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GERMAN ENGLISH No. 22 – I / 2018 EURO 15


LINDBERG »1818 « & »18 33 «


LINDBERG »1818 « & »1823 «


the original danish design

tailor - made lightweight titanium

ultimate comfort multi - adjustable award - winning

design by made by


bartonperreira.com


orgreenoptics.com


faceaface-paris.com


@SALTOPTICS


SALT.


sigmund & carl


NEUBAU-EYEWEAR.COM


WELCOME

W ELC O M E

T O

SPE C T R

#

Dear hoffmann natural eyewear. Congratulations on your 40th anniversary and thank you for pampering us with your handmade frames over decades.

photo S T EFAN DONGU S s t yli n g V ERA W IT T L AU a t NINA KL EIN h ai r & m ake - up L AU RA- ANN OL L AND a t 2 1 AGNCY mod els OT T O S EP PAL AINEN a t M4 & NAS T IA B. a t MOS T WANTE D 30

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WELCOME

H O F F M A N N N AT U R A L EYEWEAR »2268« coa t EC O A L F t u r tle ne ck N O WA D AY S p ant s L EV I ’ S

H O F F M A N N N AT U R A L EYEWEAR »2267« -

coa t ANT ONEL L I F IRENZE top P HIL OMENA ZANET T I p a nts J ACOB COHEN b o ots MELV IN & HAMILT ON

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CONTENT

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S I G M U N D & C A R L neubau ’s Psychoanalytical S P E C I A L E D I T I O N Masterpiece

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90

S A LT. Feminine Styles U P D AT E from California

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I F E A R N O M A N By Michael Mann

R O L F S P E C TA C L E S Innovation Driver with F L E X L O C K Awarded Technology

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FA C I N G SPEC T R in Motion N O R T H for copenhagen specs

WHITEOUT

lindberg

Collection Shoot

104

S TA R T- U P B E R L I N By Ava P ivot

56

A J A P A N E S E masunaga Designed D E S I G N A L L I A N C E by Kenzo Takada

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THE MASTERS OF HORN

hoffmann natural eyewear Turns 40

P A L A I S In Paris with reiz , D E T O K Y O andy wolf & masunaga

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M O D O Multiple Designs C O L L E C T I O N S H O O T with Innovative Features

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S TAT E O F By Estelle Klawitter INDEPENDENCE

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S I L E N T markus t N O B L E S S E Gold Temples

126

O L D S C H O O L you mawo B E C O M E S N E W S C H O O L Horn

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2018 – NEW PERSPECTIVE SHADES

götti Collection Shoot

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F I V E M I L E S N O R T H By Edisonga


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CONTENT

152

R E I Z How Eyewear Becomes P H I L O S O P H Y TA L K Fashion – or Not

160

THIS MUST BE ART

massada Takes the Accessory Award

162

T H E T H I R D martin & martin D I M E N S I O N »Ollie«

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S H E W E A R S V I N TA G E Vintage Dealer Mimi Lem from Brussels

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T H E M E P A G E S Black is the New Black

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W O R K I T H A R D E R By Angelika Büttner

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P L U S O N E By Sacha Tassilo Höchstetter

194

R O U N D R O U N D Philipp Foret’s 3 Faves

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K A R M O I E F R O M Worldwide N O R W AY Responsibility

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L E S S F R O M Danish Designer Brand B E L L I N G E R with New Sub-Label

200

D E L I C AT E F R A M E S A N D andy wolf C O L O R S Bi-Color

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Ö G A Ö S T R A Wooden Frames

from the French Jura

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A L A I N M I K L I x Editor’s Choice O L I V E R P E O P L E S Issue 22

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E I N S T O F F E N From Fashion to P O R T F O L I O Eyewear to Watches

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I D E N T I T Y By Stefan Kapfer

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T H R E E ’ S A P A R T Y By Tanja Tremel


THE c l a s s i c C O L L E C T I O N BY

OPTI MÃœNCHEN

HALL C2 BOOTH 416


MASTHEAD EDITOR IN CHIEF

Stefan Dongus dongus@spectr-magazine.com m: +49.(0)151.14271817

LINDBERG »1835« coa t E C O A L F blou s e S T EF F E N S C H R A UT p ants A N T O N E L L I F I R EN ZE boots NE O S EN S

L AYOUT

Caro Ross ross@spectr-magazine.com

EDITORIAL STAFF

Jana Wenge press@spectr-magazine.com Dirk Vogel vogel@spectr-magazine.com

PROOFRE ADING Insa Muth Peter Ashford Franca Rainer

TR ANSL ATION Dirk Vogel

ONLINE EDITOR L I N D BE R G C O L L EC T I O N S H OO T ( p a ge 9 4 – 1 0 0 )

Franca Rainer online@spectr-magazine.com

PHOTOGR APHERS

Angelika Buettner Eda Calisti Stefan Dongus Edisonga Sacha Tassilo Höchstetter Stefan Kapfer Estelle Klawitter Michael Mann Ava Pivot Raphael Schmitz Tanja Tremel Stephan Ziehen

PUBLISHER

Monday Publishing GmbH Kamekestraße 20-22 50672 Köln t: +49.(0)221.945267-11 f: +49.(0)221.945267-27 www.spectr-magazine.com www.facebook.com/spectrmagazine

CEOS

Stefan Dongus, Holger von Krosigk

DISTRIBUTION

DPV Network GmbH Postfach 570 412 22773 Hamburg dpv-network.de

PRINT

F&W Mediencenter GmbH Holzhauser Feld 2 83361 Kienberg fw-medien.de SPECTR is published three times per year.

DEUTSCH ENGLISCH Nr. 22 – I / 2018

4 192153 509007

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D 9,– € | AT 11,– € CH SFR 14,50

co v e r photos ST E FA N DO NG U S a ss i s t a nt IVO NNE FR E IB E R G E R d i g i t a l op e ra tor K ATR IN K A ISE R s t yli n g VE R A W IT T LA U a t NINA K LE IN h a i r & m a ke -up LA U R A -A NN O LLA ND a t 21 AGEN CY a ssi s t ed b y CLAUD IA WOLTERS re touch G LA MTO U C H mo d el s E ILE E N H E Y DO R N a t PMA , NA STIA B. a t MOS T WAN TED & OTTO S EP PALAIN EN a t M4

g l a ss e s LINDB E R G TR Æ +  B U FFA LO

This magazine and all its contents may not be re-used, distributed or stored in electronic databases in any way without prior written permission from the publishers. All inquiries regarding the usage of copyrighted materials, as well as the reproduction of excerpts in other formats must be directed to the publishers. The opinions reflected in this magazine do not necessarily reflect those of the publishers. All rights reserved.


F E AT U R E C R E AT U R E

For the best of both worlds, the neubau Sigmund & Carl Special Edition implements elements of both frame styles and creates its own mix between thin steel elements and bold natural PX components. Aside from its strikingly unorthodox visual appearance, the model also introduces a newly developed hinge concept adorned with an integrated logo on the moving hinge segment. The psychologically inspired special edition will launch in three colorways: White with Silky Rose lenses and Black paired with either Electric Silver or Glorious Gold lenses. The resulting Sigmund Freud and Carl Gustav Jung edition is a true meeting of the minds, looking for confident wearers.

SIGMUND & CARL SPECIAL EDITION N E UB A U’S

P S Y CHOANALY TI C AL

MASTE R P IE CE

photos E D A C ALIST I

Watch out! Things are about to get deep and psychological, as Austrian label neubau sets out to blend the psychoanalytic approach of their compatriot Sigmund Freud with the theories of Swiss luminary Carl Gustav Jung. Historically, the two pioneers actually did work together for several years, before finding themselves cast as adversaries in the scientific arena, and ultimately ceased personal interactions altogether. The two may finally be reconciled, thanks to neubau’s efforts releasing in April 2018, not in the form of a manuscript, but a unique frame that blends the distinct eyewear styles of Freud and Jung into one design. It’s a tall order, because after all, the bold frame style preferred by Freud is hard to reconcile with the delicate lightness of Jung’s glasses. 38


KBL »Tr i u m p h « shi r t ONLY &SONS d e n i m s TIGE R OF SWE DE N

KBL »Seine« v e s t EL L ES S E

d e n i m s W R A N G L ER

40


KBL »Tr i u m p h « su i t ANT ONY MORAT O

I F EAR

NO MAN

BY MICHAEL MANN s t yli n g BODO ERNL E a t NINA KL EIN h ai r & m ake - up MARIEL ENA KREW ER a t P EP P ERMINT CIRCUS mod els T OBIAS a t P L ACEMODEL S , J U S T IN a t IZAIO & V INCENT a t CORE re touch S T EP HANIE W ENCEK loca tion BERL IN

41


shir t L E VIS ’S M E N RE D TA B d e n i ms WRAN GL ER

ME T ROP OLITA N » 825 8 « jac ke t J A C K & J O N E S shi r t S EL EC T E D d e ni ms O N LY & S O N S

42


ME T ROP OLITA N » 825 8 « s hi r t T E D DY G L I C K M A N p a nt s A N T O N Y M O R AT O

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ØRGREEN » E e ro « suit & s h i r t T IGE R OF S W ED E N

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ØRGREEN » Q u a n t u m 1. 19 « s w e a t e r ANT ONY MORATO d e n i m s L EV I’ S MEN RE D TAB

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EINSTOFFEN »A e ro n a u t « sui t & shi r t ANT ONY MORAT O

t a nktop FRE ITAG d e n im s WRANGLE R

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EINSTOFFEN » C ro u p i e r « blou son ANT ONY MORATO shi r t MODEL’ S OWN p a nts T EDDY GL ICKMAN

47


CAZAL »70 5 8 « t a n k top F REITAG shi r t P REMIU M 48


ETNIA BARCELONA »Mit te« cord u roy ja c ke t TE DDY GLICKMAN sca r f L EV I’ S A CCE SSORIE S d e n i m s G-STAR

49


J . F. R E Y »19 8 5 / M e m p h i s « su i t ANT ONY MORATO shi r t LE VI’S

50


J . F. R E Y » D O U B L E J E U / J F 28 0 0 « shi r t EL L ES S E d e n i m s W RANGL ER

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GLCO »Convoy« shir t NOISY MAN d e n i ms LE V I ’ S M EN R E D TA B

52


SPECTR IN MOTION

spectr in motion PRESENTS

FACING NORTH AN

I N SP I RATI ONAL

ABOU T

20

OF

E Y EWEAR

THE

M OV I E BES T

BRANDS

March 03-04, 2018 PRE MIE RE AT COPE NHAGE N SPE CS

DISTRIBUTED ONLINE ON SPECTR AND COPENHAGEN SPECS A N D AT M A N Y O P T I C I A N S A L L O V E R T H E W O R L D Y O H J I YA M A M O T O »YY 7019« coa t A NT ONY MORAT O, ca p J ACOB COHEN 54


DESIGNER INTERVIEW

MASUN DESIG

The collaboration between MASUNAGA and Kenzo Takada marks the meeting of two Japanese eyewear heavyweights. On one hand, MASUNAGA commands over 100 years of expertise as a traditional family business known for high-quality eyewear. ON THE OTHER, KENZO TAKADA HAS BECOME AN INTERNATIONAL HOUSEHOLD NAME SINCE MOVING FROM JAPAN TO PARIS OVER 50 YEARS AGO TO BUILD KENZO INTO A GLOBAL BRAND. AND ALTHOUGH HE SOLD HIS NAMESAKE FASHION EMPIRE ALMOST 20 YEARS AGO, KENZO TAKADA REMAINS TRUE TO HIS MAIN PASSION: PRODUCT DESIGN. HE HAS BEEN CREATING PRODUCTS WITH HIS SIGNATURE TOUCH IN A NUMBER OF SEGMENTS, FOR THE LAST FOUR YEARS ALSO INCLUDING EYEWEAR.

HIS MASUNAGA BY KENZO TAKADA COLLECTION HAS GARNERED WIDESPREAD ATTENTION WITH ITS PAIRING OF CRAFTSMANSHIP, DETAILED FINISHES, AND UPSCALE MATERIALIZATIONS. SPECTR MET THE ICONIC FASHION DESIGNER AT HIS PARIS STUDIO FOR A PHOTO SHOOT AND AN EXCLUSIVE LOOK AT THE LATEST ADDITIONS TO THE MASUNAGA BY KENZO TAKADA LEGACY. 56


DESIGNER INTERVIEW

NAGA GNED BY KENZO TAKADA A

JAPANES E

DES I GN

ALLIA NCE

p or trai ts S T EFAN DONGU S , re touch S T EP HANIE W ENCEK, s til l s E DA CALISTI

THE STORY OF KENZO TAKADA Mr. Takada, your entire work life was strongly influenced by designing products. Why is design more important than many people might believe? Design is part of everything that surrounds us. Architecture, art, products, food – all that we see and consume requires some kind of design aspects. Would you say that these design aspects change over time? Design has been part of human creativity for centuries, and we keep getting better and better at it with new technologies and strong know-how. To me it is an essential part of life. You spent many years working as a fashion designer. In retrospect, what are your main achievements from this time and what makes designing fashion so unique? I was always interested in working in fashion. Even at a very young age, I knew I wanted to create and design. My main achievement was probably to follow and pursue these dreams. But at the time, fashion design was a rather unusual path for men, right? When I finished high school, boys couldn’t study fashion. It was considered as a woman’s industry in Japan. But about one year later, Bunka Fashion College opened to men and I directly applied, even though my parents were against it. I had to do side jobs to pay for my study, as I lost their support. Living in Japan in the era following WWII was difficult, and it was an era of sobriety. 57


DESIGNER INTERVIEW

MASUNAGA D E S I G N E D B Y K E N Z O TA K A D A »C ampanule« & »Mokko«

Is that what ultimately brought you to Europe?

wanted to stop working. Just travel and enjoy my life, which I

I got the ambition to move to Europe after reading the fashion

dedicated to work for many years before. But after two years, I

magazines of my sisters, which were colorful and looked so positive,

quickly realized that I couldn’t live without working and found

and also through movies from Europe and the U.S.

myself getting bored. So I started to accept collaborating with

And why did you choose Paris?

other brands on designs in a broad range of products.

I pursued my dream by moving to Paris. Not knowing any French, taking the leap to try building a career in France.

What are some examples? By now the portfolio is rather diverse and ranges from collabora-

So you had no doubts?

tions for the food, hotel, home furnishings, tableware, and cos-

I strongly believe that people should keep a certain faith in their

metics industries. I get to work with groups that have great know-

goals, and try to never let them go – even if you have to go through

how and excellent teams. I very much enjoy working around

hard periods.

different product segments, and getting to meet talented people.

In the year 1999, you sold your company kenzo, but still kept designing

You have now been living in Paris for more than half a century. Does that

quite a lot of products over the following years.

influence your creative approach?

Upon leaving LVMH group at the end of 1999, early 2000, I initially 58

It definitely does. My work probably became much more European


DESIGNER INTERVIEW

MASUNAGA D E S I G N E D B Y K E N Z O TA K A D A »C all a L ily«

than I could expect. I initially went to Paris for six months, and it has been more than 50 years now. Would you say that Paris is still the fashion capital? I believe so. Even if each country has its own

“DESIGN IS BASICALLY ABOUT THE HARMONY BETWEEN ELEMENTS. DESIGN NEEDS TO MAKE SENSE AND RESPECT A CERTAIN IDENTITY.”

influence and impact, Paris remains a central

IN CONTACT WITH MASUNAGA What’s your personal connection to the eyewear segment? I have always loved eyewear, it is a fascinating industry. When you wear glasses for eye correction

pillar to fashion.

or for UV protection, it changes the way you look and it becomes

What constitutes good design in your opinion? Regardless of products, is

an important accessory that defines physical attraction. How did the connection to Japanese quality eyewear label masunaga come

there some kind of generalized formula behind it?

about?

Design is basically about the harmony between elements. Design

I have been wearing masunaga for many years now. We were

needs to make sense and respect a certain identity. What is your personal design philosophy?

able to meet each other through their European distributor, and quickly decided to work together on this collaboration.

I try to blend multicultural aspects and find a story that relates

Who had the idea to collaborate?

myself to the people that will use the products. 59


DESIGNER INTERVIEW

It happened quite naturally through our meetings. I very much

MASUNAGA DESIGNED BY KENZO TAKADA

enjoy working with their highly skilled team, and the combination of both my team and theirs has been an excellent experience. I am

When was the first masunaga designed by Kenzo Takada collection

very proud of the result.

released?

Does your shared Japanese heritage play a role in the collaboration?

In the year 2014.

I enjoy working with Japanese firms such as masunaga. I can

Was designing eyewear something completely new that you needed to

quickly understand their vision and what they are looking for

familiarize yourself with?

when we collaborate. masunaga is well recognized for its great

Absolutely, I am not a specialist. I can only provide ideas and

history and know-how. Who could refuse to work with such a

design input. And masunaga was able to teach me about all the

great partner?

technical details and the complexity of realizing such high-quality

What do you particularly enjoy about working with masunaga?

products.

masunaga is a very detail-oriented company that likes to take

its time to create great products. They don’t rush anything and are very thorough.

Would you say that there’s connection between your fashion and eyewear design? I try to stay true to myself throughout all my different projects.

MASUNAGA D E S I G N E D B Y K E N Z O TA K A D A »Mira« & »C om e t«

60


DESIGNER INTERVIEW

I follow a certain identity and vision that I try to maintain. Eyewear design is certainly a very different process than fashion. But it remains a product that is wearable, and that becomes part of

won the Silmo d’Or Award for the best sunglass design. Were you expecting anything like this?

Not at all, I was very surprised when I heard the announcement.

someone’s physical appearance.

I can only thank the entire team around this project.

What’s the special task in designing eyewear? It is very meticulous work, extremely detail-oriented. Thanks to masunaga and their great capabilities, we incorporated many

masunaga is well known for its high quality frames. Does this quality

standard impede you in your freedom of design? There are definitely certain technical aspects to respect in the

details that are hard to see at first sight, that you only notice

process. We also have an identity to maintain. But we both remain

later on in time. It is very meticulous.

very open-minded towards bringing new ideas forward. We

Where do you find inspiration for your eyewear designs? I can get my inspirations from all types of sources. I only try not to always follow trends. Directly in the first year of your collaboration, you

“I TRY TO STAY TRUE TO MYSELF THROUGHOUT ALL MY DIFFERENT PROJECTS. I FOLLOW A CERTAIN IDENTITY AND VISION THAT I TRY TO MAINTAIN.”

MASUNAGA D E S I G N E D B Y K E N Z O TA K A D A »C a s t e r« & »Alt air«

61

frequently discuss how to move forward. You have now launched your fifth joint collection with masunaga. What is the underlying statement? Our collection statement is harmony between different memories. We have mixed styles of


DESIGNER INTERVIEW

eyewear designs from all over the world in various periods with a multitude of details and essences. By adopting a craftsmanship method to implement details and ornaments, we present eyewear at the highest quality in

“I TEND TO BE VERY DEMOCRATIC IN MY CREATIVE APPROACH. I DON’T LIKE TO WORK FOR A SPECIFIC KIND OF PERSON.”

an entirely new style.

fashionable, ornamented, creative, and innovative. You can feel it by looking at the collection. What are the materials you use in your collection? This collection implements titanium, acetate, and solid 18-karat gold, for instance in the »Campanule« model. The front design of the frame

Which models in the current collection exemplify this approach?

makes a strong fashion statement. Delicate engraving patterns on

For instance the »Canopus« sunglasses model. It features a rimless

the bridge, the bar and the temples are reminiscent of 1920s jewel-

mounting system, and the detailed titanium rim is precisely

ry details. The temples are fashioned with masunaga’s highly

embedded in the plastic front part. The »Canopus« is a rounded

skilled welding technology using pure titanium and solid 18-ka-

aviator shape with a shield-like look. The two-base lenses give the

rat gold. The original rim is designed with the masunaga star

sunglasses a unique and edgy look

motif and Kenzo Takada’s family emblem, the Campanula flower.

Is there a special Kenzo Takada Design Feature in the collection?

Your work as a fashion designer has earned you the title “Magician of Color”. In how far does this apply to your new eyewear collection?

Absolutely, yes. masunaga by Kenzo Takada glasses are highly

We are slowly looking to introduce colors, we just need to see how to do that in a harmonious way. What are your favorite styles in the new collection? My favorite is the »Calla Lily«, our very first women’s sunglasses model. Who do you have in mind as the typical wearer of your sunglasses? I tend to be very democratic in my creative approach. I don’t like to work for a specific kind of person. I am mostly listening to what people tell me, and try to make products that people can enjoy and be proud of. What can we expect in the future? Probably more of the unexpected.

62


L O C AT I O N C H E C K

PALAIS DE TOKYO, PARIS L O C ATI ON A NDY

C HEC K

WOLF

AND

WI TH

R EIZ,

M AS UNA G A

photos S T EFAN DONGU S mod el GABRIEL A CEGIEL S KA a t MOST WANTE D

Once you fall in love with Paris, the city has a way of making you come back again and again. There is just too much to explore. Far beyond the usual trinity of Eiffel Tower, Arc de Triomphe, and Sacre Coeur lies a wealth of architectural gems that would be centerpiece attractions in any other place. These include the Palais de Tokyo, a spectacular building with an open front overlooking the River Seine, originally built in 1937 for the Paris World Exhibition as a museum and exhibition space dedicated to modern art. The Palais is not an automatic choice for Paris tourists, but it should be. After all, the marble steps on the surrounding plaza have been a prime destination for skateboarders from around the world for decades. And serious art aficionados treasure the revolving exhibits hosted at the Palais every season.

REIZ

REIZ

»K u gel«

»Tan ge nt e« 64


L O C AT I O N C H E C K

ANDY WOLF

ANDY WOLF

»4731«

»4711 Sun«

SPECTR IN MOTION Wanna see Gabriela at the Pailais de Tokyo? Watch the video here... 65


L O C AT I O N C H E C K

MASUNAGA D E S I G N E D B Y K E N Z O TA K A D A »L e pu s«

For us at SPECTR, the modern building with its sleek monochromatic pillars and walls also seemed attractive as a photo shoot location. So we enlisted current Paris resident and Polish model Gabriela Cegielska as our muse and brought an assortment of brand-new eyewear by reiz, andy wolf, and masunaga to represent the finest

in eyewear design from Germany, Austria, and Japan in

MASUNAGA D E S I G N E D B Y K E N Z O TA K A D A

the French metropolis. And to complete the picture, we also captured the shoot on video for SPECTR In Motion,

»C anopu s«

just to add another reason to fall in love with Paris (if you haven’t already). 66


COLLECTION SHOOT

MODO M U LT I P L E WI TH

D E S IGN S

I N N OVAT I V E

F EATURES

photos AVA PIV OT s t ylin g D AVOR JE LU S I C m a ke -up D IRK N E U HÖ F ER a t N I N A K L E I N h a ir N IN A BU T K OVIC H -B UD D EN a t T O M FO LWA RK OW M AN AGE M E N T mo d el s T IM SC HU L Z VA N EN D ERT a t S P I N M O D ELS & F RID A M E L a t I C O N I C

Over the years, modo collections have drawn inspiration from a variety of influences. But despite their strikingly different constructions, the glasses have always shown a coherent overall aesthetic. The common denominator between all collections is modo’s commitment to blending innovative designs with the latest technologies. In the current line, purists will appreciate the many models with new, screwless hinges, including the modo »7007«. Featuring a double bridge design, the »7007« is the flagship of the new R1000 + Titanium Series, which applies modo’s Paper-Thin concept to the equally flexible and resilient R1000 high-tech plastic. The Paper-Thin Ultra collection also applies the screwless hinge concept in models such as the »4413« and »4414«. Overall, another standout achievement of modo collections

MODO

lies in making a bold fashion statement des-

» 6 8 7«

pite their delicate constructions. This once again becomes clear in the modo VS 1 collabo models and the latest generation of sunglasses

s ui t S T REL L S ON, s hi r t ARMANI, s hoe s CHU RCH’ S , bow tie CANALI

such as the »686« and »687«. Always modern and eclectic but also ready for everyday wear – modo is in a league of its own. 68


COLLECTION SHOOT

MODO » 6 8 7« su it H UG O B O S S , s hi r t RAL P H L AU REN, bow tie CROATA, s hoe s AS OS

69


COLLECTION SHOOT

MODO »686« jumps u i t M IC HAEL K O R S

MODO » 4 0 8 6 « & » 4 414 « s hi r ts ANT ONY MORAT O, p ants JOOP, tie s CANALI

70


COLLECTION SHOOT

MODO

MODO

» 4 413 «

» 4515 «

-

-

u n d e r sh ir t C A LV I N KL EIN

jumps ui t MICHAEL KORS

su s p e n d e r s H A C KET T h a t C A H UN

71


COLLECTION SHOOT

MODO »B abila« p a nts M ARC JAC O B S t ur t le n e ck HU GO B O S S

»70 07« p ants S T RE LL S O N t ur t le ne ck ARM AN I E XC H A N G E

MODO »686«

72


ROL F SPEC TACL E S

ROL F SPEC TACL E S

ROL F SPEC TACL E S

» M a r l i n 24 «

» B e l a i r 24 «

» C a p r i 107«

-

-

-

ja c ke t S C H O T T N . Y. C

jacke t S CHOT T N.Y.C

jacke t S CH OTT N.Y.C

s hi r t YU N G H UR N

s hi r t YU NG HU RN

s hi r t YU NG HURNX

74


S TATE

O F

INDEP ENDENCE 75

BY ESTELLE KLAWITTER a ss i s t ant L ARS HIL L EN s t yli n g ROL F BU CK h ai r & m ake - up NADINE KLIE R a t 21AGE NCY mod els EL IAS a t NOT OY S, FLORIAN UE RSCHE L & DANIEL BREU NIG a t TUNE -MODE LS loca tion DÜ S S EL DORF


KALEOS »Kowalsk i« hood ie W EEK D AY, d e ni ms W EEKDAY, boots V INTAGE ARMY BOOT S 76


KALEOS »Ta y lo r « ja c ke t S C H O T T N . Y. C . , s w e a t e r W EEKDAY, je ans L EV IS , belt CINQU E, mütz e COS 77


WOOD FELLAS » H a l t e n b e rg « jac ke t S C H O T T N . Y. C , sh ir t T O P MEN, d e ni ms P HIL IP P P L EIN, boots V INTAGE ARMY BOOT S 78


WOOD FELLAS »W i l d e n s t e i n « ja cke t S C HOT T N . Y. C , sh ir t J A R D I N P UN K

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YO H J I YA M A M O T O »Y Y 7015 « coa t MAGEN STUDIOS, s hi r t T OP ME N, d e ni ms P HIL I PP PLE IN, boots V INTAGE A RMY BOOTS

80


YO H J I YA M A M O T O »Y Y 702 0 « pullov e r CALV IN KL EIN, ca p YU NG HU RN 81


MARC O’POLO » 5 0 614 0 « he a d b a n d N I K E t ur t le n e c k J ILL S A N D E R nos e r i n g & n e c kl a ce K T Z

82


MARC O’POLO »505059« jacke t SCHOTT N.Y.C. s hi r t JARDIN PUNK d e nims E DWIN belt S T ELLA MC CARTNE Y e ar r r i n g T HOMAS SABO FOR ME RCE DE S

83


L.G.R »Z e ra f « rai n s hi r t ACDC FE STIVAL PIE CE jacke t S CHOTT N.Y.C. 84


M AY B A C H »T h e B o l d I « s w e a t e r F R UI T O F T H E L O O M 85


R AY- B A N »R B36 48« hood ie W EEKDAY 86


FINISHING

MARKUS T »ME P ur M 1074«

SILENT NOBLESSE MAR K US

T

G O L D

T EM P LES

photos E D A C AL IST I

»T I TAN A ura T 3368«

For some readers it may come as a surprise that markus t is offering select eyewear styles with the option to cover the titanium temples in gold. Because for a number of years, the German designer label has enjoyed a reputation for clean and reductionist styles, not “bling”. But it all makes sense by looking at how markus t implements the 24-karat gold coating in a non-overbearing manner. Thanks to the label’s signature use of colorways, the warm golden tone becomes part of a coherent whole in true markus t style. As an innovative feature, the gold is applied via a special vacuum process to ensure a long-lasting sheen. The result is a clear and brilliant surface texture that lends a refined finish to premium markus t models, including the ME Pur collection. Other parts of the markus t portfolio available with optional gold finish include the ME Genius, ME Ego, TITAN Aura, TITAN Terra and SUN ME. Here’s a look at the golden age of eyewear. 88


DOUBLE Jeu JEU Double

OPTI MUNICH 12-14 JANUAR 2018 / STAND 508 HALLE C2

@myjfrey


L A B E L U P D AT E

SALT. UPDATE FEMI N I N E FRO M

S A LT. »Fle km an«

S T Y L E S

C AL I F O R N IA

S A LT. »Pe ttibone«

photo RAP HAEL S CHMIT Z

California eyewear label salt. has established itself as a household name at the world’s finest boutiques. Their eyewear is crafted at the finest Japanese workshops with an eye for fashionable attitude and natural understatement. In the current salt. collection, we fell in love with the »Flekman« and »Pettibone« models. Both frames offer a characteristic blend of bold lines and feminine curvatures. They both also come in rich color choices, with our personal faves including black and the transparent antique rose. Who knew salt. could be so sweet? 90


NEW TECH

ROLF SPECTACLES FLEXLOCK INNO VAT ION WI TH

D RI V ER

AWA R D E D

T E CHNOLOGY

photos E DA CALISTI

In October 2017, ROLF SPECTACLES won the Silmo d’Or Award in the Technological Innovation category for what is now the third time. Is anyone surprised? Not really! Just the opposite: The award is quite a shoe-in, as the model behind their entry in the competition, the »Deville«, is based on the company’s innovative Flexlock technology blended with natural materials. Built on a multi-directional concept, the new hinge is bound to usher in a new era of ultra-resilient wooden frames.

R O L F S P E C TA C L E S »L a u d ale t 93« & »De ville 91«

92


NEW TECH

Despite the brand-new hinge concept, rolf remains true to its inherent product philosophy of using only 100-percent natural materials. The new hinge is entirely free of metal and, compared to conventional wooden models, offers an unprecedented level of flexibility. It is exactly this kind of flexibility that helps the multidirectional Flexlock hinges achieve such an improvement in stability. The hinge is able to balance impact from any direction without difficulty, almost Zen-like in its adjustments to flow. And how exactly does the new system achieve such a feat? The temples are connected to the frame via delicate engravings, which provide a secure fit in its closed position. At the same time, the design also allows for turning the temples in any direction, without fragmenting the surrounding hinge. The key component tasked with bringing the temples back into their initial position is a natural rubber band, threaded through the hinge to form a secure connection between frames and temples. The band is available in three different levels of rigidity, allowing each wearer to choose their desired level of flexibility. The Flexlock construction is one of those designs that is so logical, one cannot help but wonder why it had not been invented earlier. In order to take the novel concept to the test, the Austrian designers put the Flexlock hinges through 10,000 test cycles, before Roland Wolf and team awarded their own seal of approval. The new hinge breakthrough is once again proof that rolf spectacles is keeping its eye on the big picture: Creating eyewear that combines natural materials and high-grade construction processes into covetable objects of value. Objects that function exquisitely while making no compromises in terms of design language and aesthetics of form. Seeing is believing and to anyone looking to experience the new hinges in action, we recommend a visit to the nearest rolf optician who will be happy to provide a demo. Balanced, classical design with clear lines and a thin rim, produced from precious wood – awardwinning technology has never looked this beautiful.

Flexlock-System: Stabilität durch Flexibilität 93


COLLECTION SHOOT

LINDBERG »1828 « coa t S T R ENES S E t e d d y I R A C E MA S CHARF lon g v e s t & p a nts REBEKKA R U ÉT Z sn e a ke r s P U MA

94


COLLECTION SHOOT

WHITEOUT LI NDBERG

T RÆ + B U F F A L O

lindberg once again lives up to the brand’s reputation as an innova-

tor in the eyewear segment. In terms of materials, the Danish designer label from the town of Aarhus has been known as a key driver of new approaches. Now lindberg is back to launch the Træ + Buffalo collection as a three-way hybrid which elevates the proven Buffalo Titanium Line. The backsides of the frames consist of multi-layered buffalo horn, blended with a wooden front implementing four species of wood: Olive, Padauk, Ebony, and Smoked Oak. Meanwhile, all temples, hinges, and nose bridges in the collection’s models are crafted from lightweight lindberg titanium that can be molded to fit the individual wearer. Out of the innovative blend of these three materials arises the characteristic beauty of the Træ + Buffalo collection. No two pairs in the collection are entirely alike, making this a truly unique take on premium eyewear executed with premium craftsmanship.

LINDBERG »1828 « ja c ke t L IE BE S K I N D kn i t d re ss ST RE N ES S E d re ss AN T ON E L L I F I R EN Z E

photos S T EFAN DONGU S a ss i s t ant IV ONNE F REIBERGER d i gi t al op e ra tor KAT RIN KAIS ER s t yli n g V ERA W IT T L AU a t NINA KL EIN h ai r & m ake - up L AU RA- ANN OL L AND a t 2 1 AGENCY a ss i s t e d b y CLAUDIA WOLTE RS re touch GL AMT OU CH mod els EIL EEN HEYDORN a t P MA, NAS T IA B. a t MOS T WANT ED & OT T O S EP PAL AINEN a t M4 95


COLLECTION SHOOT

LINDBERG »18 31« coa t N OWAD AY S sui t D RYK ORN kn i t AS K E T sne a ke r s N OWAD AY S

boots NOWADAY S

96


COLLECTION SHOOT

LINDBERG »1823 « coa t S T RENE SSE jacke t & p ants S T EFFE N SCHRAUT boots NEO SE NS

97


COLLECTION SHOOT

LINDBERG »1814 « coa t STINE GOYA t ed d y IRACE MA SCHARF p ant s STRE NE SSE boots NE OSE NS

LINDBERG »18 35 « coa t ECOAL F blou s e S T EF F EN S CHRAU T

LINDBERG »18 35 « jacke t LE MONT ST. MICHE L s hir t NOWADAY S p olo sh ir t NOWADAY S

98


COLLECTION SHOOT

LINDBERG »182 7« rai ncoa t MOOS E KNU CKL ES p ants NOWADAYS

99


COLLECTION SHOOT

LINDBERG »18 32« coa t , sh ir t , t u r t le n e ck & p ants NOWADAYS

LINDBERG »18 32« coa t ANT ONEL LI FIRE NZ E blou s e 2 XM : SHRTS le a the r p ants U T MON E S POUR

100


DIE MESSE FÜR SCHÖNE BRILLEN


*SAVE THE DATE

Hall of Frames Zürich *10TH ANNIVERSERY 7. & 8. Oktober 2018 Papiersaal, Zürich www.hallofframes.ch Powered by Eyetech.ch

Die Brillenmesse Stuttgart *NEW LOCATION 13. & 14. Oktober 2018 Wagenhallen, Stuttgart www.diebrillenmesse.de Powered by Stratemeyer.de

@hallofframes12 @hallofframes.ch

HALL OF FRAMES GmbH Neudorfstrasse 2, CH-6312 Steinhausen +41 (0)41 878 00 13, contact@hallofframes.ch


START

B Y AVA P I V O T

UP BERLIN

s t yli n g HANIBAL L S AL IBA h ai r & m ake - up AS T RID S CHEP PAN a t L I GA NORD mod els DIMIT RIJ V YS OKOLYAN a t MODELWE RK, PAU L a t M4 , F L ORIAN & PAT RICK a t P MA loca tion BERL IN

104


MARKUS T »T i t a n A u ra T 33 6 3 « s ui t S TRE LLSON s hi r t CARL GROSS

105


STRELLSON » S N 33 0 01« t re nch coa t W I N D S O R s hi r t ST R EL L S O N t ie S E ID E NS T I C K E R

106


STRELLSON » S N 33 0 0 0 « s ack coa t CL U B OF GENT s hi r t MARCIANO bow tie T IGER OF S W EDEN

107


BLACKFIN »A rc « pullov e r FALKE s hi r t PATRIZ IA PE PE trou s e r s CLUB OF GE NT belt BUGATTI

108


BLACKFIN » S i l v e rd a l e « s ack coa t CAR L GROSS p olo s hi r t S TRE LLSON trou s e r s W I NDSOR

109


TAVAT

TAVAT

»Kafee R acer«

» S o u p C a n Pa n t o s M a s k «

-

-

ja c ke t WE E K D AY, sh ir t H A UP T, t rou s e r s S T R EL L S ON,

s ack coa t W INDS OR, s hi r t DI E GE L,

t ie B UG AT T I , b el t W I N D S O R

trou s e r s W INDS OR 110


TAVAT

TAVAT

»SoupCan Round Mask«

»Kafee R acer«

-

-

s ack coa t DIEGEL , s hi r t S TRE LLSON,

s uit H UG O , sh ir t PAT R I ZI A P EP E

t rou s e r s BU GAT T I, tie DIEGEL , belt TIGE R OF SWE DE N 111


SILHOUETTE »3 6 9 6 « s a c k coa t C L UB O F G E N T s hi r t S E I D EN S T I C K ER t ie D I E G EL p a nt s T I G E R O F S W E D E N

112


SILHOUETTE » 5516 « s ack coa t S T RELLSON s hi r t HAU PT p ants DIEG E L s hi r t U NIQLO belt T IGER OF SWE DE N

113


OAKLEY »F ro g s k i n s OX 8131« tre nch coa t S T RE LL S O N p a nt s T E D BAK E R b elt WIN D S OR tie TI GE R OF S WE D E N sho e s AIGN E R

114


OAKLEY »F ro g s k i n s OX 8131« sack coa t DIE GE L sh ir t WINDSOR bow tie TIGE R OF SWE DE N

115


ADRIAN MARWITZ » S t ra n g e r N o . 43 « tre nch coa t CARL GROSS

s hi r t STRE LLSON p ants CINQUE tie DIE GE L bel t BUGATTI

» S t ra n g e r N o . 3 8 « su i t CLU B OF GE NT

s hi r t STRE LLSON

116


TITAN Aura T3365

OPTI 2018 Halle C2, Stand 314


ARENA BERLIN

October 20—21, 2018

We support independent eyewear WWW.COPENHAGENSPECS.DE


LOKOMOTIVVÆRKSTEDET

March 3—4, 2018

We support independent eyewear REMEMBER TO REGISTER AS VISITOR AT: WWW.COPENHAGENSPECS.DK


ANNIVERSARY

THE MA OF HO

photo S T E FAN D ON GU S , s t il l s R A P H A E L S C H M I T Z

HOFFM AN N

40 YE A R S

N AT U R A L

EY EWEAR

A NNI VE R SA RY CO LLE C T I O N 120


ANNIVERSARY

ASTERS ORN HOFFMANN NATURAL EYEWEAR is a fitting brand name for two reasons: On one hand, the brand’s headquarters are situated in the heart of the German Eifel region where “nature” is an abundant resource. NATURE ALSO FEATURES HEAVILY ON THE MANUFACTURING SIDE, AS HOFFMANN EXCLUSIVELY RELIES ON NATURAL RAW MATERIALS. SO IT’S A PERFECT FIT.

FOR THE BRAND’S 40-YEAR ANNIVERSARY, SPECTR SAT DOWN WITH JUTTA KAHLBETZER AND WOLFGANG THELEN TO LEARN ABOUT THE DELICATE BALANCE BETWEEN MAINTAINING THE COMPANY’S HISTORIC CORE VALUES WHILE CONSTANTLY ADVANCING THEIR CRAFT WITH INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES.

Plus, there’s a special surprise – the Anniversary Collection of special releases, featured right here. 121


ANNIVERSARY

Horn eyewear from the Eifel region sounds almost mythical. How did it all come together?

dyed silk was also used, which really hit the pulse of fashion at the time and created a bit of a hype – you could offer the right eyewear

wolfgang: It all pretty much started with a company called

for every type. Style counseling around color types was really

Köln Optik. It was backed by a Cologne-based entrepreneur who

having its moment at the time, and individualized outfits, hairstyles

manufactured horn eyewear in his vacation home out here in the

and make-up could be matched with the perfect glasses.

Eifel. This is where brand founder JosephHoffmann cut his teeth

What were some milestones of company development after that?

as an employee. He soon recognized that his talent and passion

wolfgang: 1986 marked construction of the company building,

would help him achieve new things with horn. So when the end

the hoffmann-Haus, which is still home to our manufacturing

of Köln Optik came around, Joseph Hoffmann went into business

outfit. Through extensive expansions the building assumed the shape of the actual hoffmann logo, reminiscent of a giant “H”.

as hoffmann naturhornbrillen. Horn frames had been around way before Joseph Hoffmann. What made his models stand out?

In the year 2000, you took over the company with all its employees. What is your personal background and what was the motivation?

jutta: Hoffmann refined horn eyewear to a point where there was

wolfgang: Jutta and myself were already quite successful in kids’

no comparable quality available on the entire market. In the late

fashion eyewear with our company ivko. So there was already a

1980s, he developed Triplex Horn, a process that still enables us

fundamental affinity to eyewear, yet not including manufacturing

to this day to manufacture the world’s thinnest and lightest horn

natural horn frames. But we already had a connection [to hoffmann].

frames at the best stability.

How so?

What are the advantages of Triplex Horn? jutta: The frames retain their shape far better than a single-layer

jutta: Simply by geographic proximity – the hoffmann head-

material, which tends to bend back into horn’s original shape.

quarters are just a few minutes from our home town – there were lots of touch points. When Joseph Hoffmann no longer wanted to

Are there other peculiarities? wolfgang: There are, for instance in the horn sourcing process.

lead the company, we instantly made a move. Already fascinated

Back in the day, entire horns would be shipped from India to

by the horn manufacturing operation, we saw great potential in

Germany. In the Eighties, Hoffmann went on what was then still a

refining this gem and making it shine even more. At this point in

pretty adventurous voyage to India for several months, in order to

time, we have grown our staff tenfold and now supply 50 coun-

install the necessary machinery at workshops on-site. And also to

tries across the globe while constantly driving innovation.

teach the know-how needed to cut eyewear-specific plates out of raw horn and press them flat. Is the transformation of horn into plates a delicate process? And what are the advantages of making this step in the country of origin, India? wolfgang: Yes, it’s a highly involving process. You need to

apply exactly the right warmth and technique,

1970s

otherwise the horn will burn or fracture.

Seventies-inspired shape with pronounced, refined double cross bar – the essence of aviator style.

As of today, the entire industry is buying horn plates directly in the country of origin. This not only creates added value on a social level in the home region of the water buffalo, but also cuts down shipping volumes signifi-

H O F F M A N N N AT U R A L E Y E W E A R

cantly for added sustainability. What’s

»40 – I« & »40 – I I«

more, the endemic workshops get to utilize the precious tips of the horns for button manufacturing. Did hoffmann work exclusively with horn frames or did other materials factor into the mix over the years? jutta: Right from the start, the company also worked

with other natural materials. For instance, working with wood was on the agenda right in the beginning. In the 1980s,

1980s

The 1980s-look in an oversized edition. Curved, feminine with delicate accents and well-chosen color nuances. 122


ANNIVERSARY

1990s

Geometric, angled, and masculine 1990s frame makes a statement with single brow line.

selves with our name. We just had way too many ideas revolving around the potential of working with wonderful natural raw materials. And we have the know-how to utilize them. What would be an example? wolfgang: We also work with slate, which normally is consi-

dered rather cool and ambiguous, and implement a very delicate variety into super light frames. And we include genuine gold fragments into our

H O F F M A N N N AT U R A L E Y E W E A R

horn frames. This kind of upscale finish

»40 – I I I« & »40 – I V«

is a great fit for the aura of handmade eyewear and really emphasizes our frames as one-of-a-kind pieces. This “yin & yang” of heavy and light, warm and cold, smooth and rough

2000s

materials creates a particular overall

Reductionist approach to materials of the early 2000s in a nylor design featuring natural horn grain.

effect. In how far do your wooden frames stand out from the rest? jutta: Our wooden frames are simply diffe-

rent. Compared to other brands specialized in wooden eyewear, we focus on rather delicate material densities What kind of changes did you implement after the takeover and what

and surfaces. The look is more refined and lightweight than rough

remained untouched?

and heavy. Our hand-made touch is a bit more understated, but

wolfgang: We maintained many proven and traditional manu-

intentionally so. After all, our entire philosophy revolves around

facturing steps in their original form. And also the familiar, easygoing spirit among employees. We take special pleasure in giving

keeping the focus on the wearer’s personality. Overall, what is the significance of horn in your collection today?

our collection a new face, which continuously evolves and blends

wolfgang: Horn still represents by far the largest share of our

timeless style with daring fashion sense. Ultimately, we came to

collection. That’s because it offers the greatest benefits in terms

recognize that a certain kind of finesse and trendiness can only be

of diversity, comfort of wear, and manufacturing options. I don’t

met by constantly adding new technologies to traditional manu-

really see that changing over the next 40 years.

facturing expertise – which as we all know figures into 80 percent

Speaking of comfort, many wearers swear that horn just feels the best.

of the steps involved in making horn frames. We can only soar

True?

to great heights in terms of creative details when we are open to

wolfgang: Horn is skin-friendly and does not trigger any aller-

implementing high tech. This is what allows us today to create the

gies. It feels warm and comfortable – the frame adjusts to the body

thinnest horn glasses and highly complex hinge and combination

temperature during wear and you hardly notice walking around with glasses.

solutions, for instance featuring titanium.

And what about the look?

Were there changes in terms of your product portfolio and distribution? jutta: We almost never mention the expansion of the diversity

wolfgang: From a stylistic standpoint, buffalo horn is always

in our color palette, although it has grown to over 500 colors and

something outstanding. The soft color nuances and grains radiate

keeps expanding. We also expanded the distribution structures

with a unique sense of nature. Every horn is different in its struc-

back then, and invested in advertising. As part of our success, we

ture and color palette, which in turn makes every pair of hand-

also grew our markets and staff. Today we work with 90 emplo-

crafted frames truly one-of-a-kind. Last but not least, there’s a

yees in the production and management of the hoffmann brand.

clear conscience about wearing natural horn frames. It’s natural,

Another milestone arrived in 2002 with changing our name to

sustainable, valuable and individual. On that note, you place great emphasis on individualized frame produc-

hoffmann natural eyewear.

The name implies that you not only work with horn, but other natural

tion. How come?

materials.

jutta: Why do we offer individual manufacturing? The simple

wolfgang: Yes, because it was important to us not to limit our-

answer would be, because we can. But that wouldn’t entirely cover

123


ANNIVERSARY

2010s

The 2010 model counters the era’s hefty temples with reduced materials in alternating colors of horn layers in tiramisu style.

H O F F M A N N N AT U R A L E Y E W E A R

it. We consider individuality the highest degree of luxury we can

»40 – V« & »40 – VI«

offer people in the eyewear segment. Our capabilities go far beyond personally adjusted fits, but include far more individualized features. This goes from color combinations to material mixes all the way to special customer requests such as inlays inside the temples. Aside from natural materials, what are the USPs of hoffmann frames? jut ta: We make a conscious effort to eliminate all logos from

the outside of our frames. And we cater towards a clientele that considers “understatement as a statement”. From a technical 2018

perspective, our most unique feature can be found in our V-line. In what way?

The contemporary frame dazzles with its bold shape and ultra-matted horn finish.

jut ta: We manufacture the world’s thinnest and lightest genu-

ine horn frames, which offer the highest longevity and stability thanks to a proprietary process. In order to achieve this, we developed a special hinge solution to make this delicate frame possible. Please explain the principle behind the hinges. wolfgang: The hinges in this series resemble a lock mechanism.

been realized or enhanced with state-of-the-art techniques.

The frames are connected at the same time the lens is fitted into

Brought to life with the finishes and details of today. We also want

the rim. What’s more, the hinge also stands out by its look, which

to pay homage to the glasses of years gone by that have brought us

is why we now offer it in a number of different designs.

successes and many backstories, and ultimately made us who we

How has the hoffmann design language evolved over the years?

are today.

jut ta: When it comes to horn frames, certain classics will always

Are you planning further initiatives around your anniversary?

remain current. A pantho shape or key lock bridge never goes out

wolfgang :

of style and always figures in the collection. But we also go with

brate with our customers in several different ways. Prepare to be

We will be releasing a company history and cele-

surprised.

the times and listen to customers. We cover a wide spectrum. Anyone looking for light frames will find them just as much as

Where do you see hoffmann natural eyewear headed over the next ten

bold, voluminous or refined shapes.

years? Creating eyewear via 3D-printing seems out of the question…

This year you are celebrating your 40th birthday with the Anniversary Collection. What’s the story?

jut ta: No, we will continue to stand out from the rest by focusing

on the effect and quality of hand-crafted natural eyewear. As

wolfgang: Our Anniversary Collection consists of six models

we already said, we really treasure individuality, sustainability,

– one from each decade of hoffmann history, meaning from

authenticity, and natural products as the highest goods we can

the Seventies until today. We adapted the original designs into

offer our customers. We produce highly personal products – truly

contemporary interpretations.

one-of-a-kind. Next to the natural graining, which is different

What was your overall motivation?

for every pair, the manual production process greatly adds to the

jut ta: Bringing to life the charm, look, fashion, and attitude of

uniqueness of our glasses. These are the strengths we cherish and

each of these decades. But rather subtle than with grand gestures.

intend to build upon. Thank you very much.

People are invited to smile at how “old” frame highlights have

124


T E C H TA L K

YOU MAWO HORN OLD

SC H OOL

BE CO MES

NEW

S C HOOL

photos E D A C AL IST I

YOU MAWO »Tr i vor«

Exactly two years ago, we showcased freshly launched YOU MAWO as a hopeful startup brand. Barging onto the market with a pioneering mixture of facial scans and 3Dprinted custom eyewear, the company gained traction rather quickly. At the same time, YOU MAWO maintains an element of surprise, as their latest release in horn – not your typical material for a “3D-printed” eyewear outfit – once again proves. spectr followed up with label founders Sebastian Zenetti, Daniel Szabo, Daniel Miko, and Stephan Grotz to learn about the milestones along the way, and the new concept of blending time-honored materials with state-of-the-art tech.

»De n ali«

»Mak alu«

126


T E C H TA L K

Sebastian, you have just returned from the Hidden Champion Awards,

stephan grotz: The biggest advantage is that we succeeded in

where your brand took second place in the Innovation and Vision category.

programming a range of parameters that allow us to capture a facial

Does that feel like an accomplishment?

scan of the customer, which we can then turn into 100-percent

sebastian zenetti: Yes, for us the award is a great recognition for

individualized frame – one that is 30 percent lighter than conven-

all our work. It’s really not a given for an idea that started in the

tional plastics and far more resilient. These factors, paired with

kitchen at our shared apartment to make it this far and receive this

Daniel’s designs that have been unique from the start, have helped

award at this point. So of course we are really happy.

customers choose glasses with a perfect fit.

How do you feel about the last two years?

daniel szabo: Thanks to agreements with our manufacturing

daniel miko: It’s been a crazy and exciting time. We really took

partners, we can also manufacture in a highly sustainable manner.

the plunge into uncharted waters and spent the 24 months

3D-printing has become a buzzword at this point, but we are quite

clearing one hurdle after the other. There were actually several

proud to be able to say that we were the first to bring individually

moments where we could not believe how fast it was all happe-

fitted eyewear based on 3D-facial scans to market.

ning.

sebastian zenetti: But it was also important to us to bring

daniel szabo: The same is true for how many new challenges you

opticians on board as the critical interface in the eyewear ordering

need to face, which no business plan in the world could ever cap-

process. Are wearers responding positively to the concept?

ture. Every single one of us has invested more than 100 percent into you mawo, which goes for our energy as well as time and

sebastian zenetti: Our customers as well as our opticians are

financial resources. So it’s great to see our baby learn how to walk.

excited about all the possibilities opened up by the face scans and

stephan grotz: We are definitely really proud of what we have

the manufacturing process, in particular. What type of customer wants to purchase a customized 3D-frame?

achieved together with our team. These are people who are on fire for you mawo and our drive for new things, and we really

daniel szabo: These are primarily wearers who place an emphasis

appreciate it.

on best-possible quality, comfort, and style. you mawo glasses

You initially started in Munich, but then made the move to Konstanz.

are fashion statements, although with an understated design. In

How come?

an era where every customer wants to score something unique, we

daniel szabo: The main reason was that four of us could all agree

are happy to deliver just that.

on Konstanz as our geographic base. Mainly because it offers all

You assign an important role to opticians in your manufacturing process?

fields of study that interest us and the city welcomed us with open

Why? daniel miko: Because we believe that customers need optimal

arms. Your launch concept was highly innovative: Individual 3D-scans of custo-

personal counseling on-site, in order to really find their perfect

mers’ faces as the basis for customized eyewear crafted via 3D-printing.

glasses. The biggest challenge lies in finding the optimal fit not

What are the advantages?

only from an anatomical perspective, but also aesthetically. Our platform of 3D-scans via iPad place the optician and customers in a direct exchange. How have opticians adapted this new concept at their stores? sebastian zenetti: Initially, it required a lot of convincing on

our part, as was to be expected. There were a few opticians that believed in us right from the start and wanted to be part of our story. But in most cases, we were met with skepticism. But what did we expect when four young dudes set out claiming to turn the market on its head by realizing what many big brands have tried and failed to achieve? Ultimately, the biggest question was whether our frames, which are crafted from polyamide powder, deliver the same quality as acetate frames. The market was already over-saturated with rickety 3D-frames at that point. Two years have passed since then – are you still convinced of the technology? stephan grotz: Absolutely! We know for a fact that 3D-printing

represents unexpected potential for the optical industry. As a future-oriented eyewear manufacturer, you are now playing with horn, material usually associated with the past. What is your motivation? sebastian zenetti: Horn has had this antiquated image for the

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T E C H TA L K

longest time, and we wanted to change that. It is without a doubt

on display at the opticians’. If the frame fits right away, it can be

one of the most unique and individual materials in our industry. So

purchased directly. If the customer needs personal touches, the

it’s a perfect fit for us. Although, what was missing was a modern

optician performs a face scan to optimize the eyewear design

touch, which we now want to deliver via innovative technologies. Will this mean sacrificing the option for individually manufactured

accordingly. How did you realize that with horn?

eyewear?

daniel szabo: The largest challenge consisted of bridging the gap

daniel miko: Absolutely not, individualized manufacturing

between our 3D-digital data and classic eyewear manufacturing

will remain our focus, also in our horn frames. The basis for the

processes. These production steps are now operational and the

new custom-fitted horn glasses is just the same as the polyamide

individualized frames can be delivered in a great time frame and

frames – namely the 3D-scan at the optical store.

with the quality seal “Made in Germany”.

Is this offering also based on a certain number of basic shapes?

But what if the customer is not satisfied with their personalized pair of

sebastian zenetti: We will be starting out with six basic shapes

glasses?

that have already proven themselves in polyamide. The sales

daniel miko: That’s really the biggest inherent problem with cus-

process is also identical: A customer chooses from the basic shapes

tomized manufacturing. We try to minimize the risk by creating a 3D-printed prototype within less than a week. Much like ordering a bespoke suit, the customer can come in for a fitting. This also allows for final touch-ups or alterations. And when everything is in its right place, we go into production. How long does it take before customers can pick up their glasses at the optical store? stephan grotz: As of now, the manufacturing of a custom-fitted

horn frame takes about four weeks. Are you opening up new customer segments with your horn frames? daniel miko: First of all, we hope that customers will like our

horn frames. We think that the polished surface offers a great contrast to our matted polyamide versions. And we are also very happy to start into our third year in business with a completely fresh and quite unique collection. And if you had to choose, which material would be your personal favorite? sebastian zenet ti: Paul McCartney once said, “My favorite

Beatles song is the one that sells the best.” So if I really had to make a choice, I would go for the material that performs best. But why not just wait and see? The most important thing is that our customers are satisfied and we are free to keep pursuing our own ideas.

YOU MAWO »S ajam a«

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COLLECTION SHOOT

GÖTTI 2 0 1 8

NEW

P ERS P EC TI V E

photos S T E P HAN ZIEHEN s t yl in g & p roduc tion ANNIKA ZIEHEN h a ir & m a ke - up F RAU KE BERGEMANN- GORS KI mod el K AT E L AP P O a t L OU IS A MODEL S re touch E L EKT RONIS CHE S CHÖNHEIT loca t ion M A RRAKES H T h a n k s to C h amb re s d ’A mi s , Mar rake ch for h a v i n g u s a n d t h a n k s to moroccan ga t e s . com for t aki n g u s aroun d

The year 2017 marked a big moment for rimless frames, and the trend is far from slowing down as the pendulum swings into next year. Having already made strong headway in rimless eyewear designs in 2017 with their Perspective collection, götti follows up with fresh variations on the theme. The most notable achievement lies with their rimless sunglasses: The Swiss brand achieves new perspectives on shades with a meticulously constructed, reductionist design. All the expression rests on the lenses, and these come in new, gorgeous tints in the current 2018 collection, including Light Forest and Light Macchiato. And since rimless frames are not restricted to specific silhouettes, the lenses shine in a variety of shapes and proportions. For a field test, we took these beauties for a walk in the Northern African metropolis of Marrakesh.

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COLLECTION SHOOT

GÖTTI » P S S 02 S i l v e r « outfit COS

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COLLECTION SHOOT

GÖTTI » E F S 01 G o l d «

GÖTTI » E F S 02 B l a c k « top C O S 132


COLLECTION SHOOT

GÖTTI » P S S 02 S i l v e r « top COS , s hor ts F I LIPPA K.

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COLLECTION SHOOT

GÖTTI » P S S 03 B l a c k « b om b e r jac ke t M A R C O ’ P O L O

GÖTTI »P S S 0 4 Silver« dre ss MARC O’ P OL O 134


COLLECTION SHOOT

GÖTTI » C Y S 02 G o l d « dre ss COS , s car f OL S EN

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COLLECTION SHOOT

GÖTTI »DC S 05 Black« d re ss C O S

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F I VE

BY EDISONGA

MILES NORTH

ca s ti n g & p roduc tion TAMARA S ARIS CHWILI h ai r & m ake - up J ANE J AKOBI s t yli n g S ANDY P OW ER mod els V INDRA a t V ERA & MODEL L INK loca tion S W EDEN

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NEUBAU »Eugen« pu llo v e r MICHAEL S ONTAG

»F a b i o « k n i t d re ss L AL A BERL I N

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IC! BERLIN »Tr i a n g u l a r i t y « dre ss MICHAE L SONTAG

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IC! BERLIN »Pur it y« dre ss NOBI TAL AI

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FHONE »Nor th« & »My name is Har r y« coa t J OS EP H

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I-SPA X »Ilia II« f ur jacke t S TAND

I-SPA X »Kirk II« ca p e NOBI TAL AI

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ÖGA »10 0 4 6 O « down ja c ke t L A R EI D A , pu l lov e r G E S T UZ , p ant y W EEKDAY

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ÖGA »10 0 6 0 O « pullov e r ANT ONIA Z ANDE R

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MASUNAGA »Lyn x« pu llo v e r NOBL E W IL DE

»Daisy« pu llo v e r SEL D OM

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MASUNAGA »B ec r u x« pullov e r S EE BY CHL OÉ

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REIZ »Basalt« ja c ke t V L ADIMIR KARAL EEV

» B re k z i e « ca p e L AL A BERL I N

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16 –18 JANUARY 2018 S TAT I O N - B E R L I N

16–18 JANUARY 2018 ARENA BERLIN


16 JANUARY 2018 KRAFTWERK BERLIN

10 –12 FEBRUARY 2018 ZENITH HALL MUNICH

W W W . P R E M I U M G R O U P. B E R L I N


P H I L O S O P H Y TA L K

Regardless of their production schedules, manufacturers seem to agree that brand image is just as important as technical features these days. So it’s no surprise that eyewear brand communications are also aligning more closely with fashion labels. One of the pioneers at the intersection of fashion and eyewear hails from a quaint town in Southern Germany and is known by the name of reiz. With a reputation as one of Germany’s most sophisticated brands, reiz has made a name for itself on the international scene. We caught up with the label’s two co-founders Franz Reutter and Jochen Gutbrod in Paris at the picturesque Place des Vosges, to which both feel strongly connected. Situated in the heart of the city’s trending fashion district Marais, the Place des Vosges is the perfect setting for a SPECTR Philosophy Talk on the intricacies of fashion and the current zeitgeist, which reiz continues to capture successfully. 152


P H I L O S O P H Y TA L K

REIZ – PHILOSOPHY TALK HOW –

O R

E Y EWEAR

BEC OM ES

FAS HIO N

N O T

photos S T E FA N D O N G U S

At this point in time, the eyewear universe has been fully conquered by the fashion world. Many optical stores now boast interior designs worthy of high fashion boutiques, rather than the traditional image of “serious” (and sterile) optical shops. ALONG THE SAME LINES, OPTICAL BRANDS ALSO ASSUME AN INCREASINGLY STYLE-ORIENTED APPROACH IN THEIR POSITIONING, WHILE ADAPTING TO MANY OF THE FAST-LIVING TRENDS AND INNOVATIONS FROM THE OPTICAL BUSINESS. THESE SYNERGIES EXTEND BEYOND MERE PRODUCT DESIGNS AND COLOR CHOICES BASED ON CURRENT FASHION COLLECTIONS. THEY ALSO AFFECT THE WAY EYEWEAR IS BROUGHT TO MARKET, WITH COLLECTION RELEASE INTERVALS INCREASINGLY MATCHING THE FAST PACE OF FASHION COLLECTIONS.

AS A LOGICAL CONSEQUENCE, MANUFACTURERS ARE UNDER PRESSURE TO KEEP UP SUPPLY, WHICH OFTEN DEMANDS DEEP-TISSUE ADJUSTMENTS IN PRODUCTION PROCESSES. THEN AGAIN, THE TREND IS NOT UNIVERSAL, AND A COUNTERMOVEMENT AGAINST “FAST FASHION” IS ALREADY MOUNTING. Hello, guys. “Fashion in the eyewear business” has been a hot button

choose to search. That may be in an urban environment as much

subject over the past few years. You are without a doubt qualified to

as in nature. It’s really important to focus on the development and

speak on the issue, given your track record. Then again, your headquarters in rural Wernau are not exactly an ideal of urban sophistication.

implementing what originated as an idea, wherever it came from. How do you two stay up-to-date?

franz: Thanks for trusting in our competency, despite our remote

jochen: We are not limited to our place of residence. From the

very start, reiz was set up to operate anywhere our products are

location. Why have you never felt the need to settle in a fashion metropolis?

creating a market. Our starting point was in Germany, and initially

jochen: Wernau is our home base. This is where we can find the

the Japanese market was also of major importance for us. Frequent

tranquility to focus on essentials. It takes a lot of influences to

travels to Tokyo, New York and Paris really helped us evolve. Where do you draw inspiration from in these metropolitan cities?

create things. But they don’t need to be exclusively urban. franz: Sometimes viewing things with a bit of distance affords

franz: We have always taken great pleasure in finding locations

some objectivity. You also should not rely on external influences

that often tended to be found behind the hot spots of a metropolis.

too strongly. Much rather, creativity originates from an act. And

Sure, Omotesando is impressive as one of the largest shopping

such an act requires inspiration, which can be found anywhere you

arteries in Tokyo, but all the little alleys and side streets also hold

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P H I L O S O P H Y TA L K

loads of individual shops to be discovered, and places vibrating with a certain energy. One of these locations is the Place des Vosges, where we have been showcasing our new collections for several years now. Why not exhibit your new releases in a tradeshow setting? franz: The Place des Vosges is this small, vibrant oasis. You can

find anything here – from hipsters having a picnic to grannies just observing the bustle in the streets. jochen: The annual Fashion Week happening at the same time

here in the Marais is also an interesting story for us. Despite all these contrasts, the Place des Vosges has often been called the “heart of Paris” – a rather fitting statement, I would say. So what better place to present new eyewear than an historic building overlooking a park, far away from all the trouble and strife? No sensual overload at tradeshows, but instead open windows and lots of light, plus enough time for our clients. This peaceful atmosphere is the perfect backdrop for real conversations, even beyond eyewear. And your clients are willing to go out of their way to come here? franz: Sure. Many of them are looking to experience Paris outside

the tradeshow – much like we are – and are happy to come see us before or after the show. Every year, it’s a unique meeting with special people at an exciting location. jochen: These things tend to continue until late in the night. So

we are going the same route as our clients who are creating a special shopping experience at their stores. How would you characterize the “shopping experience” at today’s optical boutiques? franz: Today it goes beyond expertise, friendly service and a feeling

of being well taken care of to the ambiance. Stores with harmonious styling, hip sales staff, and relaxed conduct are a must. It’s trending away from the traditional optician in a lab coat. What would be some prime examples?

“TODAY IT GOES BEYOND EXPERTISE, FRIENDLY SERVICE AND A FEELING OF BEING WELL TAKEN CARE OF TO THE AMBIANCE. ”

jochen: I would definitely point out stores such as Steingasse 14

in Heidelberg, Six Million Glasses in Hamburg, and Entre Vues Seven in Lyon. But that’s just a small selection of great shops. Why is the fashion aspect gaining importance in the eyewear industry? franz: Moving forward, being in motion – why should it all end

at just glasses? The word “visual aid” and the “lab coat” have all but vanished from stores by now. Glasses have grown to become a fashion accessory. The former visual aid has matured into an irreplaceable fashion product. jochen: Ultimately, the amount of significance applied to a frame

is entirely up to the individual wearer. Our calling lies in manufacturing something that delights people and accompanies them for some time. Where do you draw inspiration for your product designs from? jochen: There are various sources of inspiration. From energetic

personalities, to nature with all its colors and hues, all the way to the shapes and lines to be discovered everywhere. franz: We also absorb colors and shapes from the fashion seg-

ment to some degree, and implement them in the reiz DNA. But our goal lies not in creating some kind of clone. We would much 154


P H I L O S O P H Y TA L K

rather nurture reiz-specific products on our own nutritious soil. And inspiration for shapes and colors must not necessarily reflect current fashion trends. Other areas can provide the spark to think about a new shape. Fashion is also changing brand communications. You have a long history of working with renowned fashion photographers on elaborate campaigns. franz: The most important thing for us is to ensure the right

chemistry between us, the photographer, and the collection. On the part of the photographer, it requires a certain kind of sensibility and delicate approach, in order to recognize the themes behind different collections and mirror them in imagery. jochen: We also don’t want to create some kind of artificial image.

We really want the photographer to be able to create visual results that we can identify with. The result just has to be reiz. On our last campaign, we had the great fortune to work with a great photographer from Stuttgart, who really read our minds with her expressionist, often bizarre interpretations. Is a positioning as a fashion label necessary in order to stay relevant as a brand? franz: The time spans, during which fashion trends exist, are

becoming increasingly shorter. The face of products is changing faster and faster. Following these trends can become rather confusing. Hitting the zeitgeist, for us appears as the best option to get noticed as a label. It’s important to stand for something as a label and gain recognition for it. Are you noticing an increasing importance of brand image? Does eyewear go beyond just technical features, proper fit, and how well it suits a wearer? jochen: Fit and technical functionality are prerequisites, and

how well it suits someone is really a matter of taste. Product design and brand communications are not the only areas mirroring the fashion business. Collection cycles are also aligning more closely with textiles. jochen: The cycles are indeed getting increasingly shorter. Custo-

mers demand longevity but also continued novelty. This is where playing with colors works well, for instance with a limited edition special colorway or model. The media is also full of capsule collections and collaborations with

artists and designers from other fields. Has reiz been playing in this field

as well? franz: Capsule collections do not necessarily have to originate

from collaborations with artists or designers, although we aren’t ruling anything out. Over the years we have always developed series within our product portfolio that were launched “encapsulated” from the rest of our basic collection. We used these series to play with themes as a canvas, from which we developed a new direction several times. jochen: For example, many years ago we did a collaboration with

bmw / mini, during which a wonderful mini Clubman in matted

black originated. In parallel, reiz developed a limited edition with ten numbered frames in matted black. But does an eyewear label even have to cater to these short cycles? Does reiz? 155

"ULTIMATELY, THE AMOUNT OF SIGNIFICANCE APPLIED TO A FRAME IS ENTIRELY UP TO THE INDIVIDUAL WEARER. OUR CALLING LIES IN MANUFACTURING SOMETHING THAT DELIGHTS PEOPLE AND ACCOMPANIES THEM FOR SOME TIME."


P H I L O S O P H Y TA L K

jochen: We are currently working with seven collections, but to-

wards the end of the year we will bring it down to four collections. That’s our basis for adding back on. What are some criteria to factor into the equation? franz: With short cycles, it’s all about not overextending produc-

tion capacities all the while maintaining high standards. Quality is the main priority for us – far beyond frequency. So we are not necessarily catering to the fast-lived cycles, as to not lose our focus. There is already a countermovement, marked by reductionism and deceleration. A great eyewear style does not need to be reinvented every year, right? jochen: Definitely not. Beautiful, expressive forms will always

remain on-trend. Basically, eyeglasses can never really be reinvented. But we can find new interpretations or executions on shapes to make them suit the zeitgeist again. Our anniversary series R20 Jubiläumsserie brings this home. The design sketches originated in 1996 and have been offered again in 2016 in a reinterpreted run. Our goal is to create a product that can endure beyond fashion trends. Simply put: to create classics. At the same time, reiz is regarded as a fashionable eyewear label. Does the larger trend towards fashion serve you or make things difficult for you? franz: It’s neither one or the other. Ultimately, there is not a trend

that couldn’t be matched with glasses. reiz represents fashion on one side, but on the other side a down-to-earth operation guided by time-honored Southern German principles. You have been playing with the Optitektur collection for the past seasons. What is the overall importance for you?

jochen: Our Optitektur series really marked a changing point.

New optics, new shapes, new styles. A deep remodel of the reiz design-DNA. As part of this creative shift, the reiz Lovely series transitions into the Optitektur line. Is such a creative shift possible without losing your brand identity? franz: To quote the former head of the international trade com-

mission in Stuttgart: “The only permanent thing is one confronting change.” What can we expect in the near future from REIZ? jochen: More fashionable and quality high-end frames that bring

joy to reiz wearers. Thanks for the interview.

Communication as usual. Always strong, never boring. 156


COLOUR UP YOUR LIFE. DIE NEUE KOLLEKTION ERSTMALS IM MEHRFARB 3D DRUCK.

BESUCHEN SIE UNS AUF DER OPTI VOM

12.-14.1.2018

HALLE C1

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be different.


THEMESHOOT

SHINE THROUGH U N E

A L L U S I O N

TRANSPARENTE photo RAP HAE L S C HM I T Z

NEUBAU

One of 2017’s biggest eyewear

»E u ge n«

trends revolved around transparent frames. Executed in crystal clear materials or subtle color tones, this trend is not going away and is bound to return next year in a number of new iterations. Looking at 2018 collections, numerous big name manufacturers are banking on transparent frames, executed in classic shapes that appear even more classical in this mode. And in order to lend a certain contrast

ANDY WOLF

to the wearer’s face, brands such as

»Soul 5074«

neubau, andy wolf, barton perreira, and salt. include care-

fully appointed contrasts in their designs. For the shape of (transparent) frames to come, here’s our line-up of stylishly executed models for the new year.

BARTON PERREIRA »Jol ant a«

S A LT. »Ian«

158


BEST ACCESSORIES AWARD

MASSADA TH I S

MU S T

BE

A RT

Looking to wear beautiful and high-quality glasses made in Japan and Italy, from a label that places extra emphasis on artistic ambitions? A label that regards eyeglasses as more than just frames fitted with lenses, held in place by temples on both sides? In other words, a brand that’s set on adding a unique vision to the world of eyewear design? Then we recommend having a look at massada. Founders Kate and Chris are full of creative energy – not to mention connections to the brightest minds in art and fashion – and know well that brand identity also

photo S T E FAN D ON GU S

originates in the subconscious. In order to satisfy their artistic ambitions, the two supplement their frame designs with a range of accessories and parallel projects, always with a love for detail and artistic execution. For a visual introduction, have a look at the massada Art Projects on their website and prepare to be amazed by the stunning visuals across mixed media. The products themselves are equally impressive, and our office has never received a shipment in which we took 20 minutes to unwrap all the gorgeous accessories. These included a vinyl record, comic book, and a high-grade leather-bound notebook in genuine stitch binding. The verdict: Nothing about massada is standard issue, everything is high art. This issue’s Best Accessories Award goes to the Swiss label.

MASSADA »Un C hie n An d alou«

»A f t e r Hour s« »Inne r Stillne ss«

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BEST ACCESSORIES AWARD

THE THIRD DIMENSION M A RTI N

&

M ARTI N

» OLL IE«

photo RAP HAEL SCHMITZ

MARTIN & MARTIN »Ollie«

For the past 20 years, Cologne-based independent label martin & martin have been designing eyewear for a cosmopolitan customer base with a sure hand for grasping the current zeitgeist. Founder Martin Lehmann’s experience as a designer culminates in the current collection’s »Ollie« model, a classical rounded shape that blends the comfortable feel of an acetate frame with modern, thin-lined metal temples. True to martin & martin tradition, the »Ollie« model comes replete with added value: in this case added layers and added depth. Working with innovative cutting techniques, multilayer acetate sheets are shaped into three-dimensional frames that still retain their delicate look due to the use of transparent acetate. The verdict: A combination of high tech and high style that’s ready to make a strong entry in 2018 – and beyond. 162


V I N TA G E PA S S I O N

SHE WEARS VINTAGE SPE A K I NG VIN TA G E

T O

B R U S S ELS -BAS ED

D E A L E R

MI M I

LEM

photo S T E FAN D ON GU S

When it comes to Brussels-based Mimi Lem, She Wears Vintage is not just an apt title for this story. It’s also the story of her life, since a large part of her everyday experience revolves around her specialty online eyewear store I-wearvintage.com which she has been running for four years now. Mimi, who goes by the legal name Myriam Lemaire, also lives right down the street from the humongous sculpture known as Atomium – a reminder that the tiny things in life can make a great difference, like rare vintage eyewear. Large on style, and focused on the details – welcome to the world of Mimi Lem.

Mimi, thanks for having us over at your home base in Brussels. How did

I am like a private detective, so my sources are a secret (laughs).

you initially develop a taste for vintage eyewear?

Got it. The whole process from building your stock to selling frames

The first contact was when my father used to take me to the

online must be more complex than one might imagine. Can you provide a

Brussels flea market.

rough outline to outsiders?

So your parents have had an influence on you?

Once I find my treasures, I have to clean and adjust them. Then I

Sure. I grew up in a family of artists and designers, so my passion

move on to taking pictures, and performing all the measurements.

for beautiful things began at an early age. I also loved to hunt for

Then I have to come up with the most precise description possible,

treasures in flea markets all around the world. I began to sell clothes

because people on the web can’t see the glasses directly. What is your philosophy?

and accessories. Later on you decided to focus on vintage eyewear only. What was the

My products have to be from what I call “new old stock”, and from

motivation?

quality brands with special designs that are in line with current

In 2006 I bought a lot of cazal glasses without even knowing

trends. What do you mean by “new old stock”?

what treasures I scored there. I only realized the potential afterward and decided to focus on eyewear because it’s cool, luxurious

Vintage, never been worn, mint condition. So there are no used glasses in your line-up?

and lightweight. In 2014 I built up my own online-store. As a vintage dealer, you’re highly dependent on a great network for obtaining these treasures. Would you mind to share these sources with us?

No. In which markets do you sell your frames? All over the world?

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V I N TA G E PA S S I O N

I sell and ship worldwide. My European and American customers

Which brands are performing the best in your store? cazal, zeiss, ray-ban, persol, mikli and silhouette.

are well balanced. I sell also quite many to Japan and Australia. Please describe your typical client? And why do they buy vintage frames? My customers are mostly men. Some are collectors or just people with taste, who want to be unique and like savoir faire from the past. Is the vintage segment still growing?

How do potential clients learn about your offering? How do you promote yourself? I hand out flyers and business cards. I sell also on vintage markets and online platforms such as Etsy, so potential clients can discover my website through it.

More and more. It goes all the way from very connoisseur customers to touching the masses now. When I began to sell vintage,

As a vintage addict you must be seeing a crazy amount of old frames all

people didn’t know the meaning. But it is also a problem, because

day. What are your favorite brands? I like silhouette a lot, and zeiss and metzler. But also Italian

the term “vintage” is often used incorrectly. So let’s clear up the misunderstanding – where does vintage start and

couture brands such as armani or missoni. And do you have your “one best frame ever”?

where does it end? There’s no starting point. It can be very old, but it needs to be at

I’m more a hunter and seller than a collector. “The cobbler’s child-

least 20 years old.

ren go barefoot” (laughs). Happy hunting, Mimi.

Do you run a sunglasses business only or also offer optical frames? I offer sunglasses and optical eyeglasses with demo lenses change-

www.i-wearvintage.com

able into prescription. 165


THEMESHOOT

BLACK IS THE NEW BLACK FLEYE »Phi 006«

photo RAP HAE L S C HM I T Z

No matter what happens, black will never go out of fashion. Despite the constant onslaught of new wannabe trend colors claiming to be “the new black”, the original stands its ground while proving

A L L I E D M E TA L W O R K S BY BARTON PERREIRA »B130«

its staying power over other members of the color spectrum. Then again, black is not really a color in the actual sense, but originates from the absence of visual stimuli. So it’s really an anti-color, which may explain its subversive, understated and self-confident chic. Old or new, black is back for 2018 in these wonderful models ready to absorb all the light (and

NEUBAU

attention) next year.

»F elix 3D«

ØRGREEN »Q u ant um 1.8« 166


BARTON PERREIRA »Sol Mate« d re ss M EM B ER S O F S OCIET Y

168


W ORK

BY ANGELIKA BÜTTNER

IT HARDER

a ss i s t ant MIROS L AV PAR U S HEV s t yli n g MEL IS S A INFANT E h ai r & m ake - up PAU L V ENOIT a ss i s t ed b y SE AN FE ARS mod els GIEDRE S EKS a t IMG NY & AL EXANDRA WATE RBURY a t W IL HEL MINA NY p os t p roduc tion BENEDIKT E MES L IN loca tion NEW YORK

BARTON PERREIRA »Gr if f in« outfi t VARPU RAPE LI

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OLIVER PEOPLES »Dacet te« top MEMBERS OF S OCIET Y

170


R AY- B A N » R B 35 8 4 - N « top MEMBERS OF SOCIE TY p ants CAROL I NA SARRIA

171


ETNIA BARCELONA » M i ra m a r « top M E M B ER S O F S O C I E T Y p a nt s C A R O L I N A S A R R I A shoe s A L D O

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ETNIA BARCELONA »Hampstead« ja c ke t & leot ard M E M B ER S O F S O C I E T Y

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LINDBERG » 82 01« out f i t M E M BE R S O F S O C I E T Y

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LINDBERG » 8 6 01« top M E M BE R S O F S O C I ET Y

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FACE À FACE » C o s m o 2« top & p a nts VA R P U R A P EL I ja c ke t R I C K O W EN S s ho e s A L D O

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FACE À FACE » D re a m 1« p ants CAROLINA SARRIA jacke t RICK OWE NS shoe s ALDO

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INVU »T 18 02« outfi t MEMB E R OF SOCIE TY

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SPECTR ARCHIVE

www.pinterest.com/spectrmagazine

SPECTR ARCHIVE ON PINTEREST T H E

W ORL D ’S

S OU R CE

F OR

BI GGES T P REM I UM

I NS P I RATIO N EY EWEAR

You want to get inspiration on more than 1.000 eyewear designs from many of the best and most fashionable labels? In our SPECTR Archive we show all frames – from the first edition to the current issue #22 – sorted by brands or shoots at locations all over the world.

180


INTRODUCING HORN

SEE YOU AT OPTI MUNICH

HALL 2, 607

AND MIDO MILAN

PAV 4, M01

EINSTOFFEN.CH


A L LIED ME TA L WORK S BY BARTON PERREIRA »Ka zuyo« b o ot s MAX & CO

t ed d y I RACE MA SCHARF g lov e s STY LIST’S OWN

P LU S

ONE

B Y S A C H A TA S S I L O HÖCHSTETTER a ss i s t ant NOEMI V EROL L A s t yli n g L ORAND L AJ OS h ai r & m ake - up MEL ANIE HOPPE mod els L ARA a t P ROMOD & L AU RA a t MU NICH MODEL S loca tion MU NICH

182


A L LIED ME TA L WORK S BY BARTON PERREIRA »Kit t« d re ss MAX MARA

b racele t IRACE MA SCHARF boots VINTAGE

183


S A LT. »Dibe rg i« ja cke t & s ho e s K ARL L A G E R F EL D

p a nt s VIN TA G E

g lo v e s DIBERGI

s lip DIBERGI 184


S A LT. »R eine r« g lo v e s ROECKL

185


KARMOIE » 417« ja c ke t COS

p ants S AINT L AURE NT PARIS belt ANN DEMEU LE ME E STE R glov e s ANN DEMEULE ME E STE R

186


ANDY WOLF » 4710 « d re ss P O LO RALPH LAURE N

s hoe s CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN

187


188


GLCO

GLCO

» D e l R e y Pc y «

»Calabar Ch«

-

-

v i nyl tre nch BEL S TAF F

v el v e t suit HIRONAÉ

b oots V INTAGE AL EXANDER MCQU EEN

s hoe s V INTAGE MIUMIU

ch ai n & b racele t S W EET DEL U XE

r i n g S WE E T DE LUXE

189


CAZAL »968« le a the r ja c ke t S AMSOE & SAMSOE

190


CAZAL » 9 071« g lo v e s ROECKL

191


E YE VAN 728 5 »762« top K OSTAS M UK UD I S

le a t he r p a nt s K O S TA S M UK UD I S sho e s VIN TAGE AL E X A N D ER M C Q UE EN g lo v e s K ARL L A G ER F EL D

t ed d y ENIQU A g lov e s KARL L AGERF EL D

192


www.wood-fellas.com

SHARP BY NATURE


C U R AT E D S H O P P I N G

ROUND ROUND 3

FAVE S

OF

P HI L IP P

FORET

photos S T EFA N D O N G US

OLIVER PEOPLES »M4 30th«

Meet the latest protagonist in our Curated Shopping segment: Philipp Foret has become, despite his relatively young age, quite the heavyweight in the German eyewear industry. Perhaps this is due to the fact that the 31-year-old approaches the market from several angles. He began his training in 2004 and right after earning his degree started working as an optician at Optik Leidmann in Munich. In his position as manager and buyer for the avantgarde optical store, he has his finger on the pulse of trending eyewear designs from leading brands which makes him the perfect style guide. But Philipp’s sphere of influence extends far beyond Munich. As a member of The German Collective, an association of forward-thinking

M AT S U D A »9004«

independent opticians, he has dialed into a net-

EYEVAN 7285 »143«

work of some of the most innovative stores across the country. He shares a special connection to the Steingasse 14 store in Heidelberg, which he started as a founding partner. Across the border, Philipp also keeps in touch with the eyewear scene in Switzerland, where he has been representing the Reiz brand since 2010. As for his personal style preference, Philipp likes it round. For this issue’s Curated Shopping, he picked out his three current favorite models, and modeled them himself in front of the camera for a complete package. 194

SPECTR IN MOTION See Philipp's favorite round glasses here...


OPTI 2018 - HALL C1 STAND 236


BRAND PROFILE

KARMOIE N O R W E G I A N

D E S IGN

–

WO R L D W I D E

R E S P O NS I BI LI TY

photos K ARM OIE

In 2010, KARMOIE was launched as a Norwegian designer label with a special focus. While the company’s frames represent the highest in design mastery and quality, the two company founders Kirsten and Lars Iversen enhanced their brand DNA to achieve a specific goal that goes beyond selling eyewear: creating long-lasting positive effects by providing people in the most remote corners of the world with access to corrective eyewear. 196

Kirsten, your karmoie brand operates from a strong sense of social responsibility. What is your personal motivation? kirsten: We are grateful to have grown up in a society with abun-

dant possibilities and access to all the help we might need. We were raised in families that value helping one another and have had good role models that are eager to assist friends and family in need. So for us, gratitude and giving back really go together. Honestly, knowing how blessed you are without wanting to show generosity in return feels shallow. Are there brands from other business areas you admire for their social commitment? lars: Houdini Sportswear, Yacutinga Lodge, LUSH cosmetics and


BRAND PROFILE

Nudie Jeans are brands we admire because they view sustainability

challenge. The projects were also very different and experiencing

and responsibility as an integral part of their business. They

both hands-on has taught us a lot. Which experiences made a lasting impression on you?

communicate these values in a clear, uncompromising way that

kirsten: In South Sudan we met a young mother with her baby

raises awareness and motivates their customers. Which came first? The idea to establish an eyewear brand or the wish to set up a company that helps your charitable engagement?

daughter. The mother’s near vision was very poor. We fitted her with positive power Eyejusters and the improvement was

lars: We knew that we wanted to build our company upon giving

impressive. Not only was she able to see some of the smaller sym-

back and acting responsibly. After that, it did not take long to see

bols on the testing card, she could finally see her daughter clearly

that working with eyewear would be the right fit for us. We’ve

as she was holding her in her arms. On the island of Cicia, we

always loved glasses and sunglasses and the global need for

asked the teenagers from the local high school to stop by and get

refractive correction struck us as something that we wanted to

their vision tested. One of them was Josefini and while she really

help with.

wanted glasses, she did not need them. She kept hanging around

In what way is your social responsibility reflected in your brand identity and DNA?

the compound, so we asked her to help us as an interpreter. She started out as an interpreter, caught an interest in the process

lars: Sustainability and responsibility are integral parts of our

and stuck around the rest of the day participating in testing and

work. It permeates every decision we make, the obvious ones

dispensing glasses. She was smart and graceful, and the patients

and the less apparent ones. Quality, style, sustainability – it’s all

loved seeing one of their own as an active part of the eye care team. On one of the smallest islands in Fiji, we met a girl who told us that

connected.

she had worn glasses up until a few years ago when her pair was

In which area did you decide to focus your social engagement? kirsten: In a world where more than 700 million people do not

irreparably broken. Ever since, she had tried to manage without

have access to the refractive correction they need, providing eye

glasses, because she had no opportunity to go to an optometrist

care was an intuitive choice. So far, we have partnered with Eye-

and get a new pair of glasses. She knew what she had been missing

justers and select non-profit organizations to provide adjustable

out on and seeing her get her eyesight back was really moving. So you get to experience that your work actually makes a difference?

eyewear to communities where logistics are a challenge.

lars: As most business owners will agree, creating your own

How exactly does it work? Do you donate part of your profits?

company and starting up can at times be quite exhausting. The fact that we can feel great about what we do and how we give back, is invaluable when it comes to motivating us to push through.

kirsten:

We donate one pair of corrective glasses for every pair of karmoie glasses or sunglasses we sell. We wanted “giving back” to be an intrinsic part of our product rather than dependent on our financial success.

Are you planning any comparable activities for the future? lars: For 2018 we are looking to set up a project in Mexico

together with our distributors in Mexico City as well as keeping our commitments to existing projects. Sea Mercy in particular is an organization that is growing and extending the regions they can reach and we want to keep up our donations to the islanders in the South Pacific.

Our customers can feel confident that their purchase is doing

How important is your social commitment to your clients?

good, regardless of the challenges we face as a business.

lars: Many opticians that carry karmoie also make the trip to

Aside from financial support, did you ever help on one of these projects

areas where they volunteer their expertise. Our way of doing busi-

personally? lars: In 2014, we joined as volunteers on a Sea Mercy rotation on

the islands of the Northern Lau Group in Fiji. Within two weeks, the team was able to serve nearly 500 patients on six different islands. We’d anchor the catamaran and traverse onto the islands on a small dinghy. We could pack all our equipment for the day in one box. In 2012, we worked with Mobile Health International, a medical outreach program, in South Sudan. The team travelled to the village of Pure to offer medical aid and perform vision tests.

ness echoes their own social commitment and adds another way they can be a part of making a positive impact. How would you describe the people who choose karmoie eyewear? kirsten: Our customers are people who are into timeless, discreet

design with a touch of individuality, who value the craftsmanship and durability of our frames and who want to surround themselves with things they cherish and that reflect their values. They appreciate the experience of getting their glasses from an optician that has a curated and interesting selection of frames.

There was no building that could accommodate us, so we stuck

Back to eyewear design: What can we expect from karmoie next season?

the distance vision chart to the 4x4 vehicle and placed a chair in

kirsten: We are releasing two new styles, one feminine and one

the shade of a tree. This worked fine and shows how suited the

more masculine. Both styles are definitely in the karmoie aesthe-

Eyejusters are in poor, rural areas where flexibility is key.

tic with classic, clean lines and soft natural colors.

What made you choose these projects?

Thank you and all the best for you, your company and your charitable

lars: These projects are good examples of situations where the

projects.

Eyejusters work well: areas where infrastructure is a main 197


NEW IN TOWN

s tills EDA CAL IS T I Don’t be fooled by the title Less from Bellinger, because it’s actually just the opposite of what the Danish designer label is planning for 2018. Get ready for more, and by that we mean more creativity and design. bellinger is gearing up for the launch of a new sub-brand, entitled

Less. The philosophy of Less revolves around the Danish design ethos based on minimalist and elegant expressions with a clean form language. It is a new direction for bellinger, who is one of three existing labels under the Bellinger House umbrella: Bellinger, Blac and Entourage of 7.

LESS

The Less collection is based on the bellinger design DNA,

»1816«

which since the founding of the brand by Malene and Claus Bellinger Diederichsen in 2003 has been marked by bold color combinations and expressive designs. Less continues the broad color spectrum, but also adds equally charismatic print patterns to the mix for a unique, personal look and feel in an innovative package.

LESS FROM BELLINGER »1812«

DANI S H

Super thin acetate front combined with beta-Titanium temples – model »1811«. 198

DES I G NER

B R A ND


NEW IN TOWN

LESS »1814«

WITH

N E W

S U B- L ABE L

»1811« But there’s more to the brand than just stylistics: Upon closer inspection, the subtle nuances of Less come to light. Based on new technical innovations, the label has created a new and much thinner high-density acetate frame. According to Claus Bellinger Diederichsen, the frame is not only among the lightest available on the market, but also the strongest. The lightness of Less frames is due to the acetate front combined with a fashionable top lamination in super thin acetate. Also bringing down the weight are slim Beta-Titanium temples in gold, silver, and new colors. The resulting frames offer a high degree of comfort, combined with exclusive fashion appeal. Look forward to the release of Less in January 2018 with an initial offering composed of seven frame designs, with added variety through a selection of patterns and colorways in true bellinger-style. Once again proof that Less is more – more design with a typical Danish twist in proven quality from the label based in Risskov, Denmark.

199

»1815«


FINISHING

ANDY  WOLF BI-COLOR ANDY WOLF »4715«

DELI C ATE

FR A MES

AND

CO LO R S

photo E DA CALISTI

»4710«

About one year ago, Austrian eyewear label andy wolf acquired a small eyewear workshop in the French Jura region, specializing in manufacturing delicate metal frames. With lots of love for detail, every single pair is crafted by hand. Naturally, such a process requires time, but andy wolf is willing to make the effort with gorgeous results including the latest Bi-Color Design collection. As the underlying concept, this new line combines ultra-delicate

»4734«

frame constructions with carefully appointed colorways for a coherent overall presentation. The two-tone color design is created by covering certain parts of the frame in aluminum foil right after the galvanizing process and before applying the paint coating. The final results are then fixated via lacquer finish in order to preserve the colorways for years of prolonged wear. Standout colors for the new season include subtle hues such as Mint, Lavender, and an especially charming Mustard tone.

»4713«

200


COLLECTION CHECK

ÖGA ÖSTRA W O O D E N F R O M

T H E

FRAM ES

F R E NC H

JURA

photos EDA CAL IS T I ÖGA ÖSTRA is an alliteration with a mysterious ring to it, at least to those not proficient in Scandinavian languages. Translated literally, the moniker boils down to a not-so-mystical combination of two elements: öga is a well-known eyewear brand under the umbrella of traditional company Morel, while Östra is the new collection that was developed in the French Jura region from a blend of extravagant materials. In the true meaning of the word, Östra means “East” in Swedish. Inspired by the rising sun, öga creates a playful blend of wood, rubber and metal. Among these ingredients, wood is the central focus in order to lend a sense of warmth to all Östra models. And to ensure that the wood is able to adapt to the anatomy of individual wearers, the insides and tips of the temples are lined with injected rubber for comfortable wear.

ÖGA »100600«

202


COLLECTION CHECK

Added flex comes from a stainless steel insert within the wooden temples. The contrasting mix of materials is supplemented by a variety of rare woods, sourced by öga from

ÖGA »100600«

sustainable forests. The brand uses Santos and Indian Rosewood for the brown hues, Wenge for the dark brown tones, and Macassar Ebony for the black colors. The Östra collection’s unique diversity goes far beyond exotic woods, as öga implements two fundamentally different concepts: All Östra 1 models connect wooden temples to sleek titanium frames, while the

»100610«

semi-frameless styles of the Östra 2 concept feature frame fronts also composed of elegant wood components. On the backside of the front segments, rubber once again ensures comfortable wear in a model available in sizes M to XL, two of which have keyhole bridges with clean lines. Wearable, thin and comfortable, the Östra collection by öga will seduce all those who want wooden frames without sacrificing the comfort or design of their glasses.

»100590«

»100450«

203


EDITOR’S CHOICE

photo RAP HAEL S CHMIT Z Sunglasses deserve credit for pulling their weight far beyond protecting sensitive eyes from glaring sunlight. Sunglasses make strong stylistic statements and add an aura of authority and glory to the wearer. It’s all about the way we wear sunglasses and when and where we decide to wear them that makes the difference. Who wears their sunglasses at night? Some people can actually pull it off! Someone who has been known to set trends in sunglasses design is Alain Mikli, who recently partnered up with California label oliver peoples on a rather stylish specimen: The »Ayer« model is dedicated to individualists with a strong sense of confident style. Marked by large cutouts and extravagant lines, this one swims well outside the mainstream, letting the world know: “I know the difference between Le Corbusier and Courvoisier!”

ALAIN MIKLI X OLIVER PEOPLES

ALAIN MIKLI X OLIVER PEOPLES »A y e r«

204


OUT OF THE BOX

EINSTOFFEN FRO M

FAS HI O N

TH R O UG H TO

E Y E W E A R

WAT CH E S

»Tam aro«

photo RAP HAE L S C HM I T Z

»A e ron a ut«

Started in 2012 as a pure-play fashion brand, Swiss label einstoffen soon expanded its stylistic presence to the

eyewear segment. Through a series of critically acclaimed releases, the brand built an international reputation as a purveyor of stylish frames crafted from natural materials. But there is more: Since late 2017, einstoffen has also reached beyond fashion and eyewear and made serious forays into chronographs (not an unlikely choice for a Swiss company). The new time keepers also retain the natural 206


OUT OF THE BOX

»Mar more ra«

»Pol ar for sche r«

»A e sche r«

»L a Pr ince ss e«

materials of other einstoffen products, blended with Swiss precision clockwork tooling. And much like the label’s eyewear, the watches also offer a snug, anatomic fit that is the result of a coherent overall design DNA. Stylistically, einstoffen watches fall on the understated side of the segment as the perfect compliment to the eyewear range. If you are looking to cover the finer things in life with just one brand, now is the time to give einstoffen a look. 207


P OW DE R & HE AT »314 « p a nts & bl a z e r & OT HERS T O RIE S sho e s AS OS

ID

ENT IT Y 208

B Y S T E FA N K A P F E R p roduc tion & re touch H6 0 OFFICE s t yli n g J IL L KRAMER a t 2 1 A GE NCY h ai r & m ake - up CL AU DIA CRE UE LS mod els MARIE L OU W ES a t ME GAMODE LAGE NCY & PAS CAL a t DOPAMINMODEL S loca tion DÜ S S EL DORF


P OW DE R & HE AT »3 0 6 « shir t LEVIS 209


TOMS Jarrett

MASSADA » S t re e t c a r N a m e d D e s i re « t u r tle n e ck C O S

210


TOMS Memphis

MASSADA » B i rd i n S p a c e « shir t ASOS

bl a z e r JILL KRAME R

211


GÖTTI »Sahin« shi r t an d p a nts YV ES L U P IT U

belt V INET T I

GÖTTI »Dexon« shi r t J IL L KRAMER

p ants YV ES L U P IT U

212


COLIBRIS »Jona« shi r t an d p ants Y V E S L UP I T U

coa t C O S s ho e s &OT HE R S T O R I ES

213


BLACKFIN »Bonita Bay« s h i r t & jacke t A S O S

214


MODO » 45 0 9 « s hi r t A S O S

215


OLIVER PEOPLES »Keer y« s h i r t JILL K RA M E R

b el t VIN E T T I p a nt s M AJ E

216


KALEOS »Wo o d « p a nt s & bl a z e r MAJE

s hoe s &OTHE RSTORIE S

LEISURE SOCIETY Rudi, Tilman

217


LINDBERG »No. 089 / Boom 9906« s k i r t & e ar r i n g s A S O S

s hi r t &OT H ER S T O R I E S

218


E YE VAN 728 5 » 417« shi r t COS

220


ECO » Po « pullov e r COS

T HREE’S

A PART Y 221

B Y TA N J A T R E M E L s t yli n g KAI KIL IAN h ai r & m ake - up CARS T EN RI CHE RT re touch S OP HIE S CHWARZENB E RGE R mod els TANYA CHU DNOV S KAIA a t ICONIC, V IKOR HAIS CH & PAU L BERREM a t SE E DS loca tion BERL IN


MAKELLOS » K re u z b e r g « sca r f STY LIST’S OWN

222


MAKELLOS » P re n z l a u e r B e r g « s h i r t C O S , coa t M A R C O ’ P O L O

223


FLEYE

FLEYE

»Chapman«

»Bon«

-

-

shi r t L EV I S , ja c ke t S AMS OE & S AMS OE

pu llo v e r COS

224


225


LOOK » M a t e r i k a 70 5 0 0 « jacke t M A R C O ‘ P O L O

226


LOOK » M a t e r i k a 70 5 01« ja c ke t T IGE R OF SWE DE N

227


MODO »686« ja c ke t MARC O’ P OL O

228


MODO »Darsena« t u r tle n e c k MARC O’ P OL O, jacke t L EV IS 229


MARTIN & MARTIN »To n i « coa t DIMIT RI, be anie L EV IS

230


ØRGREEN

ØRGREEN

» In d i an Summ e r 810 «

» E e ro 850 «

-

-

t re nch dre ss L IE BE SKI N D

ja c ke t DRYKORN

d re ss AN T ON E LL I FIRE N ZE

blou s e 2 XM : S HRTS sk i r t S T EF F EN S CHRA UT

W HE R E

TO

GO?

Where can you get the latest edition of SPECTR magazine? Answer: Right in the comfort of your own home. Because our convenient SPECTR subscription service delivers the goods all over the globe. German or English – it’s all your choice. Once you fill out the form, every issue arrives at your doorstep, neatly packaged, around the world. So no matter where you live, you can get your regular dosage of SPECTR and build your collection of back issues that will be the envy of all your eyewear-loving friends.

photo S T EFAN DONGU S s t yli n g V ERA W IT T L AU a t NINA KL EIN h ai r & m ake - up L AU RA- ANN OL L AND a t 2 1 AGE NCY mod els NAS T IA B. a t MOS T WANT ED & EIL EE N HE Y DORN a t PMA

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BESUCHEN SIE UNS AUF DER OPTI 2018 HALLE C2 / STAND 202


Spectr 22 e issuu&readly 18 01 08  

MASUNAGA Designed By Kenzo Takada: A Japanese Design Alliance | HOFFMANN NATURAL EYEWEAR Turns 40: The Masters Of Horn | REIZ Philosophy Tal...

Spectr 22 e issuu&readly 18 01 08  

MASUNAGA Designed By Kenzo Takada: A Japanese Design Alliance | HOFFMANN NATURAL EYEWEAR Turns 40: The Masters Of Horn | REIZ Philosophy Tal...

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