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Peninsula

Warrior March 09, 2018 Vol. 8, No. 10

J O I N T

B A S E

L A N G L E Y - E U S T I S

P u b l i s h e d i n t h e i n t e r e s t o f p e r s o n n e l a t Jo i n t Ba s e L a n g l e y - E u s t i s

ARMY EDITION

w w w. p e n i n s u l a w a r r i o r. c o m

TOWNSEND TAKES COMMAND OF TRADOC EUSTIS HONORS WWI AND WWII VETERANS — Page 5

LACTATION PODS arrive at Langley hospital for nursing mothers — Page 6

For more online content, check out www.JBLE.af.mil

Air Force News

LANGLEY AIRMEN showcase raptor at heritage flight — Page 8

— Page 8


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JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS EDITORIAL STAFF Joint Base Langley-Eustis Commander Col. Sean Tyler

Peninsula Warrior - Army

By Staff Sgt. Teresa J. Cleveland

Joint Base Langley-Eustis Editor Areca Bell • areca.bell@us.af.mil Carlin Leslie • carlin.leslie@us.af.mil

JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS, VA.

The Peninsula Warrior is an authorized publication for all the members of the U.S. military. Contents of The Peninsula Warrior are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, Department of the Air Force or the Department of the Army. The Peninsula Warrior is printed every Friday by offset as a civilian enterprise newspaper for the Public Affairs Office, U.S. Air Force by Military Newspapers of Virginia at 150 W. Brambleton Ave. Norfolk, VA 23510 under exclusive written contract with the commander, Joint Base Langley-Eustis. MNV is a private firm in no way connected with the Department of the Air Force or Department of the Army. Printed circulation: 25,000. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. A confirmed violation or rejection of this policy of equal opportunity by any advertiser will result in refusal to print advertising from that source. All editorial content of The Peninsula Warrior is prepared, edited, provided and approved by the Public Affairs Office Joint Base Langley-Eustis. All photographs are Air Force or Army photographs unless otherwise stated. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts and supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense or MNV of the products or services advertised.

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March 9, 2018

Green Dot training focuses on prevention

Joint Base Langley-Eustis Public Affairs Officer Alton Dunham III • alton.dunham@us.af.mil

Per Air Force Instruction 35-101/Army Regulation 360-1, only stories and photos submitted by members of the Department of Defense community and DOD news services may be printed in The Peninsula Warrior. Any stories, photos or announcements must be submitted eight days prior to publication. Stories and photos should be submitted to the editor and/or assistant editor at 633abw. paedit@us.af.mil or Public Affairs Office, 601 Hines Cir., Fort Eustis, VA 23604. Announcements for the Community Section should be submitted to fteustismain@gmail.com. Announcements for the Outside the Gate Section should be submitted to fteustismain@gmail.com. For more information call 878-4920. Authors’ names may be withheld, but all letters must include the authors’ signatures and telephone number.

633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

In the past few years, Air Force Airmen and civilian employees have seen a major shift in annual required training on topics involving suicide and sexual assault prevention. Now in its third year, the Green Dot training program focuses more on prevention and bystander intervention of all types of violence, including interpersonal and self-inflicted violence. “It’s a simple concept that enhances our visual understanding of our actions,” said Pamela Adams, the Violence Prevention coordinator at Joint Base Langley-Eustis. “When you look at our training maps, red dots represent violent behaviors, while green dots represent positive behaviors where someone prevented violence or set a positive standard that violence is not acceptable behavior. The idea is to have more green dots than red at any given time.” In previous years, suicide and sexual assault prevention training have focused on individuals protecting themselves against violent behaviors. Trainers walked classes through scenarios based on sexual assault reports from the past, such as never leaving a drink unattended at a bar, said Regina Fremont-Gomez, a Green Dot trainer. “The biggest difference with this training is that we’re discussing small things we can all do every day to protect each other, not just ourselves,” said Fremont-Gomez. “We’re not expecting you to go out and stop a rape every day, but a lot of the violent behaviors can be prevented with small actions we can take in our everyday lives.” At JBLE, just a handful of trainers,

We are all one family

and these situations don’t just happen to one demographic. It’s an Air Force-wide program because it’s important for all employees to know that they all play a vital role in the prevention of violence.” Pamela Adams, Violence Prevention coordinator known as implementers, are responsible for training approximately 10,000 employees including active duty, National Guard, Air Force Reservists and civilian employees, so classes are held regularly throughout the year. “We are all one family and these situations don’t just happen to one demographic,” said Adams. “It’s an Air Force-wide program because it’s important for all employees to know

that they all play a vital role in the prevention of violence.” Throughout training sessions, attendees are taken through survey questions to gauge how many know someone who has been personally affected by interpersonal violence. They are then taken through examples from implementers demonstrating how they might respond in various situations. “This year the program works really hard to show people these are things that happen to us every day, and it forces people in our classes to really think about what they would do in a situation, in person or online through social media,” said FremontGomez. “We all know people going through stressful situations, which doesn’t necessarily mean those individuals are suicidal; they just may be at a higher risk for it and it’s important for us to step in and check on them.” There are many ways for people on the installation to get involved in these programs on base or in their local communities, said Adams. Prevention starts with the smallest “green dot” behaviors to outnumber and eventually eliminate “red dots” on the map, she said. “We have flyers and posters you can display in your work center, your kids’ schools or your church,” said Adams. “Or, if you want to take a bigger role with the program, we are always looking for passionate trainers to help facilitate the program and spread the word of empowerment and prevention.” For more information on becoming a Green Dot implementer, contact Adams at (757) 764-5433.

We want to hear from you. Contact us at 633abw.paedit@us.af.mil, or call 878-4920 or 764-5701.


March 9, 2018

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AF officials announce creation of Info Ops tech school By Secretary of the Air Force Public Affairs WASHINGTON (AFNS)

Air Force officials have announced the creation of a new Information Operations technical training school, which is expected to open in fiscal year 2019. The standup of a dedicated training school at Hurlburt Field, Florida, follows the Air Force’s creation of the Information Operations career field and Air Force specialty code in late 2016. “Information Operations is not new to the Air Force,” said Col. Ziggy Schoepf, 14F career field manager. “However, this is the first time that the Air Force

has codified this capability in a dedicated officer career field. With the creation of the career field and a dedicated schoolhouse, the Air Force is acknowledging the importance of Information Operations to the future of warfare.” Prior to the creation of the 14F Information Operations AFSC, Airmen from various AFSCs served in IO positions as career broadening experiences for a limited period. Because these Airmen returned to their core AFSC following their service in IO positions, the Air Force was limited in its ability to sustain institutional knowledge and practice of IO tactics, techniques and

procedures. Creation of the 14F AFSC enabled the service to standardize education and training for Airmen, building a foundation to cultivate IO expertise and improve a commander’s ability to operate in more pervasive and connected information and operational environments. The 14F Initial Skills Course will consolidate and integrate content from multiple IO-related training courses, such as IO intelligence integration, military deception, operational security and psychological operations. The 14-15 week-long courses will begin late fiscal 2019. Until the schoolhouse is fully op-

erational, IO students receive training through a variety of Air Force and joint courses that cover the required subjects. “Although our Airmen currently receive training on the same subject matters, standing up the 14F AFSC allowed us to create a continuum of learning to develop expertise and experience within the Air Force,” said Schoepf. “The course will provide students with cohesive training rooted in social science. Graduates will have the skills to build strategies and plans that sustain or change perceptions and attitudes driving the behavior and decision making of relevant actors.”

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„ The 14F Initial

Skills Course will consolidate and integrate content from multiple IO-related training courses, such as IO intelligence integration, military deception, operational security and psychological operations.


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March 9, 2018

Townsend takes command of TRADOC By Amy L. Robinson

U.S. ARMY TRAINING AND DOCTRINE COMMAND PUBLIC AFFAIRS FORT EUSTIS, VA.

Gen. Stephen J. Townsend assumed command of U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command from Gen. David G. Perkins during a ceremony on Fort Eustis, Virginia, March 2. Army Chief of Staff Gen. Mark A. Milley, who hosted the ceremony, said it was a great but bittersweet day as the command bid farewell to Perkins and welcomed Townsend as TRADOC’s 16th commanding general. However, the day was not about either of the generals, Milley continued, explaining that the focus was on celebrating the accomplishments of the command and how TRADOC continues to shape the Army. “This day is not so much about Dave Perkins or Steve Townsend,” Milley said. “This day is really about the tremendous and great work that Training and Doctrine Command does.” The 39th chief of staff of the Army said that the United States Army is, without question, the most powerful Army on the face of the earth, and it’s in good hands not only because of the work of thousands of people over many years, but also directly because of the work of TRADOC since 1973. “The people and the Soldiers – the officers and all of the civilians who work in TRADOC – the Army would not be what it is without your legacy … There’s not a single Soldier who does not come in – or go out – of the Army without touching Training and Doctrine Command.” Milley also discussed the command’s history and the fact that no other command in the Army has a portfolio as wide, as complex or as deep as TRADOC. “Everyone in this room is a product of what this command did in the 1970s and

U.S. Army photo by Christoper Thompson

U.S. Army Chief of Staff Gen. Mark A. Milley passes the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command colors to Gen. Stephen J. Townsend during the change of command ceremony at Fort Eustis, Virginia, March 2, 2018. Townsend assumed command from Gen. David G.Perkins, who is retiring 9 March from the Army after 38 years of service.

‘80s to reform the United States Army,” ber is 75 percent of the entire Marine Milley said. “They didn’t do it alone – Corps.” they did it in conjunction with Army Milley then thanked Perkins and his Materiel Command and Forces Com- family for their contributions to the mand and Army leadership. But it was Army and the nation. The former TRAthis command that drove that reform, DOC commander will retire in ceremoit was this command that increased ny March 9 in Washington, D.C. the readiness In welcomand changed us ing TRADOC’s from that postincoming comTRADOC recruits and accesses Vietnam Army manding geninto the Army 120,000 Soldiers every year. Think about eral, Milley that you see to- that. That number is larger than the said the comday.” mand is very Milley then British, Canadian and Australian armies lucky to have shifted to Per- combined. That number is 75 percent of Townsend, a kins’ leadership man of tremenof TRADOC the entire Marine Corps.” dous talent and during the past great character. four years, and “This is a guy Gen. Mark A. Milley, Army Chief of Staff how he has who has incredhelped shaped ible compehow the Army will fight and win in the tence, he’s got tremendous intellect, and future through the Multi-Domain Battle he’s got extraordinary experience,” Milconcept. But TRADOC’s greatest contri- ley said. “I have no doubt that he is gobution to the Army, Milley said, is the ing to take TRADOC to the next level.” training of its Soldiers. Commissioned into the infantry “TRADOC recruits and accesses branch from North Georgia College in 120,000 Soldiers every year,” Milley 1982, Townsend has led and commandsaid. “Think about that. That number ed Soldiers at every echelon, from plais larger than the British, Canadian and toon to corps and combined joint task Australian armies combined. That num- force. His most recent assignment was

commanding XVIII Airborne Corps, the U.S. Army’s rapid deployment contingency corps and Fort Bragg, North Carolina. From August 2016 to September 2017, he commanded Combined Joint Task Force – Operation Inherent Resolve in Iraq and Syria, during which time the U.S.-led coalition assisted the Iraqis in defeating the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria in their strongholds of Mosul and Tal Afar. “What a great Army day,” Townsend said as he took the podium for his first remarks as TRADOC’s commanding general. “To the leaders and Soldiers of TRADOC – Melissa and I are excited to join your ranks, and thank you for the warm welcome and superb transition I’ve had so far,” he said. “We look forward to serving with you and accomplishing TRADOC’s important mission. “To the leaders and Soldiers of the United States Army – TRADOC is the Army’s architect, builder and teacher. I promise you that you can count on us to continue to do our part to ensure the U.S. Army remains the premier, fullspectrum land force in the world – both now, and in the future. “This we’ll defend – victory starts here.”


March 9, 2018

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Eustis honors WWI and WWII veterans with mobile exhibit By Airman 1st Class Monica Roybal

633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS, VA.

To honor the legacy and sacrifice of World War I and World War II veterans, the U.S. Army Transportation Museum has partnered with The Virginia WWI and WWII Commemoration Commission to display the Profiles of Honor Mobile tour exhibit at the museum on Fort Eustis, scheduled for March 9 – 10, 2018, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. “One of our biggest hopes in designing the exhibit is that people will walk away with a sense of remembrance and pride,” said Rusty Nix, Virginia WWI and WWII Commemoration Commission communications manager. “We also hope to show the military community

and today’s service members that in honoring our past veterans, their own service and sacrifices won’t be forgotten either.” The tour is a mobile museum that travels around the state promoting Virginia’s impact during both wars by giving visitors a chance to view artifacts, full-scale replicas of battleship bridges and tanks, and hear the stories of the men and women who served. This will be the first time the U.S. Army Transportation Museum will host a mobile tour exhibit. Hosting the exhibit coincides with Fort Eustis’ centennial, and will give community members a new perspective on Fort Eustis’ influence, said Marc Sammis, museum curator. “Most people don’t realize exactly how much of » See VETERANS | 12

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March 9, 2018

Lactation pods arrive at Langley hospital for nursing mothers

The Mamava lactation pods are spacious, lockable, and can also fit strollers, wheelchairs, walkers, canes and other equipment. They also include power outlets, USB plugs, and a pull-out table. Photos by Airman 1st Class Alexandra Singer

By Airman 1st Class Alexandra Singer 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS, VA.

Finding a place to breastfeed or pump for mothers can be almost impossible on-the-go or at work. Restrooms and cars can be unsanitary and aren’t as private as a mother might want, while office spaces can be uncomfortable and aren’t efficient. The Langley Air Force Base Hospital received new Mamava lactation pods in early February for the convenient use for staff as well as patients. The portable pods are a private space that mothers can use to breastfeed or pump while at the hospital. The need for the pods was first noticed in 2016, so the search for funding began. “This has been a work in progress,” said U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Chad Dellamonica, 663rd Medical Group medical equipment management office technician. “It started with a Department of Defense policy requiring federal buildings, including Military Treatment Facilities, to provide private space for nursing mothers. We went to base contracting, they found that the pods met all our requirements as far as portability, size requirements and they executed the contract for it.” According to Jeffrey Strubhar, Langley hospital facility manager, the suites are a great solution for nursing mothers because they are spacious, lockable, and can also fit strollers, wheelchairs, walkers, canes and any other equipment. They also include power outlets, USB plugs, and a pull-out table. Mothers have given great feedback

in the few short weeks since the pods opened. “The very first day they were there, not just the staff mothers, but the patients came up and made many comments about them,” said Strubhar. “The one in pediatrics was used in the first five minutes of the morning. The mothers are just ecstatic about it.” As a previous breastfeeding mother, Lawanna Cox, 633rd MDG flight commander of maternal child flight, was joyous over the new pods. “We’d like to all go to a breastfeedingfriendly facility, so we encourage breast is best,” said Cox. “There’s multiple reasons to breastfeed; for health reasons, it helps with immunities, it’s cheap and it also improves the bonding experience as well for moms who are able to breastfeed.” Strubhar said the pods are a great tool to promote breastfeeding. The hospital currently has two pods. One is located in the emergency department waiting area and another is in the pediatrics clinic check-in area, for use by the staff and patients waiting to be seen. The Langley hospital is currently working on getting two more pods to put in different locations around the hospital. This will allow more comfortable, private space for nursing mothers at Langley. Although Fort Eustis does not have

The lactation room at the Fort Eustis McDonald Army Health Center, Virginia, features a sink for rinsing and cleaning equipment as well as a refrigerator for mothers to store milk during the business day. The room is located next to the waiting room in pediatrics.

the Mamava pods, they do have accommodations for nursing mothers. “The lactation room has a glider for comfort, sink for rinsing and cleaning equipment as well as a refrigerator for mothers to store milk during the business day,” said Kimberly Houdashelt, McDonald Army Health center Pediatric Chief Nurse Officer in Charge. “We have a TV in the room that displays our

Q-Flow numbers allowing parents to remain informed when they are next in line for immunizations or to be seen by their primary care provider.” The MAHC lactation room is located next to the waiting room in pediatrics. JBLE is striving to make on-the-go mothers have a more convenient experience, and the lactation pods are a huge step in achieving that.


March 9, 2018

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Traffic Safety Update By Airman 1st Class Tristan Biese

633 AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS, VA.

U.S. Air Force Airmen assigned to the 633rd Civil Engineer Squadron finished installing new signs on the intersection of Hotel and Juliet taxiways and Lee Road at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, Feb. 23, 2018. “Due to an increase of people not stopping at the signs, it was brought to our attention that the old signs may not have been informative enough,” said Master Sgt. Jennifer Herr, 1st Operations Support Squadron deputy airfield manager.

In order to keep individuals safe, the new signs now indicate more clearly where to stop when an aircraft is crossing the road from either the runway or the NASA hangars. “Just because you haven’t seen an aircraft cross by, that doesn’t mean it won’t happen,” said 1st Lt. Kelsey Applegate, 1st OSS airfield operations officer. “Don’t get too familiar with what you usually see, just be ready to see an aircraft at any time. Every time you pass by there, you should look left and right, and check out the signs.” When driving on that road, it is important to treat those intersections just like any other

U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Tristan Biese

On Feb. 23, 2018, the 633rd Civil Engineer Squadron installed new signs that now indicate more clearly where to stop when an aircraft is crossing the road from either the runway or the NASA hangars at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia. The Signs are located on the taxiways Hotel and Juliet where they intersect Lee Road.

intersections on or off base. Individuals should slow down and make sure the lights are not red before continuing.

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Photos by Tech. Sgt. Natasha Stannard

Peninsula Warrior - Army

U.S. Air Force Maj. Paul “Loco” Lopez, Air Combat Command F-22 Raptor Demonstation Team, flies the F-22 Raptor, demonstrating its combat capabilities during the U.S. Air Force Heritage Flight Training Course at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona, March 4, 2018. The F-22 Raptor demonstration team is based out of Joint Base Langley Eustis’ 1st Fighter Wing in Virginia.

Langley Airmen showcase Raptor at Heritage Flight

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(1) An Air Combat Command F-22 Raptor Demonstation Team crew chief directs parking an F-22 Raptor post-flight at the Heritage Flight Training Course. (2) U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Darshele Green, Air Combat Command Raptor Demostration Team avionics technician, climbs inside an F-22 Raptor’s engine intake post-flight. (3) U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Darshele Green, Air Combat Command F-22Raptor Demostration Team avionics technician, visits with U.S. Air Force Heritage Flight Training Course spectators. (4) U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Nicholas Banducci, Air Combat Command F-22 Raptor Demonstration Team low observable aircraft structures technician, checks the low observable parts of an F-22 Raptor. (5) U.S. Air Force crew chiefs with the Air Combat Command F-22 Raptor Demonstration Team salute Maj. Paul “Loco” Lopez, ACC F-22 Raptor Demonstration Team commander, before taking off. (6) U.S. Air Force Maj. Paul “Loco” Lopez, Air Combat Command F-22 Raptor Demonstation Team, flies the F-22 Raptor, demonstrating its combat capabilities. (7) Deane Mitchell, World War II veteran and pilot, speaks with members of the Air Combat Command F-22 Raptor Demonstration Team. (8) U.S. Air Force Maj. Paul “Loco” Lopez, Air Combat Command F-22 Raptor Demonstration Team commander, smiles at one of his crew chiefs.

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March 9, 2018

U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Tristan Biese

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Michael Bray 633rd Medical Operations Squadron emergency medical technician, poses in front of the Langley Hospital at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Feb. 22, 2018. Emergency medical services work side-by-side with the 633rd Civil Engineer Squadron fire department and the 633rd Security Forces Squadron personnel as first responders.

EMS what is your profession! … Saving Lives! By Airman 1st Class Anthony Nin Leclerec 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS, VA.

It’s a late-night drive on a slick-wet road, when suddenly a car runs a red light. The brakes lock and tires squeal across the blacktop — the world has turned upside down. When that phone call comes in, all the training hours kick into gear. “When I get a phone call, that’s someone’s terrible day,” said U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Christian Roebbelen, 633rd Medical Operations Squadron paramedic. “Theoretically when people are here [at the Langley emer-

U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Anthony Nin Leclerec

An emergency response bag is displayed at the Langley Hospital at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Feb. 22, 2018. Emergency medical services respond to all 911 calls on base to help patients while on scene and transport them to the hospital if needed.

gency room] they’re having the worst day of their life.” Despite the fact that the emergency medical services team works inside the hospital helping with the patient care, their primary duty section lies just out the emergency room doors with the ambulances.

It’s in the back of these ambulances that lives are saved by their training and expertise. Paramedics are certified in advanced cardiac life support, pediatric advanced life support, basic life support and national registry certification. They are also the ones authorized to provide anesthetics to patients while on scene and in certain cases can call doctors at the 633rd Medical Group for guidance. Both EMTs and paramedics are trained in blood loss control, fracture management, advanced airway management techniques and burn management. In the case of spinal injury, they are trained in the immobilization and transport of patients. “When we arrive on scene, the patient is our primary focus,” said U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Michael Bray, 633rd MDOS emergency medical technician. “Every time we go out, we make sure to give good patient care continuously.” According to Roebellen, whether in the emergency department or the family health clinic, the 633rd MDG is always looking to improve patients’ experience. “Our goal is to make someone’s worst day a little bit better, even if we can’t make them smile” said Roebellen. “Our purpose is to save lives.”


March 9, 2018

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Purple Heart awarded to World War II veteran 74 years later By Kevin Larson ARMY.MIL

FORT STEWART, GA.

On April 11, 1944, the “Kansas City Kitty”, a B-24 Liberator bomber assigned to the 566th Bombardment Squadron of the 8th Army Air Force out of Hethel, England, was shot down by enemy aircraft over Germany during World War II. On February 23, nearly 74 years later, Edward H. Mims was presented the Purple Heart Medal for the wounds he received in the crashing bomber. He was 20 years old that fateful day; he’s now 83 and living in The Villages — a retirement community roughly an hour northwest of Orlando — with his wife, Sandi. “I’m thankful that I’m here,” Mims said. “It was unbelievable that I was spared.” Mims was the top turret gunner on the bomber, serving alongside 10 men. Seven men, including Mims, bailed out of the aircraft after it was hit by enemy fighter fire. One man’s parachute did not open. Mims and the surviving five men were captured and held as prisoners of war in Stalag 17B in Austria. He spent 390 days in the camp, where 4,000 others were held. Mims was liberated by U.S. forces on May 3, 1945, after enduring a westward 300mile march after the stalag was evacuated in the face of oncom-

ing Soviet forces encroaching from the east. Being a POW “wasn’t a picnic,” Mims said. “It was something I didn’t want to go through,” he said. “But most of us managed.” Gene Parent, a military veteran and resident of The Villages, and Mrs. Mims were instrumental in securing Mims’ Purple Heart. “We had to follow procedures to make a request to change military documents to include all military medals not yet awarded to him for World War II action in Europe,” said Parent during the Purple Heart Medal ceremony held in the Villages’ Eisenhower Recreation Center. “After filling out all the paperwork…(he was) denied the Purple Heart because the review board said they could not be sure his injures were sustained by enemy action. You see, his military records were destroyed in the St. Louis fire back in 1973.” It took seven years of hard work and social media sleuthing to ensure Mims was awarded the medal he deserved. “There was enough eye witness documentation to show that Sgt. Mims received injuries from the fire that went up through his top turret position and burned his face, head, and hands,” Parent said. It also took the support of the Trump administration, Mrs. Mims said.

U.S. Army photo by Kevin Larson

Staff Sgt. Edward Mims, 83, smiles and holds his Purple Heart Medal as well-wishers thank him for his service following a ceremony in his honor at the The Villages, a retirement community in Florida, Feb. 23. Mims was awarded the medal nearly 74 years after being wounded in World War II while serving as a top turret gunner on a B-24 Liberator bomber. Fort Stewart garrison command team Col. Jason Wolter and Command Sgt. Maj. Marty Conroy present the veteran his medal.

“I am overwhelmed and have abundant joy and appreciation that my husband can be honored the way he should be honored,” she said. Fort Stewart-Hunter Army Airfield garrison command team Col. Jason Wolter and Command Sgt. Maj. Marty Conroy presented the Purple Heart to Mims in the community’s Eisenhower Recreation Center. It was a fitting location for the ceremony, with its museum vibe, showcasing artifacts from throughout the nation’s military history. “This is long overdue,” Col. Wolter said. “Thank you for your service and sacrifice.” Although long overdue, Mrs. Mims said her husband still endures the unseen wounds the war left behind. “He has post-traumatic stress disorder,” she said. “He has nightmares, continual nightmares, where he is in the plane. And he’ll wake me and he says ‘would you please see if we’re

on land or in the sky.’ It’s an everlasting effect. For so long, he kept it in, didn’t want to share it with his family. They kept on saying ‘Ed, our children need to know what you and others have done for our county. Talk about it.’ And he began to talk about.” Mims started to open up about his service about eight years ago, roughly the same time Mrs. Mims bought tickets for him and her to fly in a restored B-24 on Father’s Day. Mims eyes’ lit up and he chuckled as Mrs. Mims described the experience. “”It was so barbaric and so cold and smelled like gasoline,” Mrs. Mims said. Mims said he was amazed people made an effort to restore a B-24. “I was just surprised,” he said. “I appreciated it.” As part of the ceremony, Parent asked for a moment of silence to honor the crew of Mims’ Liberator.

THE MIMS’ LIBERATOR CREW MEMBERS: „ Pilot, 1st Lt. Jack Wyatt, killed in action „ Co-pilot, 2nd Lt. David Stiner, prisoner of war „ Navigator, 2nd Lt. Richard Gustafson, killed in action „ Bombardier, 2nd Lt. George Sherry, killed in action „ Nose turret gunner, Staff Sgt. Robert Tackett, killed in action „ Radio operator, Staff Sgt. Kenneth Hebert, killed in action „ Ball turret gunner, Staff Sgt. Donald Williquette, prisoner of war „ Waist gunner, Staff Sgt. Ralph Wetzel, prisoner of war „ Waist gunner, Staff Sgt. Albert Rieser, prisoner of war „ Tail gunner, Staff Sgt. James Bradley, prisoner of war


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March 9, 2018

| Museum to honor legacy of WWI and WWII veterans VETERANS

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U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Monica Roybal

The U.S. Army Transportation Museum is scheduled to host the Virginia WWI and WWII Profiles of Honor Mobile Tour at Fort Eustis, Virginia, March 9 — 10, 2018.

an important role Fort Eustis played in both wars,” said Sammis. “The installation trained coast artillery, trench mortars and balloons during WWI and then became an anti-aircraft training center during WWII. I think the mobile exhibit is an interesting concept that uses a clever way to bring history to people.”

Visitors are also welcome to bring personal photos, documents or letters from the wars to be digitally preserved. The items will then be displayed on the exhibit’s website, inside the exhibit and permanently archived in the state’s records at the Library of Virginia. “It is a wonderful way to preserve your own family’s history by having it archived and have your story told

wherever we travel,” said Nix. “We encourage visitors to bring their items to scan and utilize this unique opportunity.” Joint Base Langley-Eustis and local community members are invited to take advantage of this limited time opportunity. Those without a military identification card must get a pass from the visitor’s center outside Fort Eustis’ main gate. For more information on the mobile tour visit Caution-www. VirginiaW WIandW WII.org/ tour.

Alaska Troops Hold Annual Winter Games By Army Sgt. 1st Class Joel Gibson U.S. ARMY ALASKA

These events are an excellent way to train for that and to show how well your squad or your team is proficient at skiing, setting up 10-man tents and shooting in Arctic conditions under stress.” Army 1st Lt. Christopher Rainsberger, the Arctic Warrior Games officer in charge

FORT WAINWRIGHT, ALASKA

As temperatures plummeted into the negative ’20s here, 17 teams of 10 soldiers each from across U.S. Army Alaska and the Canadian Army competed in a series of cold weather and mountainous warrior tasks Feb. 27-March 2. Team 15 from 5th Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment, 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, prevailed, scoring the highest point total. The annual U.S. Army Alaska Winter Games were held this year at the Birch Hill Ski and Snowboard Area here. Events included a biathlon, a written test, ahkio — runnerless sledge towing — shooting on snowshoes, casualty evacuation and treatment, tent setup, downhill skiing, skijoring — which is skiing while pulled, in this case by a vehicle, but a horse or dog team can also be used — and land navigation. “It’s important because it helps individuals training on these specific events, that they can then take back to their units,” said Army 1st Lt. Michael McKeon, the winning team’s leader and a platoon leader with 5th Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment. “Like for us, we’re the ski platoon for our troop, and we didn’t get really good at it until we trained for this competition,” he said. “Now, we’re excellent at skiing and can take that back to our unit.” Building Arctic Skills The games, as with any other military com-

U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class Joel Gibson

Soldiers with 1st Battalion, 5th Infantry Regiment, 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, U.S. Army Alaska participate in the Ahkio sled pull and stress shoot. After each 200-meter lap, the team fired at targets at a nearby small arms range and were graded for accuracy.

petition, serves a variety of purposes. “This process started three-and-a-half to four months ago,” said Army 1st Lt. Christopher Rainsberger, the Arctic Warrior Games officer in charge and a platoon leader with Headquarters and Headquarters Troop, 5th Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment. “Events like this are extremely important for [U.S. Army Alaska] because one of the main things that the units up here focus on is Arctic mobility and Arctic skills,” Rainsberger said.

“These events are an excellent way to train for that and to show how well your squad or your team is proficient at skiing, setting up 10-man tents and shooting in Arctic conditions under stress.” “All the effort and the heart the teams put into practicing really shows the teams are competing,” he added. “The teams practice weeks and months before the event, and there’s a lot of camaraderie with those teams.”


JBLECommunity

March 9, 2018

King Street and Armistead Gates under construction

The 633rd Civil Engineer Squadron will renovate the guard houses at the King Street and Armistead Gates. The construction will be phased to minimize traffic impact. The first phase of construction will affect two of the four inbound lanes and one of the two outbound lanes at the Armistead gate. This phase will also affect one inbound and one outbound lane of the King Street gate. Phase one of construction will last up to 60 days and begin on Nov. 27, 2017, at 9 a.m. Phase two of construction will last up to 57 days and is expected to begin Jan. 26, 2018, at 9 a.m. Phase two will affect the remaining two inbound lanes and one outbound lane at the Armistead gate, and the remaining inbound and outbound lane at the King Street gate. For more information, call 764-7766.

JBLE traffic update

The overhead traffic light at Lee Rd and Sweeney Blvd heading outbound is still out and has been temporarily replaced with a traffic light to the right side of the intersection. JBLE motorists should remain aware of the temporary placement of the traffic light, expected to be in place in approximately 12-14 weeks.

Weekly Live Fire Schedule

Ranges, training areas, and associated facilities are Off Limits to personnel not engaged in scheduled firing, operations, or inspections/recons unless clearance is obtained in person from Range Control Fire Desk (Bldg. 2432 Mulberry Island Road) or a designated Range Control Technician. All personnel are required to check in and out with range control before going into or departing any Range or Training area. Range schedule until March 16: RANGE BTRAC, R1, R2 NO LIVE FIRE SCHEDULED NO LIVE FIRE SCHEDULED BTRAC, R1, R2, R3, R5 BTRAC, R1, R5 BTRAC, R1, R2, R5 BTRAC, R1, R2,R3, R5 BTRAC, R1, MAINTENANCE R2, R3, R5

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Submit Eustis Community announcements to pw@militarynews.com

May 18-20, 2018

DATE March 9 March 10 March 11 March 12 March 13 March 14 March 15 March 16

TIME 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. ----------------------------7 a.m. to 8 p.m. 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. 7a.m. to 8 p.m.

not get an appointment with their provider right away and do not want to wait at the ER can check in at the Family Health front desk to be seen by a clinical pharmacist on a walk-in basis, Monday through Friday from 8 to 10 a.m. and 1 to 3 p.m. Service is available to all active duty and Department of Defense beneficiaries 18 to 70 years of age who are enrolled to Langley Hospital. Patients who are on flying status or Personal Reliability Program, are immunocompromised or have symptoms over 10 days cannot be seen at the Cough and Cold clinic. For more information, contact Tech. Sgt. Ashely Dixson at 764-8995.

formation please contact James Dolan at james.d.dolan. civ@mail.mil or 757-878-4152.

Langley Tax Center 2018

The Langley Tax Center is open until Apr. 13, 2018, Monday-Thursday from 8a.m. to 12 p.m., at the Education Center, Bldg. 1027 Rm. 137 (450 Weyland Rd. Langley AFB, VA) If you are deploying, this is an opportunity to make an appointment and file your 2017 tax returns before your deployment. Please call the Langley Tax Center at 757-367-9195 to 2018 Spring Turkey Season make an appointment. The 733rd Civil Engineer Division natural resources Before your appointment please gather all necessary staff at Fort Eustis will host the 2018 Spring Turkey tax documents including last year’s tax return. Season. Hunting opportunities will be based on a lottery system. Lottery tickets cost $25 with a one lot- Fort Eustis Tax Assistance Center Open tery ticket per person limit and are non-refundable, but The Fort Eustis Tax Assistance Center will operate from transferrable. (Checks or money order only) Jan. 29 to April 20, 2018, at Building 2733 on Madison The lottery tickets will be on sale Monday through Avenue. Tax filing preparation, electronic filing capability, Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Mar. 5-30, 2018, at bldg. and general tax advice will be available to eligible clients. 1407 or 1409. The lottery drawing occurs Apr. 2, 2018, For more information, contact the Fort Eustis legal office and winners will be notified between Apr. 2-3, 2018; at 757-878-2478/2343. winning hunters will choose their area and dates to hunt at that time. Chapel Annex under renovation Registration of firearms with 733rd Security Forces From January to June 2018, the Langley Chapel AnSquadron is mandatory prior to entry onto the instal- nex Auditorium, kitchen and classroom four will undergo lation. renovation and are unavailable for the duration. For more For more information please contact James Dolan at information, contact the Chapel at 764-7847. james.d.dolan.civ@mail.mil or 757-878-4152.

Durand Entry Control Facility (NASA gate) U.S. Army Officer Candidate School Alumni changes Association 2018 reunion Security Forces personnel will no longer man the DuThe U.S. Army Officer Candidate School Alumni Association will host a reunion from March 25-29, 2018, at the Columbus Marriott Hotel, 800 Front Avenue, Columbus, Ga. 31901. The association represents all Army officers commissioned through any Officer Candidate School, regardless of previous locations or branch affiliation. The event will include a Hall of Fame induction ceremony, reception, and formal dinner, including the presentation of the Patterson Award. There will also be demonstrations and briefings at Fort Benning highlighting developments related to the OCS program and OCS candidate interactions. Registration information and the reunion itinerary to follow. For more information, visit www.ocsalumni.org or call Nancy Ionoff at (813) 917-4309.

2018 Late Urban Archery Deer Season

The Fort Eustis Late Urban Archery Deer season will run Jan. 29, 2018 through Mar. 24, 2018 and will be operated from building 1409. Participants must have purchased a 2017 Fort Eustis Hunting Permit prior to Jan. 6, 2018, and passed the Fort Eustis Recreational Hunting Program Archery Qualification within two years, or pass a qualification test administered by the 733rd CED Pharmacist Cough and Cold Clinic Natural Resource Staff. Participants must also purchase The Langley Hospital will provide a Pharmacist Cough a 2018 Late Urban Archery Deer Hunting Permit at a cost and Cold Clinic starting Feb. 12, 2018. Patients who canof $20, and may do so the day of any hunt. For more in-

rand Entry Control Facility (NASA Gate). Personnel will still have their credentials checked by guards at the main NASA gate, however, their credentials will not be checked again at the Durand Entry Control Facility. NASA guards will still man their side of the Durand Entry Control Facility and will only allow CAC holders (no dependent ID cards) to enter NASA property. Additionally, no commercial vehicles are allowed access to NASA property. The Durand Entry Control Facility hours are from 6 to 9 a.m. and 3 to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Worship hours for Catholic and Protestant services Bethel Chapel: • Saturday Catholic Reconciliation at 3:30 p.m. • Saturday Catholic Mass at 5 p.m. • Sunday Protestant Community Service at 9 a.m. • Sunday Catholic Mass at 11 a.m. Langley Main Chapel: • Sunday Catholic Mass at 9 a.m. • Sunday Protestant Gospel Service at 11 a.m. • Catholic Daily Mass (Mon-Thurs) at 12 p.m. For more information call 764-7847

» See JBLE | 14


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Manpower shortage impacts 633rd Medical Group services

The 633rd Medical Group strives to provide Trusted Care to all they serve, while supporting many deployed and home-station missions. Due to contract vacancies and multiple provider deployments/permanent changes of station during the coming months, it will take longer to receive appointments and have messages returned. In light of these staffing concerns, TRICARE will temporarily enroll only Active Duty service members and their family members. This action is being taken to ensure patients receive the care they deserve within the established standards. There will be no enrollment changes or action taken to any patients who are already enrolled at the 633rd Medical Group, regardless of category. For questions regarding TRICARE benefits, or for enrollment assistance to locate the best medical facility to meet healthcare needs, contact the TRICARE Information line at 1-800-TRICARE or 1-800-874-2273.

Peninsula Warrior - Army

March 9, 2018

Submit Eustis Community announcements to pw@militarynews.com served for Airmen over 180 days from separation who are interested in separating from Active Duty early. For more information, call 751-4825 or 846-7532.

Fort Eustis’ Groninger Library encourages reading

Fort Eustis’ Groninger Library has implemented an ongoing Reading Program entitled “1000 Books Before Kindergarten” and “1000 Books from 1st -5th grades.” For every 100 books read, children can take their reading log to the library to receive a prize. After reading 1000 books, children will receive a free t-shirt. For more information, contact the library at 878-5017 or visit www.groningerlibrary.com.

Army Emergency Relief available online

Soldiers, military retirees and family members can now request financial assistance through Army Emergency Relief’s redesigned website at https://www.aerhq.org. Applications can be submitted 24 hours a day via desktop, laptop, tablet or smartphone. The redesigned site allows for easier navigation and authorized JBLE Family Child Care Program The Joint Base Langley-Eustis Family Child Care Pro- patrons can access their accounts, apply for scholargram is looking for child care providers interested in a ships, donate and utilize the new loan calculator. For professional, portable career that will allow them to stay more information, call at 878-5570. at home and run a home-based business. The program is available for children ages two weeks to 12 years old. Company Grade Officer Council welcomes Child care providers must be at least 18 years old, be members able to read and speak English, be in good health, and The Company Grade Officer Council will meet at willing to undergo a background check. The FCC will pro- 4:45 p.m., at the Bayview Commonwealth Center evvide training and materials to get your business started. ery third Thursday of the month and is open to all ComFor more information, call Fort Eustis at 878-5584/5726 pany Grade Officers. The council has an opening for a or Langley Air Force Base 764-3585/2835. U.S. Army officer on the council board. Join the council for professional development, social events and fun. For more information, call 764-9954. Life lessons over lunch workplace study Join the new Life Lessons over Lunch the first and third Thursdays of the month from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 Family Meal Night p.m., in the 633rd Mission Support Group Conference The Langley Base Chapel will host a Family Meal Room. The Langley Chapel offers this marketplace ini- Night every Wednesday from 5 to 6:30 p.m., at Bethel tiative where participants meet on a regular basis to Chapel. The event will include free food and fellowship. view a DVD message over lunch, providing a unique op- For more information, contact the Chapel at 764-7847. portunity for participants to enter an environment in the workplace where they can consider relevant insights Langley 5/6 club hosts monthly meetings around personal and professional challenges. The prinThe Langley 5/6 club will meet at 11:30 a.m., at ciples are presented from a biblical perspective but are the Bayview Commonwealth Center every second non-denominational and open to all active-duty service Wednesday of every month. A guest speaker will visit members and lunch provided is free. For more informa- the club every month to discuss various topics. Along tion, contact the Langley Chapel at 633abw.hc@us.af. with being a networking tool, the group meets to mil. brainstorm fundraising opportunities and membership drives. For more information, call 764-0507.

Air Force Reserve hosts Palace Front-Palace Chase informational sessions Air Force Reserve Technician recruiting The Air Force Reserve will host Palace Front-Palace Chase informational sessions the 2nd and 4th Wednesday of every month at 10 a.m., in the 633rd Force Support Squadron auditorium, building 15 in Wing B, room 203. Palace Front is available to Airmen within 180 days of their projected separation date. Palace Chase is re-

If you are looking to join the Air Force Reserve or to fill a General Schedule job, both can be done as an Air Reserve Technician. For information, contact Tech. Sgt. Erin Debourg, regional ART recruiter, at erin.debourg@ us.af.mil or (910) 237-8848.

Wylie Theater hosts Chapel Next Sunday services Join Chapel Next at the Wylie Theater from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., on Sundays for contemporary Christian worship. For more information, call 878-2257.

Old Point Comfort Toastmasters Club

Do you want to improve your public speaking and communication skills? The Old Point Comfort Toastmasters Club meets at 11:40 a.m., the first and third Wednesday of each month, at 650 Monroe Ave. Visitors are always welcome. For more information, visit www.district66.org or call 878-3124 or 878-2204. Transportation

operation

Museum change to hours of

The United States Army Transportation Museum on Fort Eustis hours of operation has changed. The previous hours of Tuesday through Sunday from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., has changed to Tuesday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Trespass Notice

The Langley small arms firing range, adjacent area and the bullet impact area to the rear of the range are off-limits to all personnel. The firing range maintains 24-hour operations, seven days a week and is not open for the use of privately owned weapons. Due to gunfire, trespassing in this area is illegal and dangerous. For more information, contact Combat Arms at 764-4785 or 574-4785.

Social Media policies

All JBLE associated social media pages must be approved and coordinated through the 633rd Air Base Wing Public Affairs Office. Pages not set up with this office will be reported as false and may face termination. If you currently manage a JBLE page that was not approved by the Public Affairs office, please gain compliance by coordinating with your unit commander and contacting the PA office at 764-5701. Per AFI 35-107, once approved, unit commanders are ultimately responsible for maintaining their social media presence(s), as well as all content posted to their site(s). Social media sites will be checked at least once every 24 hours to ensure operational security (OPSEC) and security, accuracy, policy, and propriety (SAPP) are not violated. (T-1).

633rd Force Support Squadron RAPIDS/ DEERS location information

Langley Air Force Base 45 Nealy Ave, Wing A, Suite 114 Hampton, VA 23665 757-764-2270 Customer Service Office’s customer service hours are Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. (CAC priority from 7:30 to 9:30 a.m.) and Wednesdays 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Walk-ins are accepted until 3 p.m.


March 9, 2018

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Puzzle 18

8

4

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6

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1

2

8

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3

7

8 3 7 2 9 5 6

5 7 4 1 3 9 2

3 9 5 6 4 1 8

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Puzzle 18 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.40)

7 6 2 8 5 3 4

ANSWER:

2

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9

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7

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(Easy, difficulty rating 0.40)

7

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Sudoku 8

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se r vi ce me m b er s,

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

March 9, 2018

2017 Heroes at Home Hampton Roads Military Spouse of the Year

Spouse of O-3 William Kuhn, USS Monterey, Norfolk Naval Station

PRESENTED BY

BRONZE SPONSORS Join us in recognizing our local military spouses for their unending strength, personal sacrifices, support for other military families and for their selfless commitment to our community. The Heroes at Home Hampton Roads Military Spouse of the Year will be chosen from nominees provided by active duty personnel from all branches of the military, spouse support groups, charitable organizations, friends and family. The 10 finalists and winner will be announced at the awards luncheon on May 10, 2018 at Norfolk Hilton: The Main. Hampton Roads and Central Virginia

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Peninsula Warrior Army Edition: 03.09.18  

Vol. 08 | No. 10

Peninsula Warrior Army Edition: 03.09.18  

Vol. 08 | No. 10