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Periodical postage (ISSN 1052 2433)

News for members of Singing River Electric Power Association

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Year-long celebration marks Natchez Tricentennial

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Picture This: Readers’ favorites from 2015

18

Mississippi co-op organizations name scholarship winners


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Today in Mississippi

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January 2016

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January 2016

You get more than electricity from your electric cooperative ffordable electric service has been the goal of your electric power association since its beginning. But just what do we mean by affordable? That can imply different things, depending on whom you ask. I’d like to explain a few things to help you better understand just what a bargain your electric service is. Your electric power association is a locally owned cooperative that was created to provide your area with a service that no one else would. Investorowned utilities, whose goal is to make profits for their investors, believed extending electric service into rural Mississippi was too much of a financial risk; they doubted whether farmers would use enough electricity to justify the expense of power line construction. They preferred to serve more densely populated towns and cities. So, the farmers themselves formed their own notfor-profit electric cooperative for the sole purpose of obtaining reliable electricity for their farms at the lowest cost possible. This rural electrification movement began in Mississippi in the mid-1930s; today, 26 electric power associations, including a generation and transmission cooperative, operate under this same guiding principle—just as their founders intended. Electrification transformed not only rural Mississippi but all of rural America. Affordable electric service made it possible for farmers to boost production, households to modernize, new businesses to open and schools to upgrade. Who could put a price tag on all that progress? Although each electric power association is a locally owned and locally controlled cooperative, all electric power associations work together to work more efficiently. For example, employee training sessions are conducted on a group basis to share their costs. Emergency power restoration is tackled collectively to speed the process and control its costs. Who knows how much those two items alone save our members each year? Behind the scenes, we are always working to attract new employers to our communities and to

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On the cover A baby bird, photographed by 15year-old Ashley Renfrow of Harrisville, makes a fitting symbol for the new year in rural Mississippi. Ashley and many other Today in Mississippi readers submitted their favorite photographs of 2015 to Picture This. See their beautiful work on pages 14-15 of this issue. Ashley’s family is served by Southern Pine Electric Power Association.

help existing companies plan expansions. We work with business people, state officials, community development agencies, local governments and others to encourage the creation of jobs here at home. These efforts are extremely valuable to a community. Then there’s our role as member advocates. Whether discussing a commercial vehicle proposal with a state legislator or cliMy Opinion mate-change issues with a Michael Callahan Congressman, we work to Executive Vice President/CEO protect our members’ servElectric Power Associations of Mississippi ice. We want to make sure lawmakers understand the impact of potential legislation on our members’ pocketbooks, livelihoods and lifestyles. What is that worth to you? I hope you see that the value of your electric power association cannot be overestimated. Fortunately, today we have the luxury of taking electricity for granted; we flip a switch to turn on lights, wash clothes, heat or cool the house, and refrigerate groceries. Memories of life before electricity grow dimmer with each generation. Today’s young people can’t imagine life without smartphones, much less electricity. I just hope they realize what a bargain electricity really is and appreciate the impact their local electric power association has on their lives. ••• Our new, updated Mississippi legislative app is now available! The Mississippi 2016 Legislative Roster lists all Mississippi state and federal elected officials, plus their biographies and addresses. An interactive map allows you to find those who represent the area you select, and other features including a legislative calendar are included. Download the free app at the Apple App Store or Google Play.

Today in Mississippi OFFICERS Keith Hurt - President Tim Smith - First Vice President Barry Rowland - Second Vice President Randy Smith - Secretary/Treasurer

EDITORIAL STAFF Michael Callahan - CEO Ron Stewart - Sr. VP, Communications Mark Bridges - Manager, Support Services Debbie H. Stringer - Editor Elissa Fulton - Communications Specialist Trey Piel - Digital Media Manager Rickey McMillan - Graphics Specialist Linda Hutcherson - Administrative Assistant

JOIN TODAY IN MISSISSIPPI

ON FACEBOOK Vol. 69 No. 1 EDITORIAL OFFICE & ADVERTISING 601-605-8600 Acceptance of advertising by Today in Mississippi does not imply endorsement of the advertised product or services by the publisher or Mississippi’s Electric Power Associations. Product satisfaction and delivery responsibility lie solely with the advertiser. • National advertising representative: National Country Market, 800-626-1181 Circulation of this issue: 456,537 Non-member subscription price: $9.50 per year

The Official Publication of the Electric Power Associations of Mississippi Today in Mississippi (ISSN 1052-2433) is published eleven times a year (Jan.-Nov.) by Electric Power Associations of Mississippi, Inc., P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300, or 665 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland, MS 39157. Phone 601-605-8600. Periodical postage paid at Ridgeland, MS, and additional office. The publisher (and/or its agent) reserves the right to refuse or edit all advertising. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Today, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300

Visit us online at www.todayinmississippi.com

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Today in Mississippi

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Our Homeplace

Memories of the lush greens of a Mississippi summer warms us in winter. This scenic backroad was photographed by Chella Cooley, of Vancleave. See more of our readers’ favorite photos from the past year in “Picture This,” on pages 14-15.

Mississippi is family and friends and home to me. I live in Edmond, Okla., now but I will always enjoy coming home to Mississippi. Home is where the heart is; that is so true. I am visiting my family in Mississippi. —Elda Raye Howard, Escatawpa I am from the snakey places on the creek, from ice-cold Dr. Pepper and Snickers smuggled to us by Daddy. I am from the towering oaks and brown-needled pines, the bark of the dogs, the twang of the off-key piano, the yellow-eyed cat sitting in the windowsill. I am from the purple magnolia that blooms four times a year instead of twice, the briars that appear in the most inopportune places, the howling wind and summer showers. I am from weekly watching of crime shows and sleeping in on Saturdays, from not giving up, even when I probably should.... I am from leather-bound bibles on the coffee table with a morning bulletin bookmark and the week-long bible vacations at Bethel.... I am from the cabinet full of photo albums, holding black-and-white memories I’ve made and ready for the many more I’ll make. —Eighth-grade graduation reading (excerpt) by Josie Stokes, at age 13 Mississippi is richly blessed: a beautiful coastal border, wonderful river systems, the Mighty Mississippi, abundant oil and gas, plentiful forests, great farming and agriculture, superb education, loving, caring, sharing people and abundant wildlife and fisheries.... Grateful to God for our Mississippi heritage. —Terry L. Holifield, Ellisville

What’s Mississippi to you? What do you treasure most about life in our state? Send your thoughts to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158, or to news@epaofms.com. Please keep your comments brief. Submissions are subject to editing for length and clarity.

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Natchez Tricentennial

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January 2016

celebrates city’s melting-pot history, culture

By Debbie Stringer The story of Natchez dates to 1716, when the French built a small wooden fort on a bluff overlooking the Mississippi River. Fort Rosalie, also called Fort Natchez, represented a firm European toehold in the land occupied by the moundbuilding Natchez Indians. Today, the overgrown fort site is slowly re-emerging as the National Park Service works to preserve the property and interpret its history for future visitors. Fort Rosalie was the first step toward what would become one of most prosperous societies in the antebellum South. “The establishment of Fort Rosalie makes Natchez the oldest continuously occupied settlement in the lower Mississippi River Valley. It makes us two years Rosalie mansion sits on a bluff overlooking the Mississippi River, older than New Orleans,” said Jeff close to the original site of Fort Rosalie. Pieces of iron manacles Mansell, lead historian at Natchez Nation- embedded in concrete, right, at the historic Forks of the Road slave market site are sobering reminders of antebellum slavery. al Historical Park. The fort renovation project will become together,” said Jessica Cauthen of one more way to tell the story of Natchez, where the Natchez Convention and VisiNative Americans, European Americans and African tors Bureau. “It’s really about Americans converged (and clashed) some 100 years inspiring pride in our community before Mississippi became a state. and, hopefully, a lifelong commThe history of Natchez reaches far beyond its city mitment to making life better for limits; it is the story of Mississippi itself. Natchez was the most important city in the old Southwest Territory each other, so that Natchez can flourish and grow for another 300 and the seat of its first territorial government, and one years.” of Mississippi’s first capitals. Natchez currently hosts more than 600,000 visitors “I think Mississippi history starts here,” Mansell a year from around the world, Cauthen said. said. The city plans to showcase its melting-pot history in a year-long celebration of its 300th anniversary, beginning this month. The Natchez Tricentennial will feaA history-lover’s tour of Natchez might begin at ture historical reenactments, festivals, exhibits, special Melrose mansion, the centerpiece of the Natchez events, tours and more. National Historical Park. The Greek Revival-style “The tricentennial is all about bringing people

home of John McMurran—a successful attorney, state legislator and owner of five plantations—was completed in 1849. Only three families and their descendants owned Melrose before the National Park Service acquired the property in 1990. Melrose is one of the most completely preserved antebellum estates in Natchez, its exterior recently restored to the original 1849 appearance. Mansell said the park service aims to provide a complete story of the Melrose planter family and the enslaved who worked there, “because you can’t separate one from the other.” “If this place could be described in one word, it would be ‘authentic,’” said Barney Schoby, a park ranger at Melrose. Schoby, a member of Southwest Mississippi Electric Power Association and a teacher by training, talks to visitors about the estate’s owners, the slaves who maintained it, the furnishings and other aspects of life at Melrose. “I love what I do, and the good thing about this teaching position is that I have different pupils every day,” Schoby said. The William Johnson House is another Natchez National Historical Park site, but with an entirely different story to tell. William Johnson, born in 1809, was freed from slavery as a boy. He became a barbershop entrepreneur who left behind a detailed 2,000-page diary of his personal life and business dealings between 1835 and 1851, the year of his death. “It also pictures the economic and social position of one individual, as well as his daily activities, his attitudes toward the slavery regime, and his thoughts and opinions on local, state and even national and international affairs,” wrote Edwin Adams Davis and William


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Today in Mississippi

The history of Natchez reaches far beyond its city limits; it is the story of Mississippi itself.

Ransom Hogan in their book “The Barber of Natchez.” Visitors touring the Johnson house will find the family’s second-floor living quarters furnished much as it was when they lived there. The park service is crafting new exhibits on the archaeology done at the home site as well as the Johnson family’s experience during Reconstruction. The exhibits will open in the summer. “Even after Mr. Johnson’s death in 1851, the family continued to be very prominent in Natchez,” Mansell said.

Natchez’s rich architectural heritage includes St. Mary’s Basilica, top left, the only church built as a cathedral in Mississippi. The Natchez Museum of African American History, above left, is housed in the Old Natchez Post Office. National park ranger Barney Schoby, left, leads tours of the Melrose mansion, the centerpiece of the Natchez National Historical Park. A historical map, top, shows the location of Fort Rosalie. Most of the site has sloughed off into the Mississippi River. Visitors to the antebellum William Johnson House, above, will find the home furnished much as it was when the Johnson family lived there.

The William Johnson House is designated a Literary Landmark by Friends of Libraries U.S.A.

The Natchez Indians lived in several settlements, or chiefdoms, in the area. But the paramount chief, known as the Great Sun, occupied a house atop a

mound at what the French called the Grand Village. The Natchez abandoned the site after violent conflicts with the French in the early 18th century. “The story of the Native Americans will be an integral part of the story we tell at Fort Rosalie,” Mansell said. Today, the Grand Village of the Natchez Indians is a showcase of Natchez Indian history Continued on page 12

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January 2016

Ornamental grasses give year-round interest rnamental grasses are reliable warm-season performers that keep on giving, even in winter landscapes. Their color and interesting texture make them great choices for any garden. A couple of good ornamental grasses that I like are Gulf muhly grass and pampas grass. Gulf muhly grass is a native plant that really performs in the winter. It flowers in billowy masses that resemble pink clouds in the landscape. Southern The color will Gardening hold as long as by Dr. Gary Bachman there isn’t a hard freeze. Even after freezing temperatures, the flower heads keep their airy shape. Pampas grass can command attention in the landscape. This perennial grass has wiry, serrated leaves and is definitely not shy. Flower heads normally shoot up to 10 feet tall, and the arching foliage is a variable green color. The flower heads are extremely dense, and the stalks are held in tight groupings that persist through the winter for landscape interest. If you have a smaller area, then plant the dwarf Pumila selection. The dwarf description is relative, as this plant grows to 6 feet tall. Gardeners interested in something with a little more pizazz should consider Pennisetum, which offers many different varieties. Rubrum has upright, arching, burgundy-tinted foliage that has the classic, true fountain grass habit. This plant produces waves of gracefully nodding, soft-purple plumes during the summer. Fireworks has pink and white variegation. It has a strong upright, arching habit that prefers full sun and will provide strong fall interest. Sky Rocket has beautifully variegated green leaves with white-striped margins that form beautiful, arching clumps. Pennisetum must be treated as an annual everywhere except right along the coast. These grasses grow up to 3 feet tall and exhibit a wispy, flowing grace of color and texture.

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Home gardeners are showing more interest in planting ornamental grasses in their spring and summer landscapes because of the variety of colors and textures they add to gardens and landscapes. But looking out at the landscape this time of year often leads to the question, “How do I care for these plants in the winter?” The dried leaves, stalks and seed heads provide visual winter interest for us and winter structure and habitat for birds and other wildlife. A common question I get during the late fall and early winter is when to cut ornamental grass back. I always tell people to just leave it alone for now. There will come a day in later winter when you just need to get out of the house and do something in the yard. That’s the day to cut the grasses back. Cut them down to about 6 inches from the ground to remove last year’s foliage and make room for this year’s new growth. Now is also a good time to divide the plants, as most ornamental grasses spread by clumping. Use a sharp shovel or spade and dig the entire clump. Chop it into three or four pieces; there’s no need to be dainty. Replant the new pieces, and give some away to neighbors.

Roaadfasdfasdfasdfasd. Photo: MSU Extension/Gary Bachman

I like ornamental grasses in the landscape because they provide four seasons of garden interest. You should like

them, too, for the same reason. Dr. Gary Bachman is an associate Extension and research professor of horticulture at the Mississippi State University Coastal Research and Extension Center in Biloxi. He is also host of “Southern Gardening” radio and TV programs.


Food for

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thought

iz Jo and I hope you had a merry Christmas and happy holidays and are anticipating with eagerness the coming new year. Remember to eat black-eyed peas, collard greens and hog jowl on New Year’s Day if you really want it to be a stellar year. I’m not sure where that tradition came from or if making prudent substitutions won’t work just as well. Turnip greens for collards, for example. And leftover ham from Christmas for the hog jowl. We here in the South seem Mississippi to orbit our Seen lives around by Walt Grayson food. My Granddaddy Cummings, Mama’s daddy, found a big petrified stump and told Grandmother he wanted it as his tombstone. He said petrified wood would be appropriate since he had

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worked in timber all his life. “Well, if that’s the case,” she reasoned, “when I die just take the door off of the oven and use it for Rob suggested we meet at the cafe near the four-way stop instead of me trying to wind my way to his house way out in the country. That mine,” since she had was one of the most satisfying suggestions I ever got. Hope I get more like that in the new year. Photo: Walt Grayson cooked so much all her life. I told that story about Granddaddy about his Forever Outdoors group, northeastern part of Mississippi, you and his headstone to a meeting of school which helps disabled folks have outdoors need to try a Slugburger just to say cafeteria workers not long ago. I thanked adventures. We were trying to come up you’ve had one, if for no other reason. them for all they do to make sure our with a place to meet. His suggestion was I guess it is a sign of the times, people kids get some nutrition in their day. I to meet at lunch at the local café, which not cooking like we used to. ‘Course we did. The place was packed. told them my mother cooked three with the kids gone and just the two of us It’s not just dedicated cafés that serve at the house now, it’s hard to cook for meals a day as long as all of us were still food nowadays. There is hardly a place at home and Daddy was alive. just that few. It’s a lot easier to pick But I went on to say that the tradition to fill up your car where you can’t also something up on the way home from of cooking like that didn’t seem to carry get fried chicken or barbeque or catfish. work. Consequently, actually cooking a down into later generations. People just And most of it is pretty good too. big meal is almost a special occasion. Donut shops are all over the place, as don’t get into the kitchen like they used The plus to all of this is we have so well as hot tamale stands. There is that to. I told them I could hide Miz Jo’s many good cafés that make much better Christmas presents in our oven. one place in Natchez that sells them meeting places than just some old But obviously we still eat. So how do both. address your GPS talks you to. Just Regions of the state have their spepeople eat like we do in the South and remember to leave room for dessert. yet not cook like our parents and grand- cialties too. I mentioned tamales—they Walt Grayson is the host of “Mississippi are an art form in the Delta. And the parents did? Simple. We eat out a lot. Roads” on Mississippi Public Broadcasting coast is where the seafood on your plate Just before Christmas I was to do a television, and the author of two “Looking story with Rob Robinson at Mathiston today slept in the gulf last night. Around Mississippi” books and “Oh! That Steak and catfish places are good Reminds Me: More Mississippi Homegrown everywhere, especially toward the weekStories.” Contact Grayson at end. And if you are ever up in the walt@waltgrayson.com.

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Today in Mississippi I January 2016

Spicy Pork Carnitas mississippi

‘Living on Love’ FEATURED COOKBOOK

Home cooking has a lot going for it. The home cook controls the quality of the ingredients, the seasonings and portions—and tailors meals to suit the family’s taste. But some folks have neither the time nor budget for cooking elaborate meals at home. What they need are ideas for preparing fast and satisfying dishes on a shoestring budget. These cooks will find plenty of culinary inspiration (and laughs) in “Living on Love: Cooking When You’re Short on Time and Cash,” a new cookbook by West Point native Annie Oeth. Writing with humor from a Southern point of view, Oeth shares her ideas and strategies as a mom who is not above delegating meal preparation to others in the household. Her recipes are quick and easy (with names like Chicken Dinner in a Flash), use convenience foods (canned sauces, dry mixes and such) and reflect Southern tastes. Her kids like them too. Oeth includes the prep/cook time and cost for each meal; most cost less than $10 and take less than 30 minutes to prepare or cook. Throughout the cookbook are Oeth’s tips for freezing make-ahead dishes, healthy eating, slow cooking, meal planning and using leftovers. Detailed instructions make this cookbook suitable for beginning cooks. A graduate of Mississippi University for Women, Oeth is the author of “Because I Said So: Life in the Mom Zone” and “For Love or Money: A Guide to Bungee Jumping Through Life.” “Living on Love,” a 233-page cookbook, is available in book stores and online. Price is $15.95 for the softcover and $8.95 for the e-book.

Curried Chicken Salad ¾ cup mayonnaise 2 tsp. lemon juice ¾ tsp. curry powder 2 cups cooked chicken, shredded or cubed 1 medium apple, cored and chopped (Granny Smith, Gala or Fuji work well)

¾ cup dried cranberries ½ cup thinly sliced celery ¼ cup chopped pecans 2 Tbsp. chopped green onions

Mix mayonnaise, lemon juice and curry powder. Blend with chicken, apples, dried cranberries, celery, pecans and onions. Refrigerate until serving. Best eaten same day it is prepared. Beautiful served on salad greens. Cost: less than $10; prep time: 30 minutes

Pork tenderloin 1 tsp. sea salt 1 Tbsp. Worcestershire sauce 2 tsp. cayenne pepper

2 cups apple cider vinegar 2 Tbsp. light soy sauce 2 tsp. hot sauce

Combine all ingredients in a zippered plastic freezer bag and freeze. To serve, thaw by placing in refrigerator the day before you plan to cook. Empty thawed contents of bag into a slow cooker and cook on low for 8 hours. Shred meat and add to tacos or quesadillas. Cost: $10; prep time: 5 minutes

Beef Lombardi This is always a hit at our house, especially in the winter, and it goes well with green salad and garlic bread. 1 lb. ground beef 1 (14.5-oz.) can diced tomatoes 1 can Rotel tomatoes with chilies 2 tsp. sugar 2 tsp. salt ¼ tsp. pepper 1 (6-oz.) can tomato paste

6 oz., more or less, of egg noodles, boiled and drained 6 green onions, sliced 1 cup sour cream 1 cup shredded Cheddar cheese 1 cup shredded mozzarella cheese

Preheat oven to 350 F. Brown ground beef and drain. Return beef to skillet and combine with next 6 ingredients. Simmer for about 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. Combine cooked noodles, green onions and sour cream. Put noodles in the bottom of a 9-by-13-inch baking dish. Top with beef mixture, and then top beef with cheese. Bake for about 30 minutes or until bubbly. Serves about 6 to 8. Cost: $15; prep time: 30 minutes, bake time: 30 minutes

Cheeseburger Soup ¾ cup chopped onion (about 1 medium) 1 tsp. dried parsley 4 Tbsp. butter, divided 2 cans low-sodium chicken broth 1 lb. ground beef, browned and drained 4 cups frozen, shredded hash browns, thawed

¼ cup all-purpose flour 1 ½ cups milk 2 cups shredded Cheddar cheese ¼ cup sour cream Salt and pepper to taste

In a deep pan or Dutch oven, sauté onion and parsley flakes in 1 tablespoon of the butter until crisp-tender. Add broth, browned meat and potatoes to pan. Bring to a boil. Cover and simmer until potatoes are tender, about 10 minutes. In a small skillet, melt 3 tablespoons of the butter. Stir in flour until a thick paste forms. Whisk in milk—about ½ cup at a time—and cook over medium heat until thickened, stirring frequently. Add milk-and-flour mixture to soup, about ½ cup at a time, mixing in well. Bring to a boil and let boil about 2 minutes. Reduce heat to low. Add cheese and stir until cheese melts. Remove from heat and stir in sour cream. Add salt and pepper to taste. Freeze in gallon-size zippered plastic freezer bags. To heat, thaw in refrigerator and heat by simmering on stove until heated through. Cost: less than $15; prep and cook time: 45 minutes

Lauren’s Chicken Fried Rice 1 cup long-grain rice 1 lb. boneless, skinless chicken, cut into bite-size strips 1 egg

½ onion, chopped ½ small bag frozen peas and carrots Soy sauce, regular or reduced sodium

Cook rice in 2 cups water according to package directions. Coat a skillet with nonstick cooking spray. Sauté chicken until done and set aside. In skillet, scramble egg and set aside. In the same skillet, spraying again with nonstick cooking spray if necessary, sauté onion until translucent. Add peas and carrots, and continue to sauté for about 5 to 10 minutes, or until done. Fold in cooked rice, cooked chicken and cooked egg, stirring to mix. Season with desired amount of soy sauce. Cost: $8; prep and cook time: 45 minutes Tip: If you have chicken and rice earlier in the week, cook extra of both to use in this recipe.


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How we treat our pups “T he new year is almost here,” I was saying to Mr. Roy as we sat in the den enjoying the Christmas tree. “Let’s leave it decorated longer this year.” “You know there’s a superstition that the tree should come down before January 1 or have bad luck,” he said, as he took a big swallow of his afternoon coffee. I couldn’t help but snicker. “You say that every year, but we never get around to removing all decorations for a week or so after New Year’s Day.” I glanced over at Sugar, our baby with four legs who was curled lazily in her bed between us on the sofa. “Poor Sugar,” I said, “you won’t have another Christmas gift until next year.” She immediately perked her ears, jumped down and ran over to the tree that no longer had presents underneath. She heard me say “gift” and her ears perked up. She began scratching the floor around the tree, pulled the tree skirt away from the trunk Grin ‘n’ and barked at us. “You must Bare It wait until next by Kay Grafe year,” I explained. Sugar certainly understands the word “wait” since we use it often when talking to her. She waits for us to come home, waits to get her food, waits for us to let her outside, waits for us to play, waits until we say “go ahead and open your gift.” She spends her life waiting. “It’s amazing how many words she understands and how she lets us know exactly what she wants,” Mr. Roy said. “People wouldn’t believe the signs she transfers to us. First by direct eye contact, followed by a distinctive bark until we follow her, then she shows us in body language her heart’s desire.” “Stop right there!” I said. “You gave me an idea for the January column. I’ll make a survey by calling several friends and ask them how their dogs communicate and how they treat their pets.” First, I’ll tell you how we treat Sugar,

our miniature schnauzer. She sleeps in her bed at the foot of our bed. Each morning Mr. Roy says, “Sugar, go tell Mom good morning.” She walks up to my pillow, nudges my shoulder and rolls on her back. I scratch her tummy and she goes back to her daddy, who takes her outside. At night she picks up her toy bear and waits for one of us to lift her up in bed. (Mamma Bear is the same toy we gave her nine years ago when we brought her home.) I sing three songs to her, then she falls asleep. I called Margaret Graham. “This is Kay. Tell me two things about Cindy, the dog you inherited from Winnie Faye Dale. How does Cindy communicate to you and Ruffin, and how do you treat her?” “At exactly 4 p.m. every day she nudges my hand for food. She will not walk on a leash. When I put it on her she plops down and won’t stand up. She’s afraid of other dogs, so if one of my children brings their dog over, Cindy jumps in her bed and hides her face. She sits in a chair with Ruffin and me … except in the back. No relaxing when he’s working or I’m watching TV.” “Alice, this is Kay. Tell me about Lucy. I’m writing a column about our friends with dogs, so tell me a couple of things about Lucy.” “Lucy is special. I cook her food. Actually I stopped cooking years ago for Jerry and me; we eat out. One night Jerry came in from work and walked in the kitchen while I was cooking. He said, “Wow, Alice, I’m glad you decided to start cooking again … and that steak looks great.” I said, “Jerry, this is for Lucy. She needs extra nourishment. I treat her like I would my own child. Jerry never liked my cooking anyway.” Our pets are important, yet some of us

Killer’s mouth. I noticed no hand washing. Pet lovers come in all varieties. Some folks make their dogs stay outside. Like our friend Randy Brown. He says that’s where they belong … and he loves his Jack Russells. I’m not sure where Mr. Roy and I fit into the population of dog lovers. I’m sure, however, those who don’t enjoy pets think we are asking for unnecessary work, or maybe we’re just kooky. Happy new year!

go overboard. For instance, we had dinner with Betty and Steve, friends in Starkville. They had a Yorkie. The four of us sat down to eat dinner and Steve put Killer in his lap; after Steve ate a bite of pork chop, he chewed up another bite and put it in

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10  Today in Mississippi  January 2016

Mike Smith, General Manager & CEO Lorri Freeman, Manager of Public Relations Amanda Parker, Public Relations Specialist For more information, call 601-947-4211/228-497-1313 x 2251 or visit our website at www.singingriver.com

Mike Smith, General Manager and CEO Singing River Electric

Beginning January 8, Singing River Electric member billing statements will reflect a power cost adjustment decrease of 0.6¢/ kilowatt-hour due in large part to lower natural gas prices. "This will reduce all member bills by $6.00 for every 1,000 kilowatthours," said Singing River Electric CEO and General Manager Mike Smith. The power cost adjustment is driven by the cost of generating and purchasing electricity. It increases and decreases based on these costs, and it is a pass-

through cost to the membership. "By purchasing a blend of owned and contracted generation resources, as well as a diversified mix of fuel sources, South Mississippi Electric, Singing River Electric's wholesale power provider, keeps the cost of power low as possible," commented Smith. South Mississippi Electric (SME) currently generates or purchases electricity made from resources including natural gas, coal, nuclear, and hydroelectric power. SME will add solar energy to its resources for 2016.

In addition to working with SME to lower power cost during generation, Singing River Electric also partners with its members to lower their energy costs at home. "Our website has many tips, articles and even energy calculators that enable members to learn how to conserve energy and save money on their electric bill," said Smith. "All brochures, tips and calculators are also available from any mobile device by visiting singingriver.com or using SRE's SmartHub mobile application."

www.singingriver.com

Power Cost Adjustment decrease applied to January bills

Beware of electric space heaters

Nick DeAngelo, CEM Manager of Member Services & Facilities deangelo@singingriver.com

Electric space heaters are inexpensive to purchase and convenient to use. However, the operating cost of an electric space heater is notably higher than most other forms of heating. With a space heater, you are only heating the area immediately around the unit. The rest of your home or work area isn’t affected by its efforts. Also, consider the fact that it takes the same amount of electricity to operate two space heaters as it does to run a 3-ton high efficiency electric heat pump. This winter, consider purchasing a few tubes of caulk or weather stripping for your doors and windows. Even little changes like caulk can add up to big savings. Better yet, replace your inefficient, old HVAC unit with an energyefficient and properly sized electric heat pump. Should you choose to use a space heater, safety should be the top priority. Make sure the space heater is placed on a level surface and away from curtains, furniture and clothing. Choose a unit that will turn itself off if tipped over. Make sure the cord is not frayed or damaged. Find out how the little changes add up to savings and safety by visiting singingriver.com, or follow us on Facebook and Twitter for daily energy and conservation tips.


January 2016



Today in Mississippi  11

The Mississippi Legislature convenes in January for the 2016 session. These are the state lawmakers representing residents living in Singing River Electric Power Association’s service area, along with addresses where they can be reached by letter. Take time to familiarize yourself with the legislators in your area because they are your voice at the state Capitol. Singing River Electric salutes our state senators and representatives for their dedication and willingness to serve in the spirit of public service to help shape the future of our state.



SENATE

Sen. Dennis DeBar Jr.

Sen. Billy Hudson

District 43: George, Greene and Wayne counties Address: P.O. Box 1090 Leakesville, MS 39451 Years in Legislature: 5

District 45: Forrest and Perry counties Address: 27 Troon Circle Hattiesburg, MS 39401 Years in Legislature: 9



Sen. Joseph M. “Mike” Seymour District 47: Jackson, Pearl River and Stone counties Address: 15417 Indian Fork Rd. Vancleave, MS 39565 First year in Legislature

Sen. Michael Watson

Sen. Brice Wiggins

District 51: Jackson County Address: P.O. Box 964 Pascagoula, MS 39568 Years in Legislature: 9

District 52: Jackson County Address: P.O. Box 922 Pascagoula, MS 39568 Years in Legislature: 5

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Rep. Shane Barnett

Rep. Roun McNeal

District 86: Greene, Perry and Wayne counties Address: P.O. Box 621 Waynesboro, MS 39367 First year in Legislature

District 105: George, Greene and Perry counties Address: P.O. Box 1435 Leakesville, MS 39451 First year in Legislature

Rep. Douglas D. “Doug” McLeod District 107: George and Stone counties Address: 1211 Bexley Church Rd. Lucedale, MS 39452 Years in Legislature: 5

Rep. Manly Barton District 109: George and Jackson counties Address: 7905 Pecan Ridge Dr. Moss Point, MS 39562 Years in Legislature: 5

Rep. Jeramey D. Anderson

Rep. Charles Busby

District 110: Jackson County Address: P.O. Box 311 Escatawpa, MS 39562 Years in Legislature: 4

District 111: Jackson County Address: 907 Grant Ave. Pascagoula, MS 39567 Years in Legislature: 5

AVAILABLE! A free, interactive legislative app for Mississippi.

Rep. John O. Read District 112: Jackson County Address: 2396 Robert Hiram Dr. Gautier, MS 39553 Years in Legislature: 24

Rep. Henry B. “Hank” Zuber III District 113: Jackson County Address: 429 Hanley Rd. Ocean Springs, MS 39564 Years in Legislature: 17

Rep. Jeffrey S. Guice District 114: Harrison and Jackson counties Address: 1208 Iola Rd. Ocean Springs, MS 39564 Years in Legislature: 8

The Electric Power Associations of Mississippi offers free versions of the 2016 Legislative Roster. We hope they will be helpful in your involvement with state government. Our easy-to-use mobile app provides information on Mississippi’s state and federal elected officials. Look for “Mississippi Legislative Roster” in the Apple AppStore. An Android version is also available through Google play.


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Natchez Tricentennial I

Today in Mississippi I January 2016

Continued from page 5

and culture. The site includes three prehistoric ceremonial mounds, a reconstructed Natchez Indian house, a museum and gift shop, and a nature trail. Admission is free. Native American tribal members from across the country converge in March each year for the annual Natchez Powwow at the Grand Village.

Opulent white-columned mansions framed by giant live oaks draped with Spanish moss—if Natchez has a visual cliché, this would be it. Yet the city’s architecture heritage is far more diverse. Greek Revival style dominates, but notable exceptions in home design include the octagonal, ornate (and unfinished) Longwood, as well as Edelweiss, the Swiss chalet-style house built in 1883 by a coal dealer. Historic churches abound, including St. Mary’s Basilica, located on the corner of Main and Union streets. Construction began in 1842 on St. Mary’s, the The paved Bluff Trail, above left, affords beautiful views of the Mississippi River and sunsets. A part of the Natchez Trails network of recreational only church built as a cathedral in Mississippi. The Federal-style Adams County Courthouse, built paths, the trail also takes users past Edelweiss, above, a Swiss chalet-style home built in 1883. Visitors who travel to Natchez via the 444-mile Natchez Trace Parkway, above right, can enhance their journey with stops at historic sites, hiking trails and parks with campsites. in 1817, is the oldest in Mississippi. Before the Civil War, slaves were among the property the sheriff aucity in Natchez, and the locals know how to roll out Visitors arriving in Natchez without a plan of tioned on its steps. the red carpet for their guests. action may find the choices of attractions overwhelmThe Natchez Museum of African American History One of the city’s newest attractions, the Natchez ing. But no need to fret—this is a city that is worth is housed in the Old Natchez Post Office, built in Trails, provides a designated walking tour of historic visiting often. 1904 on the corner of Main and Wall streets, the site downtown and the river bluff. Interpretive panels disFor more information on the Natchez 2016 of one of William Johnson’s three barbershops. play old photographs and stories of the historic sites Tricentennial Celebration, call 800-647-6724 or go to On a bluff north of downtown lie the Natchez City walkers encounter along the trails. The Bluff Trail www.natchezms300.com. Tourism information is Cemetery, established in 1882, and the National offers unparalled views of colorful sunsets over the available at www.visitnatchez.org. Cemetery. Sculpted marble monuments, creative iron- Mississippi River from a work and poignant inscriptions distinguish the 100park shaded by giant live acre city cemetery. oaks. Gravesites at the National Cemetery include two At the Natchez Visitor Buffalo Soldiers of the 24th Infantry and members of Center, located at the the 58th U.S. Colored Troops, re-interred from other Mississippi River Bridge, area sites. visitors can buy tour and event tickets, see exhibits, watch a movie about Natchez does parade its past but the city offers Natchez history presented plenty of modern entertainments as well: live music, in a 65-seat theater, local restaurants, bed and breakfasts, antique stores, browse the gift shop and flea markets, art galleries, museums, bike and kayak get tourist information rentals, and more. Tourism is a major economic activ- from the center’s staff.


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A final color show and postage-stamp bucks he entire episode dards, it was still a time of tranquility. brought to mind But I suppose like Faulkner and perexchanges I have read haps all young adults, unfamiliar envibetween William rons called. Years slipped by in city Faulkner and Sherwood life, New Orleans among them, but Anderson, both wellthe lure of my postage stamp kept known and influential writers. So tugging. I’ve been home now for more influential was Faulkner that he is than 30 years. And during those times regarded as a key figure in setting the away, most things changed. From the direction of literature for the 20th outdoors standpoint, one of the most century. Born in New Albany and pleasant changes was the expansion of later living in Oxford, Faulkner went white-tailed deer. Absent when I was a to New Orleans in his mid-twenties child, these were becoming somewhat to associate with estabcommon when I came lished artisans such as back. Today, they are Anderson. Faulkner downright regular, appearwrote and socialized and ing along country roads began to develop his and in backyard gardens. voice as a writer of short My 12 acres are no excepstories and novels. tion. While I paraphrase Thanks to Hurricane rather than quote in this Katrina, I inherited an next sentence, the advice open spot in the hardgiven by Anderson is woods behind my house. accurately portrayed. That spot was gradually Anderson told Faulkner reclaimed and made into a to go back to his postagefood plot. I put up a tree by Tony Kinton stamp world and write stand, and every hunting about what he knew. season since I have spent a Faulkner followed that guidance, and few hours in that stand. And I saw the real-life locals of his fictional deer. They would come to munch Yocknapatawpha County became acorns and eventually drift into the famous, perhaps infamous. It is plot. Always I found some viable rumored that if William Faulkner excuse not to shoot. Truth is, I simply walked into a barber shop in Oxford, didn’t want to! This year, however, all gossip immediately ground to a was different. I determined to take a halt for fear of those suppositions mature buck if one obliged. showing up in print. A week or so before the hunt, So how does the episode to which I weather conditions cooperated with referred above relate to Anderson and three mornings of freezing temperaFaulkner, and where am I going with tures. Within a very few days, leaves this discourse? Please allow me to began to dress appropriately. I had explain. feared the autumn spectacle would Compared to those grand expanses pass unnoticed and take a form of of agricultural properties and mounnothing more than dull brown, foltains and plains and prairies and lowed by a sudden release of showerwoodlands associated with hunting, I ing leaves, but on this particular day I live on a postage stamp. But I know was proven wrong. Looking from my that postage stamp thoroughly and back porch, I was greeted with woncan navigate the 12 acres almost by derment. Gold and orange and red feel. It is a long, narrow rectangle and yellow, sparkling in early-morning chopped off a square 40 with straight- light and inviting adventure. I would line borders. My house and sheds and sit in the stand come afternoon. a scattering of trees occupy the front To enhance the experience, I chose two acres. But the back remains in a tool that, like me, is old. An 1874 hardwoods, these surrounded on two Sharps rifle with black-powder carsides by more acres of hardwoods. tridges and lead bullets; the loads I I grew up in this area. A rather had fashioned myself. Faded jeans, a Spartan existence by today’s stangrey wool jacket and a felt hat were all

T

Outdoors Today

Colors that I thought would not be this fall suddenly erupted with three consecutive frosty mornings. Photo: Tony Kinton

I needed to be comfortably warm. At something just short of 4 p.m., I gathered my gear and walked into the woods. Molly, my dog and constant companion, followed, but I knew she would tire of the regimen in due time and return to her favorite spot beneath an ornamental in the front yard. The walk was hardly 100 yards, but the color show was abundant. I climbed. Within 45 minutes after reaching my station, I heard squirrels begin to scold and scurry. Tired sunshine had begun to cast haunting shadows. And then a buck. He was small, a six-point that was obviously in his second year. But he was legal. I eased the Sharps up and looked through the sights. Immediately I knew I was not going to follow through. He went about his business of popping white-oak acorns. Then a second deer, creeping from a shallow depression and following the same route as his comrade. But this one was different. He possessed that

cautious swagger common to a mature buck, and his start-and-stop gait indicated practiced experience. A finger of light still poking through the trees glinted from impressive antlers. All was right this time. The Sharps erupted in a dazzling display of blackpowder smoke and the woods fell quiet. I approached this first postagestamp buck with deep reverence and reflection. I knelt, removed a tattered hat and gave thanks for the gift. As I turned to go and get a neighbor to assist in dragging the buck back to my shed, I once again noticed the colors, now muted in fading light but still vibrant. Molly barked as I entered the yard. Home was where I was and home was where I should be. Tony Kinton has been an active outdoors writer for 30 years. His newest book, “Rambling Through Pleasant Memories,” is now available. Order from Amazon.com or Kinton’s website: www.tonykinton.com.


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January 2016

Picture this...

My Best Shot!

1. An insider’s view of a cornfield. Robbie Roberson, Hattiesburg; Pearl River Valley Electric member. 2. Aspen White shows what a 5-year-old does with lip gloss. Leah White, Byhalia; Northcentral Electric member. 3. The sun sets as Brent Moeller wraps up another day’s plowing. Tiffiany Moeller-Perry, Picayune; Coast Electric member. 4. Brilliant flowers brighten our winter day. Elizabeth King, Pascagoula; Singing River Electric member. 5. Sam Wilkes and dog Bitzi ease homeward at sunset. Becky Wilkes, Mathiston; 4-County Electric member. 6. Sunlight paints the winter landscape gold, to look like Daisy. Brooklyn Renfrow, age 13, Harrisville. Southern Pine Electric member. 7. Samuel Charles West goes along with mom’s creative photo poses, for now. Donna Roane, Aberdeen; Monroe County Electric member.

2

3 4

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8. Jack gazes with grass-green eyes. Karon Netherland Wilcher, Carthage; Central Electric member. 9. Butterfly stops to sip. Barbara Smart, Carrollton; Delta Electric member.


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12. Marsh mirrors a sunset. Tom Brewer, Picayune; Coast Electric member. 13. An anole prefers not to stand out. Ron Cram, Diamondhead; Coast Electric. 14. Otis retrieves with ease. Amanda Butler, Meridian; East Mississippi Electric member.

7

Our next Picture This theme: Spring Colors Details at www.todayinmississippi.com.

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13 10. Spider lilies make a spectacle of themselves. Sandy Warren, Benton; Yazoo Valley Electric member. 11. Blake Walker, 3, hangs on by a pocket. Cassandra Walker, Maben; 4-County Electric member

Congratulations!

Rochelle Rhyne of Durant, a member of Delta Electric Power Association, is the winner of our 2015 Picture This drawing for a $200 cash prize!


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Marketplace

Today in Mississippi

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January 2016

Mississippi

LAND FOR SALE

47 ACRES • HINDS COUNTY

Type or print your ad clearly. Be sure to include your telephone number. Deadline is the 10th of each month for the next month’s issue. Rate is $2.50 per word, 10-word minimum. Mail payment with your ad to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300. Have any questions? Phone 601-605-8600 or email advertising@epaofms.com.

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January 2016

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Today in Mississippi

Keep an eye on the skies Mississippi’s poultry growers

Ducks and geese have arrived in the South, and in a few more months they will fly back on their northward journey. The annual migration through Mississippi that comes with the changing of the seasons has Mississippi’s largest agricultural industry on alert. Mississippi’s poultry and egg industry, which pumps about $20 billion into Mississippi’s economy, is very attune to migratory waterfowl this year. The ducks, geese and other waterfowl may possibly carry Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) that killed almost 50 million laying hens and turkeys, mainly in Iowa and Minnesota in the spring of 2015. The wild birds carry but don’t suffer from the virus, but it is deadly to commercial and backyard poultry. The virus is called highly pathogenic because it can spread rapidly and cause high mortality rates in domestic poultry. For example, in less than a week of infection, all the birds on a farm could be dead. So the goal is to keep the virus out of the poultry house. Poultry growers, employees of the companies they grow for and anyone who visits a poultry farm are stepping up their biosecurity procedures to make sure the virus does not get into a house. If there is an HPAI outbreak, the Mississippi Board of Animal Health and its partners have developed a coordinated plan for all poultry companies, state and federal agencies, and MSU to follow to contain and eradicate the virus. Poultry growers are watching their birds closely and are much more cautious about biosecurity procedures associated with entering and exiting their houses, and the disinfection procedures they follow. The virus could get into a house on peo-

ple, feed, water, equipment, pests or pets. There were no cases of this strain of avian influenza causing infection in humans and no birds with the virus make it into the food chain, but one case in Mississippi can have global consequences. Mississippi exports about 15 percent of its processed poultry to countries around the world. Some of these trading partners will close their borders to Mississippi chicken with the first case. In addition to 1,500 poultry farms under contract to raise about 730 million birds annually for poultry processors, more and more Mississippians are raising their own chickens on farms, on suburban lots and even urban areas. Dr. Tom Tabler, Mississippi State University Extension Service Poultry Science professor, has been working with commercial and backyard poultry growers. He recommends six simple biosecurity steps developed by USDA that backyard enthusiasts and commercial producers can follow to lower the risk of disease entering their flocks:

1. Keep your distance. Restrict access to your property and your birds. 2. Keep it clean. Don’t track something in on your clothes or shoes. Have clothes and shoes dedicated only to wear around your birds. 3. Don’t haul disease home. If you go to the feed store, co-op, poultry supply store, café, etc.,

where other commercial producers or backyard enthusiasts may congregate, be aware that disease organisms can hitch a ride home on your vehicle tires or clothes and shoes. Clean and disinfect these items before going around your birds. 4. Don’t borrow disease from your neighbor. Don’t borrow or share tools and supplies with friends or neighbors. If you must share, clean and disinfect materials before they reach your property and again before you return them. Clean, then disinfect! 5. Know the warning signs of infectious bird diseases. 6. Report sick birds. If you suspect a problem, say something immediately. If mortality rates increase suddenly and drastically, you should inform the proper officials. Sick and dying birds should be submitted to a diagnostic laboratory for proper diagnosis of the problem. If you are a commercial producer, contact your service tech for guidance and assistance at the first sign of a potential disease issue. If you are a backyard producer, contact your local county Extension agent, your veterinarian, the MSU Poultry Science Department (662-325-3416) and ask for a poultry Extension specialist, or the Mississippi Board of Animal Health (601-3591170 or the animal disaster hotline at 1-888-7223106).

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Events MISSISSIPPI

HAPPY NEW YEAR! Want more than 400,000 readers to know about your special event? Submit it at least two months prior to the event date. Submissions must include a phone number with area code for publication. Mail to Mississippi Events, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300; fax to 601-605-8601; or email to news@epaofms.com. Events open to the public will be published free of charge as space allows. Please note that events are subject to change; we recommend calling to confirm details before traveling.

Mid-South Swap and Flea Market, Jan. 23 - Dec. 18, Southaven. Open fourth Saturday and Sunday of each month. Free admission. The Arena. Details: 901-831-9519, 901-412-6195.

Starkville Public Library Book Sales, Jan. 4 & Feb. 1, Starkville. Free admission; noon-6 p.m. Starkville Public Library. Details: 662-323-2766.

Mississippi Gospel Music Association Gospel Singing, Jan. 9, Independence. Six to eight groups to sing; 6 p.m. Lighthouse Baptist Church. Details: 662-564-2159. Shape-note Singing School, Jan. 13 and Feb. 10, Florence. Learn to sing Early American hymns in four-part harmony; second Wednesday monthly, 6-8 p.m. Free. Details: 601-953-1094. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parade, Jan. 16, Vicksburg. Historic downtown; 1 p.m. Details: 601-678-8263; visitvicksburg.com. 43rd Annual Delta Agricultural Exposition, Jan. 20-21, Cleveland. Keynote speaker and more than 100 agriculture-related exhibits. Free admission. Bolivar County Expo Center. Details: 662-843-8361; craigh@ext.msstate.edu. Shuffle to the Chefs, Jan. 28, McComb. Culinary benefit for St. Andrew’s Mission, featuring top regional chefs; 6-9 p.m. Admission. McComb Mill. Details: 601-684-4678. Gulf Coast Orchid Show, Jan. 29-31, Gautier. Classes, guided show tour, children’s activities. Daily events vary. Gautier Convention Center. Details: 228-474-2500, 601-530-8778.

The McKameys in Concert, Jan. 30, Meridian. Doors open 6 p.m., concert 7 p.m. Admission. Meridian Temple Theater for the Performing Arts. Details: 601-416-1630; mckameysonline.com. Vicksburg Coin Club Winter Show, Jan. 3031, Vicksburg. Local and regional dealers with coins, currency and medals. Free verbal appraisals. Free admission. Riverwalk Casino. Details: 662-571-1484. Mardi Gras Parade, Feb. 6, Vicksburg. Downtown; 4 p.m. Details: 601-634-4527; downtownvicksburg.org. Carnaval de Mardi Gras and Gumbo Cookoff, Feb. 6, Vicksburg. Food, children’s activities; 5-9 p.m. Admission includes gumbo. Benefits Vicksburg Foundation for Historic Preservation. Southern Heritage Cultural Center Auditorium. Details: 601-636-5010; facebook.com/vicksburg.mardi.gras. Welcome Center Celebrates Black History Month, Feb. 9, Hernando. Southern soul food, live entertainment, African American arts and crafts; 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. Maps, photos, civil rights videos on exhibit through February. DeSoto County Welcome Center. Details: 662429-9969.

Cooperatives award scholarships The Mississippi Council of Cooperatives (MCC) and the Electric Power Associations of Mississippi have awarded scholarships to deserving Mississippi youth. Katie Bell Berkeley, of Stoneville, is the recipient of the 2015 L.L. “Red” Monroe cooperative scholarship for students attending Mississippi State University and enrolling in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. Samantha Taylor Metz, of Hernando, is the 2015 recipient of the Hobson Waits Cooperative Leadership scholarship at the University of Mississippi. The Monroe and Waits scholarships are named in honor of two cooperative leaders who were instrumental in the

Samantha Taylor Metz

Katie Bell Berkeley

development of education programs for young people. Waits served the Electric Power Associations of Mississippi for 37 years and retired in 2006 as CEO. “Over the past eight years, the Council has awarded more than $50,000 in scholarships to students attending senior and community colleges in Mississippi,” said Ron Stewart,

Four electrical engineering students are recipients of Electric Power Associations of Mississippi Foundation engineering scholarships: Ike Armour, of Laurel; Hunter Fowler, of Glen; Drew Kirkwood, of Lucedale; and Ashton Pace, of Sumrall. “Through our electric cooperative scholarship program, our Association encourages students to pursue a career in engineering,” Stewart said. “In addition to the scholarships, we offer many opportunities for students to work in the field while completing their studies. As a cooperative, we underscore the importance of service to others. We are proud to provide promising young people with the support, education and confidence needed to realize their aspirations.” The Mississippi Council of Cooperatives is the principal organization charged with promoting cooperatives in the state. The Electric Power Associations of Mississippi is the service organization for 26 consumer-owned electric power From left are Randy Smith, general manager of Dixie Electric Power Association; Ike Armour; Michael Callahan, associations serving some 1.8 million CEO of Electric Power Associations of Mississippi; Ashton Pace; and Christa Bishop, representing South Mississippians. Mississippi Electric Power Association.

MCC’s secretary and treasurer. “We are proud of our long-standing tradition of investing in our young people.” In 2016 the Council will provide funds for the $1,000 scholarships recognizing the two longtime, outstanding cooperative leaders. For more information, visit www.mscouncil.coop and click on the scholarship tab.


January 2016

HARBOR FREIGHT

R PE ON SU UP CO

QUALITY TOOLS AT RIDICULOUSLY LOW PRICES

We have invested millions of dollars in our own state-of-the-art quality test labs and millions more in our factories, so our tools will go toe-to-toe with the top professional brands. And we can sell them for a fraction of the price because we cut out the middle man and pass the savings on to you. It’s just that simple! Come visit one of our 600 Stores Nationwide. R PE ON SU UP CO

12" SLIDING COMPOUND DOUBLE-BEVEL MITER SAW WITH LASER GUIDE

7 FUNCTION DIGITAL MULTIMETER

WOW6.5SUPHPER(21CO2 UPCCON) OHV

HORIZONTAL SHAFT GAS ENGINES

Customer Rating

LOT 61282 shown 68049/62326 62670/61253 • Weighs 73 lbs.

$

SAVE $85

8499

R PE ON SU UP CO

LOT 68121/69727 shown CALIFORNIA ONLY

$$97

97

SAVE

$

230

$

SAVE 65% $

119

AUTO-DARKENI WELDING HELMET

49%

Customer Rating

Customer Rating

R PE ON SU UP CO

$

comp at

$79.99

comp at

SAVE $29

• Extends from 6 ft. to 8 ft. 10"

$34.49

LIMIT 8 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R PE ON SU UP O C

10 TON HYDRAULIC LOG SPLITTER LOT 62291 67090 shown

Customer Rating

• 300 lb. capacity • 23 Configurations

SAVE Customer Rating $90

$

11999

comp at

$209.99

Customer Rating

$

6999 comp at

$

$99

83%

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ED 9 PIECE FULLY POLISHON COMBINATI WRENCH SETS SAE

LOT 69043 42304 shown

YOUR CHOICE SAVE

66%

$

comp at

calling rFreight.com or by at our stores, Harbo n or prior LIMIT 7 - Good t be used with other discount or coupo l receipt. 800-423-2567. Cannodays from original purchase with origina be Original coupon mustday. able. purchases after 30 ansfer Non-tr per es last. Offer good while supplih 5/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer presented. Valid throug

• 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed • Over 30 Million Satisfied Customers

LOT 42292 shown 69594/69955

SAVE 82% $ 99

5

comp at

$34.99

LIMIT 6 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

WOW SUPER COUPON

LY MOVER'S DOL 88 shown

LOT 60497/938 61899/62399 • 1000 lb. capacity

$

39999

$752.99

• 70 dB Noise Level

54%

4000 PEAK/ 3200 RUNNING WATTS 6.5 HP (212 CC) GAS GENERATORS

SAVE $169

comp at

comp at

$19.97

R PE ON SU UP O C

Customer Rating

10 FT. x 10 FT. POPUP CANOPY LOT 62898/62899 62513/62384 62897/69456 shown

SAVE $40

SUPER QUIET

29999 comp at

1199

calling rFreight.com or by at our stores, Harbo n or prior LIMIT 8 - Good t be used with other discount or coupo l receipt. 800-423-2567. Cannodays from original purchase with origina be Original coupon mustday. able. purchases after 30 ansfer Non-tr per es last. Offer good while supplih 5/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer presented. Valid throug

LOT 68528/63079/69729/63080/69676 shown LOT 69675/69728/63090/63089 CALIFORNIA ONLY

$

$

comp at

calling rFreight.com or by at our stores, Harbo n or prior LIMIT 5 - Good t be used with other discount or coupo l receipt. 800-423-2567. Cannodays from original purchase with origina n must be coupo al Origin able. purchases after 30 per day. es last. Non-transfer Offer good while supplih 5/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer presented. Valid throug

R PE ON SU UP Customer Rating O C

$899

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$

5999 comp at

$469

$99.99

LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R PE ON SU UP O C

R PE ON SU UP O C

R PE ONCustomer Rating SU UP O C

RETRACTABLE AIR HOSE REEL WITH 3/8" x 50 FT. HOSE LOT 93897 shown 69265/62344

HIGH LIFT RIDING LAWN MOWER / ATV LIFT LOT 61523 shown 60395/62325/62493

Customer Rating

SAVE $106

99

8

Customer Rating

$$29999

8999

LOT 42305 69044

$ 99

AUTOMATIC BATTERY FLOAT CHARGER

453

LOT 60813 61889/61256 68142 shown

METRIC

$5

R PE ON SU UP CO

Customer Rating

SAVE

$149.99 LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

$17.97

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

$17.99

CH 12,000 LB. ELECTRIC WIN L AND Customer Rating WITH REMOTE CONTROBRA KE AUTOMATIC

SAVE $60

comp at

LOT 62514/62656/67646 shown

2

$ 99 SAVE

$89

WOW SUPER COUPON

7

$ 99

1.5 HP ELECTRIC POLE SAW

7

17 FT. TYPE 1A MULTI-TASK LADDER

YOUR CHOICE

3999

LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

SAVE 76%

4999

calling rFreight.com or by at our stores, Harbo n or prior LIMIT 3 - Good t be used with other discount or coupo l receipt. 800-423-2567. Cannodays from original purchase with origina be Original coupon mustday. able. purchases after 30 ansfer Non-tr per es last. Offer good while supplih 5/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer presented. Valid throug

$ 99

R PE ON SU UP O C

Customer Rating

comp at

LOT 60758 62689 shown

LOT 62896/68862 shown

$20.37

RIP LOT 47873 shown 69005/61262

LOT 60637 61615 95275 shown

$

10 PIECE DRAGONFLY SOLAR LED STRING LIGHTS

comp at

LIMIT 9 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

CLAW LOT 69006 60715/60714

comp at

SAVE 55%

$49.21

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

$40

SAVE

SAVE 60%

16 OZ. HAMMERS WITH FIBERGLASS HANDLE

Customer Rating

1699

LOT 61611/46092 shown

20"

R 4 PIECE 1" x 15 FT. PER N PE ON RATCHETING TIE DOWNS SUOUPO SU UP O LOT 63056/60405/61524 C C 63057/62322/90984 shown Customer Rating

R PE ON SU UP CO

3 GALLON, 100 PSI OILLESS PANCAKE AIR COMPRESSOR

comp at

$328 by calling

rFreight.com or at our stores, Harbo n or prior LIMIT 5 - Good t be used with other discount or coupo l receipt. 800-423-2567. Cannodays from original purchase with origina be Original coupon mustday. able. purchases after 30 per es last. Non-transfer Offer good while supplih 5/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer presented. Valid throug

R PE ON SU UP CO

LOT 69651 62868/62873 68239 shown

Customer Rating

99

WOWADSUPJUSERTABCOLEUPSHAONNGDE

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

$349.99

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

LIMIT 1 - Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or prior purchase. Coupon good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Offer good while supplies last. Shipping & Handling charges may apply if not picked up in-store. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/5/16. Limit one FREE GIFT Coupon per customer per day.

Includes one 18V NiCd battery and charger.

comp at

$399

$169.99

9999

comp at

VALUE

18 VOLT CORDLESS 3/8" DRILL/DRIVER WITH KEYLESS CHUCK

LOT 60363/69730/68120

134

RAPID PUMP® 3 TON LOW PROFILE HEAVY DUTY STEEL FLOOR JACK

R PE ON SU UP CO

15

$

SAVE $250

LIMIT 8 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

99

LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

$

ANY SINGLE ITEM

• 580 lb. capacity

– Truckin' Magazine

LOT 90899 shown 98025/69096

SAVE $264 Customer Rating

comp at

26", 4 DRAWER TOOL CART

WINNER

WITH ANY PURCHASE

LOT 61776 61969/61970 69684 shown

$

I

61634/61952

FREE 20% OFF Limit 1 coupon per customer per day. Save 20% on any 1 item purchased. *Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or any of the following items or brands: Inside Track Club membership, extended service plan, gift card, open box item, 3 day parking lot sale item, compressors, floor jacks, saw mills,  storage cabinets, chests or carts, trailers, trenchers, welders, Admiral, CoverPro, Daytona, Diablo, Franklin, Hercules, Holt, Jupiter, Predator, Stik-Tek, StormCat, Union, Vanguard, Viking.  Not valid on prior purchases. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/5/16.

Today in Mississippi

Customer Rating LOT 95659 shown

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON

How Does Harbor Freight Sell GREAT QUALITY Tools at the LOWEST Prices?

I

Customer Rating

$

• 300 lb. capacity

5999

8999 comp at

comp at

LOT 66537 shown 69505/62418

SAVE 61% $ 99

6

comp at

$199.99

$17.97

LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

LIMIT 9 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

$166

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

$

SAVE $110

72" x 80" MOVER'S BLANKET

• No Hassle Return Policy • Lifetime Warranty On All Hand Tools

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19


Today in Mississippi January 2016 Singing River  

Today in Mississippi January 2016 Singing River

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