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News for members of Coast Electric Power Association

B.B. King

LeAnn Rimes

Periodical postage (ISSN 1052 2433)

Elvis Presley

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Get the kids cooking with fun new cookbook

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Mardis Gras merriment invades Mississippi


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February 2016


February 2016

Informing new legislators about your electric service ith last year being an election year in Mississippi, there were some new faces among the crowd at the opening of the 2016 legislative session in January at the state Capitol. One of the new legislators joked that he spent part of that first week just locating the restrooms in the sprawling three-story Capitol building. I understand, as one who has served in state government, how overwhelming those first few weeks can be for newcomers. There are lots of new people to meet, a hectic schedule to work out and a hefty workload waiting. No doubt all Mississippi legislators are eager to get going in the 2016 session, which will be longer than usual—125 days versus 90—because of the statewide elections last fall. We will be at the Capitol too, serving as the voice of your local electric power association and its members. Our task will be to inform new state legislators and other elected officials about electric power associations. Because electric power associations serve primarily rural areas, elected officials living in cities may not be aware of the network of 26 consumer-owned electric cooperatives that serves some 1.8 million Mississippians in all regions of the state. They probably don’t realize that rural Mississippians have been owning and operating their own electric power associations for some 80 years. They might not know that farmers began organizng their own electric power associations in the mid-1930s to provide a much-needed service that no one else would. As not-for-profit cooperatives, electric power associations were a new breed of utility in America, one that could distribute electricity into rural areas at the lowest cost possible. Electric power associations’ success spurs growth and progress in rural Mississippi. They empower residents to vastly improve their quality of life through high-quality electric service. Because electric power associations are not beholden to investors, they remain true to their founders’ vision of memberfocused, service-oriented electric utilities.

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On the cover The first Grammy museum outside of Los Angeles opens next month on the campus of Delta State University in Cleveland. Cutting-edge technology makes the exhibits highly interactive. Visitors can learn about every artist who has won a Grammy since the awards program began in the 1950s. The museum will also serve as a concert venue and a significant educational resource. See story on page 4.

Making sure legislators understand the purpose and goals of Mississippi’s electric power associations is important to these cooperatives’ future success, and the well-being of their members. Working closely with elected officials enables us to share the electric power association story and to monitor proposals that could hinder our ability to deliver affordable, dependable electric service to anyMy Opinion one who wants it. Michael Callahan No legislator wants to Executive Vice President/CEO support a bill that would Electric Power Associations of Mississippi cause you to pay more for electricity. Yet there have been times when a bill included language that could result in unintended consequences for our members—for example, a significant hike in your electric power association’s operating expenses. Our govenment relations team looks for those “gotchas” to inform lawmakers long before a bill comes to a vote. Representatives from your electric power association contribute to this effort as well. They strive to keep the lines of communication open with the lawmakers whose constituents are members of the cooperative, like you. Do you know who your state legislators and Congressional delegation are? It’s easy to find out by using the Electric Power Associations of Mississippi 2016 Legislative App, or by checking out our Legislative Roster online at www.epaofms.com. Click on Government Relations and then General Information to reach both of these helpful free products. Learn “How a Bill Becomes Law” in the graphic on page 17 of this issue. We encourage our members to remain alert to actions in the Mississippi Legislature as the session unfolds. An informed electorate is the most effective means of ensuring responsive state government.

Today in Mississippi OFFICERS Keith Hurt - President Tim Smith - First Vice President Barry Rowland - Second Vice President Randy Smith - Secretary/Treasurer

EDITORIAL STAFF Michael Callahan - CEO Ron Stewart - Sr. VP, Communications Mark Bridges - Manager, Support Services Debbie H. Stringer - Editor Elissa Fulton - Communications Specialist Trey Piel - Digital Media Manager Rickey McMillan - Graphics Specialist Linda Hutcherson - Administrative Assistant

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ON FACEBOOK Vol. 69 No. 2 EDITORIAL OFFICE & ADVERTISING 601-605-8600 Acceptance of advertising by Today in Mississippi does not imply endorsement of the advertised product or services by the publisher or Mississippi’s Electric Power Associations. Product satisfaction and delivery responsibility lie solely with the advertiser. • National advertising representative: National Country Market, 800-626-1181 Circulation of this issue: 436,001 Non-member subscription price: $9.50 per year

The Official Publication of the Electric Power Associations of Mississippi Today in Mississippi (ISSN 1052-2433) is published eleven times a year (Jan.-Nov.) by Electric Power Associations of Mississippi, Inc., P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300, or 665 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland, MS 39157. Phone 601-605-8600. Periodical postage paid at Ridgeland, MS, and additional office. The publisher (and/or its agent) reserves the right to refuse or edit all advertising. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Today, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300

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Today in Mississippi

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Our Homeplace

Oseola McCarty Hall, a residence hall at the University of Southern Mississippi, is named in honor of the frugal African American washerwoman who left some $150,000 of her life savings to the university for the establishment of a perpetual scholarship for deserving black students who could not afford a college education. McCarty’s surprising gesture made international news when it was announced in 1995, and President Bill Clinton presented her with a Presidential Citizens Medal, the nation’s second-highest civilian award. She died in 1999 at age 91. The Oceola McCarty Endowed Scholarship Fund has provided scholarships to 44 recipients since its inception. Photo courtesy University of Southern Mississippi

Mississippi is remembering swimming as a kid with my brother and sisters in the county swimming pool. Going to the garden and picking a truck full of butterbeans, and shelling them. It was so much fun, Mama taking us girls to buy new things for school. Going to my aunt and uncle’s house to feed the cows and pick corn. And having a cookout at my other uncle and aunt’s fair camper, laughing and seeing old friends. It’s a small town but I love it. —Linda Chism, DeKalb Before the beach, I remember it all Catching crabs off the Gulf’s seawall. Sand being pumped to make the coastline, a beautiful beach, created in time. Gulls screeching, picnics, bonfires at night, And oh! The Edgewater, what a grand sight. Boats in the harbor, lined up in a row, Evenings at the yacht club, the place to go. Fishing rodeo, once a year. Fishing was good, even off the pier. The grand Gulf stood all alone, Her pink faded from years of bygone. Cy Simon’s, the place to do the Biloxi Shuffle, Vapors on the beach, if you wanted to do the Hustle. Friendship House served seafood gumbo. Places gone now, but I wanted to share My home, the Mississippi Gulf Coast, Gulfport. —Shirley Ladner, Petal

What’s Mississippi to you? What do you treasure most about life in our state? Send your thoughts to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158, or to news@epaofms.com. Please keep your comments brief. Submissions are subject to editing for length and clarity.

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February 2016

New

Grammy Museum

sings praises of America’s music greats B.B. King

By Debbie Stringer What do the Grammy Awards have to do with Mississippi? Plenty. Nearly 8 percent of Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award winners have Mississippi roots, according to Emily Havens, of Cleveland. Havens is executive director of the new Grammy Museum Mississippi, set to open March 5 on the campus of Delta State University in Cleveland. The 27,000-squarefoot museum, served by Delta Electric Power Association, comEmily Havens bines interactive activities, exhibits, films, special events and live performances that celebrate the many forms of American popular music—and emphasize Mississippi’s role in its development. Through interactive exhibits, visitors will be able to find information on every Grammy winner and watch performance highlights throughout the Grammys’ 58year history. The Grammy Museum L.A. is helping the Cleveland foundation collect and curate artifacts from recording artists to develop its exhibits. Artifacts ranging from Bob Dylan’s electric guitar to one of Beyoncé’s Grammy gowns and a report card from Elvis will be displayed. Exhibits will be updated continously to keep the museum relevant, Havens said. The first of many special museum events will be Art of the Craft: Songwriting with Grammy-winning songwriters, set for March 3 as part of the grand opening weekend. The traveling exhibit “Ladies and Gentlemen ... The Beatles” opens March 5 at the museum. Visitors will see instruments, rare photographs, video and tour arti-

facts associated with Beatlemania in America from their first press conference in 1964 to their 1966 concert at San Francisco’s Candlestick Park. The Grammy Museum Mississippi and Delta State will present Beatles Symposium 2016: From the Cavern to the Candlestick April 1-2. The event centers on discussions with notable Beatles historians, live music and film screenings.

The $19 million museum is being touted as the most technologically advanced music museum in the world. About half the exhibits involve interactive activities: Visitors can write and produce their own song, learn historic dance moves, explore advancements in sound and play real instruments under stage lights. “Kids and adults can play their hearts out but only they can hear themselves. They all wear headphones,” Havens said. “It’s a great experience for kids who’ve been told, don’t touch that piano. Hopefully, this will be a catalyst for that kid who wants instrument lessons or wants to try something new.” The nonprofit Cleveland Music Foundation was formed in 2011 to raise funds for and oversee the museum’s development. The foundation acquired licensing agreements with the Grammy Museum in Los Angeles and The Recording Academy to build the only Grammy museum outside of California. Mississippi seemed the logical choice for a new Grammy museum location, Havens said. “Mississippi had more Grammy winners than the next five states combined when we started this project. So it really was a no-brainer. A lot of music historians credit Mississippi for being the birthplace of American music.” When foundation members pitched their museum

David “Honeyboy” Edwards

proposal to The Recording Academy, “they said yes, we get it,” Havens said. The museum’s educational potential in partnering with Delta State’s Delta Music Institute was another strong selling point. Delta State University is an educational affiliate of the Grammy Museum L.A. Local support for the project proved to be solid. “Almost half the money we raised is private, and out of those private donations, about 75 percent was raised here in Bolivar County, which is impressive to me,” Havens said. Additional funding included contributions from state legislators, the city of Cleveland and Bolivar County supervisors.

The Grammy Museum Mississippi will entertain and excite visitors of all ages, but its primary goal is music education. “We’re expecting to serve 20,000 to 24,000 school students the first year,” Havens said. The museum will expose students to all genres of America music and various aspects of the music industry, from studio production to stage lighting. Internships will be offered under partnership with Delta State and its Delta Music Institute, and an early learners program will teach youngsters about musical instruments. Music education programs will target to students of all ages and provide professional development opportunities for educators. A classroom equipped with two Smart Boards (interactive whiteboards) is available for their use. Underscoring its educational priority, the museum’s first visitors will be students chosen through a competi-


February 2016

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Today in Mississippi

Exhibit highlights

“Mississippi had more Grammy winners than the next five states combined when we started this project. So it really was a no-brainer. A lot of music historians credit Mississippi for being the birthplace of American music.” — Emily Havens

Visitors enter the Grammy Museum Mississippi the Southern way— through a front porch. Inside the modern structure, a light-filled lobby houses the box office and a gift shop. Nearby is a wall display of the most recent winners of the Grammys’ nine major award categories. Winners announced at the 58th Grammy Awards, to be broadcast live on CBS at 7 p.m. Feb. 15, will be featured during the museum’s grand opening March 5. Exhibits in the museum’s galleries include these highlights: I Artifacts from the most recent

Renderings of areas still under construction indicate what’s in store for visitors when the museum opens March 5. Located on the campus of Delta State University, the museum’s 27,000-square-foot building, top, includes exhibit galleries, a soundstage, classroom, conference room and gift shop. A lighted interactive dance floor, above left, teaches dance steps, and one exhibit traces the history of the electric guitar, with a display of iconic models. Renderings courtesy of Grammy Museum Mississippi. Above right, the Mississippi exhibit area features a wall engraved with Mississippi Grammy winners’ signatures.

tion for which they created an original song, essay or visual artwork on the theme “The Roots of American Music Grow Deep in Mississippi.” The nine winners’ classrooms and teachers get to share in the honor of being the first admitted to the new museum on March 5, grand opening day, hours before the public opening at noon. The museum’s educational mission lured Havens away from her former job as Mississippi field director for 15 counties in the Boy Scouts Chickasaw Council. She served

on the museum’s board during its development but never aspired to become its director. “Then I started thinking, wow, this is really about education, not just tourism,” she said. Havens sees the museum serving a “life-changing” role in the lives of visitors of all ages, but especially young people who may become inspired to pursue their dream of a career in music, whether in creative or technical areas of the industry. “It’s about 15 years from now a [former] fourth grader being on stage at the Grammys, saying they started in Cleveland, Mississippi,” Havens said. The Grammy Museum is open daily at 800 W. Sunflower Road in Cleveland. Admission is $12 for adults and $6 for ages 6-17. Discounts apply to college students, seniors and military members, and group rates are available. Annual museum membership includes free admission. For details, call 662-4410100 or visit grammymuseumms.org.

Grammy winners, and video of every Grammy ever awarded. I Small theater where visitors can watch memorable Grammy collaborations from past awards shows. Included is video of Paul McCartney performing with Kanye West and Rihanna at the 2015 ceremony. I A changing display of clothing worn by artists attending the Grammys. Exhibit opens with gowns worn by Katy Perry, Whitney Houston, Donna Summer, Lady Gaga, Taylor Swift and Beyoncé. I A dance floor that responds to footsteps with changing colors while a video featuring R&B singer/dancer NeYo teachs dance moves, including the jitterbug and moonwalk. I An interactive stage experience where visitors can play electronic musical instruments while listening to themselves through headphones. I Singer/songwriter pods with touchscreens that prompt visitors through the process of writing and producing a song. I The history of the electric guitar told through a display of iconic and other models from major guitar makers. I A Mississippi area with artist artifacts and interactive touchscreens that offer in-depth insight into Mississippi’s Grammy-winning artists.

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February 2016

Enjoy snapdragons in your spring landscape ust as it seems I’m finally settling into the winter color season and noticing how good all the pansies and violas are looking, it’s time to start planning for

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spring. Snapdragons, or snaps as I like to call them, are a good choice for cooler weather. In my experience, they won’t tolerate any extended freezing, but snapdragons will hang on through the winter in south Mississippi. They provide Southern good color in the Gardening cool fall and by Dr. Gary Bachman spring seasons. In the northern half of the state, it’s probably better to consider them as fall and spring annuals. But whenever you plant them, the flowering display is sure to dazzle and liven up the landscape, kind of like a floral kaleidoscope. They’re usually available in a variety of sizes sure to be perfect for almost any garden. I consider the Sonnet series to be the most visible snapdragon we see in the landscape. The wide variety of colors in the series is one reason Sonnets are so popular. Sonnets grow up to 30 inches tall and display colors including red, orange, yel-

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Sonnet snapdragons, right, produce multiple large flower stalks that make excellent cuts. The Snapshot series, above, includes small snapdragons that spread out in the landscape and produce plenty of pastel flowers. Photos: MSU Extension/Gary Bachman

low and white, with others in between. The plants produce multiple tall flower spikes, which make them a perfect choice for enjoying indoors as cut flowers. An added bonus is that warm indoor air will enhance the flowers’ light cinnamon fragrance. As good as the Sonnet snapdragons are, they may be a little too big. If that is the case in your landscape, I would recommend either the Montego or Snapshot series of snapdragons. Montego snapdragons only grow up to 10 inches tall and wide. Like their big cousins, they come in a wide variety of colors. Red, yellow, white, pink and bicolor would be gorgeous lining the front edge of a flowerbed. These plants are ideal for planting in the full sun to partial shade. Individual flowers of Montego snapdragons are aligned neatly and are tightly bundled on the many stems. The flowers

heads stay compact and do not stretch in the warm spring weather. Another good, smaller snapdragon is the Snapshot series. These plants are a little shorter than the Montego, reaching 6 to 10 inches tall, but they will spread up to 14 inches. They produce plenty of flowers with soft, pastel colors. There are also bicolors and a mixture. A good feature of both Montego and Snapshot is that the flowers are big for the size of the plant, and to support these big flowers, both series

have sturdy stems. If you didn’t plant any snapdragons last fall, as we move forward into spring, keep an eye out for them to show up in the garden centers in the coming weeks. You won’t regret getting some for your garden. Dr. Gary Bachman is an associate Extension and research professor of horticulture at the Mississippi State University Coastal Research and Extension Center in Biloxi. He is also host of “Southern Gardening” radio and TV programs.


Natchez

February 2016

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Today in Mississippi

Happy birthday,

utside my window is a winter-blue sky with the bare limbs of a hackberry tree and a young oak farther out in the yard reaching upward toward it. They look like they are freezing to death. But you and I know that here in the South we will bail out of the chill of winter in just a few weeks and have a carpet of green grass and beds of daffodils, crocus and iris popping up. Back in the late 1920s and early ‘30s, that’s what folks in Natchez counted on— the extensive gardens surrounding the old homes—to bring in tourists. People weary of winter elsewhere in the nation took advantage of the improving highway network and springtime to hit the roads and come tour the gardens of Natchez. Only one year, winter wasn’t quite finished and a late cold snap nipped the gardens in the bud while the Mississippi town was full of Seen tourists to see by Walt Grayson them. Trying to save the situation, someone came up with the idea that since the gardens were dead, open up the houses and let folks take a look inside the old mansions. From that day until this, it has been the houses people have flocked to see every spring and fall during pilgrimage time in Natchez. I would imagine this year’s pilgrimages will have some added pageantry and hoopla because Natchez is in the process of a yearlong celebration of its 300th anniversary. It is the oldest city on the Mississippi River. In 1716 (101 years before Mississippi became a state) the French built Fort Rosalie on the bluffs overlooking the River, near where the Natchez Indians had their Grand Village, as protection for French

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traders in the area. It didn’t take long for a settlement to spring up around the fort. And it wasn’t too much longer before African slaves were brought in and planting overtook fur trapping as the predominant occupation. In 1729, however, the Natchez Indians got tired of land disputes with the French and wiped all of them out. In response, French troops came back and wiped out the Natchez Indians. That’s the way of the world. But by the middle of the 1700s the bluffs were busy again with people filtering into the area and creating a town they named after the Indian tribe. And Natchez has been ever since. Pre-Civil War, Natchez became one of the richest towns in the nation because of cotton. The planters wanted their homes on the high bluffs in the city away from the flood-prone flatlands along the river where they had their plantations. They had enough money to build what you might call palaces, houses with enough personality that they have names. And because there was little military action in Natchez in the Civil War, by and large many of those old homes are still here. Let me add that the reason the planters were so successful was because of slave labor. (Same reason New York cotton traders and English textile mills became wealthy.) Many of the homes are so ornate and still standing today because of the black artisans who built them. Natchez is just now tapping into its rich African American heritage and weaving those threads into its tapestry. There is not much else in our part of the country that even nearly approaches 300 years of age, except maybe some trees. That many years give you plenty of time to complicate things too. However, there is no other place quite like Natchez. After all, it has had 300 years to work on itself.

Trees are still winter bare as the spring flowers start to pop up in the front yard of Magnolia Hall in Natchez. Photo: Walt Grayson

Walt Grayson is the host of “Mississippi Roads” on Mississippi Public Broadcasting television, and the author of two “Looking Around Mississippi” books and “Oh! That Reminds Me: More Mississippi Homegrown Stories.” Contact Grayson at walt@waltgrayson.com.

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Picture This:

Help us get a jump on spring fever! Our next “Picture This” theme is Spring Color. We are looking for photos of the brilliant, beautiful colors of springtime in Mississippi (or anywhere else). Submissions must be emailed or postmarked by March 7. Selected photos will appear in the April issue of Today in Mississippi. “Picture This” is a reader photo feature appearing in the January, April, July and October issues of Today in Mississippi. We publish a few of the photos that best illustrate the given theme. Photographers whose photos are published become eligible for a $200 cash prize, to be awarded in a random drawing in December. Please note: This is not a contest, as photos will not be judged. Photos are selected for publication based on their overall quality, relevance to the given theme, visual impact and suitability for printing on newsprint paper. (Dark photos usually do not print well. We look for bright photos with good contrast and sharp focus.)

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Submission requirements • Submit as many photos as you like, but select only your best work. • Photos must relate to the given theme. • Photos must be the original work of an amateur photographer (of any age). • Photos eligible for publication may be either color or black and white, print or digital. • Photos must be in sharp focus. • Digital photos should be high-resolution JPG files. Please do not use photoediting software to adjust colors or tones. (We prefer to do it ourselves, if necessary, according to our printer’s standards.) • Please do not send a photo with the date appearing on the image. • Photos must be accompanied by identifying information: photographer’s name, address, phone and electric power association (if applicable). Include the name(s) of any recognizable people or

places in the picture. • Prints will be returned if accompanied by a selfaddressed, stamped envelope. We cannot, however, guarantee their safe return through the mail.

How to submit photos Prints and digital photos are acceptable. Prints: Mail prints to Picture This, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300. Digital photos: Email (as an attachment to your e-mail message) to news@epaofms.com. If submitting more than one photo, please attach all photos

to only one e-mail message, if possible. Or, mail a photo CD to Picture This, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300. Question? Call Debbie Stringer, editor, at 601-605-8610 or email news@epaofms.com.


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There is no way to explain the unexplainable ou can outdistance that which is running after you, but not what is running inside you.” —Rwandan proverb This is creative thinking on the part of a group of people I would not have chosen in a multiple-choice question to have complex reasoning. Then again, my knowledge is limited on Rwanda. I do appreciate their proverbs, which is consistent with ancient philosophers Socrates, Plato Grin ‘n’ and Aristotle. Bare It These three by Kay Grafe thinkers focused their attention on the role of human beings. In other words, on what makes us tick. Oh, my, this is becoming too serious. I used this proverb to illustrate to the many readers who tell me they relate to

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my columns because they have similar experiences. I can get serious, but there is already too much written or talked about on the media that can scare the jeans off a person. Who wants to read the same daunting reports in Today in Mississippi? In this positive newspaper you can kick your shoes off, lean back in your recliner and read information that will enlighten your mind. I believe many of us have traits inside us that we simply cannot control, nor can we “run away” from them. For example, some people have busy minds with thoughts constantly whizzing by and though they try, cannot slow them down. Some of us cannot keep our mouths shut at the proper time or we do not think before we act. Could it be that some people live under a star (you tell me) that randomly places us in situations that are out of our control? Today I will expand this theme. The experience I encountered this past December is based on the inability to slow my thoughts down. This happens when I am thumbing through my cookbook collection. An unexplained excitement

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normal places. Whew! My party outfit was one I had worn for a function at my grandson’s wedding. The top was a black sheer, but lined, barely below the waist with gold sparkly stars on the long, full sleeves; a flouncy black skirt, just below my calf; black leggings; and black boots. Mr. Roy was out of breath by the time he loaded and unloaded our car with fancy plates of food. I was breathless from cooking. The rest of the story. All went well. The host’s home was decorated beautifully, ladies wore beautiful outfits, everyone had the Christmas spirit and then we all went home. My countertop at home was scattered with leftover food still in the decorative dishNot all the pieces of the party outfit made it to the party. es. Photo: Kay Grafe I knew what he was about to envelopes me and causes my mind to sky- say before he said it: “I told you not to make so many appetizers. What are you rocket. Especially if I am assigned a projgoing to do with all of them?” ect to prepare a specific dish or furnish “Freeze!” I said. Though I knew most appetizers for a special event. of them were unfreezeable. This was the case before Christmas. At that exact moment I glanced down Our 30-year-old dinner club members, and realized something startling. My only four couples now, decided to have a mind was reeling. What must people party at the couple’s home whose turn think of me? And why didn’t my normalwas to host in December. We were to ly observant husband notice? I asked him bring appetizers and restrict the number that question. of guests, since our children and grand“I thought that was the way you wantchildren were invited. A house can only ed to wear it. You wear such peculiar entertain its capacity. The party was a come-and-go occasion. things at times,” he said. I had forgotten to wear my skirt. The get-together gave us a reason to dress “At least you wore your leggings,” he up and wish folks a merry Christmas and talk as fast as we could to catch up on the said. latest activities in our friends’ lives. I made finger food for two days and Kay Grafe is the author of “Oh My Gosh, barely finished in time to get dressed for the 6 p.m. deadline. That was after I real- Virginia.” To order, send name, address, phone number and $16.95, plus $3.50 ized the large number of appetizers I had S&H to Kay Grafe, 2142 Fig Farm Road, accumulated and scurried to locate my Lucedale, MS 39452. nice serving dishes that are not stored in

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February 2016

Where our members have the power This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Communicators: Melissa Russo and April Lollar For Today in Mississippi information, call 877-7MY-CEPA (877-769-2372) www.coastepa.com

CEO’s message

Make energy efficiency a new resolution By this time in the new year, many of us have started to slip up a little on our resolutions. If your resolutions are long forgotten, I ask you to consider making a new one – focusing on energy efficiency in your home. A home that uses less energy means you spend less money each month on your bill – and that’s something we can all appreciate. Robert J. Occhi President and CEO

There is so much information out there and it can be confusing to sift through all of the advice. If you want to make your home more energy efficient and save money in 2016, I encourage you to attend one of our upcoming energy fairs. We host these fairs each year with the goal of letting you know about the programs and services we offer that can help you save. Cooperatives like Coast Electric

are probably the only companies that will tell you to use less of the product we are selling, but as notfor-profit businesses, we can focus on what is best for you, our members. If you are interested in learning how you can save, please take a look at our energy fair schedule and make plans to attend. If you can’t, give us a call. Our experts are always available to help you learn how to manage your energy use and save.

Payment kiosks Now in all locations! Coast Electric is offering members another convenient way to pay with kiosks at all office locations. Kiosks allow you to make payments 24 hours a day and payments are immediately posted to your account. Kiosks can accept your cash, check or credit card payment and will read your Coast Electric membership card.

Coast Electric celebrates years of service In January, two valued employees from our Picayune office retired after decades of service to Coast Electric and its members. Susie Estapa, a senior member service representative, retired after 37 years of service and Jeffrey Dedeaux, a serviceman,

retired after more than 30 years of service. Whether it was going the extra mile to help a member or working long hours to ensure reliable service, Jeffrey’s and Susie’s contributions to the cooperative will be missed. Susie Estapa

Jeffrey Dedeaux

Retirees and employee awards: We appreciate the years of dedication and service these employees have given to Coast Electric and its members.

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Years of service

Thomas J. Koenenn II Cedric B. Ladner Clement L. Ladner Keith A. Ladner Jacko H. Taylor Wayne J. Ulrich

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Years of service

Janell M. Nolan Donald J. Acker Billy M. Gilmore Jr. James M. McGuire Debra J. Seals

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Years of service

Anna S. Richardson Don E. Herndon Tony S. Russo Darrell W. Hardie David W. Ladner Ruth A. Landrum Jill M. DeSalvo Ronald G. Barnes

Kiosks are located at these Coast Electric offices Kiln headquarters on Hwy. 603 Bay St. Louis office on Hwy. 90 Picayune office on Hwy. 11 Poplarville office on Hwy. 53 Gulfport office on Hwy. 49 Biloxi office on Cedar Lake Rd.


February 2016

Annual energy fairs coming to an office near you! Coast Electric’s annual energy fairs are coming to an office near you this spring! If you have never attended one of our fairs, here is what you can expect: 1. Experts: You will have the opportunity to meet with our energy efficiency experts. Each county we serve has a dedicated residential energy management representative and we have one commercial marketing executive as well. These experts will be available to talk to you about energy savings programs that can help you save at your home or your business. Have questions about energy efficiency? Get answers at our energy fairs. 2. Interactive displays: You’ve heard that CFL and LED light bulbs can save you money, but have you seen the proof? Our light display will show the difference in the amount of energy these bulbs use.

There is also a display showing various types of insulation and air leak sealing methods. 3. Savings: After you speak to our experts about the types of energy savings programs that might be right for your home or business, you can sign up right then and there. Want to try our Time of Use rate? We can get you signed up. Need a Co-op Connections Card to help you save on prescriptions and other services? We will have cards there for you. We can walk you through savings on filters ar airfilter.coop, get you started with our Comfort Advantage Home program and much more! 4. Lagniappe: Besides information about energy savings, we can offer tips and materials on topics like hurricane preparation and generator safety. There will also be giveaways, drawings and treats! We hope to see you all at our energy fairs this spring.

2016 Energy Fair Dates and Locations All energy fairs will be begin at 8 a.m. and end at 2 p.m. Biloxi Energy Fair Gulfport Energy Fair Bay St. Louis Energy Fair Picayune Energy Fair Poplarville Energy Fair

Coast Electric Office on Cedar Lake Rd. Coast Electric Office on Hwy. 49 Coast Electric Office on Hwy. 90 Coast Electric Office on Hwy. 11 Coast Electric Office on Hwy. 53

March 1 March 2 May 3 June 3 June 3

MLK Day of Service Coast Electric Power Association employees spent time on Martin Luther King Jr. Day completing service projects to help and beautify the community. As part of an effort to honor the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr., many are turning the day set aside to honor King into a day of service to make their communities stronger and better. Coast Electric employees wanted to pitch in. Employee volunteers spent the cold morning cleaning up the cooperative’s adopted stretch of Hwy. 603 in Kiln and also participated in a diaper drive held by The United Way of South Mississippi. By the end of the

day, employees picked up around 20 45-gallon bags of trash and donated many diaper packages to families in need. “Dr. King challenged people to be proactive in their communities to make the world we live in a better place,” said Coast Electric President and CEO Bob Occhi. “It is our responsibility as part of this community – and one of our operating principles – to see where we can make a positive difference. I am proud that Coast Electric employees are taking a lead in improving the quality of life for our members and residents of south Mississippi.”

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Today in Mississippi I February 2016

everyday life!

Helping you to enjoy

Mississippi’s electric power associations have a long-standing tradition of promoting electrical safety and energy efficiency—a natural fit with our initial mission of extending affordable electric service to everyone who wanted it. We have helped generations of electric power association members make informed choices every time they flip a switch. We are member-owned electric cooperatives whose viability reflects our commitment to providing valuable, money-saving services to our members. So it’s only natural for electric power associations to work in the interests of members. Our broad mission of service also encompasses a range of community service activities. With a work force exceeding 2,900, electric power association employees are respected business leaders and civic-minded volunteers in small towns and rural communities throughout Mississippi. We help grow communities through economic development, leadership and volunteerism. We are more than an electric utility service. We are part of the family of electric cooperative members, and we work every day to make life better in our great state.

MAKE SURE YOU’RE JUST TRIMMING LIMBS When you’re trimming trees, check for nearby overhead power lines, including lines which might be hidden in the foliage of trees nearby. If knocked down by a falling limbs, these lines can kill. Think Safety !

while they keep your service reliable Our crews work every day to keep more than 94,800 miles of power lines energized. When you see them working along roadsides, please slow down and pass with care. We want our line workers to return home safely at the end of their work day!

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February 2016

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Today in Mississippi

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Swimming upstream and the Great Georgia Bear Hunt rom a practical standpoint, we really can’t imagine the rigors of those who began westward exploration of this country back in the 18th century. We may read about them and have perhaps seen TV programs or movies featuring such famous characters as Daniel Boone, but after removing the romanticism that so often accompanies portrayals of these and other individuals and cutting to the truth, we come to realize that life was difficult. Actually, simple survival was too often difficult. These men and others like them were not super human; they were simply human. Tragedy and hard times impacted them same as these do us. The time reference here is when men and women, motivated by a host of forces, among which was wanderlust, moved from the relative comfort of established settlements to live off the land and explore what was then the frontier—primarily the Appalachians. That region in 1770 was truly wild. It is probably safe to say that quiet folk along the Eastern Seaboard considered the behavior of those who chose to move toward wilderness as by Tony Kinton reckless. These brave, and sometimes foolish, travelers were definitely swimming upstream in the thinking of most who were contentedly domiciled and who had extinguished their own spark to ramble. As I now look back at more than six decades of life, it seems that I, too, have always been swimming upstream. In the face of perfected optics and long-range rifles, I prefer the flintlock, a tool with which those 1770 adventurers would have been totally familiar. I like a canvas haversack waterproofed with beeswax more than a sophisticated backpack made from

F

Outdoors Today

Noontootla Creek gurgled over rocks and made the perfect companion to sound sleep.

technologically advanced synthetics. Camo clothing and footwear can’t compare to center seams and buckskin and frocks and weskits. With such a propensity burning inside, I hatched a plan to live, with some modifications and for only one week, as did the long hunters. I would hunt bears. Site selection was the north Georgia mountains, a setting closely associated with those long hunters of 1770. The Appalachian Trail begins, as the crow flies, not 10 miles from where I camped. I set up a wall tent with wood stove and cot, for even Daniel Boone stopped wandering and sleeping on the ground when he was 65. I am older now than he was then. The little camp area, hardly big and flat enough for five tents, was perfect. No one was there! Noontootla Creek gurgled maybe 20 yards away. Huge hardwoods, then in their autumn finest, crowned the mountains and stream side. I cooked in a Dutch oven and corn boiler and bathed in creek water heated on the wood stove. Sleep was gentle and pleasant each night. The third day of my trip, I opted to drive out and visit my friend Stephen Patten. He manages Noontootla Creek Farms (NCFGA.net, 706-838-0585) near Blue Ridge, Ga. Among other activities, Noontootla Farms has three

Kinton’s camp, complete with a wall tent and wood stove. Photos: Tony Kinton

miles of private land bordering the creek on each side, and some of the finest trophy trout fishing available can be had there. After catching up with Stephen, I opted to divert my attention from bears and employ the services of guide Carter Morris. We put on waders and picked up flyrods. A 20-inch rainbow was my reward that afternoon. On the sixth and last day of my hunt, not long before shadows became menacing and haunting mountains forced me to begin a sizable trek back toward camp, I heard the bear. He climbed a white oak, broke an acornfilled limb, dropped it to the ground and then shuffled down to gorge himself on the bounty that had fallen. I marked his spot in my head as best I could and slid the haversack’s strap

over my shoulder. Perhaps I could get to the bear’s location while enough light remained to properly see the big flintlock’s sights. But I didn’t. Soft padding of paws in autumn leaves was all I heard; a ghostly dark form vanishing into heavy cover was all I saw. The following morning I broke camp and loaded my truck for the drive home. The 21st century was about five miles down a twisting dirt road. As I left the site it occurred to me that swimming upstream is not too bad after all. Tony Kinton has been an active outdoors writer for 30 years. His newest book, “Rambling Through Pleasant Memories,” is now available. Order from Amazon.com or Kinton’s website: www.tonykinton.com.


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February 2016

Peppermint Float mississippi

2 Tbsp. finely crushed peppermint candy 1 qt. peppermint ice cream 4 cups milk

Combine candy, milk and half the ice cream in a large mixer bowl. Beat on low speed until slushy. Pour into chilled glasses. Top each with a scoop of remaining ice cream. Makes 6 servings.

FEATURED COOKBOOK

‘Kitchen Memories Cookbook’ Simple recipes, fun activities, art and craft ideas, childhood memories and lively layouts make Sheila Simmons’ “Kitchen Memories Cookbook” a good choice for any adult and child who enjoy (or want to start) cooking together. “I’m expecting my first grandchild in a few weeks, and I wrote this cookbook with a mind for anyone to use with the child they love,” said Simmons, a Central Electric Power Association member living in Lena. Her recipes are easy to follow and use simple ingredients kids crave. We asked 13-year-old Olivia Fulton, of Yazoo County, to share her impressions of the cookbook. Olivia admits to being a picky eater, “so it’s a pretty big thing that I like a lot of [the recipes] in there,” she said. Some of her choices are reprinted here; the French Toast Sticks is a favorite. (We threw in the two vegetable recipes in the interest of culinary balance.) Olivia pronounced the cookbook “kid friendly” and said the easy directions for a wide variety of “yummy” recipes made her want to cook. “To me, it doesn’t really look like a cookbook. It looks more like a cook activity book,” she said. “There are not just recipes [for food]. There is a recipe for handprints and for some fingerpainting. And I thought that was really cool.” Simmons also provided pages for kids to customize with their own favorite foods, books, activities, holiday memories, vacations and much more. Olivia gave this highly interactive cookbook her top rating—five stars. “Kitchen Memories Cookbook” is published by Great American Publishers, Simmons’ company based in Lena. Copies are available from bookstores, gift shops and online booksellers. Price for the full-color, 256-page softcover cookbook is $18.95. For details, call 1-888-854-5954 or visit www.greatamericanpublishers.com.

French Toast Sticks 8 thick slices bread (Texas toast style or thick-cut French bread) ¼ cup melted butter 4 eggs

1⁄3 cup sugar ¼ tsp. cinnamon ¾ tsp. vanilla extract 2⁄3 cup milk

Preheat oven to 350 F. Cut each slice of bread into 3 pieces to make sticks. In a bowl, mix melted butter, eggs, sugar, cinnamon, vanilla and milk. Beat well. Dip sticks into egg mixture and place on a cookie sheet that has been sprayed with cooking spray. If there is any dip left, drizzle it over the sticks. Bake 25 minutes on middle rack of oven. Turn sticks halfway through baking time. Serve with syrup. To make ahead, allow sticks to cool. Flash freeze on cookie sheet, remove and place in a zip-close plastic bag. To reheat, place 3 sticks on a microwave-safe plate and heat on high 1 minute or until warm.

Egg in a Hole White or whole-wheat sandwich bread Vegetable oil

Eggs Salt and pepper

Use a glass to cut center out of a slice of bread. Heat oil in a skillet. Place bread in skillet. Break egg carefully so that contents fall into the hole. Salt and pepper to taste. Fry until egg is cooked through. May need to turn. Repeat for more sandwiches.

Oatmeal Pancakes ½ cup all-purpose flour ½ cup quick-cooking oats ¾ cup buttermilk ¼ cup milk 1 Tbsp. sugar

2 Tbsp. vegetable oil 1 tsp. baking powder ½ tsp. baking soda ½ tsp. salt 1 egg

Beat all ingredients in a medium bowl with a hand beater until smooth. For thinner pancakes, stir in an additional 2 to 4 tablespoons milk. Using a pastry brush, grease a heated griddle, if necessary, with shortening. To test if griddle is hot enough, sprinkle with a few drops of water. If drops skitter around, the heat is just right. For each pancake, pour about ¼ cup batter onto the hot griddle. Cook until pancakes are puffed and dry around the edges. Turn and cook other side until golden brown. Serve with applesauce if desired. Makes 10 to 12 pancakes.

Honey-Butter Peas Veggie Bites 1⁄3 cup melted margarine or butter, divided 1 egg 2 tsp. water ½ cup all-purpose flour ½ tsp. salt

2 cups fresh vegetables (broccoli or cauliflower florets, ¼-inch carrot slices, ½-inch zucchini slices, ½-inch green or red pepper slices Grated Parmesan cheese, optional

Heat oven to 450 F. Place 1 tablespoon margarine in a 9-by-13-inch baking dish in oven to melt. Beat egg and water with a fork in a shallow dish. Mix flour and salt in another shallow dish. Dip about ¼ cup vegetables into egg mixture. Remove 1 piece at a time with a slotted spoon, fork or hands; roll in flour mixture to coat. Place in prepared pan. Repeat with remaining vegetables. Carefully pour remaining margarine over each vegetable piece and into pan. Bake, uncovered, turning once, until vegetables are crisp-tender and coating is golden brown, 10 to 12 minutes. Drain. Sprinkle lightly with Parmesan cheese if you like.

1 (12-oz.) pkg. frozen green peas ¼ cup honey ¼ cup margarine, softened

Prepare peas according to package directions; drain. Combine honey and margarine in a small mixer bowl; beat until fluffy. Pour over peas. Serve immediately.

Popcorn Cake 4 quarts (16 cups) popped popcorn 1 lb. spiced gumdrops ½ cup dry roasted peanuts

½ cup butter or margarine ½ cup vegetable oil 1 (1-lb.) pkg. marshmallows

Combine popcorn, gumdrops and peanuts in a large bowl. In a saucepan, melt butter. Mix in oil and marshmallows. Heat, stirring until marshmallows are melted. Pour over popcorn. Mix well. Press into a greased springform pan. Serve immediately.


February 2016

Mississippi Mardi Gras offers a season of merriment

By Nancy Jo Maples floats, bands and marching groups like the upon Christian observances. Carnival startLet the good times roll and throw me Ole Biloxi Gentlemen’s Club, whose mem- ed Jan. 6, The Epiphany, and ends at midsomething, mister. Mardi Gras season has bers famously hand out flowers and beaded night on Fat Tuesday, which is always the day before Ash Wednesday. The Lenten arrived and parades are rolling. necklaces along the parade route—usually Lively parades and royal revelry abound in exchange for kisses. season begins on Ash Wednesday and repalong the Gulf Coast and in a few other resents a period of fasting and prayer lead“The biggest joy I get is looking at the cities in Mississippi this time of year. smiling faces of the people along the route ing up to Easter Sunday. Mardi Gras madness definitely fills the air The calendar date of Fat Tuesday differs as they catch the throws,” said Nancy in the three coastal counties. Places like from year to year because the date of Easter Rogers, executive director of the Gulf Hattiesburg and Natchez also changes. Easter is the first celebrate the season. Even Sunday following a full moon Laurel has joined the action and after the Spring Equinox and hosted a parade for its second Ash Wednesday is six weeks year this carnival season. prior to that date. For example, Coast parades kicked off in while this year Mardi Gras is Ocean Springs with the 41st Feb. 9, it will be on Feb. 28 Annual Elks Parade on January next year and on February 13 23. Others are slated for the in the year 2018. season including one in Carnival season is not only Pascagoula geared for children filled with parades but also and featuring anything nonwith parties where families and motorized such as cyclists, friends feast on bounties of skaters and walkers pushing food, especially King Cakes, shopping carts or pulling wagoval-shaped sugary pastries Parades and balls celebrate Mardi Gras season in several Mississippi communities, especially those along the Mississippi Coast. Photos: Tommy Triplett ons. Most other parades have decorated in the Mardi Gras motorized floats ornately decocolors of purple, green and rated and topped with masked riders wear- Coast Carnival Association. “When I see gold. Each one contains a tiny doll hidden ing costumes who throw extravagant treats the barricades go up on the streets I get inside the cake. The person who receives to spectators along the sidewalks. Common goose bumps in anticipation of the happithe piece of cake with the doll is expected trinkets thrown during the parade include ness that is about to come.” to host the next party. Krewes (carnival beads, stuffed animals, toys, moon pies, Rogers grew up in Biloxi and has partic- social clubs) host balls featuring their kings and doubloons (aluminum coins embossed ipated in parades all of her life. As an adult and queens wearing face masks and dressed with commemorative data about the she has been part of planning and riding in in royal costumes with stately sculptors, parade). parades. However, as a child she watched sparkling rhinestone crowns and long, Parades fill every weekend of the season from the streets with her cousins and relaflowing velvet capes. and are predominantly found in Harrison, tives. Because balls are by invitation only, not Hancock and Jackson counties. Feb. 9, Fat everyone can attend one. However, any“We spent the day watching the parade Tuesday, features three parades. One of and then stayed for the night parade. It’s a body can go to the parades. these is sponsored by Biloxi’s Gulf Coast Let the parades and the good times roll. time for families to spend time together Carnival Association, which is the oldest and have fun,” she said. Writer Nancy Jo Maples can be reached association on Mississippi’s coast and has Mardi Gras is French for Fat Tuesday at 188 Ernest Pipkins Road, Lucedale, MS the largest parade. It begins at 1 p.m. and and signals the climax for a season of mer39452 or nancyjomaples@aol.com. expects to showcase more than 100 units of riment called “carnival,” which centers

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February 5 Ocean Springs Carnival Association Night Parade, 7 p.m.; Downtown Ocean Springs

February 6 • Jackson County Carnival Association, 1 p.m. (rain date Feb. 7, 2 p.m.) Pascagoula • 46th Annual Krewe of Gemini Mardi Gras Daytime Parade, 2 p.m. Downtown Gulfport • Krewe of Neptune, 5:30 p.m. Downtown Biloxi

February 7 • 86th Annual St. Paul’s Carnival Association Parade, noon Highway 90, Pass Christian • North Bay Association (D’Iberville) Mardi Gras Parade, 1:30 p.m. St. Martin to D’Iberville

February 8 • Mystic Krewe of The Seahorse Parade, 5 p.m. Downtown Bay St. Louis

February 9 • Ninth Annual Krewe of Diamonds Mardi Gras Parade, 1 p.m. (predominantly African American and formerly known as Krewe of the Real People) Downtown Bay St. Louis • Gulf Coast Carnival Association Mardi Gras Parade, 1 p.m. Downtown Biloxi • 46th Annual Krewe of Gemini Mardi Gras Night Parade, 5:30 p.m. Downtown Gulfport


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Marketplace

Today in Mississippi

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February 2016

Mississippi

Type or print your ad clearly. Be sure to include your telephone number. Deadline is the 10th of each month for the next month’s issue. Rate is $2.50 per word, 10-word minimum. Mail payment with your ad to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300. Have any questions? Phone 601-605-8600 or email advertising@epaofms.com.

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 Use your generator only outdoors,

away from open windows, vents and doors. Do not use it in an attached garage.  Never plug your generator directly into your home outlet. Connecting a generator to your home’s wiring requires the professional installation of a power transfer switch.  Read and heed the manufacturer’s instructions and safety warnings.

What to do during an

Electrical Storm

THINK SAFETY!

LAND FOR SALE

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Lightning can enter your home through a direct strike, through wires or pipes, and through the ground. During a thunderstorm, don’t touch electrical equipment or cords, such as a corded phone, computer, stove, TV or microwave. Postpone your bath or shower to avoid contact with plumbing. And stay indoors for at least 30 minutes after the last clap of thunder.

A safety message from your local Electric Power Association


February 2016

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Today in Mississippi

I

How a Bill Becomes Law in Mississippi BILL

The Mississippi

NO. 123

LEGISLATURE The Mississippi State Constitution gives the legislature the power and responsibility to write the laws of the state and appropriate funds for the operation of government. The legislature is composed of a Senate and a House of Representatives. Membership is currently limited to 122 representatives and 52 senators, elected for four-year terms. Special elections may be called to fill unexpired terms. Most of Mississippi’s legislators have other occupations and are not full-time legislators. The lieutenant governor presides over the Senate. The speaker of the house is a representative elected to the position by House members to preside over the House. The legislature convenes annually at the Capitol for a regular session that begins on the Tuesday after the first Monday in January. Regular sessions last 90 days, except during the first year of a new term (when the governor, legislators and other state elected officials take office); then the session lasts 125 days. However, the governor may call a special session whenever he deems it necessary. Between sessions, legislators prepare bills, study issues, attend meetings and legislative conferences, and work with constituents.

Contact House and Senate members during session:

601-359-3770

Introduction in House or Senate (First Reading)

Reference to Committee (Second Reading)

YES

FEBRUARY 4 1 2 3 11 10 9 7 8 18 19 14 16 17

NO (Third Reading) Debate by House of Origin

Vote on Final Passage

If bill passes, sent to other House

Report of Committee

Committee Hearings

Placed on Calendar

BILL NO. 123

Reference to Committee (Second Reading)

(First Reading) Other House

YES If bill passes, returns to House of Origin

FEBRUARY 4 1 2 3 11 10 9 7 8 18 19 14 16 17

NO

Vote on Final Passage

Bill Passes Both Houses in Identical Form

Report of Committee

Committee Hearings

(Third Reading) Debate

Placed on Calendar

Bill Passes Both Houses In Different Form and House of Origin Accepts Changes

Bill Passes Both Houses In Different Form and House of Origin Rejects Changes; May Invite Conference

This information provided as a service of the Electric Power Associations of Mississippi

It’s easy to know your elected officials

AVAILABLE! A free, interactive legislative app for Mississippi.

The Electric Power Associations of Mississippi offers free versions of the 2016 Legislative Roster. We hope they will be helpful in your involvement with state government.

YES

NO

Both Houses Vote on Conference Report

BILL

NO. 123

Enrolled Bill Sent to Governor

To check on the status of a bill during session: 601-359-3719

Conference Committee Reaches Compromise and Files Conference Report

If Both Houses Adopt Conference Report

Bill Sent to Conference Committee

Bill Becomes Law If: 1. Signed by Governor 2. Not Signed By Governor By Deadline 3. Vetoed But Overridden

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MISSISSIPPI

Events Want more than 400,000 readers to know about your special event? Submit it at least two months prior to the event date. Submissions must include a phone number with area code for publication. Mail to Mississippi Events, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300; fax to 601-605-8601; or email to news@epaofms.com. Events open to the public will be published free of charge as space allows. Please note that events are subject to change; we recommend calling to confirm details before traveling.

Valentine Scherenschnitte Paper Cutting Class, Feb. 6, Ridgeland. Learn to make unique Valentines with artisan Shawn Richards; 1:30 - 4:30 p.m. Admission. Mississippi Craft Center. Details/reservations: 601-856-7546; Sheri@mscrafts.org. Chili Cook-off and Family Fun Day, Feb. 6, Hattiesburg. Chili, burgers, inflatables, face painting, silent auction; 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. First Presbyterian Church. Details: hopeforhattiesburg.org/chili. Gulf Coast Winter Classic Horse Shows, Feb. 10 - March 20, Gulfport. Showing jump-

• • • • • • •

Easton Corbin Maddie and Tae John Anderson Joe Diffie Frankie Ballard 38 Special Tyler Farr

ing, food, entertainment, kids’ activities. Free admission. Harrison County Fairgrounds. Details: 228-832-2745; gulfcoastclassiccompany.com. Great Backyard Bird Count, Feb. 13, Moss Point. Presentation by Mark LaSalle; 10-11 a.m. Free. Pascagoula River Audubon Center. Details: 228-475-0825. Oxford Film Festival, Feb. 17-21, Oxford. Screenings of 144 films, filmmaker panels, workshops. Admission; some events free. Details: 877-560-3456; oxfordfilmfest.com. JAMfest Cheer and Dance Competition,

Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb.

11 12 13 14 15 16 17

Feb. 20, Southaven. High-energy music and games; 8 a.m. Free admission. Landers Center. Details: jamfest.com. Shape-note Singing School, Feb. 24, Jackson. Learn to sing Early American hymns in four-part harmony; 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum. Details: 601-953-1094. Roosevelt State Park Music Festival, Feb. 25-27, Morton. Bluegrass, gospel and country music, including Driskill Mountain, Clear Blue Sky, others. Admission. Livingston Performing Arts Center. Details: 601-537-3641. Warren County Wildlife and Outdoor Expo, Feb. 27, Vicksburg. Outdoor clothing and equipment, speakers, outdoor cook-off, kids’ activities, photo contest, more. Free admission. Vicksburg Convention Center. Details: warrencountywildlifeexpo.com. 56th Annual Mississippi Gem, Mineral, Fossil and Jewelry Show, Feb. 27-28, Jackson. Dealers, lapidary arts demos, children’s activities, exhibits, door prizes, more. Admission. Mississippi Trade Mart, fairgrounds. Details: missgems.org. 26th Annual Greenhouse Tomato Short Course, March 1-2, Raymond. Expert speakers, exhibitors. Advance registration encouraged. Admission. Eagle Ridge Conference

Center. Details: 601-892-3731; greenhousetomatosc.com. B&S Consignment Sale, March 1-3, Brookhaven. Infant, children/teen and adult clothing, toys, furniture; 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Free admission. Lincoln Civic Center. Details: bnsconsignment.com. “Dearly Departed,” March 3-6, Laurel. Southern redneck comedy presented by Laurel Little Theatre. Historic Arabian Theatre. Details: 601-428-0140; laurellittletheatre.com. MidSouth Home Expressions Expo, March 4-6, Southaven. Admission. Landers Center. Details: midsouthhomeexpressions.com. Starkville Public Library Book Sales, March 7, Starkville. Proceeds go to support library projects; noon - 6 p.m. Free admission. Starkville Public Library. Details: 662-3232766. Twice As Nice Kids Resale, March 9-12, D’Iberville. Sale of used children, infant and maternity items from more than 800 consignors. D’Iberville Civic Center. Details: 850341-1676; 2asnicekidsresale.com. Shape-note Singing School, March 9, April 13, May 11, Florence. Learn to sing Early American hymns in four-part harmony; second Wednesday monthly; 6-8 p.m. Free. Details: 601-953-1094.

Tickets available through

Dixie National Mobile App Download Free from the Apple or Android Store.


February 2016

HARBOR FREIGHT

® N RAPID PUMP 1.5 TOJAC K ALUMINUM RACING

We have invested millions of dollars in our own state-of-the-art quality test labs and millions more in our factories, so our tools will go toe-to-toe with the top professional brands. And we can sell them for a fraction of the price because we cut out the middle man and pass the savings on to you. It’s just that simple! Come visit one of our 600+ Stores Nationwide. R PE ON SU UP CO

SAVE 57%

R PE ON SU UP CO

59

comp at

$259.99

459

calling rFreight.com or by or prior n at our stores, Harbo LIMIT 3 - Good t be used with other discount or coupo al receipt. 800-423-2567. Cannodays from original purchase with originn must be Original coupo rable. purchases after 30 ransfe Non-t es last. er per day. Offer good while supplih 6/5/16. Limit one coupon per custom presented. Valid throug

comp at

$29.97

R PE ON SU UP CO

R PE ON SU UP CO

27 LED PORTABLE WORKLIGHT/FLASHLIGHT LOT 67227 shown 69567/60566/62532

• 1500 lb. capacity

$

2999

$

comp at

Batteries included.

comp at

2

$ 99

DRIVE 1/4" 3/8" 1/2"

LOT 2696/61277 807/61276 62431/239

$

comp at

R PE ON SU UP CO

$149

99 $

SAVE

$

99

$

• Includes Ram, Hook and Chain

comp at

$269

LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 6/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R 3/8" x 14 FT. GRADE 43 PERON PE ON TOWING CHAIN SUOUP SU UP Customer Rating CO C

$

99

SAVE 59% $ 99

comp at

comp at

5

21

LIMIT 9 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 6/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R PE ON SU UP CO

R PE ON SU UP CO

R PE ON SU UP CO

R PE ON SU UP CO

• Pair of arbor plates included

comp at

$369.99

SAVE 33%

Customer Rating

3999

$

comp at

• 2000 lb. capacity • 27-3/16" clearance

$59.99

$

7999

• 350 lb. capacity

• 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed • Over 30 Million Satisfied Customers

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 6/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

SAVE $40 99 $

59

comp at

comp at

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 6/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

SAVE

76%

comp at

$59.97

calling rFreight.com or by or prior n at our stores, Harbo LIMIT 5 - Good t be used with other discount or coupo al receipt. 800-423-2567. Cannodays from original purchase with originn must be coupo 30 al after Origin ases purch es last. Non-transferable. er per day. Offer good while supplih 6/5/16. Limit one coupon per custom presented. Valid throug

R PE ON SU UP CO

Customer Rating

MOVER'S DOLLY

LOT 60497/93888 shown 61899/62399/63095/63096 63098/63097

• 1000 lb. capacity

SAVE 54%

8

$ 99 comp at

$19.97 LIMIT 7 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 6/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

SAVE

WOW12 VOSULT,PE10R CO/2/UP50ONAMP

57%

$99.99

$199.99 LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 6/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

LOT 61161/90428 shown

SAVE $120

Customer Rating

19

99

30" SERVICE CART WITH LOCKING DRAWER

• 3-1/2 ton capacity

Customer Rating

15999

$

LOT 97214

$

$14.97

$64.99

3-POINT QUICK HITCH

$1399

Customer Rating

SAVE 66% Not for overhead lifting.

32 PIECE SCREWDRIVER SET

LOT 5889

LOT 61259/90764 shown

LOT 60658 97711 shown

• 5400 lb. capacity

99

99

comp at

349

calling rFreight.com or by or prior n at our stores, Harbo LIMIT 3 - Good t be used with other discount or coupo al receipt. 800-423-2567. Cannodays from original purchase with originn must be coupo 30 al Origin purchases after es last. Non-transferable. er per day. Offer good while supplih 6/5/16. Limit one coupon per custom presented. Valid throug

WOW SUPER COUPON

FOLDABLE SHOP CRANE 29 PIECE TITANIUM E COATED LOT 69512/93840 NITRID 61858/69445 shown HIGH SPEED BIT SET shown STEEL /622 81/61637

SAVE $169

1179$499

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 6/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

Customer Rating 1 TON CAPACITY

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 6/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

LOT 32879/60603 shown

$952.99

comp at

LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 6/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

Customer Rating

$7.15

LOT 60668/6530 shown

LOT 61609 67831 shown

Customer Rating

$29.99

• Accuracy within ±4%

LIMIT 6 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 6/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

42" OFF-ROAD/ FARM JACK

ROLLER CABINET

• 1060 lb. capacity • 14,600 cu. in. of storage

1199 $ 99 319 SAVE $633

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 6/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

SAVE $210

$69.99

R PE ON SU UP CO 26", 16 DRAWER

Customer Rating

YOUR CHOICE

AIR COMPRESSOR

LOT 69091/61454 61693/62803 67847 shown

comp at

$179.99

Item 239 shown

TORQUE WRENCHES

$49.99 LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 6/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

Customer Rating

7999

20 TON SHOP PRESS

3199

comp at

SAVE 58%

SAVE $100

– Car Craft Magazine

60%

4-1/4" grinding wheel included.

WOW

8

"Impressive Accuracy, Amazing Value"

SAVE 40% Customer Rating SAVE

1500 WATT DUAL SUPER COUPON TEMPERATURE HEAT GUN 2.5 HP, 21 GALLON (572°/1112°) 125 PSI VERTICAL

SAVE 70% $ 99

R PE ON SU UP CO

LOT 61613 68221 shown

comp at

LIMIT 8 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 6/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

$

ELECTRIC CHAIN SAW SHARPENER

$999

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 6/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

LOT 90018 shown 69595/60334

SAVE 54%

LIMIT 1 - Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or prior purchase. Coupon good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Offer good while supplies last. Shipping & Handling charges may apply if not picked up in-store. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 6/5/16. Limit one FREE GIFT Coupon per customer per day.

$540 $59999

SAVE

SAVE $200

SUPER-WIDE TRI-FOLD ALUMINUM LOADING RAMP

R 60 LED SOLAR SECURITY LIGHT PE ON SU UP Customer Rating O C LOT 62534/69643 shown

Includes 6V, 900 mAh NiCd battery pack.

LOT 68525/69677 63087/63088 CALIFORNIA ONLY

Customer Rating LOT 61258 shown 61840/61297/68146

R PE ON SU UP CO

LOT SUPERT 63085/69671 shown QUIE

LOT 62340/62546 63104/96289 shown

99

$119.9

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 6/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

2500 LB. ELECTRIC WINCH WITH WIRELESS REMOTE CONTROL

$

comp at

ANY SINGLE ITEM

R PE ON SU UP CO

Customer Rating

899999

VALUE

comp at

$9.38

60

4

• 76 dB Noise Level

LIMIT 6 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 6/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

$

$ 97

Customer Rating

3

SAVE

t 800-423-2567. Canno ht.com or by calling 30 days from original after our stores, HarborFreig LIMIT 5 - Good at discount or coupon or prior purchaseslast. Non-transferable. Original be used with other al receipt. Offer good while supplies coupon per customer per day. one origin Limit with . purchase ted. Valid through 6/5/16 coupon must be presen

LOT 69031/69030 shown

LOT 69249/69115/69137 69129/69121/877 shown

$ 99

$59

$

99

1" x 25 FT. TAPE MEASURE

8750 PEAK/ ING WATTS NN RU 0 700 13 HP (420 CC) RATORS6 GAS GENE6853 0/6308

$

• 3-1/2 Pumps Lifts Most Vehicles • Weighs 32 lbs.

WITH ANY PURCHASE

Limit 1 coupon per customer per day. Save 20% on any 1 item purchased. *Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or any of the following items or brands: Inside Track Club membership, extended service plan, gift card, open box item, 3 day parking lot sale item, compressors, floor jacks, saw mills,  storage cabinets, chests or carts, trailers, trenchers, welders, Admiral, CoverPro, Daytona, Diablo, Franklin, Hercules, Holt, Jupiter, Predator, Stik-Tek, StormCat, Union, Vanguard, Viking.  Not valid on prior purchases. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 6/5/16.

I

LOT 69252/60569 shown 68053/62160 Customer Rating 62496/62516

FREE 20% OFF

WOW SUPER COUPON

7 FT. 4" x 9 FT. 6" ALL PURPOSE WEATHER RESISTANT TARP

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON

Today in Mississippi

WOW SUPER COUPON

QUALITY TOOLS AT RIDICULOUSLY LOW PRICES

How Does Harbor Freight Sell GREAT QUALITY Tools at the LOWEST Prices?

I

LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 6/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

• No Hassle Return Policy • Lifetime Warranty On All Hand Tools

BATTERY CHARGER/ ENGINE STARTER

LOT 66783/60581 62334/60653 shown

$2999 $

4999 comp at

$69.99

calling rFreight.com or by or prior n at our stores, Harbo LIMIT 5 - Good t be used with other discount or coupo al receipt. 800-423-2567. Cannodays from original purchase with originn must be coupo 30 al after Origin purchases es last. Non-transferable. er per day. Offer good while supplih 6/5/16. Limit one coupon per custom presented. Valid throug

• 600+ Stores Nationwide • HarborFreight.com 800-423-2567

19


Today in Mississippi February 2016 Coast  

Today in Mississippi February 2016 Coast

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