio is committed to designing innovative spaces that nurture learning. By conducting research in to current and projected trends, NBRS have extensive knowledge in catering for the evolving future of junior, senior and tertiary education facilities.

INTERIOR DESIGN

Our Interior Design Studio is passionate about achieving a seamless connection between interior design and the whole architectural concept. We deeply consider how interior spaces are used and create innovative design solutions. Our Interior services include space planning, detailed fixture design and the selection of furnishings.

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

Landscape Architecture is an amalgam of art and science. As designers, Landscape Architects are required to be careful interpreters of the natural and cultural conditions of a site. Our Landscape Studio seeks to create attractive, meaningful, usable, connected and equitable spaces that embody sustainable design principles.

HERITAGE

Our Heritage Studio has specialist expertise in providing conservation and heritage planning advice, in addition to adaptivereuse design. We have experience in the identification and management of built heritage items of all types and periods and in design documentation and project administration of projects for both government and private sectors.

LIFE & CULTURE

The Life & Culture Studio is a foundation studio at NBRS. Passionate about human centred design and creating spaces that engage people for civic, religious, cultural and recreational purposes.

JUSTICE

The Justice Studio is creating impactful, well rounded design solution to improve the lives of compromised people. With a wealth of experience across correctional facilities and other justice buildings, the NBRS seeks to create responsive facilities that service all who interact with these spaces.

WELLNESS

Through ongoing research and the development of future focused wellness spaces, the Wellness Studio continues to create impactful designs for a range of clients and communities.

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CONTENTS PAGE 360° Integrated Studios

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Research Based Design

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1.0

Stages of Learning

1.1

Early Learning to Stage 1

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1.2

Preschool to Year 3

12

1.3

Primary Years 4 to Year 6

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1.4

Middle Years 7 to Year 8

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1.5

Senior Years 10 to Year 12

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Tertiary Education

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1.6

19

2.0

Learning Environments

2.1

Innovative Learning Spaces

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2.2

Outdoor Learning Environments

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2.3

Auditoria & Performing Arts

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2.4

Sports & Aquatic Facilities

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3.0

Case Studies

36

4.0

Recent Education Experience

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NBRS Profile

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RESEARCH BASED DESIGN DESIGN INFORMED BY RESEARCH NBRSARCHITECTURE’s core values rely on a rich underpinning of research to inform our design outcomes. The ‘Real Insights’ that we achieve come about through a range of different research methodologies. Over the years through our annual Envision program, NBRS has produced a number of research pieces that form a solid foundational understanding of different aspects of learning spaces and typologies. This ensures not only that NBRS is at the forefront of educational design research but that all projects are informed by innovative, cutting edge knowledge. It is through this thought leadership that allows NBRS to bring dynamic, considered design to each and every teaching space. What follows is a selection of our recent Envision books that relate to educational spaces.

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RESEARCH BASED DESIGN

BUILDING BLOCKS Early childhood represents a period of growth both mentally and physically, which lays the ground work for future learning and engagement. Early learning centres provide the building blocks necessary to nurture and teach future leaders through holistic education and care practices, eschewing traditional notions of simple child-minding and embracing an everevolving pedagogy. The ages 0 to 6 represent a period in which the brain is most malleable. By introducing young children to various stimuli in a controlled environment, early learning centres cultivate a wide disposition towards a variety of learning typologies. Contemporary practices recognise the need for a holistic approach to quality early childhood education and care, centred around the unification of community centred care and curriculum based learning. Educators are recognising children as capable citizens of the community with agency to affect the world around them. This reflects the need to respect the rights and opinions of children and account for them as primary users of designed early learning centres.


The Academic

e change The Adaptation of Existing School Buildings // March 2012

THE LEARNING CONTINUUM

THE ACADEMIC EXCHANGE

In a school curriculum, students are presented with an offering of subject areas and activities to study, however each individual selects only a combination of these, tailoring the school learning experience to their interests and possible needs. In future schools, the built environment should foster and extend this notion of offering by providing spaces that can be used and grant students understanding in several ways. Instead of prescribing uses, spaces suggest experiential learning possibilities through subtle cues and the presentation of spatial opportunities as opposed to spatial demands.

The Academic Exchange is a highly adaptable design solution that can be applied in a multitude of configurations. The Exchange is comprised of a combination of Pause Points, selected as appropriate for the spatial configuration and intended use. The implementation of the Privacy Gradient in spatial planning will guide the selection and placement of components (Pause Points) that make up the Exchange. Pause Points are categorised into the three zones of the Privacy Gradient: Private, Permeable and Public.

An awareness into worldly interaction can be gained. Immersive learning environments should go beyond just considering the needs of the people inhabiting it, but become encouraging grounds that can inspire students with a willingness to learn.

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1.0 STAGES OF LEARNING

STAGES OF LEARNING Understanding and designing for the distinct requirements and opportunities for learners

1.1

EARLY LEARNING Early childhood education entails the provision of holistic care and child-led curriculum to young children. The delicate nature of this stage in cognitive development requires careful oversight by educators and the sensitivity of the learning environment around them to help cultivate a disposition towards learning. Educators help children develop social, emotional and physical skills through a combination of challenging indoor and outdoor investigations that engage all their senses. This new curriculum is defined by a mutual respect of children as active agents of their own learning, with children directing investigations and engaging with a variety of stimulus materials. Early learning centres provide the setting for children to mature through active indoor and outdoor play environments. These environments are flexible and allow children to emerge as active and ready citizens of the community.

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TAFE NSW EARLY CHILDHOOD CENTRE 11


1.0 STAGES OF LEARNING

1.2

PRESCHOOL TO YEAR 3 The early stage of learning includes quality preschool or early learning programs that promote life learning outcomes and creates a solid basis for future learning. Skills acquired in the early learning stage include negotiation, self-control and cooperation. Children develop understandings of size, shape, numbers and letters as well as gaining a sense of their body in space. At this specific stage, stable relationships are a key part of effective learning and children are still highly influenced by their family, but start to gain influence from other significant adults and peers around them. During the early learning stage, children effectively learn through supportive and challenging play and experience including using their senses.

INABURRA JUNIOR SCHOOL


1.3

PRIMARY YEARS 4 TO YEAR 6 As children transition from the early years to the primary years, there is increasing emphasis on reading, writing and numeracy with integration of group activities with peers. During the primary years, children begin to experiment with identity, experiencing various kinds of friendships and comparing themselves with their peers.

Movable walls that allow easy teaching space configuration change

PLC SYDNEY JUNIOR SCHOOL

They begin to feel responsibility for their learning and behaviour and develop problem solving and decision-making skills. At this stage, children have a high level of energy and enthusiasm, enjoying movement and noise in class and play spaces. Children begin to demonstrate an emerging awareness of values and begin to expand their thinking in reflective and spontaneous ways.

Natural interior textures allow children’s work to be showcased

Ample sunlight and visible access to communal learning areas

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1.0 STAGES OF LEARNING

1.4

MIDDLE YEARS 7 TO YEAR 8 The middle years embody a transition into adolescence. At this stage of learning, students are assessed on reading, writing and numeracy through system-wide tests and there is an increasing emphasis on extra-curricular and community based activities. During this time, students form, articulate and manage relationships. They develop stronger links with their peers, greater independence and a stronger sense of belonging in wider adolescent cultures. Students are able to reflect on who they are as a person, where they belong, what their values are and the direction in life they are taking. They begin to develop their own voice and sense of social justice and start to challenge the voices of significant adults, including parents and teachers.

1.5

SENIOR YEARS 10 TO YEAR 12 The transition from the middle years to the senior years emphasise a more mature learning approach as students build on previous stages to develop employment or university-ready qualities equipping them to take advantage of a number of pathways.

PLC SYDNEY SOCIAL LEARNING SPACE


Lighting that denotes points of focus in large spaces

Dynamic areas allowing a range of teaching space configurations Technology integration

Spaces for multi modal learning

Modular furnishings that allow different configurations

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1.0 STAGES OF LEARNING

1.6

TERTIARY EDUCATION Higher education combines research, practical application (in the form of internships or work experience), professional skills and individual passion. Students utilise what they have learnt throughout secondary school and apply it to their studies in higher education, whether it be at university, college, TAFE or an institute of technology. During this stage of learning, students are encouraged to take responsibility for their education by developing a personal study rigor and making decisions regarding their career path.

Feature lighting evokes a sense of spacial division

Private rooms to support focused collaboration Booths for informal group study

Individual or small group meeting spaces that allow ‘bump into’ situations

UNIVERSITY OF NSW LAW LIBRARY

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MACQUARIE UNIVERSITY FACULTY OF SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING 17


2.0 LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS

TARONGA INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE AND LEARNING


LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS How innovative spaces can create push learning beyond the traditional classroom. While a substantial amount of learning occurs within the classroom, environments outside of the classroom provide opportunities for extended learning. These environments include auditoria, performing arts centres, sports facilities, aquatic facilities and outdoor learning environments. Auditoria and performing arts centres help students express and share creativity through music, drama, dance and other creative outlets. Sporting and aquatic facilities provide students with an outlet for their energy

and offer stimulating and challenging environments for them to excel. These facilities allow students to harness interests and passions through sports like swimming, netball and basketball. Outdoor environments encourage spontaneous, voluntary and joyful learning opportunities for children to explore and interact with their peers and the world around them. Play spaces, vegetable gardens and outdoor sports courts are outdoor learning activities that promote team work and hands on experiences.

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2.0 LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS

2.1

INNOVATIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS New South Wales Parliament House Education Centre


Standard teaching mode is a natural warm light.

In this space children learn about the Parliament of NSW in an innovative, hands on way. The green and red lights represent the Legislative Assembly or the Legislative Council.

By changing the lighting the children are transported to a more immersive and visceral experience.

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2.0 LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS

2.1

INNOVATIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS Taronga Institute of Science and Learning

A safe and hands on space for both the students and the animals

Ample space that prevents crowding and no opportunity for child or animal to feel confronted

Led by experts

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Features that allow presentation to the class in a way that does not feel like a tradition classroom

Unobstructive fencing and gates that allow a strong relationship with the students and animals

Zoo led specific habitats that ensure the health and safety of the animals

Atmospheric elements that evoke natural habitats

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2.0 LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS

2.2 Buildings were delivered through modular prefabrication

OUTDOOR LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS We strive to create play environments that encourage outdoor learning to occur in spontaneous ways. Well-designed play spaces can offer safe opportunities for experimentation and challenge that teach children how to extend beyond their perceived limits through hands on experience. Learning is a crucial element of a child’s development and can be incorporated into play. Play spaces that encourage exploration and experimentation extend a child’s interaction with the world around them,

facilitating immersive learning. Elements within a play space can provide various opportunities for learning, including water elements and vegetable gardens. Active play can be integrated both through designed play elements as well as more free form spaces, allowing the children to use their imagination and play how they want. It is important to provide different opportunities and experiences that are both flexible in use and provide varied opportunities for activity.

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Clear sight lines at all times for educators

A hill that allows an unobstructed view and allow playful risk assessment in a safe way

Non confrontational communication for children who struggle with making eye contact

NSW DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION CAIRNSFOOT SCHOOL FOR ADDITIONAL NEEDS

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2.0 LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS

PLC SYDNEY OUTDOOR LEARNING SPACE


Riverbed Exploration Space

Natural Amphitheatre

Shaded Playground

Butterfly Farm

Vertebrate Pond

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2.0 LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS

TARONGA INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE AND LEARNING


2.3

AUDITORIA & PERFORMING ARTS Our approach to designing performing arts facilities involves researching fundamental aspects of performance space design. These entail; the mix of spaces, types of instruments played, the types of performances, technology, any flexibility needed between spaces, the aesthetic outcome, the sitting of the building in its context, external influences and general feel and flow of the building the client intends to achieve.

The brief sometimes requires accommodating different types of performance related spaces into the one building, these being a mix of musical performance spaces, theatrical performance spaces, musical and vocal practice spaces, technical and recording laboratories, dance and drama spaces, back of house support spaces and associated public spaces.

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2.0 LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS

KNOX GRAMMAR SCHOOL PERFORMING ARTS CENTRE

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HILLSONG CITY CAMPUS


2.0 LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS

QUEENWOOD AQUATIC CENTRE


2.4

SPORTS & AQUATIC FACILITIES Our team have demonstrated experience of designing and delivering contemporary sporting facilities that include outdoor and indoor pools, change rooms, foyers / reception facilities, plant rooms, staff offices, gyms and grandstands. Our practice is leading the way in the implementation of innovative value adds and long term benefits. Our team have designed pool halls to function with natural ventilation when conditions permit and mechanically ventilated at all other times to control humidity and condensation. This system makes further energy savings by reclaiming heat.

In order to minimise running costs, we ensure pool water is heated via heat pumps which is the most efficient technology for pool water heating. The integration of these large heat pumps into buildings, whilst controlling noise emissions to neighbours, is a significant design challenge to overcome by careful coordination of consultants’ requirements and the restrictions of each site. The control of reverberation noise in pool halls is a common design challenge in this building type. NBRS are experienced at working collaboratively with our consultants to assess and overcome these issues in an innovative and discrete way.

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2.0 LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS

The appearance of a ‘floating’ structure to allow visual connection from the school and the oval

BARKER COLLEGE GRANDSTAND

Fully accessible with ample railing and safety considerations to prevent over crowding

Tiered to enable unobstructed views

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MERIDEN SPORTS CENTRE


3.0 CASE STUDIES

CASE STUDIES Design thinking in practice


KNOX GRAMMAR SCHOOL PERFORMING ARTS CENTRE


3.0 CASE STUDIES

TARONGA INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE AND LEARNING


3.1

TARONGA INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE AND LEARNING Taronga Conservation Society believes in a shared future, where wildlife and people don’t just live together, they thrive together. The first of its kind in the Southern Hemisphere, the Institute supports this vision by enabling Taronga to expand capabilities in conservation science, research and learning. Located within Sydney’s Taronga Zoo, the building holds a six-star environmental rating. The NBRSARCHITECTURE approach was based around bringing together three major hubs: Learning, Science, and the Collaboration / Visitor Hub. Over three levels, the design centres around an atrium space that links the building’s functions and allows scientists, animals carers, educationalists and the public to interact. The Science Hub is a facility not only for research scientists but university students, fostering the next generation of conservation innovation. Specialist laboratories and digital teaching labs provide opportunities to broaden partnerships with leading universities.

WINNER - PROJECTS OVER $8M

WINNER - EDUCATIONAL ARCHITECTURE

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3.0 CASE STUDIES

The Learning Hub allows students from early learning, high school, through to researchers and tertiary students to interact with the zoo. Multi modal learning environments provide areas for individual study, group discussion and presentation modes. Three immersive learning spaces themed around desert, rainforest and woodland environments allow children to enter the habitat of animals and experience their natural behaviours. These environments provide authentic STEM learning and align with curriculum priority areas. The Visitor Hub allows a connection between visitors and the Institute. It has been designed for one-of-a-kind experiences to create a closer bond between students, scientists, animals and 300 staff. In 2019 the Institute was recognised by Learning Environments Australasia and the Australian Institute of Architects as an innovative learning space.

TARONGA INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE AND LEARNING


TARONGA INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE AND LEARNING

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3.0 CASE STUDIES

3.2

PLC SYDNEY HAMILTON BUILDING The new Junior School was commissioned to replace an existing collection of buildings that had grown and been adapted over many years. The new purpose-built school provides teaching spaces that better reflect the modern curriculum and teaching methods. The school buildings have been designed toward the edge of the site to allow the maximum outdoor spaces on the northern side for teaching and play. This concept also enabled the majority of the new school to be built prior to the demolition of the existing school. This allowed the school to remain active during construction. The buildings also act as an acoustic buffer to the surrounding streets.

Learning environments have been clustered in year groups with a high focus on adaptive spaces and collaborative teaching. Each of the classrooms has access to outdoor gardens, general breakout spaces and wet areas for a wide variety of teaching. In addition to learning environments for years 3, 4, 5 & 6, two specialist teaching rooms have been included focusing on Science. The focus on Science is also evident with the inclusion of the butterfly farm and vertebrate pond adjacent to the science rooms and central to the other classrooms. There has been a large focus on the landscape and how it can be used to teach. The scale of the school is particularly important in order to relate to small children. Landscape stairs have been minimised and ramps included as much as possible.

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3.0 CASE STUDIES

3.3

HILLSONG HILLS CAMPUS THE EPICENTRE Completed in early 2017, Hillsong Epicentre has provided state of the art facilities that serve the Church, the community and the college in an identity building that welcomes and inspires those who gather there. Epicentre is the second stage of a two stage project. Stage one included the 300 seat Hillsong Chapel and carpark, which were completed in 2006. Stage two incorporates a 500 seat auditorium with foyer and back of house facilities including: a green room, guest room, storage, a loading bay, a professional TV studio & TV control room. As well as 3 TV edit suites, a smaller college training TV studio, a professional sound studio with 8 professional sound edit suites.

The college also includes technical facilities such as four edit suites, three band rehearsal rooms, nine music practice rooms and 20 classrooms. Two large seminar / meeting rooms will be used by the college during the week and children’s ministries on Sundays, a specialised preschool children’s playroom, a large youth area, carpark area providing spaces for 300 cars.


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3.0 CASE STUDIES

3.4

FAIRFIELD PRIMARY SCHOOL (VIC) NBRSARCHITECTURE designed a modular solution for Fairfield Primary School as part of a Victorian School Building Authority Capital Works Project. The school required a new double storey facility to support their grade five and six students for the start of the 2019 school year. The unique building design opens up on the ground floor to a column free walkway with tiered seating. This space functions as an informal outdoor teaching space. On the first floor the walkway has been enclosed and doubles as a learning commons, an efficient use of space that provides additional teaching areas. The faรงade screening design and window orientation maximises natural light to internal spaces and reduces energy demand. The specification of low energy fittings and high spec thermal insulation ensures a sustainable building design. Modular design and construction was utilised to ensure a time efficient outcome. Both storeys (25 modules) were delivered over the space of a week, which equates to over 700 square metres.


Best New Primary School


3.0 CASE STUDIES

2020

AILA

Health and Education Landscape


3.5

CAIRNSFOOT ADDITIONAL NEEDS SCHOOL NBRSARCHITECTURE was appointed to deliver design works for the relocation of the Cairnsfoot School to a new site in Brighton-Le-Sands. Cairnsfoot School is a school for students with moderate or severe intellectual disabilities, physical disabilities, sensory impairments and students with Autism Spectrum Disorders. It caters for students from Kindergarten to Year 12. The project has primarily been delivered through modular prefabrication. The design concept for the school provided an environment which intersects shelter and challenge. The design utilises a holistic approach where the built forms intersect with the natural and outdoor forms. The planning of the site allowed arrival and pedestrian flow to be centralised, supervised and easy. The site easily divides into junior and senior sectors.

The shared facilities are central and easy to navigate with good shared public access to the swimming pool. A large roof forms to reinforce the central idea of shelter and creates an all-weather outdoor learning environment. The landscape design was given careful consideration, with regard to the particular needs and preferences of the Cairnsfoot students. The landscape elements include fixed play equipment in fenced areas, a bike track, slides, swings, a climbing wall, “roadway” or “train track” paths with pedestrian crossings and signage, herb and vegetable gardens, orchard planting for group use, a garden for kitchen learning, and a sensory garden with a range of plant types and ground textures.

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3.0 CASE STUDIES

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3.6

MACQUARIE UNIVERSITY FACULTY OF SCIENCE & ENGINEERING NBRSARCHITECTURE was commissioned by Macquarie University to transform the Mitchell (E7A) Building, supporting the teaching, learning and research pursuits of the Science and Engineering departments. The vision for the refurbishment was to create an energy and space efficient contemporary workspace that encourages collaboration whilst respecting the historical, social and aesthetic significance of the building. By revitalising the existing fabric NBRS enhanced the appearance of the building, improved street presence and created a sense of arrival to the University’s main courtyard.

A new bright and airy 3 storey glazed atrium provides a physical link between the 8 storey Mitchell (E7A) Building and the adjacent E7B. The atrium is activated with a café and provides space for individual research as well as promoting collaborative learning. To help support the University’s One Planet ecological footprint target, sustainability was key to the project. Retention of the existing façade significantly reduced carbon impact, high performance glazing has reduced solar heat gain and the use of natural ventilation has been maximised throughout.

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3.0 CASE STUDIES


3.7

TAFE EARLY CHILDHOOD CENTRE The relocation of the Children’s Services facilities to The Northern Sydney Institute at St Leonard’s offers students and staff an innovative learning environment at the forefront of tertiary education, particularly early childhood education. NBRSARCHITECTURE worked as a collaborative multi-discipline team and lead consultant as part of the major $6.5m building refurbishment. The overall design makes adaptive re-use of the brutal 1960s building and associated carpark previously occupied by the engineering facility.

The playground, built over what was the original staff car park, makes clever use of level changes as integrated play elements while ensuring all spaces are inclusive and accessible. The playground reflecting a nature play theme includes various play elements to both develop children’s skills and demonstrate real world experience to early childhood students. The playground includes a running creek bed with piston pump, forest adventure play area, sand pit, performance amphitheatre, cycle track and extensive open space for adaptive play.

Completed in late 2017 the ground floor has been transformed to a contemporary early childhood teaching environment flowing out to a purpose built and allinclusive playground and central student break out courtyard.

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3.0 CASE STUDIES


3.8

KNOX GRAMMAR SCHOOL PERFORMING ARTS CENTRE The multilevel, ‘semi-professional’ facility provides a venue for students to learn, practice and showcase a variety of creative talents such as music, drama, dance and audio visual. The building contains a 700 seat tiered lyric theatre and 180 seat multi-purpose auditorium along with a large variety of teaching spaces, studios, a green room, peripatetic rooms and laboratories.

The facility also includes a café, secure basement carpark and a connecting bridge link to the existing school Aquatic Centre. The project had to meet complex site constraints, planning criteria, acoustic and service requirements.

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3.0 CASE STUDIES

Fully accessible with ample railing and safety considerations to prevent over crowding

Sky bridge connects the students to then new entrance of the performing arts centre

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4.0

EDUCATION EXPERIENCE Armidale Secondary Senior College

Glendale Technology High School

PLC Sydney

Artarmon Public School

Hillsong Epicentre

Queenwood

Asquith High School

Hobsonville Point Secondary School (NZ)

Rutherford Primary School

Barker College

Hunter School of the Performing Arts

St Andrew’s Cathedral School

Belmont High School

Hurstville Public School

St Clair High School

Bolwarra Primary School

Inaburra School

St George Christian School

Cairnsfoot Special School

Integricare

St Peter’s Anglican College

Waratah Technology Campus

International Screen Academy

TAFE NSW

Canberra Grammar School

Knox Grammar School

Tara Anglican School for Girls

Canterbury South Public School

Kotara High School

Taronga Conservation Society

Cardiff High School

Kurri Kurri High School

The Infants Home

Carlingford Primary School

Macquarie University

The Riverina Anglican College

Central Coast Grammar School

Manly Vale Public School

The Scots School

Central Coast Steiner School

Marsden Park Public School

The University of New South Wales

Covenant Christian College (VIC)

Merewether High School

The University of Sydney

Charles Sturt University

Meriden School

Trinity Grammar School

Coolah Central School

Montgrove College

Wagga Wagga Agricultural Institute

Croydon Public School

Narellen Special School

Waitara Public School

Davidson High School

Norfolk Island Central School

West Wallsend High School

Duffy Primary School

North Kellyville Public School

Western Sydney University

Epping Public School

NSW Parliament House

Westfields Sports High School

Farrer Memorial Agricultural High School

Oran Park Public School

Wollemi College

Francis Greenway High School

Pacific Hills Christian School

Fairfield Primary School (VIC)

PLC Armidale

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NBRS & PARTNERS PTY LTD Sydney Level 3, 4 Glen Street, Milsons Point NSW 2061 +61 2 9922 2344 Melbourne Suite 704 / 575 Bourke St Melbourne VIC 3000 +61 3 73116714 ABN 16 002 247 565 architects@nbrsarchitecture.com nbrsarchitecture.com @nbrsarchitecture NBRSARCHITECTURE is a people focused, research based studio that aims to enrich lives. By developing creative design partnerships, our portfolio - spanning public and private sectors exhibits an understanding of the people whose lives will be affected. Above all NBRS seeks to design environments that will have positive life changing affect. Architecture is the cornerstone of NBRS global interdisciplinary design practice with expertise in Architecture, Heritage, Interiors, Urban Planning, Landscape Architecture, ESD and Research. Since 1968, NBRS has developed a research led architecture practice recognised for its innovative, award-winning design excellence and comprehensive expertise.

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DIRECTORS:

STUDIO PRINCIPALS:

ASSOCIATES:

DIRECTOR OF DESIGN Andrew Duffin

EDUCATION STUDIO Jonathan West Macella Salzmann

Hung-Ying Foong Gill

Nominated Arch. NSW 5602, ACT 2450, NT 1160, QLD 5465, SA 3539, TAS 1160, VIC 20063, WA 2699, NZ 4897

DIRECTOR OF STRATEGY James Ward DIRECTOR OF TECHNICAL DESIGN Garry Hoddinett DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Rodney Drayton DIRECTOR OF PEOPLE & CULTURE Andrew Leuchars DIRECTOR OF STUDIOS Samantha Polkinghorne

LIFE & CULTURE STUDIO Andrew Tripet WELLNESS STUDIO Ian Gibson

Katie Hurst Alison Huynh James Kim Derek Mah Maria Orellea Romano

JUSTICE STUDIO Anthea Doyle

Carmit Saar

INTERIOR DESIGN STUDIO Sophie Orrock

Alice Steedman

Ewan Saunders

Craig Stephen LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE STUDIO Andrew Leuchars

John Vasco

HERITAGE STUDIO Samantha Polkinghorne

PRACTICE LEADS: TECHNICAL David Heap Trevor Eveleigh

Photography Credits: Alexander Mayes Brett Boardman Holly Medway Mike Chorley Fleetwood Australia Rick Stevens / Taronga Conservation Society Australia

PEOPLE & CULTURE Shumaila Ali FINANCE Madeleine Stewart BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Sally Gordon

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Profile for NBRS ARCHITECTURE

NBRS Education  

NBRSARCHITECTURE strives to create and encouraging new modes of learning and engaging every student.

NBRS Education  

NBRSARCHITECTURE strives to create and encouraging new modes of learning and engaging every student.

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