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July 2016 | Vol. 26 Iss. 07

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LOCAL LIFE

130 Years OF TRUST Taking Care of

YOUR FAMILY’S NEEDS

EVERY STEP OF THE WAY.

Get Outside

By Tori La Rue | tori@mycityjournals.com

PAGE 18

A view of the Jordan River Parkway – one of the best places to work-out outside in the Salt Lake Valley area. – Tori La Rue

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PAGE 2 | JULY 2016

SOUTH VALLEY JOURNAL

Bike Festival Prevails Through Rain By Tori La Rue | tori@mycityjournals.com

A child rides through the bicycle rodeo obstacle course at Heathy Herriman’s Pedal Palooza. The goal of the event is to teach children about bicycle safety. – Tori La Rue

W

ind and rain, officers from the Unified Police Department, staff and council from Herriman City and community members, joined in Healthy Herriman’s eighth annual Pedal Palooza festivities on May 21. “When I saw the weather outside, I was worried that no one was going to come out,” Healthy Herriman Chair Kami Greenhagen-Jones said. “This is the first year we ever had rain. We had fewer come than usual, but I was expecting maybe five people to come, and I’d say about 100 kids made it. It was definitely still a success.” At the event, children participated in helmet and bicycle safety inspections, a bike rodeo, helmet decorating and a bike a scooter raffle. The event usually includes bike races and a bike parade, but these events were cancelled because of the inclement weather. Healthy Herriman puts on the Palooza each year to educate kids about biking, scootering and pedestrian safety in the spring. This enables them to enter their summer break with a better understanding of what to do when riding a bike and what not to do, GreenhagenJones said. “I think overall we want them to leave here knowing that even though when are on their bike they are usually safe, there are other people out there, too, Unified Police Officer Marcus Beckstead said. “There are safety rules that they need to follow with their bikes, just like an adult needs to with cars. If we do stuff like this to kind of bring

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Ella Thompson, 7, decorates a helmet during Healthy Herriman’s eighth annual Pedal Palooza on May 21. – Tori La Rue

bicycle safety to the people, then we might be able to avoid any major disaster.” Beckstead and other police officers manned the bicycle rodeo and helmet safety inspections. If a child’s helmet didn’t fit right, he or she was given a new helmet, donated by Infinite Cycles bike shop. When asked if she would wear her new helmet, Ella Thompson, 7, said yes. She said she loved decorating her new helmet with stickers at the decorating station. “It has a soccer ball because I like soccer,” she said. “And I had to add flowers and a heart because I like those, too.” While Ella decorated her helmet, other children biked through a bicycle safety rodeo, an obstacle course for kids to ride through. It was set up to resemble bicycle paths that children might come across, such as a railroad crossing, a crosswalk and a stoplight. Police watched as children went through the course and helped them to learn the precautions they should take while riding their bikes. Lisa Johnson, a Herriman resident, brought her 9-year-old son to the event. Johnson attended the Palooza in years past but said she keeps attending because it is not a one-and-done type of activity. “The kids get to interact with the officers and learn the correct tings that they should be doing that they have forgotten about all year—like wearing their helmet,” Johnson said. “They need that little reminder every year.” 


JULY 2016 | PAGE 3

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LOCAL LIFE

S OUTHV ALLEY JOURNAL.COM

Get Outside

By Tori La Rue | tori@mycityjournals.com

A view of the Jordan River Parkway – one of the best places to work-out outside in the Salt Lake Valley area. – Tori La Rue

Q

uit paying for your gym membership this summer and get outside. You’ll get a nice tan, soak up some Vitamin D, maybe lose some weight and save some money. That’s what I call a win-win-win-win situation. Here’s a list of some of my favorite places to exercise outside: 1. Jordan River Parkway Trail: The parkway includes more than 40 miles of paved trails lining the Jordan River through three counties, and it’s the ideal place to bike, run, walk the dog or even roller skate. It’s highly accessible, perfect for distance training and rests at a cooler temperature than the nearby area because of its proximity to the river. Visit jordanrivercommision.com for a map of all trailheads. 2. West Jordan City’s Veterans Memorial Park: It’s 99 acres of park at 8030 S. 1825 West and includes a HUGE country-western themed, wooden playground that will knock your socks off. If you bring your kids, you’re sure to burn a few calories as you chase them around. You may also want to enjoy tennis, baseball, basketball or volleyball. 3. Draper Hikes: Since part of Draper is built on the side of a mountain, it’s the prime place to hike. It’s close to home, but it has scenic views and will still make your legs burn if you choose a trail with a significant grade. The trails are of varying difficulty and they’re listed on the city website at draper.ut.us. You won’t get bored because they have more than 35 options. Thank you, Draper.

4. SoJo Race Series: I don’t know if you know this, but South Jordan is really into running. They host eight races a year, including races from a 2.5K to a marathon. They decided to offer free Runner Socials this year to help runners network and get tips from dieticians, physical therapists and others. If you’re interested, follow SoJo Marathon/Half Marathon/5k on Facebook for more details on runner’s socials.

5. Gary C. Swensen Valley Regional Park: This park at 5100 South 2700 in Taylorsville is a great place to bring a group of people to play sports. It’s not as crowded as some other parks in the valley and it still offers volleyball and basketball. It’s also unique because it’s the only place I know of in the valley that offers the use of a disk golf course for free. 6. Centennial Park: I grew up going to this small Riverton Park at 13000 S. 2700 W. At the park there’s several small hills. The small hills are perfect to run up and down for runners to train on. 7. Bingham Creek Trail: Leave the skateboards and scooters at home on this trail. This 1.3-mile trail, stemming from Colter Bay Cir. west of 4000 West in West Jordan to 4500 Skye Dr. in South Jordan is made of gravel. Although you can run on this trail, I recommend biking. Horses are also welcome on the trail, but I’ve never done that because I don’t have a horse. 8. Riverton City Park: Take your pick – Riverton City Park has Tennis, Pickle ball, volleyball, horseshoes and basketball. It’s all located at 12830 Redwood Rd. They also have three metal work-out stations that give instructions of simple exercises you can do while at the park. 9. Constitution Park: If it rains this summer, you can still work-out outside. Put on some clothes that dry quickly, grab some friends or family members, and head over to Constitution Park at 7000 S. 3200 West in West Jordan. The park dips in on all sides and it fills up with water as it rains. Play soccer through the huge water puddle throughout the park. You’ll be sliding all over the place. Soccer has never been so much fun. Now that I’ve let you in on all of my secrets, what are you waiting for? Call Vasa or 24-hour fitness and cancel your membership. You don’t need them anymore. You’re Welcome. 

JULY 2016 | PAGE 5


PAGE 6 | JULY 2016

Biking in Riverton Just Got Easier City officials plan to extend and add bike lanes to three major areas in the next two years. —Briana Kelley.

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JULY 2016 | PAGE 7

Biking in Riverton Just Got Easier By Briana Kelley | briana@mycityjournals.com

NOW

HIRING For people who want to be part of a great team! Mayor Bill Applegarth and Councilmember Paul Wayman inform residents of Riverton’s Active Transportation Plan on June 11. —Briana Kelley.

T

here is good news for residents who love to bike, walk and run. Riverton City is currently pursuing projects to increase bike lanes and walking trails throughout the city. Project construction begins this year and will continue through 2018 (see map on next page). Mayor Bill Applegarth and Councilmember Paul Wayman presented information to the public at Riverton Hospital’s Community Health Fair on June 11. “I think the highest priority for many people is having bike lanes and safe walking routes,” Wayman said. “That to me has always been really up high on people’s priorities, along with parks. Parks, bike lanes and safe walking trails. So these projects, I think, really benefit everybody.” Wayman has worked on the city’s transportation master plan along with Public Works Director Trace Robinson, Councilmember Tricia Tingey, Applegarth and others. The city is also a member of the Wasatch Front Regional Council (WFRC), a metropolitan planning organization that provides federal funds for transportation policies and projects. Through WFRC, Salt Lake County and other organizations, Riverton City has been able to secure grants for these active transportation projects, according to Applegarth. Active transportation is a new term used to fund walking, running and bicycle routes. “I think there are many ways that these projects benefit Riverton residents,” Applegarth said. “From a health standpoint, it helps improve air quality because they’re riding a bike and taking a car off the road. It improves their health because they’re involved in exercise. I think those are very, very significant things.” Applegarth said there are other benefits as well. “It also helps in congestion because you’re pulling cars off the road and putting bicycles on there,” he said. “So the goal and the

reason people are putting out grants is not just to use it for recreation time but to encourage people to ride bikes to the destinations.” The projects include: – Completing buffered bike lanes from 11800 South to 12600 South along 2700 West in 2016. – Completing Midas Creek Trail connections west of Bangerter Highway in 2017. – Extending the road right-of-way to add bike lanes on 13400 South west of 2700 West in 2017. – Adding width for bike lanes along 12600 South from Bangerter Highway to Mountain View in 2018.

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Applegarth’s vision for a more bikefriendly and walking-friendly city began when he visited Minneapolis in 2013, a city that he described as a mecca for urban bike riders. Since that time, city leaders have actively pursued ways to build better active transportation routes. “You always have to ask the question ‘Should the government be involved in this, or should the government not be involved in this?’” Applegarth said. “When you’re talking bike lanes on long roads or painted in the roads, who else could do it but the government? So I believe it is a very strong government function to help improve the health of the citizens in this city.” Many residents are excited about the changes, and many participated in the active transportation survey sent out by the city. “I think it’s good because it’s going to make our city a much safer place for people, especially people who like to bike and run and that’s really important to me,” resident Cynthia Portlock said. “My husband likes to run and bike, and he’s had many times where he has felt unsafe. I think there is a lack of education for where it is safe to be running and biking. It’s good to get outdoors, and it’s good to exercise, and I think this is going to help our city be a safer place.” 

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PAGE 8 | JULY 2016

SOUTH VALLEY JOURNAL

Newsletter to Continue in Final Riverton City Budget By Briana Kelley | briana@mycityjournals.com

R

iverton City Council unanimously passed the budget for this year (fiscal year 20162017) at the June 14 council meeting. The decision comes after a month of discussion and deliberation on how best to direct resources. Many issues, including the city newsletter, were discussed before the final vote was made. “The budget is the most important document in municipal government. The budget is the legal document that gives local

government officials the authority to incur obligations and pay expenses. It is also the document that allows projects to be completed and services to be performed for the benefit and enjoyment of its residents,” Lisa Dudley, Administrative Services & Finance Director, said. During the June 14 council meeting, council members unanimously adopted the tax rate for 2016 of .000000 for the 2016 tax

Riverton City’s Finance Department has been working hard on the city budget the past few months. From clockwise left to right, Lisa Dudley, Administrative Services Director and Finance Director; Trish Dixon, Human Resources Technician; Kevin Hicks, Assistant Finance Director; Laura Bown, Payroll Technician; Jiny Proctor, Staff Accountant. - ©Riverton City Communications

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year. After further discussion on culinary water fees and garbage tote fees, a motion to leave all funds as is was passed unanimously. The Fee Schedule was then approved 4-1 with Staggs voting no. The council also decided to continue delivering a paper newsletter to residents throughout the year, though the publication will no longer be monthly. Councilmember Tricia Tingey made a motion to fund a newsletter and residential survey by redirecting funds found in the budget. The motion was made after concerns were voiced about people in the city who rely on the newsletter, including the senior center and certain residents. Tingey was also concerned by the low amount of residents currently signed up for the electronic newsletter. “I’m quite frankly embarrassed and I want to offer an apology to those residents [who use the newsletter],” Tingey said concerning the “hasty” decision to end the newsletter. “There needs to be education before you just rip it from them...the newsletter is necessary. That’s how I feel.” The funds will provide for a newsletter four-five times this year and will fund a survey at the end to gauge residential interest and use. It passed 3-2 with Stewart and Staggs voting no. Stewart’s substitute motion, which did not pass, proposed a quarterly newsletter with a more extensive survey. Other than the newsletter and salary in-

crease for council members, there were no other large changes to the multi-million-dollar budget. The budget was passed unanimously and will go into effect July 1. In doing so, the city remains in compliance with state and federal auditory laws and statutes. Staff and elected officials have been working hard to finish the budget on time. Applegarth, who acts as the Chief Financial Officer, took staff and elected official recommendations from the strategic planning sessions conducted earlier this year and wrote the mayor’s budget. Council members then spent the month of May reviewing the budget and making suggestions. “Every time a different group of people looks at the budget, they will see things differently. By that I mean when the staff makes their budget, they are looking at it from a worker’s viewpoint. What do they need to do a good job? They understand what they need to do and they are the best group to know what tools they need to do the job,” Applegarth said. “The Mayor [and the council] looks at it from a sustainability point of view. Can we afford to pay for what staff wants? And, can we continue to pay for it for many years? For example… can we continue to pay for a program we start now, in five more years? Or, does the increased cost to the program make it impossible to continue to provide the service? If it isn’t sustainable, should you continue or start certain new programs?” Applegarth added. 

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tive buyers away altogether. In most cases, you can make a reasonable pre-inspection yourself if you know what you’re looking for, and knowing what you’re looking for can help you prevent little problems from growing into costly and unmanageable ones. To help homesellers deal with this issue before their homes are listed, a free report entitled “11 Things You Need to Know to Pass Your Home Inspection” has been compiled which explains the issues involved. To hear a brief recorded message about how to order your FREE copy of this report call toll-free 1-800364-7614 and enter 5003. You can call any time, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Get your free special report NOW to learn how to ensure a home inspection doesn’t cost you the sale of your home.

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S OUTHV ALLEY JOURNAL.COM

JULY 2016 | PAGE 9

Herriman Honors Veterans With Tribute Ceremony By Hope Zitting | hope@mycityjournals.com

“W

e’ve gathered to give honor to our hero’s buried here. Those who served our country for the freedom we hold dear. In times of peace. In times of war. At home or overseas. Because they served, “Old Glory” still waves proudly in the breeze. Dear Lord we still have many yet on the battlefield. Guide them and protect them. Be their armor and their shield. And when the conflict’s over and our victory flag has flown, bring the sons and daughters of our nation, safely home. To those who gave their very lives, words cannot convey they gratitude felt in our hearts for what each had to pay. May the spirits of our brave who now dwell with Thee above; know a thankful nation, remembers them with love.” This poem, titled “Memorial Day,” was composed by Marine Corps Veteran Ron Tranmer, who also led the Memorial Day Tribute Ceremony at 9 a.m. on May 30 at the Herriman City Cemetery, located at 12520 South Pioneer Street. “May we never be too busy to honor and pay tribute to the many men and women who have given their very lives in defense of our country, and to all who have ever served in the military and on the battlefields serving defending and protecting our freedom. May God be with them,” Ron Tranmer said, opening the ceremony. The tribute ceremony began with an introduction by Riverton Post 140 American Legion Commander Ron Tranmer and proceeded with an opening prayer by Chaplain Roger Davis. Afterward, Tranmer recited a poem he had written, and Miss Riverton, Whitney Gillman, sang the National Anthem. Following, Legion Adjutant Bruce Thayne gave a Memorial Day speech. A former commander volunteered to offer another poem and the Reading of the Names of veterans buried in the cemetery was given by another member of the Riverton Post 140 American Legion. The playing of the taps followed, and the

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Herriman City Cemetery was adorned with flags for Memorial Day. –Hope Zitting

Tribute Ceremony ended with a 21-gun salute. “We’re so thankful for the freedom we have. We’re thankful for everything that has been granted to us, for this land of liberty and for this exceptional nice day that we have to participate in this program. We pray for the servicemen and servicewomen wherever they are this day that they may be protected and that they will be doing the things that they should be doing, and someday that they may all come home,” Chaplain of Riverton Post 140 American Legion, Roger Davis, said during the opening prayer of the Memorial Day tribute ceremony. “This reading from Deborah Parker, who was a soldier at Bamberg, Germany: ‘Darkness enveloped the whole American armada. Not a pinpoint of light showed from those hundreds of ships as they surged on through the night toward their destiny, carrying across the ageless and indifferent sea tens of thousands of young men, fighting for…for, well, at least each other.’…

These words impel us to remember the cost of bringing America this far, and also force us to admit the price is not yet paid in full. This is what Memorial Day symbolizes. A time Americans take a clear look at both our past and our future,” Legion Adjutant Bruce Thayne said during his speech. “One day each year that we acknowledge the debt we owe to those men and women who because they so cherished peace, chose to live as warriors,” Thayne said. Today can’t be contradictory to the lives of our soldiers. They love America; they spent long years in foreign lands, far from our shores. They revere freedom, so they sacrifice their own that we may be free. They defend our right to live as individuals, yet yield their individuality in that cause. Perhaps, the most paradoxically of all, they value life, and so bravely ready themselves to die in the service of our country,” Thayne said. 

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Be Ready Herriman Meets with UPD for CERT Utilization By Hope Zitting | hope@mycityjournals.com

Receive a complete, same-day diagnostic evaluation that leads to a program of personalized treatment. This map illustrates the many differentHERRIMAN areas that Herriman City CERTs cover. –Hope Zitting CITY C.E.R.T. AREAS

O

n May 26, the Unified Police Department taught a class on the effectiveness of Community Emergency Response Teams (CERTs) in missing person cases and how to use CERT when children go missing in residents’ neighborhoods. The class was held at Fire Station 123 in Herriman, located at 4850 West Patriot Ridge Drive. Unified Police Department Lt. Carr of the Herriman Precinct and the Herriman City Emergency Coordinator Tina Giles taught the Be Ready Herriman meeting. Carr began the meeting by referring to a PowerPoint Presentation named, “Effective Searching: A Guide to Practical Application.” The slideshow explained that there are three different levels of searchers. Law enforcement is at the top level of searching, CERT is the next level and Citizen Volunteers are at the bottom level of effective searching. Citizen volunteers are sometimes numbering in the thousands. Usually, citizen volunteers are often uncontained and have a pattern of erratic searching; they generally begin searching before the police are even notified. Often, these citizen volunteers will pick up evidence that should not be moved and bring it to the police. Community Emergency Response Teams, on the other hand, are a volunteer member force multiplier. As a result of thorough training and qualifications CERT members require in order to practice effective searching, these individuals are highly trained and well equipped. CERTs also have a firm understanding of Incident Command. The Incident Command System, as described by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, “is a standardized onscene incident management concept designed specifically to allow responders to adopt an integrated organizational structure equal to the complexity and demands of any single incident or multiple incidents without being hindered by jurisdictional boundaries.” This system aids law

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I

enforcement and other individuals in knowing where to go and where not to go, whether it be in hot zones, containment area, staging areas or media areas. A specific case that came up during the Be Ready Herriman meeting was that of missing person by the name of Fritz Helland. Helland was an 80-year-old man who went missing for a week and a half last October. The Unified Police Department issued a missing person advisory a day after he was reported missing on Friday. Helland’s family members told the police that he took his dog for a walk at 2:50 p.m. on the day before, Thursday. During the case, the UPD asked volunteers to help search for the lost man on that Saturday. The result was chaos; untrained civilian volunteers were everywhere on the crime scene, and trained CERT members had several individuals assigned to them, as there were not enough trained individuals. “The elderly can walk,” Carr said during the CERT meeting with Be Ready Herriman. “The children we’ll find close; the elderly: they’re gone. We immediately now start out, depending on how many hours they give me when I get it. We do not start close. They walk so far, you would be absolutely shocked.” “We got people telling us, ‘Oh, we saw him in a car; I think somebody gave him a ride to the parking lot,’” Carr said. “None of that ended up being true. We talked to a few people who said, ‘I did see him.’ It’s amazing how many people tell us after, even though we’re begging them on the news to tell us now’ they’ll wait until after. ‘Yeah, I did see him. I didn’t know if it was him, but I didn’t want to bother you.’” Carr urged residents to contact the police with any information they may have with any case that may be going on, as all CERT members already know. For more information about the CERT program and how to get involved, go to Be Ready Herriman’s website at http://www. herriman.org/be-ready-herriman/. 

Path: Q:\GIS\Projects\Special\Emergency Preparedness\WebPageCoverMaps\CERTAreas.mxd 5/12/2016

Don’t wait, be seen today!


local life

S OUTHV ALLEY JOURNAL.COM

JULY 2016 | PAGE 11

First ‘Summerfest’ Delights South Valley Residents By Tori La Rue | tori@mycityjournals.com

S

Fireworks burst into the sky at the end of South Jordan’s summer festival. – Tori La Rue

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outh Jordan’s annual summer festival came back this year with a different name—Summerfest—and a few new events. “It’s all part of trying to meet the needs of the community,” Melinda Seager, South Jordan’s associate director of administrative services, said. “The community is ever-changing and the festival is, too.” In addition to the parade, equestrian events, carnival and car show, which were traditional events in South Jordan’s Country Fest, the city also included a mermaid show and swim and BMX demos for its first renamed festival. City officials were also planning on hosting a battle of the bands event, but it was cancelled. One of the most widely attended events was the concert that preceded the fireworks on June 4. Although the concert is an annual occurrence, city leaders seek to feature a new artist each year. Drew Baldridge, a rising country singer, opened the 2016 concert, and then LeAnn Rimes, the headliner and a two-time Grammy award-winning artist with several radio hits, took the stage. “It was awesome,” Robert Diaz, of Riverton, said. “Drew Baldridge was a surprise. He was really good, but LeAnn Rimes was awesome.” Jacob Halliday, 17, thought his mother, Tamina Halliday, was joking when she mentioned that Rimes was performing a free concert in South Jordan. It sounded too good to be true, he said. The mother and son attended the concert together and said they were impressed.

“For a free concert, that was the bomb,” Tamina, of Bluffdale, said. “This was my first time at South Jordan’s fair, and it was good—better than I thought it was going to be, actually.” In addition to the concert, Jacob and Tamina scoped out the carnival and watched the fireworks. Tamina said South Jordan’s firework display was the best firework show that she had ever seen. “It was even better than Murray’s Fourth of July show,” she said. “I loved it.” Ryker Spangler, 7, didn’t have a good experience with the fireworks and said he hated them because they were so loud, but he said he still liked Summerfest because he went on a carnival ride that spun him around in circles. “It scared me, and it made me cry, but it was fun,” Ryker said. Deedee Spanger, Ryker’s mother and a Riverton resident, said South Jordan’s event took place at an ideal time because Riverton’s Town Days celebration wouldn’t happen until July— when festivals are taking place at many locations throughout the valley. “It gave us a chance to sort of build our own holiday,” she said. “It was fun and a good time around for everyone.” 

“It gave us a chance to sort of build our own holiday.”


education

PAGE 12 | JULY 2016

SOUTH VALLEY JOURNAL

Mr. and Mrs. Science By Tori La Rue | tori@mycityjournals.com

130 Years

OF TRUST Taking Care of

YOUR FAMILY’S NEEDS

EVERY STEP

Dawn and Todd Monson, residents of Riverton, sport technicolored lab coats in Dawn’s classroom on one of the last days of school. Dawn and Todd, both teachers, have collectively taught nearly 16,000 students. – Tori La Rue

OF THE WAY.

“If she’s ahead in reading and behind in science, this lets her be a second-grader in reading, but catch up in science.”

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n January, the Tucker family switched from traditional public school to an online charter school, allowing them to have custom-built school-day schedules. During the schoolyear, Megan Tucker, 7, would sometimes get up at 5 a.m. and finish her day of first-grade coursework by 10 a.m., while her brothers did their schoolwork just before going to bed. “I can’t think of one negative,” Melissa Tucker, said about enrolling her children in Utah Virtual Academy. “I think they’re learning more going at their own pace here than in the brick and mortar school.” For some time, Melissa’s children were begging her to home school them. Her oldest had entered middle school and was being exposed to profanity and bullying more than ever before, and another one of her children was tired of waiting for her class to learn material that she’d already caught on to, Melissa said. By the middle of the 2015–16 school year, Melissa was ready to make a change. “I was worried, though. I didn’t have the skills to teach them by myself,” she said. When Melissa found K12.com, an online education website, she said she realized that online public school was an option. She chose a Utah-based school fit with her children’s needs and signed up on the waiting list. Within a couple of days, her children were admitted into the school and she was transferring their records from traditional Herriman public schools to an online school. The Tucker family’s chosen online school has several different kinds of learning opportunities. During some classroom sessions, teachers use webcams to broadcast their lessons in real-time to the students. Students may watch the lessons then, or they can watch the recordings at a more convenient time. Other learning concepts are taught through reading material and interactive games and assignments. Students of the virtual academy must get 80 percent or higher on each assignment before it’s considered mastered, but they may redo assignments as many times as they want or need to. The online system is continually tracking where the student is at in each subject compared to grade level, but if they are

behind or ahead of grade-level, the system can be readjusted to help the student work up to proficiency or excel in what he or she is good at. “It’s so great because it means that just because she’s in first grade, it doesn’t mean that she has to have all first-grade work,” Melissa said, referring to Megan. “If she’s ahead in reading and behind in science, this lets her be a second-grader in reading, but catch up in science.” Each of the Tucker children is ahead in at least one subject, which gives them confidence, according to Melissa. “Instead of feeling like they are dumb because there is one subject they don’t get, they can think, ‘I may be struggling on this one thing, but I could basically skip a grade in this other subject,’” Melissa said. Usually each of the Tucker children has five assignments to complete each day, which takes them between three to four hours. In addition to this core-curriculum based learning, the Tuckers complete a couple hours of additional learning— similar to electives classes at traditional schools. During this instructional time, Melissa teaches them skills such as cooking, sewing and music, or they’ll head over to the J. L. Sorenson Recreation Center for some PE. The four Tucker children have embraced and loved the new lifestyle their school brought to their home, Melissa said. “I love this school because I get to see my mom more and Graham Cracker,” 7-year-old Megan said as she held her guinea pig, named Graham Cracker, in her hands. Melissa and her husband bought each of their children a pet to take care of as part of their extra-curricular school learning. “They’re learning how to take care of things and develop skills that I feel like they never would have known had we not tried this new school out,” Melissa said. As the 2016–17 school year approaches, Melissa said she encourages local families to look into Utah Virtual Academy and other online schools by visiting K12.com. “This school’s not for everyone, but it definitely works for us,” she said. 


education

S OUTHV ALLEY JOURNAL.COM

JULY 2016 | PAGE 13

Herriman Children Attend Virtual School By Tori La Rue | tori@mycityjournals.com

I

n January, the Tucker family switched from traditional public school to an online charter school, allowing them to have custom-built school-day schedules. During the schoolyear, Megan Tucker, 7, would sometimes et up at 5 a.m. and finish her day of first-grade coursework by 10 a.m., while her brothers did their schoolwork just before going to bed. “I can’t think of one negative,” Melissa Tucker, said about enrolling her children in Utah Virtual Academy. “I think they’re learning more going at their own pace here than in the brick and mortar school.” For some time, Melissa’s children were begging her to home school them. Her oldest had entered middle school and was being exposed to profanity and bullying more than ever before, and another one of her children was tired of waiting for her class to learn material that she’d already caught on to, Melissa said. By the middle of the 2015–16 school year, Melissa was ready to make a change. “I was worried, though. I didn’t have the skills to teach them by myself,” she said. When Melissa found K12.com, an online education website, she said she realized that online public school was an option. She chose a Utah-based school fit with her children’s needs and signed up on the waiting list. Within a couple of days, her children were admitted into the school and she was transferring their records from traditional Herriman public schools to an online school. The Tucker family’s chosen online school has several different kinds of learning opportunities. During some classroom sessions, teachers use webcams to broadcast their lessons in real-time to the students. Students may watch the lessons then, or they can watch the recordings at a more convenient time. Other learning concepts are taught through reading material and

During a typical school day for Megan Tucker, 7, she scrolls through her online agenda to find out which assignments she needs to complete. – Tori La Rue

interactive games and assignments. Students of the virtual academy must get 80 percent or higher on each assignment before it’s considered mastered, but they may redo assignments as many times as they want or need to. The online system is continually tracking where the student is at in each subject compared to grade level, but if they are behind or ahead of grade-level, the system can be readjusted to help the student work up to proficiency or excel in what he or she is good at. “It’s so great because it means that just because she’s in first grade, it doesn’t mean that she has to have all first-grade work,” Melissa said, referring to Megan. “If she’s ahead in reading and

behind in science, this lets her be a second-grader in reading, but catch up in science.” Each of the Tucker children is ahead in at least one subject, which gives them confidence, according to Melissa. “Instead of feeling like they are dumb because there is one subject they don’t get, they can think, ‘I may be struggling on this one thing, but I could basically skip a grade in this other subject,’” Melissa said. Usually each of the Tucker children has five assignments to complete each day, which takes them between three to four hours. In addition to this core-curriculum based learning, the Tuckers complete a couple hours of additional learning—similar to electives classes at traditional schools. During this instructional time, Melissa teaches them skills such as cooking, sewing and music, or they’ll head over to the J. L. Sorenson Recreation Center for some PE. The four Tucker children have embraced and loved the new lifestyle their school brought to their home, Melissa said. “I love this school because I get to see my mom more and Graham Cracker,” 7-year-old Megan said as she held her guinea pig, named Graham Cracker, in her hands. Melissa and her husband bought each of their children a pet to take care of as part of their extra-curricular school learning. “They’re learning how to take care of things and develop skills that I feel like they never would have known had we not tried this new school out,” Melissa said. As the 2016–17 school year approaches, Melissa said she encourages local families to look into Utah Virtual Academy and other online schools by visiting K12.com. “This school’s not for everyone, but it definitely works for us,” she said. 

Your Water source

changed

Have you adjusted your water softener? Did you know your water now has a significantly lower hardness rating?

OLD Hardness Setting

New Hardness Setting

grains per gallon

grains per gallon

30

12

Riverton City recently changed its culinary water source to Jordan Valley Water Conservancy District. If you have not already adjusted your water softener to this new level, doing so will provide the following benefits: MORE MONEY IN YOUR POCKET (SAVE $150 OR MORE A YEAR!)

IMPROVED FUNCTIONALITY AND LIFE FOR YOUR SOFTENER. LESS SALT GOING INTO LOCAL RIVERS AND STREAMS. (SOME HAVE REPORTED CUTTING THEIR SALT USE BY 80% OR NOT NEEDING A SOFTENER AT ALL!)

RIVERTON CITY

Any questions? Please call the Riverton City Water Department at 801-208-3164 or Marie Owens, JVWCD’s Water Quality Manager at 801-446-2000.

rivertoncity.com

JORDAN VALLEY WATER

C O N S E R VA N C Y D I S T R I C T

jvwcd.org


PAGE 14 | JULY 2016

education

SOUTH VALLEY JOURNAL

Students Test Out Potential Careers By Tori La Rue | tori@mycityjournals.com

Chloe Burt spent a day at Delta Airlines with her father as part of a job shadow assignment given to her by Fort Herriman Middle School careers teachers. – Chloe Burt

“Some of them found out things that they didn’t want to do instead of jobs they did want to do, and that’s OK.”

G

race Barkdull, 13, said she never wants to be a librarian. “It’s just boring, I guess, because you sit there all day, and it’s very quiet,” she said. “Now I know I’d rather be a pet rescue person or something else.” Tami Flygare, Grace’s college and career awareness teacher at Fort Herriman Middle School, required each of her students go on a full-day job shadow during one of the last days of the 2015–16 school year. Grace chose to shadow her mother, who works as a librarian at a Herriman elementary school. “They have a hard time relating what they learn about in class to the real word, and so when they go out and can see how they are using science and technology and mathematics in a real-world setting, it makes them more serious about their studies,” Flygare said. “Some of them found out things that they didn’t want to do instead of jobs they did want to do, and that’s OK. It is all about exploration.” Grace said she learned that there can be positive qualities about jobs, even if they aren’t the right fit for an individual. She loved getting to befriend a Kindergartener named Lewis while she was job shadowing, even though she decided that overall, it is not the job for her, she said. Most of the students came away realizing that careers are harder than they might first appear, Flygare said. Allison Bryan, 13,

shadowed a landscaper because she thought it would be fun to plant flowers. “I learned how to do a lot more than that,” Allison said. “I learned how to use a lawn mower, and it was hard because you have to push it and make sure it has straight lines. I thought it would be easier, but we were working on the yard of this milliondollar house, so I wanted it to look perfect.” Allison also learned how to tidy up a driveway and porch. She said that landscaping is a potential career path for her in the future if her dream of being a culinary artist doesn’t come to fruition. Ben Freeman’s goal is to be a computer programmer, but he said that if that doesn’t work out, he could always work in home construction. For his job shadow, he spent a day with employees from Legend Homes. Ben, 13, observed home foundations and learned how to ensure their stability. “It’s kind of a family-owned business, so if it came to it, I think I could do this job because I am good with my hands,” he said. After the job shadows, Flygare’s class shared their experiences aloud. Many of them said they sat in more meetings than they would have liked to. Others shared that they thought they were going to a sedentary job, yet they were actually walking around quite a bit. “I think it was a really cool and eyeopening for them,” Flygare said. 


S OUTHV ALLEY JOURNAL.COM

education

JULY 2016 | PAGE 15

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government

PAGE 16 | JULY 2016

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SOUTH VALLEY JOURNAL

How healthy

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JULY 2016 | PAGE 17

S OUTHV ALLEY JOURNAL.COM

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Chamber News

t was an honor to award the following students with a $1500 scholarship for any type continuing education: Caitlyn Earnhart, Paige Forbush, Michael Vasques, Francine Meastas. We fund the scholarship through our annual golf tournament that was held on June 23. Big O Tires has opened its newest store at 4689 West 12600 South in Riverton. The 11,000 square foot store features 8 state-of-the-art service bays, Challenger & Ammco Lifts, Hunter laser guided alignment machines and environmentally friendly waste depositories. The customer waiting area offers a 50” cable television, wireless Internet access, complimentary coffee, bottled water, children’s play area and courtesy customer shuttle service. The store will employ 20 full time service staff. The tire store chain has made significant cutting-edge improvements in the energy efficiency of the building design to cut energy use by implementing the newest technologies in cooling, water, and lighting design. The “Eco-friendly” design includes standards and practices that include pollution prevention, cleanliness, recycling, resource conservation and bio-friendly lubricants and flushes. With the combined services of Big O Tires Service Center and the Havoline Xpress Lube, the store becomes a “one stop shop” for all auto, truck and trailer needs. Services include: oil and lube, air conditioning repair, batteries, starters and alternators, shocks, struts, cooling systems, transmissions, steering and suspension, wheel alignment, brake repair, Utah State Safety and Emissions Testing, as well as the latest diagnostic and manufacturer schedule maintenance services. “Big O Tires is excited to open a new store in Riverton and we look forward to earning the business of our new neighbors while providing great value and exceptional customer service,” said David Critchlow, franchise owner of Big O Tires in Riverton. The store hours are Monday through Friday 7 a.m. to 6 p.m.; and Saturday, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed Sundays. Express service is available with Big O’s “Speed Lanes” to better serve customers.

oquirrhhillsvet.com

O

Assist. Principal Allred, Kristen Flandro, Caitlyn Earnhart, Paige Forbush, Jake Bright

Jordan Jones, Principal Gough, Michael Vasquez

Jordan Jones, Francine Meastas, Principal Gough

Riverton Mayor Bill Applegarth, Big O Tires Owner David Critchlow and members of the Southwest Valley Chamber of Commerce cut the ribbon at the new Big O Tires store in Riverton on May 20, 2016.

Upcoming Events

Our Women in Business will be holding its monthly meeting on June 28. Go to www.swvchamber.org for more information. We will not be holding any meetings in July as we have found that many people are on vacation during this month.

Go to www.swvchamber.org for more information.


LOCAL LIFE

PAGE 18 | JULY 2016

SOUTH VALLEY JOURNAL

Centenarian Still Calls Herriman Home

F

amily, friends and community members gathered at a little yellow home—one of the first to be built in Herriman—on June 3 to celebrate one woman’s 100th birthday. “When you get to be as old as I am, everybody seems to be your cousin,” Roberta Crane, the centenarian, said about the guests who kept piling into her small house. When Roberta Crane was born in 1916, World War I was still going on, and Ford Motor Company’s Model T was on the rise. World War II was more than 20 years from starting, credit cards and CDs were decades from being invented, and today’s common devices like cell phones and the internet were unthinkable. But among all the change within the last century, Roberta said there have been a few constants. “I was born in this very house and have lived here ever since,” Roberta said while sitting on the couch in the front room of her Herriman home. “It has been remodeled and improved, but it is still the same old house.” The home was built in 1880 by James Crane, a polygamist and one of the early settlers of Herriman, for his third wife Rachel, Roberta’s grandmother. Carrie and Bert Crane, Roberta’s parents, later purchased the house, and raised their two daughters, Roberta and Evelyn, there. Neither Roberta nor Evelyn wanted to move away, so they didn’t, Evelyn said. Evelyn, Roberta’s 92-year-old “baby sister” said she still remembers some of their experiences growing up. Balloons were the sisters’ favorite party favor. Evelyn said she’d always end up popping hers on a rose bush or losing it in the wind before she’d make it into the house, while Roberta would keep hers in pristine condition for days. “That’s just how things worked out being the younger sister,” Evelyn said. “Roberta was older and wiser in more ways than that.”

By Tori La Rue | tori@mycityjournals.com

Roberta Crane, who’s lived in Herriman for her entire life, holds her “adopted grandchild” at her 100th birthday party. – Tori La Rue

As Roberta got older, she mastered the skills of the piano and at age 16 was asked to be the organist of the Herriman First Ward congregation of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. She continued to serve her congregation in this capacity until she was 80 years old, according to her relatives. In addition to her church service, Roberta made a livelihood from her talent by teaching piano lessons and accompanying school and community groups as they sang. “Now I am embarrassed; I can’t play a tune very good,” Roberta said. “But I know the things that my students learned were for their benefit and mine. I’m still proud.” Roberta worked at the Herriman Mercantile Store before

Evelyn got her a job at Riverton Motor Company, which used to be off of Redwood Road in Riverton. Evelyn worked at the front desk of the motor company as the secretary, and Roberta did paperwork from within the shop. “I had a little corner office, where I was squished like a bug,” Roberta said.” I was the only woman in the shop, but I was idolized, I guess is the word to say, because they all came to my aid. They wouldn’t let any customer cause me any trouble. My, that was a good job.” Although she never married or had any children of her own, Roberta inherited grandchildren through one of her relatives, Lisa Egbert. Lisa’s father died when she was 14, and her mother was dying of cancer by the end of her senior year of high school. “My mom asked her to take care of me, so I got given to Roberta. I am hers,” Egbert said. “She was always there for me, and she and Evelyn are the only grandparents my children have ever known.” Egbert’s son Jed Egbert, who is now grown-up with a family of his own, said he remembers coming to his “adopted grandmothers’” house during the summer. “They’d take to the museums around town and on hikes up South Mountain before there were houses there,” Jed Egbert said. “Roberta’s always been really quiet, but whenever we needed her, she was always there to watch us and take care of us.” Jed Egbert’s baby boy, one of the youngest party-goers, sat on Roberta’s lap during the party as she, the oldest, greeted and conversed with her guests. Her friends and family shared stories, laughs and goodies with her as they retold old memories and created new ones. “Roberta is really special,” Lisa Egbert said. “She is. She is.” 


S OUTHV ALLEY JOURNAL.COM

JULY 2016 | PAGE 19


PAGE 20 | JULY 2016

SPORTS

SOUTH VALLEY JOURNAL

Mustangs Girls Track Win Fourth Straight Title By Greg Jame | gregj@mycityjournals.com

Mustangs win fourth straight title Photo 1: Senior Brielle Carr placed second in the pole vault at the state track and field meet. –Greg James

“We wanted to come home with two trophies and we did. We knew it needed to be a team effort.”

H

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erriman High School girls track team was not to be denied of its fourth straight state track championship. It all came down to the final leg of the 4x400 meter relay. To top it off, the boys placed second overall. “I felt like our season went very well,” Head coach James Barnes said. “Our goal was to do what we did. We wanted to come home with two trophies and we did. We knew it needed to be a team effort.” Headed into the 4x400 relay, the Mustangs knew they needed to finish sixth or better to clinch the state title. As senior Marlee Peterson received the baton for the final leg, they stood in eighth place. She ran her final leg in 55 seconds, passing two opponents to finish sixth. “It was such a team effort,” Barnes said. “Our throwers stepped up, our jumpers stepped up and our relays could have been the highlight. We have never had all of our relays in the finals. We needed all the kids to score in their events. We had to work at it. It was a total team effort.” Kaysha Love finished her storied Mustang career with overpowering victories in the 100 and 200. She also placed second in the high jump and secured the anchor leg in the winning girls 4x100 relay. She has signed a national letter of intent to attend and run track at the University of Nevada–Las Vegas. The boys also won the 4x100 relay and the 4x400 relays. The boys 200 was dominated by Mustang runners: Dallin Tycksen finished second, Jordan Marr sixth and Jake Jutkins ninth.

“That was the best part of our team. We have some studly athletes, but everyone stepped up,” Barnes said. 2016 State Girls Track Team Scores Herriman . . . . . . . 88.5 Davis . . . . . . . . . . 87 Syracuse . . . . . . . . 67 Bingham . . . . . . . . 63 Lone Peak . . . . . . . 63 2016 State Boys Track Team Scores Davis . . . . . . . . 126.6 Herriman . . . . . . . . 92 American Fork . . . . . 81 Lone Peak . . . . . . . 75 Sierra Freeland and Tori Bailey finished first and second in the shot put. Freeland took second in the discus. She has signed to continue her career at BYU. Ty Shaw took first place in the boys shot and Stone Sagala placed fourth. Shaw also placed third in the discus. “We do have some good young athletes coming up too,” Barnes said. “The size of our team grew to about 225 kids. That is what happens when you win. It will translate into some good things in the future. The standard has been set. We have a good coaching staff and an administration that supports us. This is a good area, and we have a lot of people that are supportive. That definitely plays into our success.” 


SPORTS

S OUTHV ALLEY JOURNAL.COM

JULY 2016 | PAGE 21

Silverwolves Volleyball Wins State Championship By Greg Jame | gregj@mycityjournals.com

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ast fall a dedicated group of volleyball coaches and supporters started the Utah Boys Volleyball Association. In that time the UBVA organized its first sanctioned boys volleyball state championship. On May 15 Riverton earned a victory in that state championship. “We had a unique group of guys this season,” Riverton head coach Mike Rogers said. “They were all willing to come to practice and work to get better every single time. We had a lot of success early in the season, and that painted a huge target on our backs. Our opponents always wanted to play their best against us. This group was made up of high-caliber kids.” The state tournament was made up of 16 teams. The tournament featured the top six teams from Utah and Salt Lake Counties and the top four teams from Davis County. Riverton entered the tournament as the second seed. In the pre-tourney pool play, the team defeated Northridge, Skyline and Wasatch to advance to the final day. Outside hitter Tristan Penrod earned tournament most valuable player honors. “Tristan is from Southern California,” Rogers said. “He has been playing a little longer than some of the others. He was certainly a model of consistency for us.” They defeated Bingham in three sets for the finals victory. Riverton won the first game 25-23, Bingham managed to win the second 25-17, and Riverton took over to pull out the win in the third and final set, 15-8. It was a repeat performance of the Salt Lake County finals the week before. “That was gruesome for us; they beat us just like they did in the county tournament,” UBVA Director and Bingham head coach Jill Davis said. “It was a fun finish. Our kids relished in how much fun they had playing and how great the volleyball was.” Silverwolves setter Brayden Penrod and outside hitter Trevor Sampson were named first team all-state. “Trevor was the team’s only senior,” Rogers said. “He started out the tournament slower than he expected, but the second day he was unstoppable. Brayden was like our team’s quarterback. When things were not going well we looked to him to get us back on track. He made great choices.” Boys volleyball is not currently sanctioned by the Utah High School Activities Association. Salt Lake, Utah and Davis counties have each held its own versions of state tournaments for many years. The UBVA organized the county programs and centralized the control of boys volleyball. Games began in March and continued through April. The high school league is

Silverwolves Volleyball Wins State Championship Photo 2: The Silverwolves gather together after going undefeated in the 2016 boys state championship. –April Parady

“It was a fun finish. Our kids relished in how much fun they had playing and how great the volleyball was.” created around school boundaries; athletes should play for the school they attend or one approved by the UBVA. “Title nine laws that passed in the ’70s really killed boys volleyball in this state,” Davis said. “The sport has struggled; in places like California it is alive and well. It was hard for me to find a place for my sons to play. For us BYU fans, we know we live in the shadow of one of the best men’s teams in the country, and people here still think that boys don’t play volleyball.”

Since the organization of the UBVA in the fall of 2015 the number of teams is growing. As an example the Bingham boys volleyball program grew to five teams this season. The Gold division team played at the top level. They also offered a developmental team for players with lower skill level. The Riverton team is made up of Tanner Wright, Brayden Parady, Nick Bergstrom, Tristan Penrod, Trevor Sampson, Zane Minnick, Bennet Moody, Rilley Wooden and Parker Fillmore. 

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SPORTS

PAGE 22 | JULY 2016

SOUTH VALLEY JOURNAL

Riverton Brings Home Softball State Championship By Tori La Rue | tori@mycityjournals.com

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espite being down two runs in its final at-bat, the Riverton Silverwolves girls softball team found the spark it needed and secured the school’s first-ever softball state championship. “It was a fun season,” Silverwolves head coach Katelyn Elliot said. “I could not have asked for it to end any better than it did.” State Championship Game West . . . . . . . . . . 11 Riverton . . . . . . . . 13 Winning Pitcher: Jordan Lockhart HR: Taylor Eakle Jordan Lockhart The Silverwolves trailed 11-5 entering its final at bat. The team used its never-say-die attitude to rally past West and cling to its first state championship trophy. “There was a lot that kept them going all season,” Elliot said. “Like all teams we had trials. We had our ups

SOUTH VALLEY

and downs. I kept telling them that every time we had something hard we had a choice. We could learn from it or we could give up, get worse and start blaming and pointing fingers and blame each other. They didn’t; they came together and got stronger.” The Silverwolves did not give up despite trailing. They managed to plate four runs before junior Taylor Eakle’s historic at-bat. Two runners occupied the bases as she entered the batter’s box. “Honestly, before that hit I thought it would be cool if she could hit one over. We were down by two, and that would be a walk-off,” Elliot said. “No matter what I knew she was going to get a hit in that situation. She just decided to hit it out.” The walk-off home run by Eakle topped off the season for the Silverwolves. Their 13-11 victory earned them the trophy. They only lost two games the entire season. The 9-3 defeat to Herriman may have been the catapult to changing their season. “Our loss to Herriman in the beginning really changed our team,”

Elliot said. “They came together and got stronger from it. They were fighters and continued to get stronger. In the fifth, sixth and seventh innings when they were down they continued fighting. We did not give up like most teams. We were like that all year. That was a key to our success.” The Silverwolves ended the state tournament with five straight wins. They defeated Davis 11-1, Fremont 5-1, Syracuse 5-2 and West 11-8 and 13-11. The team batted .421 overall and belted 21 home runs collectively. Senior Jordan Lockhart dominated in the circle. She had 195 strikeouts in 126 innings pitched. Lockhart has committed to continue playing softball at Weber State; Sarah Linford will play at Western Nebraska Community College; and Kaitlynn Withers and Katie Alder will attend Colby Community College. Elliot finished her second season as the Silverwolves head coach. They have qualified for the state playoffs both seasons. 

During a typical school day for Megan Tucker, 7, she scrolls through her online agenda to find out which assignments she needs to complete. – Tori La Rue


GOVERNMENT

S OUTHV ALLEY JOURNAL.COM

A

Stewardship and Accountability for Your Tax Dollars Steven L. DeBry County Council District 5

s your member of the Salt Lake County Council, I take very seriously my responsibility to set budgets and monitor the use of your tax dollars. I place high value on fiscal responsibility and transparency. Any chance I have to encourage those values in the use of public funds is an opportunity I will not ignore. I had just such an opportunity in May when the Utah Transit Authority announced the closure of their committee meetings to the public. The meetings had previously been open, and that concerned me. Closing meetings to the public would not only be a potential violation of the Utah Open and Public Meetings Act, but would shut out the public from the decision-making process that determines the use of their own tax dollars. This was wrong. Salt Lake County assesses over $150 Million annually in sales tax and fees on behalf of UTA. Those tax dollars were authorized by taxpayers, and were earmarked

JULY 2016 | PAGE 23

for public transportation. In order to give some perspective, $150 Million annually represents twice as much as the full cost of our County Sheriff’s budget, which includes the County Jail, and protective and security type services for all our County facilities. $150 Million is also 3 times as much as our annual costs to operate our full County Library system. That’s 18 libraries! Determining how to spend that money should be done in the open, with plenty of public input, and appropriate media scrutiny as well. When asked by a local newspaper reporter why the meetings were closed, the Board Chair of UTA said, “You want to know the truth? Because you screw us up!” Seeing the problem, Councilman Richard Snelgrove and I decided to take action to preserve the public’s right to hold UTA accountable, and to keep their meetings transparent. During the May 17th Council meetings, Councilman Snelgrove and I

pledged that if UTA refused to open their meetings, we would work on changes to our County Ordinances that would allow us to delay distribution of some of that $150 Million until those meetings were re-opened to the public. “If transparency screws you up,” I said, “transparency isn’t the problem.” To UTA’s credit, after potentially serious consequences were raised by the County Council, they agreed to re-open their meetings to the public. That is as it should be. I am pleased UTA will keep those meetings open, and allow the public the access that they so richly deserve. You can count on me, as your representative on the County Council, to continue supporting efforts to improve accountability and scrutinize the use of your tax dollars. If you ever see misuse or waste of County taxpayer funds, please contact me. I can be reached at (385) 468 7458. 

“If transparency screws you up, transparency isn’t the problem.”

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PAGE 24 | JULY 2016

SOUTH VALLEY JOURNAL

“Perfect Pitch - Despicable Glee!”

Reasons to Call the 911 or Police Dispatch By Kelly Cannon | kelly@mycityjournals.com

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here are some instances when people know when to call the police such as a fire or someone is having a heart attack. Other times are trickier and people may hesitate because they don’t know if calling the police is necessary. On top of that, people don’t often know whether they need to call 911 or the non-emergency number for the police. Here is a handy guide that outlines when to call 911 and when to call for non-emergency numbers.

WHEN TO CALL 911: 1.

Top Left to Right: Dan Larrinaga, Wendi Griffiths, Matt O'Mally, & Brittany Shamy. Bottom Left to Right: Nick Whitaker & Kerstin Davis —Julean Hickenlooper

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esert Star Playhouse continues its riotous 2016 season with the hilarious family feel-good musical of the summer, “Perfect Pitch - Despicable Glee!” The new dean of Northern Salt Lake State University, Dean Reno, is starting her inaugural year off with a bang! Her plan is to tear down the ramshackle student building and replace it with a faculty only day spa. Much to the distress of the student run clubs who use the building exclusively. In order to save their beloved meeting place, Jenny and the other club presidents need to come up with the money to fix the building and fast. Deciding to join forces and enter into a singing competition, Jenny and company soon discover that Dean Reno has enlisted the power pop boy

band, D!Vine, to enter into the competition to thwart the students’ plans of saving the student building. Directed by Scott Holman, Perfect Pitch runs from June 9 to August 20, 2016. The evening also includes another of Desert Star’s signature musical olios following the show. The Kick Up Your Boots Country Olio will feature some new and classic country music favorites, with a unique and always hilarious, Desert Star twist! Desert Star audiences can enjoy gourmet pizza, fresh wraps, burgers, scrumptious desserts and other finger foods as well as a full selection of soft drinks and smoothies while they watch the show. Food is available from an á la carte menu and is served right at your table.

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WHEN TO CALL THE NON-EMERGENCY NUMBER: 1.

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A fire or heavy smoke that is suspicious. Many times, people worry that the smoke is a false alarm. Maybe someone accidently burned their dinner or a local farmer is doing a controlled burn of his crops. It doesn’t matter. It’s always better to call 911 if you see a fire or heavy smoke. Lives and property may be at risk. Someone is forcing a child into a car. If you see someone trying to force a child into a car and the child is obviously in distress, immediately call 911. Take notice of the make, model and color of the car and the license plate if possible. Try to remember what the perpetrator looks like. These details will be vital if the child is being kidnapped. A fight or domestic violence. Calling to break up a fight, especially if it’s domestic violence can be hard because people feel it’s either none of their business or they are over reacting. However, it’s always better to call than not. Someone’s life could be a risk and if the situation is domestic violence, the victim needs help and resources. Gunshots. This one seems pretty self explanatory. When you hear gun shots, call 911. If you can, try to identify where the location of the gunshots came from. Burglar alarm or glass breaking. While car alarms can go off for any number of reasons, burglar alarms in homes or other buildings only go off when someone has gone inside who is not allowed to go inside. Likewise, there are very few reasons why a person should have to break a window to gain access into a building.

3.

4. 5.

Someone is looking into vehicles, walking in and out of backyards or loitering on private property. While some people may hesitate to contact the police because they don’t want to be a nosey neighbor, these are suspicious behaviors. However, unless there is immediate danger, calling the non-emergency number is best. Someone is approaching doors and asking unusual questions or soliciting without proper purpose or valid license. If someone you don’t know comes to your door to sell something, they typically have to carry with them a license or identification of some kind. If they don’t have that or if the questions they ask are suspicious, such as asking where your neighbors are or when you think they should be back, close and lock your door and call the non-emergency number. A home in your neighborhood has constant, short-term traffic, with people coming and going at all hours. Again, there are very few reasons why a home should have this kind of traffic, especially at all hour of the day or night. A single party is one thing but this type of constant traffic is suspicious and should be reported. You see older children intimidating younger ones. As long as the children are in no immediate danger, calling the non-emergency number is appropriate. Any circumstance that is not “normal” for your neighborhood. You know your neighborhood. You know what a regular occurrence is and what is not. Don’t be afraid to alert the police if something feels off. 


JULY 2016 | PAGE 25

S OUTHV ALLEY JOURNAL.COM

Nelson Brothers Student Housing: The parent’s Guide to Finding the Perfect Fit 1. Does it make life efficient and easy? Securing housing that places your student in proximity to everything he or she needs can be tricky, but will make a big difference over time. “People don't realize how much 10-15 minutes a day adds up over four years,” said Nelson. “Make sure you choose a place that makes your student’s life efficient so they spend time on what is most important.” Ultimately, if Jacob’s life is more efficient, mine will be too.

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tudent housing has been on my mind as my son, Jacob, prepares for college. While we’re focusing on ACT prep, perfecting his GPA, and finishing that Eagle Scout for the finishing touch on his college applications, my mind is going full speed ahead. Finding the right type of housing in Utah will help define Jacob’s college experience. So, I was excited to sit down with Pat Nelson, CEO of Nelson-Brothers Property Management (managing over 19 student housing properties throughout the country, including University Gateway, University Towers, 9 & 9 Lofts, Park Plaza, 900 Factory, and Alpine Flats in Utah) to get some tips on how to choose the best student housing. Here are four things to consider before you put money down on that first month’s rent.

2. Is it safe? The location is a plus, but the condition of the property needs to be evaluated. For example, are the units equipped with carbon monoxide alarms and lighted hallways? Is it in a good neighborhood? How well does the management care for the property? Do I feel comfortable around the other residents? Look for properties that are near public transportation and provide safe and well-lighted parking. 3. Is it priced right? Do you rent the nicest apartment or the one that’s budget friendly? The answer is to consider your needs and the amenities the housing provides. “Some properties may charge more, but they offer on-site laundry facilities, a fully furnished unit, a swimming pool, free Wi-Fi, a fitness center, or a game room,” said Nelson. “The cost of many of those features is

figured into the rent and could save you money overall. Even more importantly, it can give students more time at the library instead of hassling with the laundromat or constantly searching for the nearest Wi-Fi hotspot.” Before you scratch the upscale apartments off your list, add up the cost of the perks—it might be worth it. 4. Does it have the right vibe? Different apartment complexes have different vibes—you’ll be happiest with one that suits your student's lifestyle best. “A law student may not want to live in a highly social complex,” said Nelson. “Rather, he or she will probably need a quieter, more academic environment. In contrast, an incoming freshman may enjoy an environment with a robust social network.” To ensure your student’s home away from home will be sweet, allow yourself enough time to consider factors like the freshman experience, location, safety, price, and social element of the available properties. For more information on Nelson Brothers’ Utah properties, please visit: www.nelsonbrothersutah.com. Next article: “Why You Should Live in Student Housing Even When You Are Local” 

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PAGE 26 | JULY 2016

SOUTH VALLEY JOURNAL

Nothing to do with Coupons – An Evening at Red Butte Gardens with the Monkees

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ast week some friends and I enjoyed the musical stylings of the Monkees at Red Butte Garden. Being a Monkees generation Baby Boomer, who dreamed of one day marring Davey Jones, I could not wait to see them. Dawning my tie-dyed style neon shirt I was ready to sing every song right along with them. Now, I could go on about how to save money when attending a concert at Red Butte. What’s allowed, what to bring, how to get tickets, where to park, but I’m feeling the need to deviate from the money saving genre for a moment. When the Monkees performed Shades of Gray they expressed that it was time for us to rock out with the dearly departed Davey Jones. They told us because of the shootings in Florida just 3 days earlier, this song was far too emotional for them to sing it alone. They then brought up video and the voice of Davey singing the song as they played and we sung along. In light of what’s going on in the world and right here in our own country the audi-

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ence and the performers (Dolenz and Tork) were overwhelmed with sorrow while performing. It was an emotional moment that left me, and I imagine a great many of the audience with tears in our eyes. Some dear friends of mine are an interracial couple that have been married for many years. They are an amazing family raising 4 great kids, that routinely give back to the community. She mentioned the other day that while dining at a restaurant right here, in the self proclaimed most tolerant state in America, that when the server presented the check(s) they had been separated for each to pay their own. When asked, the waitress admitted she had made assumption and apologized. My friend chuckled and went on to tell me that this was not an isolated incident and that these things happen all the time. It was just something they live with, something that has become routine. She stated that this was mild compared to some of what they’ve experienced. Our religious leaders of every faith preach kindness and tolerance daily, that it

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is not for us to judge. They are right, it isn’t. Yet, I’m often scratching my head as they are the very ones that fight against protecting all peoples right to live peaceably within their own core religious values. They judge other religions as wrong and untrue, they fight for laws remaining restrictive, passing judgment on those who don’t conform to the attitude that they “know best” what is right for each of us. Then when something like Florida happens they tell us we must be a less hateful and a more tolerant people.

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S OUTHV ALLEY JOURNAL.COM

A Voice Crying in the Wilderness

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D O EN FF T IC AL E

ummer means camping. Outdoor living is a wonderful way to acquaint your children with Lyme disease, tourniquets, tick removal, poison ivy, skunk identification, rabid chipmunks and tent life. Why go to a hotel when you can sleep on the ground in a Ziploc bag? It’s a mythological fact that camping builds character. Okay, I’ll admit camping builds some characters; the Unabomber comes to mind. After living in a remote cabin with no electricity or running water, Mr. Unabomber started a nationwide bombing crusade. But still, families plan extravagant camping adventures and look forward to spending an inordinate amount of time living like squatters in the mountains with their loved ones. Their days are filled with card games, sing-alongs, murderous rage and fishing. And by the way, fishing is not a sport. “Sport” indicates a level of exertion, sweat and training. I’ve never seen a sport that involves kicking back in a camp chair and swilling a cold beer while holding onto a stick. It could easily be confused with the sport of TV watching. One of my daughters refused to even cast a fishing line, afraid she might hit a trout on the head with a lure, causing it to need glasses for the rest of its fishy life. Hiking is another fun camp activity, if “fun” means you enjoy carrying toddlers for a 4-hour hike that would have taken

only 20 minutes if they would walk like a functioning person. And who can forget the hellish outhouses where you just know there’s a snake coiled up behind you or a spider creeping around the toilet seat or a swarm of wasps waiting for you to exit. When nighttime rolls around and it’s time to build a fire, you soon realize it should be called building a smoke. All the green wood your kids gathered creates billows of hot, grey air that infiltrates every piece of clothing you own. Plus, the wind blows through the campfire, distributing hot ash, eye-melting

smoke and pieces of exploding branches so everyone around the fire can enjoy the great outdoors. Once you finally have a campfire merrily dancing in the pit (usually around 2 a.m.), it’s fun to roast marshmallows that your kids won’t eat because they’re burnt, and look at the stars. Me: Aren’t the stars beautiful? Daughter #1: It’s making my neck hurt. Can I stop looking? Me: No. Daughter #2: What if a star fell on us right now? Daughters #3 and #4: (Crying because they don’t want a star to fall on them.) Me: Forget it. Go get in your Ziploc bags. Safety is always a concern when camping. “Don’t Feed the Bears” signs encourage campers to lock food in the car so bears don’t get into your Oreos. Shouldn’t the signs also warn you that a bear can easily shred your tent, looking for juicy, humanflavored tidbits? But, hey, as long as the Oreo cookies are safe. Once camp is over, a miracle happens. Everyone forgets the scraped-shins, fire-singed fingers, burned breakfasts, lost underwear and temper tantrums. And suddenly you’re planning next year’s camping trip to acquaint your children with dehydration, crazy hermits, leaf toilet paper, stinging nettle, wet socks, outdoor swearing and organic granola. Because why go to a restaurant when you can eat soot-covered hot dogs in a rainstorm? 

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Over the past 13 years, I’ve sent out literally millions of flyers with a picture of my family and usually I’m in there somewhere. I shared personal details of my back pain, my struggles with weight gain, and how I watched my cute wife get in shape by running. I shared my drama of trying to run to get healthy, but how my low back and knees didn’t agree with the running thing…and ultimately how this led me to discover how awesome Chiropractic care can deal with problems like mine. The long and short of this journey is that I eventually lost the weight, ran some marathons, and completed the 7 years of college required to become a Chiropractor.

So Why Do I Share this… I Think most People WANT to know that with a serious spinal problem, there are more options than just popping pills, or surgery, or just getting a bunch of chiropractic or physical therapy treatments to manage pain…they want solutions.

But Here’s What I Didn’t Tell You… As time passed I continued to do what I could to be healthy, such as exercise and get regular chiropractic treatments. But as much as this helped me be active and pain free, I began to be aware of something that started bugging me. And the reality was I couldn’t stop it nor could I control it. The fact is…I WAS GETTING OLDER…time and gravity were creating problems for my back. To make matters worse, working as a chiropractor to fix other’s, ironically puts additional stress on my back. So, even with my regular personal chiro treatments and exercise, I started hurting again. And to be open and real, I struggled with it. Not because of the pain, but because I felt that maybe there was some contradiction that I was treating and teaching patients how to get rid of their back pain....but meanwhile I was having mine. The Real Truth is This... After taking X-rays of my back, I discovered that one of my spinal discs was in bad shape and that I also had arthritis. It took me only seconds

I THINK MOST PEOPLE WANT an honest skilled doctor who is good at discovering what is wrong and what needs to be done to give the best outcome…even if that means turning the case down and referring them out.

to see that my low back was going to need more than just chiropractic adjustments to get better. So as much I as believe in what chiropractic adjustments can do, I needed something more effective for this problem or else my back was going to be in serious trouble. If this took place 10 to 15 years ago, I would have just had to live it or roll dice with surgery. But the REAL TRUTH and the REAL BLESSING is now days there is great technology and time tested protocols that have excellent success with these types of serious problem. And the good news is that solution to my problem was already sitting in my office. We use powerful protocol that includes the LiteCure class IV non-surgical laser (to help reduce pain and stimulate healing), the DRX 9000 Spinal Disc Decompression, and a unique exercise program that stabilizes the surrounding muscles. This specific combination has literally helped hundreds of my patients with severe disc and sciatic problems. I’m happy to report first hand

Complete Spinal Exam (X-rays if needed)

& 2 pain relieving Treatments

I THINK MOST PEOPLE WANT clear directions with their treatment plans and clear financial options that are affordable with or without insurance. We are on most insurance including Aetna, Altius, Blue Cross, Cigna, Deseret Mutual, Educators Mutual, IHC Select Med, PEHP, UHC, and others. I have affordable cash plans. And Regardless of fault, Auto Injuries are 100% Covered by Auto Insurance. When you call to schedule your visit, you will receive a Complete Spinal Assessment and 2 Pain Relieving Treatments for only $17 ($297 Normal Price). My assistant’s name is Linda. We are Elite Performance Health Center. We are located at I-15 and Bangerter Hwy (13552 S. 110 W.). Don’t hesitate to call our office. The number is 801-302-0280… Thank you. —Matthew D. Smith, D.C. CSCS Chiropractic Physician P.S. I am also extending this offer to a second family member for only $7.

Spinal Disc Decompression

FOR ONLY $17 ($293 Value) Auto Injuries are 100% covered by Auto Insurance. The most powerful pain relief laser available.

801-302-0280

www.elite-spinal-care.com

BUY ONE GET ONE

385-722-0326

2882 West 12600 South • Riverton, UT 84065

We Now Offer Catering! Utah’s Favorite Flavored Shot Soda pop_shop_pop

DRX 9000

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FREE Of equal or lesser value. Limit 1 per coupon. Expires 7/31/16 Some Exceptions Apply

Profile for My City Journals

South Valley July 2016  

Vol. 26 Iss. 07

South Valley July 2016  

Vol. 26 Iss. 07

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