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Periodical postage (ISSN 1052 2433)

News for members of Coast Electric Power Association

4 Explore Tenn-Tom Waterway at Columbus museum

12 Southern recipes

for busy Southern cooks

14 Picture This:

Country churches


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January 2017

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January 2017

Mississippi Bicentennial a time to reflect, learn and enjoy his issue marks the start of Today in Mississippi’s 70th year of publication. Our first issue was mailed to members in January 1948 as the post-war rural electrification effort in Mississippi was expanding rapidly, making it possible for more residents to have electric light for the first time in their lives. Another important anniversary comes around this year: Mississippi’s 200th year of statehood. Mississippi became the 20th state in the nation on Dec. 10, 1817, when President James Madison signed the resolution enabling citizens to form a constitution and state government. Communities around the state will celebrate the Mississippi Bicentennial with events held throughout the year. If you haven’t been in the Old Capitol Museum in Jackson since its 2009 restoration, I highly recommend making plans to visit this beautiful and fascinating site. Exhibits focus on the historical building itself and major events that have taken place there. On exhibit until Jan. 6 is the 1817 Mississippi Constitution and 20-Star Flag Exhibit. The rare 20-star flag was the first American flag to include Mississippi. The highlight of the year-long bicentennial observance will be the opening in December of two new “world class” museums in Jackson, the Museum of Mississippi History and the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum. Excitement has been mounting in the capital city as we’ve watched the buildings rise on a spacious lot across the street from the state fairgrounds. Visitors will be able to walk from these two museums to the William F. Winter Archives & History Building, the War Memorial Building and the Old Capitol Museum. The Governor’s Mansion and the new Capitol are only a few blocks away. Taken together, these institutions paint a complete picture of Mississippi through its history, government, culture and architecture. ••• Speaking of government, the 2017 regular session of the Mississippi Legislature convenes at noon on

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On the cover Readers’ submissions to this month’s “Picture This” feature include (from top): • Carr United Methodist Church (1837), in Forest, by Barney Finch of Forest, a member of Southern Pine Electric • Estill Church, by Lester Sumrall of Byram. See more historic church buildings throughout Mississippi on pages 14-15.

Jan. 3. Do you know who represents your interests in the legislature? You can find pictures of local legislators on the center pages of this issue. For more complete information, look to the Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi Legislative Roster. ECM produces the digital roster each year as a guide to state senators and representatives. The roster provides an easy way to identify legislators and all state elected officials, view their biographical information and get contact information. The roster also lists the latest committee assignments for legislators. My Opinion Find the roster online at Michael Callahan ecm.coop; click on “GovExecutive Vice President/CEO ernment Relations” and Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi “Legislative Roster.” The roster is also available as a free app for your mobile device. Search for “Mississippi Legislative Roster” in the Apple App Store or Google Play. ••• Your local electric cooperative is part of a statewide network of electric cooperatives who not only deliver reliable electric service but guard that service from harmful legislation. We constantly monitor proposed bills to ensure they will not adversely affect your electricity’s cost or reliability. As member-owned, not-for-profit cooperatives, we work to provide safe, reliable electric service at the least cost possible. That service includes acting as your legislative watchdog. No legislator wants to cause you to pay more for electricity, but increased cost can be an unintended consequence of a proposed bill. We work closely with legislators to prevent that from happening. They appreciate our input and we are grateful for their cooperation.

Today in Mississippi OFFICERS Tim Smith - President Barry Rowland - First Vice President Randy Smith - Second Vice President Keith Hayward - Secretary/Treasurer

EDITORIAL STAFF Michael Callahan - CEO Ron Stewart - Sr. VP, Communications Mark Bridges - Manager, Support Services Debbie H. Stringer - Editor Elissa Fulton - Communications Specialist Trey Piel - Digital Media Manager Rickey McMillan - Graphics Specialist Linda Hutcherson - Administrative Assistant

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ON FACEBOOK Vol. 70 No. 1 EDITORIAL OFFICE & ADVERTISING 601-605-8600 Acceptance of advertising by Today in Mississippi does not imply endorsement of the advertised product or services by the publisher or Mississippi’s electric power associations. Product satisfaction and delivery responsibility lie solely with the advertiser. • National advertising representative: National Country Market, 800-626-1181 Circulation of this issue: 458,007 Non-member subscription price: $9.50 per year

The Official Publication of the Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi Today in Mississippi (ISSN 1052-2433) is published 11 times a year (Jan.-Nov.) by Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi Inc., P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300, or 665 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland, MS 39157. Phone 601-605-8600. Periodical postage paid at Ridgeland, MS, and additional office. The publisher (and/or its agent) reserves the right to refuse or edit all advertising. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300

Visit us online at www.todayinmississippi.com

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Our Homeplace

St. Mary Chapel was built in the late 1830s on a portion of Laurel Hill Plantation, near Natchez. The privately owned building is included in the National Register of Historic Places. Behind the Gothic-style structure is a cemetery with grave markers dating to the late 1700s. Photo by Ouida Donald, of Louisville, a member of East Mississippi Electric.

Mississippi is a place for pure serenity, a place to raise a family patiently with morals and respect. A time and place full of adventure, exploring and fun. Get-togethers, family reunions, festivals and country tradition are deeply rooted and grounded in the state. Beautiful and rich countryside wins the hearts of tourists and people passing through the state. The locals are hospitable and share advice, remedies and experiences. A seasonal time and place where springtime is fresh, the summer abundant with sunshine. Fall is decorative, cool and culturally festive, and the winters are short and special. I’m a proud Mississippian. — Artilus Mondale Moore Sr., Panther Burn My mind drifts back to the homeplace of my mother (in Greenwood Springs). Along with her brothers and sisters, she grew up in an environment that was enveloped by nature. I recall from past visits the wispy clouds that hung over the hazy fields that made up the farm on which she lived. Winding its way through the middle of this paradise was a lazy creek on which slithered a limber water snake. As the daylight faded, the sun exploded through the oak and willow trees, and seemed to set each one ablaze from tip to tip. This old homeplace smelled of the ghosts of days gone by that laughed and frolicked through this peaceful and serene setting, now overgrown with brush. If I listened closely, and closed my eyes tightly, I could still hear my mom as she celebrated her childhood. — Marshall Eubanks Jr., Amory

What’s Mississippi to you? What do you treasure most about life in our state? Send your thoughts to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158, or to news@ecm.coop. Please keep your comments brief. Submissions are subject to editing for length and clarity.

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January 2017

columbus museum showcases

tenn-tom waterway By Nancy Jo Maples The Tenn-Tom Waterway Transportation Museum in Columbus provides a fun format for learning about the passageway that connects inland America to the Gulf of Mexico. An estimated 2,000 guests tour the museum each year. The facility opened in February 2015 and the number of visitors is expected to increase as public awareness grows. Admission is free of charge, but donations are appreciated. “We want all school children to have the opportunity to tour this very educational hands-on museum, and sometimes their funds might prohibit that and we would never want that to be the case,” Executive Director Agnes Zaiontz said. All exhibits are interactive, making the museum an entertaining and educational opportunity for both students and adults. “This has truly been a labor of love for the board and myself. We wanted to capture the long history of the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway along with the construction, legal battles, funding and development. I think we have done it well,” Zaiontz said. The museum highlights the uniqueness of the waterway with its extensive lock and dam system. The museum also explains the intermodal system through which the waterway works with other transportation methods, such as railroads, to carry goods in a single journey. While the waterway’s primary purpose is to provide a transportation route, it consequentially offers a multitude of recreational opportunities like camping, boating, picnicking, fishing and hunting. The Tenn-Tom connects the Tennessee River and the Tombigbee River. The water route has a storied past of opposition from environmentalists who wanted to preserve nature, railroad companies who sought to thwart transportation competition, and other states who wanted government funding for their own projects. French explorers in the mid-1700s recognized the benefit of a connected water route in this area. Studies in the first half of the 20th century led to congressional approval of the waterway in 1946. However, opposition via politics and through the court system pre-

Interactive exhibits throughout the Tenn-Tom Waterway Transportation Museum provide both fun and educational experiences for all ages. Artifacts include a model of the steamboat Vienna, right, built to commemorate the waterway’s grand opening in June 1985. The model also served as a time capsule until its reopening in June 2010. Photos: Tellos Creative

vented the Tenn-Tom from becoming reality until 1985. The passageway officially opened to commercial voyages on Jan. 10, 1985. A lottery was conducted to select the first vessel to transit the waterway. The towboat, Eddie Waxler, won the draw and transported almost 2.7 million gallons of petroleum products. Stretching 234 miles, the $2 billion federally fund-

ed waterway starts on the Tennessee River near the Tennessee state line in the upper eastern corner of Mississippi and runs southward through Tishomingo, Itawamba, Monroe, Clay, Lowndes and Noxubee Counties. It continues in a southeasterly direction to


January 2017

Demopolis, Ala. where it intersects the Tombigbee River. The Tombigbee continues southward to the Mobile Bay and to the Gulf of Mexico. The Tenn-Tom channel is 9 feet deep, 300 feet wide and has 10 locks. The connecting strip enables shipping from Kentucky to the Gulf. The Tenn-Tom Waterway’s selling points include the fact that an eight-barge tow can move as much freight as 120 railcars or 461 tractor trailer trucks. A barge can move a ton of freight twice as far as a train and eight times as far as a tractor trailer on the same amount of fuel, according to the waterway’s website, www.tenntom.org. The waterway shortens shipping distances for many inland ports by 800 miles or more. Common items shipped via the channel include timber, wood chips, petroleum by-products, crushed rock and grains. Geared toward youngsters and adults, the museum’s hours of operation are Monday through Friday 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. and by appointment on weekends. Special tours can be arranged by calling 800-457-9739. Its physical

location is 318 Seventh St. North in Columbus. Writer Nancy Jo Maples can be reached at 188 Ernest Pipkins Road, Lucedale, Miss. 39452 or via email at nancyjomaples@aol.com.

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Through this hands-on exhibit, visitors can explore the Tenn-Tom Waterway system, one of largest public works projects ever untaken in U.S. history. Learn more about the Tenn-Tom Waterway Transportation Museum at its website, museum.tenntom.org.

Located at 318 Seventh St. North in Columbus, the museum is open weekdays 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and by appointment on weekends. Special tours can be accomodated with prior notice.


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BICENTENNIAL presents opportunity to bone up on Mississippi history

Today in Mississippi

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January 2017

appy 200th birthday, Mississippi! Two hundred years ago this year, Mississippi graduated from territory to statehood. Well, the actual date of the signing of the constitution (therefore the official birthdate) isn’t until December. But a significant anniversary like two centuries should be celebrated for more than just one day. There are special events planned throughout the year in association with the state’s bicentennial. A twenty-star U.S. flag (Mississippi was the 20th state) and the handwritten first state constitution are on a year-long tour of the state. Jay Dean is putting together a concert saluting the state’s 200th birthday. Jay is director of orchestral activities and professor of music at the University of Southern Mississippi, and artistic director for the Mississippi Opera and the Natchez Festival of Music. Clay Williams is the sites administrator for the Mississippi Department of Archives and History. In this capacity, he oversees operations at six historic sites across the Mississippi state including Seen two directly by Walt Grayson associated with early statehood, Jefferson College in Washington and the Old Capitol in Jackson. Clay is writing a book for Mississippi’s bicentennial. He says that in many ways 1817 really was a long time ago, in terms of daily living. But as for issues facing the young state, many are the same we face now. I admitted to Clay that I am a little fuzzy about Mississippi’s colonial history and early statehood. I know the French were here first, then the Spanish and then the English. Clay stopped me right there and said it’s way more complicated than that. First of all, the Native Americans were here first. Then came the French, then the Spanish and English. And the Native Americans were still here. Even the Colony of Georgia along with

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Near the imposing statehood monument, on the campus of Historic Jefferson College at Washington, are the so-called Burr Oaks. Their name perpetuates the idea that our early statehood history is littered with fable and forgotten lore. Maybe the attention of this bicentennial year will bring some of those tales to light. Photo: Walt Grayson

the French, the Spanish, the English and later, the U.S. Government and the Native Americans all had land claims in Mississippi at one time or another, or at the same time. So, well after statehood the government was still making treaties with the Choctaws and the Chickasaws over lands they owned that eventually opened up the interior of the state. It hadn’t even occurred to me that there were still Native American treaties being negotiated after statehood. I thought all of that was ancient history. Clay says there is a lot of fuzziness about that period in history. He said many people today wouldn’t even recognize the names of the most well-known personalities in the days of early statehood: George Poindexter, Winthrop Sargent, David Holmes, William Dunbar. For that matter, not a lot of people

know that Washington was Mississippi’s capital at the time of statehood, nor do they even know where it is. For the record, Washington is just up Miss. 61 from Natchez. In a Methodist church on the campus of Jefferson College in Washington the statehood constitution was written and signed. The building is gone, but an impressive monument marks where it once stood. Overshadowing the church site are the Burr Oaks, under which Aaron Burr is fabled to have been put on trial for treason and murder. Only problem is the oaks weren’t even here in Burr’s day. Burr’s is another name mostly familiar today only because of the popularity of

the play “Hamilton” about Alexander Hamilton, whom Burr killed in a duel. All of this is not a stone’s throw away from where Andrew Jackson camped his men on the way to and from the Battle of New Orleans. Hmm. More going on back then than I thought! Should easily keep us busy all of this bicentennial year with occasional stories. Walt Grayson is the host of “Mississippi Roads” on Mississippi Public Broadcasting television, and the author of two “Looking Around Mississippi” books and “Oh! That Reminds Me: More Mississippi Homegrown Stories.” Contact Grayson at walt@waltgrayson.com.

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January 2017

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Youth and squirrels:

A perfect combo he memories are many and but my dad had his way and that was go back to childhood. If that! restricted to personal parThe common grey squirrel found ticipation, these began scattered across Mississippi is viewed when I was 11. But recall now through a variety of lens that color exists from times even earlier. the final picture. Some see squirrels as Even before I took to the woods with cute little boogers that dart about in city my dad, I saw him come in from an streets and perform acrobatic maneuvers early morning or late afternoon squirrel along power lines. They do this. hunt and empty a worn and Some may see them as stained game vest on a obnoxious little rodents that wooden table outside. Squirdeal as much grief as possirels for the most part, but ble by nesting in suburban occasionally there was a rabattics. They do this. bit or duck or quail in the But the squirrel hunter is mix. likely to view them in an None of this was done for entirely different posture. recreation; it was simply a Squirrels, to these fortunate trip to the grocery stores ones, are a worthy game anifound in various woodlots mal that exists in abundance near home—a curious and and affords a protracted seamisunderstood tactic by son—somewhere approachby Tony Kinton many in today’s society. The ing six months. I appreciate contents of that ragged vest the squirrels’ cuteness and were an integral part of our food supply pronounced gymnastics and am alarmed during open hunting season. by their housing arrangements when my My primary chore in those informaown abode becomes theirs as well, but tive years was to assist in the skinning of that last image mentioned above is the game, particularly squirrels. My dad’s one I adopt, for I am a squirrel hunter. old system of cutting a small slit in the A relatively new form of nose-wrinback skin and pulling in opposite direckling disgust often found in this second tions practically demanded two individdecade of the 21st century comes from uals. Yes, there were perhaps better the mere suggestion that folks still eat methods touted and even demonstrated, squirrels. This disconcerting idea would not have been prevalent in 1958. The jacket-and-tie restaurant practitioner may writhe in angst and antiseptic oblivion at the thought of anyone actually consuming a squirrel. But for common and poor country folk of days past, that was not the case. Still not for some of us. The older squirrels were then and are now put into a stew that was and is more than glorious. The younger specimens fried crispy brown and perhaps

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smothered in gravy can be considered fine food. Served with hot biscuits, fried squirrels offer a presentation fit for nobility. Perhaps the most endearing element of squirrels is that they are a superb game animal. Far distanced from the backyard variety, a truly wild squirrel is fully cunning, difficult to hunt. An accomplished squirrel hunter is a refined and well-versed hunter no matter the game. And in addition to those long seasons that seem to go on forever, squirrels afford a great measure of action, much greater than petrifying in a deer stand while hoping a whitetail wanders by. This is not to take away from the state’s most regal wild thing, but the fact is that deer hunting can be hours and hours of boredom interrupted by 20 seconds of explosive exhilaration. That has a peculiar appeal that none of us desire to give up, but in contrast, squirrel hunting can be one episode of fast-paced

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doings after another. Should an old codger such as I elect to introduce a new hunter to the woods and fields, that old one could do far worse than take that novice to viable squirrel haunts. This newcomer will there have the opportunity to develop and refine skills such as stealth, eye and ear acuity, pin-point shooting and potentially repeated success. Not a bad way to begin it seems. Mississippi is fortunate to have many thousands of acres of good squirrel habitat, much of it open to public use. And long seasons have already been noted. There is included in those seasons a spring season and even youth-only hunts scheduled on some areas and with special, set-aside dates for the purpose of getting young hunters into the woods, And while it is not illegal to have such things along on a squirrel hunt, encourage youngsters to leave their electronic gadgets behind. Two months remain in the fall/winter season in the state. As a result, there is ample time to get out and give squirrel hunting a try. It holds the potential to become a favorite pastime.

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Tony Kinton has been an active outdoors writer for 30 years. His newest book, “Rambling Through Pleasant Memories,” is now available. Order from Amazon.com or Kinton’s website: www.tonykinton.com.


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Ornamental cabbage, kale show winter color rnamental kale and cabbage are in a group of my favorite plants for the winter landscape, and I find them to be among the most reliable, as well. They are really easy to grow, and now that we’re getting cooler weather—as in frost—kale and cabbage are starting to show some great color. Garden centers often lump ornamental kale and cabbage together, and it is true that they are the same species. However, there are a few differences that I think should be considered. Ornamental cabbage usually refers to selections that have smooth and more or less unruffled leaves. Kale, on the other hand, has ruffled, textured leaves and many have feathered leaf edges. This characteristic, in my opinion, makes ornamental kale much more interesting and cabbage more stabilizing in the winter landscape. There are many different colors and leaf textures to add landscape interest, so don’t plant a single type. Mix and match for increased visual interest. But while I plant the various colors available, I really love the red selections. An old favorite in years past has been Redbor kale, but in recent years, there has been a seed shortage, and Redbor is Southern hard to find. Gardening Don’t despair; by Dr. Gary Bachman there are other great selections to choose from. Peacock Red kale lives up to its namesake. The foliage is displayed in beautiful sprays in shades of rose-red centers with green outer leaves. This plant has been a must have in my landscape the last couple of years. A newer kale I’ve been observing in our Mississippi State University trial gardens is Coral Queen. This is a robust kale featuring leaves that are deeply notched and feathery. The foliage has a bright-red center with purplish-green edges. Ornamental cabbage has a more uniform look compared to kale.

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Pigeon Purple forms round semisolid heads, and the outer leaves maintain a darker green with purplish veins. As the season progresses, the new center leaves emerge with the purplish-red color. The Pigeon series also has white and pink selections. Everyone knows Coral Queen, top, is a newer kale growing in about droughty weath- Mississippi State University trial gardens. Peacock Red kale, right, lives up to its namesake with rose-red cener in the hot summer season, but it can hap- ters and green outer leaves. The new center leaves of pen in the winter too. Pigeon Purple ornamental cabbage, above, emerge with a purplish-red color. Photos: MSU Home gardeners Extension/Gary Bachman should look out for drought conditions in the winter fairly heavy feeders. I months. like to add a tableCold fronts moving through the area spoon of a good slowcan be relatively dry, allowing soil mois- release fertilizer into ture to deplete rapidly. Kale and cabbage each planting hole to like consistent moisture, so apply a layer get the plants off to a of mulch to help conserve soil moisture. great start. On a monthly schedule, I Don’t forget that cabbage and kale like to use water-soluble fertilizer to don’t like “wet feet,” so good bed keep the plants healthy and growing drainage is essential. Some of the best strong. growth and performance I get is by Dr. Gary Bachman is an associate planting kale and cabbage in commerExtension and research professor of horticially produced, self-watering containers, culture at the Mississippi State University which, in case you forgot, are my Coastal Research and Extension Center in favorite home-growing systems. Biloxi. He is also host of “Southern Ornamental cabbage and kale are Gardening” radio and TV programs.


January 2017

few weeks ago my husband, Mr. Roy, and I were sitting in the waiting room at our local doctor’s office. Lately, we spend more and more time there, as do our friends. Anyway, as we were thumbing through their magazines a lady in the next chair asked if I was a native of Lucedale. I told her my family moved here when I was 11 years old, so I assumed this qualified me. After she left, my partner leaned over and said, “You’re not a native; you were not born in Lucedale. I’m a native.” “So our friend Dr. Dayton Whites isn’t a native either? I assumed he was born here because of the book the two of you are writing.” I answered. “Yes, he is,” Mr. Roy answered. “There are extenuating circumstances you wouldn’t understand. We voted him in.” I could see this was an argument I couldn’t win,

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so I said, “That’s illogical, and who is the ‘we’ that voted him in?” Before he could answer the nurse called my name, so our conversation ended there. At this point, I will explain why I brought Dr. Whites’ name into our conversation. Roy has known Dayton for almost 70 years. As children and teens we attended school together as well as the same church. Roy and I moved away for awhile, but when we came back he was our family physician for 40 years. He and his wife, Susanne, are some of our closest friends. I don’t know of anyone who has given more back to Lucedale than Dayton. He was a two-term mayor soon after retirement, but that’s just one of his countless contributions. Mr. Roy and Dayton have special memories of growing up in this “Best Little Town” and have a special love for it. Approximately four years ago, they decided to attempt to write down some of their memories of this Best Little Town so that future generations would have a record of the town during this period of time. The snapshot in time they selected was 1945 to 1950. They also agreed that if they were able to obtain enough information, they would put it into a book. This turned out to be a laborious task that required making maps, holding numerous meetings, getting groups together that were familiar with certain sections of town, making hundred of calls and visits, and writing and rewriting.

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But in December 2016, after four years of work, they sent their completed project to a publisher. As you read this, they will have received printed copies to show for all of those hours of work. After they sent their work to the publisher, my question to Mr. Roy was, “I watched you spend hundreds of hours on this. What was the primary section that impressed or surprised you as you finished it?” He said, “That’s a good question. I had always told people that I was blessed to grow up in the best of times, in the best little town around the best people. I had assumed the main ingredient in this mix was the people, and they were vitally important. But I believe the reason this period of time was so special to us was because of other factors too.” Mr. Roy said, “I’ll explain what I mean. In December 1941 the country was attacked and forced into a war for our very survival. We had fought in World War I barely 20 years before, and on top of Grin ‘n’ that the country had experiBare It enced its worst economic by Kay Grafe depression that lasted for all of the 1930s. “Finally, in August 1945, World War II ended. Many young lives had been snuffed out in their teens and early 20s, and their families suffered terribly. Some young men and women had not seen their loved ones for four years. “Over shadowing all of this was a feeling of euphoria that this country will probably never experience again. Now, everyone desperately wanted to recapture as much lost time as possible. And everyone wanted a new house and a new car. The War and the Great Depression were both over. There was a sense of pride in America that made everyone feel safe, hopeful and optimistic about the future. “This feeling remained strong throughout the 1940s and 50s. These were happy times for America. Many people have referred to this period as the ‘Golden Years,’ and they truly were. All of us who lived in small towns or rural Mississippi during these years were truly blessed.” If anyone wants to know more about Dayton and Roy’s book, “The Best Little Town,” please contact us at the address below, or telephone 601947-3037. Kay Grafe is the author of “Oh My Gosh, Virginia.” To order, send name, address, phone number and $16.95, plus $3.50 S&H to Kay Grafe, 2142 Fig Farm Road, Lucedale, MS 39452.


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January 2017

A NEW YEAR,

Where our members have the power

This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

CEO’s message

new opportunities

Happy New Year! I hope all of you and your Co-ops Vote did more than register voters. This families had a happy holiday season and are enterinitiative sent a strong message to the country’s ing 2017 with hope and optimism for a wonderful elected officials that rural electric consumers new year. I know many of you are working on your matter. And co-ops will be reinforcing this message New Year’s resolutions. Some resoluwith a request that policymakers keep tions are grand goals and life achievethe needs of members front and center. ments, and some are small things that Needs such as funding for infrastrucwill help us be the person we want to ture, increasing the efficiency of the be. I hope each of you will consider electric system and determining the making saving a resolution this year. future of hydropower and nuclear enerThere is a wealth of information about gy. how you can save in this month’s pubAdvocating for these issues is nothing lication – from our Time of Use rate new. In fact, we’ve been doing it for and our new renewable energy program years. And we’re ready to continue the Robert J. Occhi to an easy-to-use savings calendar. I fight on your behalf. The time is now to President and CEO hope you will make us your trusted reach out to all elected officials, new and source for energy savings in 2017. returning. This year brings change in our nation’s leaderAt Coast Electric, we will reach out to local, ship. Our message to elected officials, both old and state and federal officials. In initial conversations new, Republican and Democrat, will be the same: we will explain the unique member-owned, notwe all need to work together to protect consumer for-profit co-op business model. And we will access to safe, reliable and affordable electric servremind long-time politicians of our co-op’s comice. mitment to our members. We have reason to believe this message will be In Washington, D.C., our national trade associwell received. After all, co-ops speak for more than ation, the National Rural Electric Cooperative 42 million electric consumers nationwide, a sizeAssociation, will conduct similar introductions, able constituency by any measure. speaking with key agencies and departments within Moreover, whatever you thought of the 2016 the new administration. It is likely many of these campaign, one message came through loud and new policymakers will know little or nothing of the clear: many people don’t believe their concerns are co-op model. being heard. For member-owned cooperatives, lisForging an energy future that serves rural contening to people is at the heart of our business sumers, and protecting access to safe, reliable and model. And we carry our members’ concerns to affordable electric power will be a bipartisan effort. Electric co-ops are optimistic. As we work with our public officials every day. As we reach out to engage with elected officials, elected leaders, we hope to renew a spirit of cooperation in the nation’s Capital and in statehouses we will build on the strength of Co-ops Vote, the across the country. grassroots initiative to reverse declining voter After all, cooperation is what co-ops do best! turnout in rural areas.

Communicators: Melissa Russo and April Lollar For Today in Mississippi information, call 877-7MY-CEPA (877-769-2372) www.coastepa.com

Watt’s up this month

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I Cost decrease

I Bob Occhi receives award

from NRECA I Meet your

2017 Legislators I Coast

Electric is offering a new renewable energy program for members

I 2017 Energy Efficiency

calendar


January 2017

COAST ELECTRIC MEMBERS see cost decrease Coast Electric Power Association members began seeing lower costs last November due to a power cost adjustment decrease. The decrease means that for every 1,000 kilowatt-hours used each month, members will see a $2 decrease. “We review power costs regularly and make adjustments as needed,” said Coast Electric Controller Damali Clark. “We are fortunate to have a reduction for the upcoming year.” What can you do to see even more savings? Coast Electric offers so many ways for members to manage their energy use and save. Whether we are offering tips on small ways you can save – like changing your air filter every month – to offering rebates for making energy efficient improvements to your home, we are your trusted source for energy efficiency information. Coast Electric also offers members options so they can choose what is best one for their homes and businesses. From Time of Use rates that offer savings based on the time of day you use electricity to our new solar program, which will lock in today’s rate for the next 20 years, there are great options for your energy needs. Visit www.coastepa.com for tips on how you can save or call 877-769-2372 and ask to speak with one of our Residential Energy Management Specialists. They can get you on track for a new year of savings!

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CEO Bob Occhi receives award from National Rural Electric Cooperative Association

From left: Coast Electric President and CEO Bob Occhi accepts a National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) regional award of outstanding service from NRECA CEO Jim Matheson. The award is given to those who have shown remarkable leadership and service to rural electric cooperatives.

Coast Electric Power Association Olive Branch, Miss., spoke at the event, President and CEO Bob Occhi was honnoting Occhi’s 43 years of service to Coast ored recently by the National Rural Electric and its members. Doddridge said, Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) “In that time, you have instituted many with a Regional Award for Outstanding technical innovations – even last year when Service. your co-op made investments in solar. You Occhi was recognized at NRECA’s have represented the co-op and your state Regional Meeting in South Carolina that in many advocacy initiatives.” Doddridge also stated that, “Your leadbrought together leaders from cooperatives ership in recovering from Hurricane in Mississippi, Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, Georgia, Katrina was a model South Carolina and for all utilities.” Honorees must have Florida. He was one “In my years here demonstrated remarkable at Coast Electric, we of two co-op leaders to be recognized for leadership and must have have always his contributions to remained true to our worked to advance the the industry. mission to provide prosperity of electric Recipients of excellent service to Awards for the people of south cooperatives to benefit Outstanding Service Mississippi and to rural Americans. are chosen based on improve the quality their service to electric of life here. With cooperatives at the state and regional levels. that as our guide, we have been able to Honorees must have demonstrated remark- advocate for those we serve and accomplish able leadership and must have worked to great things for our members,” said Occhi. advance the prosperity of electric coopera- “I am honored to receive this award from tives to benefit rural Americans. NRECA. We will continue to work for our Kevin Doddridge, the CEO of members and make advances that are beneNorthcentral Electric Power Association in ficial to those we serve.”


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Today in Mississippi I January 2017

The Mississippi Legisl

convenes in January for the Where our members have the power

Communicators: Melissa Russo and April Lollar For Today in Mississippi information, call 877-7MY-CEPA (877-769-2372) www.coastepa.com

On this page are the state lawmakers representing residents li well as addresses where they can be reached by letter. Take ti because they are your voice at the state Capitol. Coast Electr dedication and willingness to serve in the spirit of public serv

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SENATE

Congressional Delegation

PHIL BRYANT Governor

TATE REEVES Lt. Governor

It’s easy to know your elected officials

Now available A free, interactive legislative app for Mississippi

THAD COCHRAN United States Senator

Sen. Angela Burks Hill

Sen. Philip Moran

District 40: Marion and Pearl River counties Address: 54 Watts Rd. Picayune, MS 39466 Years in Legislature: 6

District 46: Hancock and Harrison counties Address: 18403 Old Joe Moran Rd., Kiln, MS 39556 Years in Legislature: 6

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Sen. Jo “Mike”

Distr Jackson, Pea Stone c Address: 15 Fork Vancleave, Years in Le

HOUSE OF RE

The Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi offers free versions of the 2017 Mississippi Legislative Roster app. We hope they will be helpful in your involvement with state government. Our easy-to-use mobile app provides information on Mississippi’s state and federal elected officials. Look for “Mississippi Legislative Roster” in the Apple App Store. An Android version is also available through Google Play.

ONLINE VERSION AVAILABLE AT www.ecm.coop ROGER WICKER

United States Senator

Rep. Timmy Ladner

Rep. Patricia H. Willis

District 93: Hancock, Pearl River and Stone counties Address: 6 Michael D. Smith Rd. Poplarville, MS 39470 Years in Legislature: 6

Dist District 95: Lam Hancock and Pearl Ri Harrison counties Address: 545 Address: Lumberto 5565 Diamondhead Dr. East First year Diamondhead, MS 39525 Years in Legislature: 5

Rep. Joh

STATEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer. If you wish to file a Civil Rights program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form, found online at http://www.ascr.usda.gov/complaint_filing_cust.html, or at any USDA office, or call (866) 632-9992 to request the form. You may also write a letter containing all of the information requested in the form. Send your completed complaint form or letter to us by mail at U.S. Department of Agriculture, Director, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20250-9410, by fax (202) 690-7442 or email at program.intake@usda.gov.

STEVEN PALAZZO

United States Representative Fourth District

Rep. Scott DeLano

Rep. Greg Haney

District 117: Harrison County Address: P.O. Box 4524 Biloxi, MS 39535 Years in Legislature: 8

District 118: Harrison County Address: 106 45th St. Gulfport, MS 39507 Years in Legislature: 6

Rep William

Dist Harriso Address: 2 Gulfport Years in L


January 2017

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lature

e 2017 session.

iving in Coast Electric Power Association’s service area, as ime to familiarize yourself with the legislators in your area ric salutes our state senators and representatives for their vice to help shape the future of our state.

seph M. Seymour

rict 47: arl River, and counties 5417 Indian k Rd. , MS 39565 egislature: 2

Sen. Debbie Dawkins District 48: Harrison County Address: 111 Lang Ave. #3 Pass Christian, MS 39571 Years in Legislature: 18

Sen. Sean Tindell

Sen. Thomas A. Gollott

District 49: District 50: Harrison County Harrison County Address: 20 Mockingbird Ln. Address: 235 Bay View Ave. Gulfport, MS 39507 Biloxi, MS 39530 Years in Legislature: 6 Years in Legislature: 50

Coast Electric Service Area and

SENATE DISTRICTS

EPRESENTATIVES

hn G. Corley

trict 106: mar and iver counties 5 Otho Davis Rd. on, MS 39455 in Legislature

p. Sonja ms-Barnes

trict 119: on County 2317 Searle Ave. t, MS 39057 Legislature: 6

LAMAR FORREST

40

PERR

PEARL RIVER

GEORGE

STONE

47

JACKSON HARRISON

46 HANCOCK

Rep. Mark S. Formby

Rep. Jeffrey S. Guice

Rep. Randall Patterson

Rep. Casey Eure

District 108: Pearl River County Address: 423 North Main St. Picayune, MS 39466 Years in Legislature: 25

District 114: Harrison and Jackson counties Address: 1208 Iola Rd., Ocean Springs, MS 39564 Years in Legislature: 9

District 115: Harrison County Address: 1352 Kensington Dr. Biloxi, MS 39530 Years in legislature: 14

District 116: Harrison County Address: 11820 Sleeping Deer Lane Saucier, MS 39574 Years in Legislature: 7

49

48

50

Coast Electric Service Area and

HOUSE DISTRICTS 106 PEARL RIVER

03 93 108

Rep. Richard Bennett

Rep. Carolyn Crawford

District 120: Harrison County Address: 20108 Daugherty Road Long Beach, MS 39560 Years in Legislature: 10

District 121: Harrison County Address: 23155 Stablewood Circle Pass Christian, MS 39571 Years in Legislature: 6

Rep. David Baria District 122: Hancock County Address: 544 Main Street Bay St. Louis, MS 39520 Years in Legislature: 10

HARRISON

122

119

121

114 118

HANCOCK

95

GEORGE

116 STONE

120

117

115

JACKSON

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Today in Mississippi I January 2017

Coast Electric is offering a

new cooperative solar program Coast Electric announced in November the cooperative will be offering a new renewable energy program to members, which will initially be offered in a limited amount. More members will have the ability to take advantage of the renewable energy program as more renewable generation sources are constructed over the coming months.

Why is Coast Electric offering this program? Surveys have shown that many members are interested in actively pursuing participation in renewable energy sources, like solar. Solar energy generation costs have fallen, making large-scale solar facilities more affordable for electric utilities. Rooftop solar, however, can still be very costly for end-users. Coast Electric believes offering a renewable energy program to members is beneficial for many reasons.

What are the benefits? • Purchasing solar energy from Coast Electric is less expensive than remodeling your home to accommodate rooftop solar panels. • Rooftop solar simply isn’t an option for many people. If you rent, live on a shaded lot or don’t have the means to pursue a rooftop system, this might be a great way for you to use a renewable energy source. • You will never have to repair or maintain solar panels if they are damaged and need to be replaced. • Members who choose to purchase solar capacity can lock in the rate they pay now for the next 20 years. This means as the cost of electricity increases, the cost for your solar capacity stays the same. You can also cancel any time you like.

What will it cost? Currently, Coast Electric members can purchase up to four kW of solar capacity in one kW increments. The cost will be $18.10 per solar kW purchased per month. Solar output is expected to produce an average of 164 kilowatthours per month per kW purchased. The number of kilowatt-hours that are produced by the solar units purchased will be subtracted from your kilowatt hours used. For example, if you purchase two kW of solar capacity: – You will be billed a total of $36.20 ($18.10 x 2) for your two kW of solar purchased. – If your use for the month is 1,500 kilowatt-hours and you purchased two kW of solar capacity that in turn produced 164 kilowatt-hours each, the charge for 328 kilowatt-hours (164 x 2) is subtracted from your 1,500 kilowatt hours, so you will only pay for 1,172 kilowatt hours.

Why should I sign up for the program ? That is an individual choice each member who is interested in pursuing solar must determine, but Coast Electric employees are here for you to help you determine which may be the better fit for your home. We want to be your source for renewable energy decisions. As a not-for-profit company, we are able to help you make the best decision for you, without being concerned about making a profit.

NOW THAT YOU KNOW sign up and save! solar@coastepa.com

How do I sign up? If you would like our energy experts to help you determine the best option for you, or if you would like to sign up for the program, you can email solar@coastepa.com or call one of our

Residential Energy Management Specialists: Scott White – Pearl River County – 601-889-5109 Phillippe Michel – Hancock County – 228-363-7261 Tyler Green – Harrison County – 228-539-5720 Director of Residential Energy Management: Mark Wallace 228-363-7305


January 2017

You are a member of Coast Electric and you have the power to save! Thousands of your friends and neighbors are doing just that with our Time of Use (TOU) rate – and this year, it is your turn. Our TOU rate offers you savings for the power you use in off-peak hours. Power used during peak hours (MondayFriday 6 a.m.-8 a.m. in winter months and Monday-Friday 3 p.m.-6 p.m. in summer months) costs more, but energy use in offpeak hours is significantly less.

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We need your help in 2017! This calendar is for you. We want you to use this to help your families save this year. Put this savings calendar somewhere in your house where everyone can see it – on the fridge or pinned to a bulletin board – and help the grownups in your house remember these great tips so they can save. Who knows? Maybe less money on the utility bill can add up to extra coins in your piggy bank.

Here are some tips that can help you save: • Don’t do laundry or wash dishes during peak hours. • Use a programmable thermostat to automatically adjust the temperature of your home during peak hours. • A water heater timer will help keep warm water in your tank for showers during peak hours, without using electricity to heat water during peak times. • In the spring and summer, take advantage of those longer hours of daylight. Get outside during those peak hours and enjoy the time unplugging with your family!

2017 Energy

Efficency Calendar Each month, try changing your energy use habits by using the tips below. Keep this calendar

JANUARY

Turn off lights when you leave a room.

Not sure you want to make the switch? This is why you should: • Each month, you will see a statement of the bottom of your bill that tells you what your costs would have been with our residential rate. If our TOU rate is costing you more, you can request to move back to our standard residential rate and we will refund the money you would have saved to your account. That means there is no risk to you to try TOU. • It gives you the power to save. Members on any of our rate plans have the ability to manage their use and save, but our TOU rate takes that control to a new level and allows more savings than ever for those who have a plan to move their use to off-peak hours. • There are only 10 peak hours a week in the winter and 15 peak hours a week in the summer. That means that out of a 168-hour week, you are paying a reduced rate for 153 or 158 hours. Weekends are always all off-peak and certain holidays are too. But don’t take our word for it; ask your friends and neighbors who on are TOU what their savings are each month! They will gladly tell you how they are saving.

Saving – that’s a great resolution for 2017!

APRIL

Ask an adult to help you plant a tree to help shade your home in the summer.

OCTOBER

Only open the refrigerator door for short amounts of time when necessary.

MAY

FEBRUARY

Remind family members to use cold water when washing clothes.

Turn off water while brushing your teeth.

JUNE

Clean or replace your air filter. You may need to ask an adult to help.

Keep the thermostat at 78 degrees Fahrenheit during summer months.

JULY

AUGUST

Close curtains and blinds during the day to block the sun.

Keep all doors and windows closed while the AC is running.

NOVEMBER

DECEMBER

Take short showers instead of a bath.

MARCH

Decorate your home for the holidays with energy-saving LED bulbs.

SEPTEMBER Dry clothes outdoors on a clothesline instead of using the dryer.

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RECIPES FROM:

‘South Your Mouth’ Mandy Rivers presents her own versions of classic Southern recipes in two cookbooks seasoned with storytelling, insights and humor, making them as fun to read as they are useful. “South Your Mouth: Tried & True Southern Recipes” and “South Your Mouth Some More!” include her takes on traditional favorites as well as some internationally inspired flavors (with a Southern accent). You’ll find Cat Head Biscuits, My Best Meatloaf, Sweet Potato Praline Casserole and Southern-Style Collard Greens—as well as Grecian Baked Ziti, Mediterranean Orzo Salad and Sriracha Bacon Deviled Eggs. The author offers plenty of easy weeknight meals (she’s the mother of three and holds a fulltime job) with suggestions for recipe variations to keep things lively. Appetizers, salads, cakes, pies, cookies and other desserts round out each book’s rich variety of recipes. Ingredients are readily available and some recipes include time-saving convenience items, such as jarred pasta sauce. The instructions are explicit enough for novice cooks. Color photographs accompany many of the recipes. Rivers’ culinary credentials include two guest appearances on QVC’s “In the Kitchen with David” TV show

and selection to represent the South on the Food Network’s “America’s Best Cook” TV show. This North Carolinian cook’s recipes have been featured in Taste of Home, Healthy Cooking, Country Woman and many other publications. Find more of her recipes and stories on her blog at SouthYourMouth.com. “South Your Mouth” cookbooks are sold in stores and may be ordered at QuailRidge.com or by calling 800343-1583. Price is $19.95 for each softcover.

Sweet and Tangy Smoked Sausage 1 lb. smoked sausage 2 Tbsp. yellow mustard

2 Tbsp. brown sugar

Cut smoked sausage evenly into 6 to 8 pieces. Slice each piece in half lengthwise, stopping just short of cutting it all the way through, so it opens like a little book. Arrange sausage pieces on a baking sheet, cut side up (skin down). Broil sausage in the oven until sizzling and starting to brown. Remove from oven and baste with mixture of mustard and brown sugar. Return sausage to oven and continue broiling until browned and bubbly. (Watch it closely. You don’t want these babies to burn.) Good served with boiled potatoes and pork ‘n’ beans. —“South Your Mouth”

Butter Baked Shrimp ½ cup (1 stick) butter, melted 2 lemons, sliced

1 lb. unpeeled shrimp 1 Tbsp. Old Bay Seasoning

Pour melted butter into a 9x13-inch baking dish. Arrange lemon slices evenly over melted butter. Arrange shrimp evenly over lemon slices. Generously sprinkle Old Bay over unpeeled shrimp. Bake at 350 F for approximately 10 minutes, or until shrimp turn pink and are cooked through. Strain butter and lemons from pan, and serve as a dipping sauce for shrimp. —“South Your Mouth”

Peanut Butter Brownie Cheesecake 1 box brownie mix ¾ cup hot fudge topping, warmed 2 (8-oz.) pkgs. cream cheese, softened 1 ½ cups crunchy peanut butter 1 (14-oz.) can sweetened condensed milk

1 (12-oz.) tub frozen whipped topping, thawed 1 ½ cups chopped mini peanut butter cups 2 Tbsp. chocolate syrup

Prepare brownie mix according to package instructions, using a 9x13-inch pan. Cool completely. Cut brownies into small chunks. Using ⅔ of the brownie chunks, press brownies into bottom of a 9-inch springform pan, forming an even crust. Spread with warm fudge topping; set aside. Crumble remaining brownies; set aside. In a large mixing bowl, beat cream cheese and peanut butter with an electric mixer on medium speed until combined. Add condensed milk; beat until just combined. Fold in ⅔ of the whipped topping until thoroughly incorporated. Spread ½ of cream cheese mixture over brownie crust. Sprinkle with ½ of reserved brownie crumbles. Spread remaining cream cheese mixture over brownies. Top with remaining whipped topping. Sprinkle with remaining brownie crumbles and peanut butter cups. Drizzle with chocolate syrup. Cover and refrigerate for 6 hours before serving. —“South Your Mouth”

Southern-Style Slow Cooker Macaroni and Cheese 12 oz. (2 heaping cups) uncooked elbow macaroni 1 (12-oz.) can evaporated milk 1 ½ cups milk ½ cup sour cream 2 eggs, beaten 1 tsp. salt

½ tsp. dry mustard ½ tsp. white pepper ¼ tsp. cayenne pepper 4 Tbsp. butter, melted 16 oz. Cheddar cheese, shredded, divided (4 cups)

Boil macaroni in liberally salted water for 5 minutes, then drain well. Do not cook noodles longer than 5 minutes. While noodles are cooking, combine evaporated milk, milk, sour cream, eggs, salt, mustard, white pepper and cayenne pepper in a large bowl; mix well. Add parboiled macaroni, melted butter and 3 cups shredded cheese to milk mixture; stir until thoroughly combined. Spray inside of a medium to large slow cooker (approximately 4-quart size) with cooking spray, then pour macaroni mixture in. Top with remaining 1 cup cheese. Cover and cook on low for 3 to 4 hours, or until set in center and golden brown around edges. Makes 10 to 12 servings. —“South Your Mouth Some More!”


January 2017

Flat, Broke and Busted Potatoes 10 to 12 red potatoes (or however many you’d like to serve) Salted water Olive oil 2 to 3 tsp. minced garlic

Coarse-grain salt Black pepper Chopped fresh chives Sour cream (optional)

Boil potatoes in liberally salted water until fork-tender, about 15 minutes. Drain potatoes and place on a large baking sheet. Using the heel of your hand, a potato masher or whatever gets the job done, press down on the potatoes until they’re flat, broke and busted. Drizzle each potato with olive oil. Top each potato with minced garlic, then sprinkle with salt, pepper and chives. Bake at 425 F for 30 to 35 minutes, or until potatoes are golden brown and crispy around the edges. Serve with a dollop of sour cream, if desired. —“South Your Mouth”

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History of state’s capitals reflects the Mississippi story Jackson was an unsettled wilderness when territorial legislators met in 1817 to make Mississippi a state

Corn Casserole with Cheese and Bacon 2 eggs 2 Tbsp. butter, melted ¼ cup all-purpose flour 2 Tbsp. sugar ¼ tsp. cayenne pepper 2 (12-oz.) bags frozen steam-in-the-bag corn, thawed (or 4 ½ cups fresh), divided

8 oz. Cheddar cheese, shredded (about 2 cups), divided 4 pieces bacon, cooked and crumbled (about ½ cup) 2 Tbsp. chopped chives Territorial legislators gathered at a building on the campus of Historic Jefferson College, in Washington, to draw up the 1817 Mississippi constitution, one of the first official steps toward statehood.

Add eggs, melted butter, flour, sugar, cayenne and 2 cups corn to a blender or food processor and pulse 3 to 4 times to mix well and cream the corn. Pour mixture into a medium bowl. Add remaining corn, ¾ of the cheese, bacon and chives; stir to combine. Pour mixture into a greased 2-quart shallow baking dish; sprinkle with remaining ½ cup cheese. Bake, uncovered, at 325 F for 30 to 35 minutes, or until golden brown and bubbly around edges. Makes 6 to 8 servings. —“South Your Mouth Some More!”

Lemon Crumble Cream Cake 1 white cake mix Egg whites, oil and water for mix 1 lemon, zested and juiced ½ cup sugar 1 stick butter, melted 1 ½ cups all-purpose flour

Pinch of salt 1 (8-oz.) pkg. cream cheese, softened 2 cups powdered sugar, plus more for dusting 1 cup heavy whipping cream

Prepare cake batter per package instructions. Stir in lemon zest. Pour into a greased and floured 10-inch springform pan. Combine sugar, melted butter, flour and salt in a small bowl; stir with a fork until combined and crumbly, and sprinkle over batter. Bake at 350 F for 35 to 45 minutes or until cooked through. Cool completely; slice in half horizontally. Combine cream cheese, powdered sugar and lemon juice in a large bowl; mix until well combined and smooth. In a separate bowl, beat whipping cream until soft peaks form. Fold whipped cream into cream cheese mixture until well combined. Spread cream cheese mixture over bottom half of cake; top with remaining half of cake. Dust top of cake liberally with powdered sugar. Refrigerate until ready to serve. Makes 12 to 14 servings. —“South Your Mouth Some More!”

Lemon Garlic Chicken 8 Tbsp. salted butter 1 Tbsp. minced garlic 1 lb. chicken tenderloins Salt to taste

2 Tbsp. lemon juice 1 Tbsp. parsley 4 to 6 cups egg noodles, cooked 3 Tbsp. grated Parmesan cheese

Preheat oven to 400 F. Add butter to a 9 x 13-inch baking dish and place into oven to melt. Stir garlic into melted butter. Add chicken, toss to coat in butter mixture and arrange in a single layer. Season chicken with salt and bake for 15 minutes. Remove pan from oven. Baste chicken with garlic butter, then drizzle with lemon juice and sprinkle with parsley. Return to oven and continue baking for 10 minutes. Remove chicken from pan and set aside. Add cooked egg noodles and Parmesan to pan, and toss to coat in garlic butter. Serve with chicken. —“South Your Mouth”

By Debbie Stringer Before Mississippi became a state, it was a territory. The United States was only 20 years old when the Mississippi Territory was formed in 1798. The territory encompassed most of present-day Alabama and Mississippi, a vast hinterland populated by only 5,000 citizens. Natchez, the oldest and largest settlement in the territory, was the territorial capital until 1802, when legislators moved their General Assembly some six miles away to Washington. The tiny Adams County village continued to serve as the territorial capital until Mississippi became a state in 1817. Washington is the home of Jefferson College. Chartered in 1802, the institution opened in 1811 as a prep school with 15 students. By 1817 Jefferson College had become a full-fledged college—and the birthplace of Mississippi statehood: Mississippi’s first constitutional convention met for six weeks in Washington. From July 17 until Aug. 17, 1817, 48 delegates representing the 14 counties of the Mississippi Territory gathered in a Methodist meeting house on the campus of Jefferson College. Territorial Gov. David Holmes presided as president of the convention. The goal was to draft a state constitution, the first official step toward statehood. The constitution would

have to be accepted by both houses of Congress before Mississippi could become a state. During the constitutional convention, the name “Washington” was proposed for the new state, but delegates voted for “Mississippi” because the river formed a large portion of the state’s western border. Delegates signed the new state constitution on Aug. 15, 1817. In December 1817, Congress approved the constitution and formally admitted the western part of the Mississippi Territory as the 20th state. (The eastern part became a new territory, and later the state of Alabama.) President James Madison signed the resolution on Dec. 10, 1817, and within the week Mississippi had two U.S. senators and one representative. David Holmes was elected the state’s first governor. By year’s end, in accordance with the state constitution, Natchez became the state capital, and legislators continued to meet there through the 1820 session. In 1821 legislators voted to move the state capital away from Natchez. They wanted a location closer to the state’s geographical center and with access to a navigable river. The legislature met in Columbia in June 1822 while a new capital was being chosen. Le Fleur’s Bluff was selected, due in part to its high ground and Continued on page 17


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Country PICTURE THIS

Churches Tucked away in rural Mississippi are these architectural gems 1. Bethany Baptist Church, Enid. Karon Netherland Wilcher, Carthage; Central Electric member. 2. Christ Episcopal Church, Church Hill. Ben Foy, Hazlehurst. 3. Liberty Universalist Church, Winston County. Glenn Wiygul, Louisville. 4. Mt. Vernon Baptist Church (est. 1847). John Bond, Magnolia. 3 5. Church of Jesus Christ Latter-day Saints, Clarke County. Jeff Johnson, Quitman; East Mississippi Electric member. 6. Vernal Presbyterian Church (1908). Nancy McIntosh, Lucedale; Singing River Electric member. 7. Rocky Springs Church (1837), Port Gibson. Darlene Mayatt, Meridian; East Mississippi Electric member. 8. Hermanville United Methodist Church (est. 4 1893), Hermanville. Gayle Wade, Hermanville; Southwest Electric member. 9. Catholic church (from Rodney), Grand Gulf Military Park, Port Gibson. Pam Sing, Hernando; Coahoma Electric member. 10. Church at Elmwood Plantation, Greenwood. Carol Hodge Terrell, Ruleville; Delta Electric member.

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14 11. Annunciation Catholic Church (1869), Kiln. Diana Favre, Kiln; Coast Electric member. 12. Chapel of the Cross, Brooksville. Bettye Forbes, Starkville. 13. Mt. Zion Baptist Church, Rodney. Norman Bowlin, Summit; Magnolia Electric member. 14. St. Barnabas Anglican Church (1928), Picayune. Rosalie Smith, Picayune.

CONGRATULATIONS to Debbie Suggs, of Carrollton, winner of $200 in our 2016 ‘Picture This’ random prize drawing. Our next photo theme: Country Roads Send your original photos of scenic country roads in Mississippi. Deadline for submissions is March 17. Details on page 18.

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Marketplace

Today in Mississippi

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January 2017

Mississippi

FOR SALE

MISCELLANEOUS

SAWMILL EXCHANGE: North America’s largest source of used portable sawmills and commercial sawmill equipment for woodlot and sawmill operations. Over 800 listings. Call for a free list or to sell your equipment, 800-459-2148; www.sawmillexchange.com. BILOXI BEACH, MS. 2BR. Timeshare Week 24. Yearly dues $500. 228-224-4433.

PLAY GOSPEL SONGS by Ear! $12.95. “Learn Gospel Music” - chording, runs, fills - $12.95. Both $24. Davidsons, 6727MS Metcalf, Shawnee Mission, Kansas 66204. 913-262-4982.

VACATION RENTALS SMOKIES. TOWNSEND, TN. 2 BR, 2 BATH Log Home, Jacuzzi, Fireplace, wrap-around porch, charcoal grill. 865-320-4216; For rental details and pictures E-mail: tncabin.lonnie@yahoo.com. CABINS IN THE SMOKIES, PIGEON FORGE, TN. Owner rates, 251-649-3344, 251-649-4049; www.hideawayprop.com.

FREE BOOKS/DVDS, Soon the “Mark of the Beast” will be enforced as Church and State unite! Let the Bible reveal. The Bible Says, P.O. Box 99, Lenoir City, TN 37771. 888-211-1715; thebiblesaystruth@yahoo.com.

Type or print your ad clearly. Be sure to include your telephone number. Deadline is the 10th of each month for the next month’s issue. Rate is $2.50 per word, 10-word minimum. Mail payment with your ad to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300. Have any questions? Phone 601-605-8600 or email advertising@epaofms.com.

FARM BARNS

Hattiesburg, MS • 1-601-296-0550 Our Prices Include Labor & Metal Sides Also Available in Wood Sides

Garage with hardy siding and concrete slab, any size.

www.farmbarnsinc.com

We will build any size barn.

Mobile Home Owners: ROOF KING

Mobile Home Super Insulated Roof Over Systems. 40 Year Warranty. Factory Direct from

ROOF KING 1-800-276-0176 www.roofking.net

SOUTHEASTERN RED DEER FARMS

If you like deer hunting & the outdoors, then you will love raising Red Deer!

A small amount of land needed. Raising red deer is fun & profitable. Red deer are ready to be delivered to your farm now.

Call: Willie Strickland, Southeastern Red Deer Farms, 601-736-5057.

SINCE 1982


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State capitals reflect Mississippi history housed Union as well as Confederate location on the Pearl River. Plus, the area was still a headquarters. Seeking refuge from wilderness, so no one could claim that favoritism led to Union troops from 1863-1864, state its selection. government temporarily relocated to The new capital city was surveyed, mapped and Enterprise, Meridian, Macon and named Jackson in honor of Gen. Andrew Jackson, the Columbus. Lawmakers returned to hero of the Battle of New Orleans during the War of meet at the Capitol in May 1865, but 1812. by then the building was in a grim state Mississippi’s first state house was completed in of decay. 1822. Intended to house only the legislature, the In 1896 the planning of a new 2,400-square-foot, two-story brick building stood at Capitol began and soon the state penithe corner of Capitol and President streets. The tentiary was demolished to make way December 1822 session marked the first time the legis- for the construction. In January 1904 lators had met in a building owned by the state; earlier legislators met for their first session in sessions had convened in houses and even a tavern. the new state Capitol, the building still The nearby town of Clinton nearly became the state in use today. capital a few years later. Jackson’s growth was sluggish, After housing state offices until but Clinton had two academies, was located on the 1959, the deteriorating Old Capitol, as Natchez Trace and had a better road to rapidly growing it became known, survived repeated Vicksburg. The senate passed bills in 1828 and 1829 calls for its demolition before finally providing for the move to Clinton, but the effort failed undergoing a major renovation in in the house, by narrow margins. 1961, when it reopened as a state hisJackson’s fortunes began improving in 1830, and the torical museum. A second major 1832 constitution ensured the city would remain the restoration completed in 2009 returned capital, at least until 1850. the building to its 19th century appearIn 1833, legislators provided for the construction of ance inside and out. Lawmakers met for their first legislative session in the (old) Capitol on Jan. 7, 1839. After a a larger state house, state offices and a “suitable house Exhibits at today’s Old Capitol major restoration in 1961, the building reopened as the Old Capitol Museum. Work completed in 2009 restored the building to its 19th century appearance. for the governor.” On Jan. 7, 1839, legislators conMuseum tell the story of a state house vened for their first session in the Capitol building, that has survived 178 years through National Historic Landmark by the U.S. Department although work continued on the building until 1841. war, neglect, decay, fire and hurricanes. Like of the Interior and is currently undergoing repairs and During the Civil War, Jackson fell to Union troops Mississippi itself, the building has endured a roller system upgrades, its first major work project in 35 in 1863. The town was burned and plundered but the coaster ride of triumphs and trials. years. Capitol building remained intact. For brief periods, it The new Capitol was recently designated as a Continued from page 13

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I

Today in Mississippi

I

January 2017

Events MISSISSIPPI

Want more than 450,000 readers to know about your special event? Submit details at least two months prior to the event date. Submissions must include a phone number with area code for publication. Mail to Mississippi Events, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300; fax to 601-605-8601; or send to news@ecm.coop. Events open to the public will be published free of charge as space allows. Please note that events are subject to change. We recommend calling to confirm details before traveling.

Friends of Starkville Public Library Book Sales, Jan. 9, Feb. 6, Starkville. Used books at bargain prices. Free admission; 12-6 p.m. Starkville Public Library. Details: 662-323-2766. Mississippi Southern Gospel Music Association Gospel Singing, Jan. 14, Coldwater. Performers to include The Peppers, The Kinsmen, The Pounders, Two For God and more; 5 p.m. Lighthouse Baptist Church. Details: 662-216-3827. Shuffle to the Chefs, Jan. 26, McComb. Culinary benefit for St. Andrew’s Mission featuring regional top chefs; 6-9 p.m. Admission. McComb Mill. Details: 601-684-4678. Seventh Annual Oxford Fiber Arts Festival, Jan. 26-28, Oxford. Classes, vendors, petting zoo, demonstrations, lectures, children’s activities. Powerhouse Community Arts Center. Details: 662-2366429; OxfordArts.com/events/fiberfest. THINK SAFETY!

Fourth Annual Cleveland Farm Toy Show, Jan. 27-28, Cleveland. Buy, sell, trade farm toys, trucks, construction toys, memorabilia, more. Admission. Bolivar County Expo Center. Details: 662-588-0677. Gulf Coast Orchid Show, Jan. 27-29, Gautier. Children’s activities on Saturday; raffle, free orchid classes on Sunday. Gautier Convention Center. Details: 228-474-2500, 228-424-7374. Pearl River Classic Poultry Show, Jan. 28, Columbia. Family fun event with vendors, crafts, food, 600-plus birds shown; 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. Free admission. Columbia Expo Center. Details: 601-441-4386; PearlRiverClassic.com. Oxford Film Festival, Feb. 15-19, Oxford. Film screenings and other events celebrating the art of independent cinema. Details: OxfordFilmFest.com.

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‘Picture This’ explores country roads Country roads take us home in our next “Picture This” reader photo feature. Send us your photos of scenic rural roadways (paved or not) anywhere in Mississippi. Selected photos will appear in the April issue of Today in Mississippi. Deadline for submissions is March 17.

Submission guidelines • Submit as many photos as you like, but select only photos in super-sharp focus. • Photos must relate to the given theme. • Photos must be the original work of an amateur photographer (of any age). • Photos eligible for publication may be either color or black and white, print or digital. • Digital photos should be high-resolution JPG files. Please do not use photoediting software to adjust colors or tones. (We prefer to do it ourselves, if necessary, according to our printer’s standards.) • Please do not send a photo with the date appearing on the image. • Photos must be accompanied by iden-

tifying information: photographer’s name, address, phone and electric power association (if applicable). Include the name(s) of any recognizable people or places in the picture. • Be sure to include the name of the town or county where your country road is located. • Prints will be returned if accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope. We cannot, however, guarantee their safe return through the mail.

How to submit photos Email digital photos (as an attachment to your email message) to news@ecm.coop. If submitting more than one photo, please attach all photos to only one email message, if possible. Or, mail prints or photo CD to Picture This, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300. Question? Contact Debbie Stringer, editor, at 601-605-8610 or email news@ecm.coop. Photographers whose photos are selected for publication are eligible for a $200 cash prize, to be awarded in a random drawing in December.


January 2017

R PE ON SU UP CO

I

Today in Mississippi

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12,000 LB. ELECTRIC WINCH WITH REMOTE CONTROL AND AUTOMATIC BRAKE ITEM 61256/61889/60813 shown

How Does Harbor Freight Sell GREAT QUALITY Tools at the LOWEST Prices? We have invested millions of dollars in our own state-of-the-art quality test labs and millions more in our factories, so our tools will go toe-to-toe with the top professional brands. And we can sell them for a fraction of the price because we cut out the middle man and pass the savings on to you. It’s just that simple! Come visit one of our 700+ Stores Nationwide. R PE ON SU UP CO

R PE ON SU UP CO

RAPID PUMP® 4 TON HEAVY DUTY STEEL FLOOR JACK

ITEM 60706/62319 68056 shown Customer Rating

FREE 20% OFF WITH ANY PURCHASE

1" x 25 FT. TAPE MEASURE

4

$ 97

Limit 1 coupon per customer per day. Save 20% on any 1 item purchased. *Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or any of the following items or brands: Inside Track Club membership, Extended Service Plan, gift card, open box item, 3 day Parking Lot Sale item, automotive lifts, compressors, floor jacks, saw mills, storage cabinets, chests or carts, trailers, trenchers, welders, Admiral, Badland, Bauer, Bremen, CoverPro, Creekstone, Daytona, Diablo, Doyle, Drummond, Earthquake, Franklin, Hercules, Holt, Jupiter, Lynxx, Maddox, Portland, Predator, Quinn, StormCat, Tailgator, Union, Viking, Vulcan. Not valid on prior purchases. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/5/17.

SAVE $228

6.5 HP (212 CC) OHV HORIZONTAL SHAFT GAS ENGINES

99 99 $

$ comp at

• Pair of Arbor Plates Included

comp at

$328

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R PE ON SU UP CO

1500 LB. CAPACITY MOTORCYCLE LIFT

A. HOT DOG

ITEM 69269/97080 shown

B. PANCAKE

SAVE 59%

B

YOUR

$39

comp at

6999 $

$369.99

LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

AUTOMATIC BATTERY FLOAT CHARGER

8999 89

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

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comp at

R 3/8" x 14 FT. GRADE 43 PE ON SU UP • 5400 lb. capacity TOWING CHAIN Not for overhead lifting. CO

$ Customer Rating ITEM 60658 97711 shown

$

SAVE $129

$319

1500 WATT DUAL TEMPERATURE HEAT GUN (572°/1112°)

$

89

899 $

99

14

LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R PE ON SU UP CO

16 OZ. HAMMERS WITH FIBERGLASS HANDLE

$

36999 $952.99

Customer Rating

SAVE 77%

YOUR CHOICE

4

3

$69.99

SAVE $633

calling rFreight.com or by at our stores, Harbo n or prior LIMIT 4 - Good t be used with other discount or coupo l receipt. 800-423-2567. Cannodays from original purchase with origina be must n 30 coupo Original purchases after per day. es last. Non-transferable. Offer good while supplih 5/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer presented. Valid throug

WOW SUPER COUPON

4-1/2" ANGLE GRINDER Customer Rating

13

MOVER'S DOLLY

ITEM 60497/93888 shown 61899/62399/63095/63096 63098/63097

Customer Rating

10 10

comp at

$19.97

WOW SUPER COUPON

Customer Rating

12 VOLT MAGNETIC TOWING LIGHT KIT ITEM 63100

SAVE 71%

9 99

$ 99

99 $9 1 14 999

$

LIMIT 7 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

SAVE 50%

$

799

$ 99

SAVE 59%

ITEM 60625 shown 95578/69645

$

comp at

19

comp at

$20.26

calling rFreight.com or by at our stores, Harbo n or prior LIMIT 8 - Good t be used with other discount or coupo l receipt. 800-423-2567. Cannodays from original purchase with origina be must n 30 coupo al Origin purchases after per day. es last. Non-transferable. Offer good while supplih 5/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer presented. Valid throug

R PE ON SU UP CO

SUPER-WIDE TRI-FOLD ALUMINUM LOADING RAMP ITEM 90018 shown 69595/60334

$ Customer Rating

• 1500 lb. capacity

$34.95 calling rFreight.com or by at our stores, Harbo n or prior LIMIT 6 - Good t be used with other discount or coupo l receipt. 800-423-2567. Cannodays from original purchase with origina be must n 30 Original coupo purchases after per day. es last. Non-transferable. Offer good while supplih 5/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer presented. Valid throug

R PE ON SU UP CO

4 PIECE 1" x 15 FT. RATCHETING TIE DOWNS

Customer Rating

ITEM 63056/63057/60405/63094 63150/61524/62322/90984 shown

SAVE $110

SAVE 57%

99 79 99 $

$ 99

99

$

comp at

comp at

$18.85

LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

LIMIT 8 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R PE ON SU UP CO

R PE ON SU UP CO

R PE ON SU UP CO

WE CARRY A FULL LINE OF WELDING WIRE AND ACCESSORIES

170 AMP MIG/FLUX WIRE WELDER

ADJUSTABLE STEEL WELDING TABLE Customer Rating

ITEM 61888 68885 shown

SAVE $380

$ 99 $

Customer Rating

1699999

184

ITEM 63069 61369 shown

$ comp at

SAVE $90

99 59 99 $

79

$549.99

comp at

10 TON HYDRAULIC LOG SPLITTER

SAVE $60

ITEM 62291 67090 shown

Customer Rating

$

8999

$

1114499 comp at

$149.99

$149.99

• 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed • Over 30 Million Satisfied Customers • No Hassle Return Policy

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LIMIT 6 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

at $ 99 $17comp .99 $

LIMIT 8 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

7 99 comp at

$189.99

comp at

LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

9

comp at 99 $29.97

• 1000 lb. capacity

$31.47

RIP

CLAW

ITEM 69006 ITEM 47873 shown 60715/60714 69005/61262

R PE ON SU UP CO

comp at

$ 99

Customer Rating

comp at

ITEM 62534 69643 shown

39

Customer Rating

$

SAVE 71%

$189

Customer Rating

99 32 99 $

• 16 ft. lit, 22 ft. long

Customer Rating

ITEM 62340 62546/63104 96289 shown

5999

comp at

$

SAVE 66%

of storage

99

39

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

Customer Rating

$34.99

60 LED SOLAR SECURITY LIGHT

ITEM 62533/68353 shown

ITEM 61609 • 1060 67831 shown • 14,600 cu. in.

99 21 99 $ $60.95

69265/62344

$ 99

LIMIT 7 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

SOLAR ROPE LIGHT

$ 99

comp at

RETRACTABLE AIR HOSE REEL ER N WITH 3/8" x 50 FT. HOSE SUPUPO ITEM 93897 shown CO

Customer Rating

5

R PE ON SU UP CO

26", 16 DRAWER ROLLER CABINETlb. capacity

SAVE 63%

ITEM 42292 shown 69594/69955

SAVE 82% $899

$752.99

comp at

WOW SUPER COUPON

• Lift range: 5-1/4" to 17"

$

Includes 6V, 900 mAh NiCd battery pack.

5999

calling rFreight.com or by at our stores, Harbo n or prior LIMIT 3 - Good t be used with other discount or coupo l receipt. 800-423-2567. Cannodays from original purchase with origina be must n 30 coupo al after Origin purchases per day. es last. Non-transferable. Offer good while supplih 5/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer presented. Valid throug

comp at

SAVE 52%

$

$98.62

$135

R PE ON SU UP CO

99

Customer Rating

$

R PE ON SU UP CO

ITEM 95275 shown 60637/61615 CHOICE Customer Rating

ITEM 69995 shown 60536/61632

SAVE $65

ITEM 32879 Customer Rating 60603 shown

199

A

99

• Weighs 105 lbs.

99 154 99 $

LESS 3 GALLON, 100 PSI OIL AIR COMPRESSORS

119

$199.99

SAVE $215

39999

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

LIMIT 1 - Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or prior purchase. Coupon good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Offer good while supplies last. Shipping & Handling charges may apply if not picked up in-store. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/5/17. Limit one FREE GIFT Coupon per customer per day.

WOW SUPER COUPON

Customer Rating

20 TON SHOP PRESS

$

ITEM 69031/69030 shown

ITEM 68121/69727 shown CALIFORNIA ONLY

R PE ON SU UP CO

29999

LIMIT 8 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

ITEM 60363/69730

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

$

ANY SINGLE ITEM

$

129

Customer Rating

VALUE

SAVE $80

99 119 $ 99

SAVE $453

SUPER COUPON

VALID NOW ON 5,000 + ITEMS

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

• 700+ Stores Nationwide • Lifetime Warranty On All Hand Tools

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

• HarborFreight.com • 800-423-2567

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

At Harbor Freight Tools, the “comp at” price means that the same similar functioning item was advertised for sale at or above the price by another retailer in the U.S. within the past 180 days. Prices by others may vary by location. No other meaning of "comp at" implied. For more information, go to HarborFreight.com or see store

item or a "comp at" advertised should be associate.

19


Today in Mississippi January 2017 Coast  

Today in Mississippi January 2017 Coast

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